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Peter Jochimson

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Örebro, SCHLESWIG, Sverige
Death: Died in New Amsterdam (Manhatten / New York, New York, NY)
Place of Burial: New Amsterdam ( New York, New York, NY)
Immediate Family:

Son of Hans Jochim and Anna Catheina Jochim
Husband of Ella Olofsdotter Mansson
Father of Elizabeth Ogle; Peter Peterson Yocum, II and Elizabeth Petersdotter Yokim

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Peter Jochimson

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohiomuskingumyocums/aqwg15.htm

http://www.colonialswedes.org/forefathers/Yocum.html

Peter Jochimsson, born in Schleswig in Holstein, was enrolled in Gothenburg in September 1642 to serve as a soldier in New Sweden at a wage of ten guilders per month. He sailed to the colony on the Fama, the same ship that carried the new Governor, Johan Printz.

In New Sweden, Peter Jochim (as he was usually called) was first assigned to the new Fort Elfsborg near the mouth of present Salem Creek NJ. Later, when the Dutch in 1648 built Fort Beversrede at Passyunk on the Schuylkill, he was transferred to Fort Korsholm on the Schuylkill. The Dutch commander complained that in September 1648 Peter Jochim "contemptuously pulled the palisades of Fort Beversrede apart and broke through them, making use of great insolence by words as well as deeds." The Swedes built a house in front of the Dutch fort, blocking its view from the river. They also prevented Dutch freemen from settling in the area, effectively preserving the trade with the Indians for themselves.

Stuyvesant countered in 1651 by abandoning Fort Beversrede and Fort Nassau (on the east side of the Delaware) and building a new fort at present New Castle (Fort Casimir). To counter this move, Printz sought declarations from the Indians that the new fort was built illegally on land sold by the Indians to the Swedes. Peter Jochimsson was instrumental in obtaining the needed affidavit from the Indians, which was signed at Fort Elfsborg on 3 July 1651.

Shortly thereafter, Peter Jochim married Ella Stille, daughter of Olof Stille. They made their home at Aronameck on the west shore of the Schuylkill. Their first child was born in 1652, and on 1 November 1652 Peter Jochim was granted his discharge and made a freeman.

As a freeman, Peter Jochim joined his father-in-law and 20 other freemen in filing a protest with Governor Printz on 27 July 1653, seeking relief from the Governor's oppressive treatment of the freemen, particularly the Finns. This was the last straw for the tormented Governor, who packed up his substantial belongings and returned to Sweden via New Amsterdam and Amsterdam.

Upon the arrival of the new Governor, Johan Rising, in May 1654, the Dutch fort surrendered to the Swedes without a shot being fired. Peter Jochim then found his services in demand once more. As one ofthe few freemen who could read and write and being well-known to the Dutch, Peter Jochim was chosen by Rising to travel overland to New Amsterdam (Manhattan) to deliver a diplomatic letter to Governor Stuyvesant and to find out his intentions towards New Sweden. Peter Jochim and his Indian guide Taques left on 27 May 1654. Taques returned on 25 June with a letter from Jochim reporting that he had become ill in Manhattan and was too sick to return. Shortly thereafter, Rising received a bill from Stuyvesant for 127 guilders for Jochim's burial.

Ella Stille Jochim, widowed at the age of 20, married Hans Månsson later in 1654. He took over operation of the Aronameck plantation and raised her two children by Peter Jochim as his own. In addition, Ella had six additional sons, the eldest of whom, John Hansson, was bom in 1655. Hans Månsson died in Senamensing NJ c. 1690. Thereafter, Ella and her sons by her second marriage adopted the surname of Steelman. Ella died in 1718 at the home of her youngest son, Eric Steelman, in Gloucester County NJ.

Peter Jochim and Ella Stille had two children:

1. Peter Petersson, born in 1652, grew up in a household where his closest friend was his half-brother, John Hansson Steelman, born in 1655. Both became Indian traders with John Hans Steelman becoming a big-time operator, establishing trading posts in Maryland and Pennsylvania. Peter, however, remained at Aronameck, which became his own in 1681 when Hans Månsson, having moved to New Jersey, sold the tract to Peter Petersson Yocum, the new surname which Peter had adopted. It was derived, of course, from his father's patronymic. The new spelling can be blamed on the English clerks. Although many spelling variations are to be found, the surname became standardized as Yocum, except among descendants of Jonas, who chose the Yocom spelling.

Peter Petersson Yocum was married c. 1675 to Judith, daughter of Jonas Nilsson. Aside from farming and trading with the Indians, Peter also served as an Indian interpreter for William Penn in the negotiation of new treaties and owned a small gristmill on Mill Creek, a creek just south of present Woodlands Cemetery. He died in 1702 and by his will asked to be buried at Gloria Dei Church in Philadelphia. His widow Judith moved to Berks County with two of her younger sons. She died at Manatawny in Berks County in 1727 and is buried at St. Gabriels Church in Douglassville.

Peter Petersson Yocum and Judith Jonasdotter Nilsson had ten children:

Peter Yocum, born 1677, died 1753 in Upper Merion Township; married Elizabeth; one surviving son. Måns Yocum, born 1678, died 1722 at Aronameck in Kingsessing; married Margaret Boon; no children. Catharine Yocum, born 1681, died 1723; married Swan Justis; 5 children. Charles Yocum, born. 1682, died 1741, Kingsessing; married Ann Supplee; one son and one daughter. Swan Yocum, born 1685, died 1758, Kingsessing; married Joanna Collins; two surviving sons. Julia Yocum, born 1687, not traced. Jonas Yocum, born 1689, died 1760, Douglass Township, Berks County; married Hannah Enochson; survived by two sons and three daughters. Anders Yocum, born 1693, died after 1734, Kingsessing; married Elizabeth Trollup; survived by one son and three daughters. John Yocum, born 1696, died 1727, Berks County; never married. Maria Yocum, born c. 1699; married William Morgan. 2. Elizabeth Petersdotter, born in 1654, moved from her home as a teenager to help in the household of her uncle, Anders Stille, living on Christina River. Here she met and married John Ogle, an English soldier who had participated in the English conquest of the Delaware in 1664. John Ogle and Rev. Jacob Fabritius were indicted in 1675 for inciting the Swedes and Finns to riot in opposition to orders of the New Castle Court to build a dike and road for Hans Block, a Dutchman.

John Ogle and Anders Stille made their homes at Christiana Bridge, Christina River. Ogle, a big speculator in lands and tobacco, died insolvent in the winter of 1683/4. Adding to his widow's troubles was a 1684 raid by Colonel James Talbot from Maryland which resulted in the destruction of her hay and the building of a Maryland "fort" on her property. Elizabeth Ogle and Anders Stille then sold their property and moved to White Clay Creek. She lived at the "Hopyard," which had been surveyed for her husband the year before. Unable to pay all of the estate's debts, Elizabeth Ogle was discharged from all further debts of her husband on 17 June 1690 by the New Castle Court. Meanwhile, her brother Peter Petersson Yocum in 1687 had purchased the "Hopyard" to protect it from creditors. Elizabeth died before 12 Sept. 1702 when John Hans Steelman and Judith Yocum, as executors of the Yocum estate, sold the property.

John and Elizabeth Ogle had two sons:

Thomas Ogle, bom c. 1672, died 1734 in White Clay Creek Hundred, New Castle County; married [1] Mary Crawford, [2] widow Elizabeth Graham., John Ogle, born c. 1674, died 1720 in White Clay Creek Hundred; married widow Elizabeth Harris

RECORD:

1. Peter Stebbins Craig and Henry Wesley Yocom, Yocums of Aronameck in Philadelphia, 1648 - 1702, The (National Genealogical Quarterly Vol. 71 No. 3 December 1983), pg. 245-47,269-70. NOTE: Swedish Colonial News Vol. 1 No. 15 (Spring 1997) ?updated version??. " ...was stationed between 1643 and 1648 at Fort Elfsborg (called "Fort Mosquito" by the soldiers), built at Printz's direction near present- day Salem, N.J., to command and control ship traffic on the Delaware, then called the South River by the Swedes and Dutch. Peter Jochimson made some modest contributions to the history of the Swedes on the Delaware, first as Printz's loyal supporter, later as one of his chief critics, and finally as his successor's diplomatic courier. In 1648, after becoming a freeman and taking up residence at Aronameck on the west bank of the Schuykill RIver near present Bartram's Garden, Peter Jochimson single handedly destroyed the palisades at Fort Beversreede, a small trading post built by the Dutch across the river in Passyunk in an attempt to intercept the Swedes' trade in beaver skins with the Minquas Indians (Amandus Johnson, Swedish Settlements of the Delaware (Philadelphia, 1911), 425-6; Charles T. Gehring, Delaware Papers (Dutch Period), 1648 - 1664 (Baltimore, 1981) 11). In 1651 he served as interpreter and witness to a treaty with the Delaware Indians confirming New Sweden's ownership of land claimed by the Dutch. Soon thereafter Peter Jochimson turned against his governor. On 27 July 1653 he was one of 22 settler who signed a petition to Governor Printz protesting his allegedly oppressive rule (Amandus Johnson, Swedish Settlements of the Delaware (Philadelphia, 1911), 462-3; Amandus Johnson, Instructions for Johan Printz (Philadelphia, 1930), 37-8.....

Governor Rising tended to the immediate problems at hand and then retired on 26 May 1654 to begin drafting a carefully written letter to Governor Stuyvesant explaining his actions in taking Fort Casimer. The letter advised that the fort had been "voluntarily surrendered" and that the Dutch colonists, upon learning the "reasonable conditions" offerd them, had take an oath of allegiance to Swedish rule...The letter pledged good neighborliness and asked Stuyvesant to confirm his peaceful intentions ( Doucuments of Colonial History of New York

(E. B. O'Callaghan, Editior) 1:606 the letter was dated 27 May 1654). To deliver this letter to Manhatten, RIsing sought a bekvamilg karl (a suitable fellow) who was known in New Amsterdam and "would know how to mix with the Hollanders to our best advantage" The person selected was Peter Jochim, who was fluent in Dutch as well as Swedish and was also on good terms with the Indians who knew the way to Manhatten. JOchim was summonded and agreed to take on the task with an Indian named Taques to serve as his quide. They left for Manhatten on 28 May 1654... It is probable that Peter Jochim and Taques arrived in Manhatten on 31 May 1654, shortly after the landing of Coelen's yacht broght the news of the fall of Fort Casimir. In any event Jochim's arrival was totally eclisped by the news brought by the passengers on Coelen's yacht....

Peter Jochim and Taques spent about three weeks in New Amsterdam carrying out their instructions from Governor Rising. Jochim called upon Peter Stuyvesant and delivered RIsing's letter; however, Stuyvesant declined to  give him a written answer. Jochim also minled among the New AMsterdam residents, soliciting cargo for the return voyage of the Orn. He also became very ill and from his deathbed sent back to Rising several letters.... 
Peter Jochim died in New Amsterdam sometime betwenn 22 June 1654, the probable date on which which is guide Taques left for New Sweden, and the middle of July 1654,. On 27 July 1654 Governor Rising made the following entry in his Journal: "Hans Mansson, Freeman, was dispatched from Kingsessing to Manhattans to find out how conditions were there, seeing that Petter Jochim, our previous emissary, had died there and no reply had come to us from there other than the report that he had died and been buried there, with a bill of 127 florins for his burial."...Although Peter Jochimson left New Sweden on 28 May 1654, never to return, his name remained prominent in the reorganized government of the colony.... 

Heading the list of 19 freeman who had been in the colony before Rising's arrival was the name of Peter Jochim. Then followed the names of 29 freeman or their widows who had arrived on the Orn....

Because the defense of Lock and Stille rested primarily on the grounds that the accusations against Prinz were true, Rising suggested to the old residents present at TInicum that they should reduce their charges against Printz to writing so that the accusations could be forwarded to Sweden with Lock for the Queen's consideration. This resulted on 7 July 1654 in a second, more detailed listing of grievances against Printz, signed by six old residents. Prominent among these six names was the name of Peter Jochim (misspelled Peter Hichim), indicating that even in absentia his word against and with the new governor (Amandus Johnson, Swedish Settlements of the Delaware (Philadelphia, 1911), 510; Johnson Papers Box 55).....

Prior to his untimely death in New Amsterdam in July 1654 Peter Jochimson had married and started a family..." COMMENT: Arrived on the Swan.

2. Irene R. Fertig Jost with Roberta R. Jost Trapp, Yocum-Rizor Families (1985), pg. 2023. " The name Yocum means 'God makes to stand still'....

The Yocum history in the New world begins with the arrival of Peter Yocum (Jacombe). Peter Yocum was a Dane from Schleswig-Hosltein who crossed the Atlantic Ocean on the Ship Sawn with the Swedish settlers in 165=43 and settled at Upland, now in Delaware, Pennsylvania.....

Peter Yocum was a 'massive muscular man, performing gallant acts of his employer, the Swedish Matriarch'. Therefore he was chosen by Governor Printz to break into the Dutch Fort Beavesreede (Beaver Trade) at night and tear down the building which they had erected, thus frustrating the trading advantage of the Dutch.....

.In 1653 Peter Yocum and twenty-two other settlers signed a complaint listing eleven grievance against Governor Printz They accused him of negligence to the security of the settlement and selfish and unfair practices. Printz tried and executed the instigator, however, no action against Peter is recorded. Later that year, Governor Printz returned to Sweden. He was replaced by John Rising. When Governor Rising arrived in the New World, he tool possession of the Dutch Fort Casimir based on the land title mentioned above. The he sent a letter to the Dutch Governor, Peter Stuyvesant, via Peter Yocum. ...

Peter travelled on foot with a sole Indian guide. He never returned from New Amsterdam, having died purportedly from poisoned liquor given him by the Dutch....the Indian returned to Governor Rising, July 25, 1655 with a letter of communication including the bill for the burial of Peter Yocum (127 florins)....

They remained under Dutch control until 1664. At that time there were 400 Swedes living in and around Philadelphia. Among them was 10 year old Peter Peterson Yocum, the son of Peter Yocum...."

3. Records of Ann E. Hunter, Ann E. Hunter, According to Dr. Peter Stebbins Craig Peter Jochimsson was enrolled in Gothenburg in September 1642 to serve as a soldier in New Sweded at a wage of ten guilders per month.

He sailed to the colony [on the Delaware River in Pennsylvania] on the "Fama". 

He was assigned to Fort Elfborg near the mouth of present Salem Creek, N.J. Later when in 1648 the Dutch built Fort Beversrede at Passyunk on the Schuykill, he was transferred to Fort Korsholm on the Schuykill. The Dutch commander complained that in September of 1648 Peter Jochim "contemptuously pulled the palisades of Fort Beversrede apart and broke through them, making use of great insolence by words as well as deeds".

The Swedes not only built a house in front of the Dutch fort blocking its view from the river but they also prevented Dutch freeman from settling in the area thus keeping the trade with the Indians for themselves

. In 1651 Stuyvestant abandoned Fort Beversrede and Fort Nassau which were on the east side of the Delaware and built a new forrt at present New Castle (Fort Casimir). To counter this move at the suggestion of Govenor Printz Peter Jochimsson was instrumental in obtaining an affidavit from the Indians signed at Fort Elfsborg on 3 July 1651 that the new fort was built illegally on land sold by the Indians to the Swedes.

Peter and ELla lived at Aronameck on the west shore of the Schuykill and in 1652 Peter was granted his discharge and made a freeman. He joined his father-in-law and 20 other freeman in filing a protest with Governor Printz on 27 July 1653 seeking relief from the Governor's oppressive treatment of the freemen, particularly the Finns. The Governor returned to Sweden. 

After the new Governor Johan Rising arrived in May 1654 the Dutch fort surrendered without any shots being fired. As one of the few freeman who could read and write and being well known to the Dutch Peter Jochim was chosen to travel overland to New Amsterdam (Manhattan) to deliver a diplomatic letter to Governor Stuyvestant and to find out his intentions toward New Sweden. Peter left on 17 May 1654 with his Indian guide Taques. Taques returned on 25 June with a letter from Jochim reporting that he had become ill in Manhattan and was too sick to return. Shortly thereafter, the Governor received a bill from Stuyvesant for 127 guilders for his burial."

4. H. C. Smith, M.D., History of The Yoakum, Yocom, Yocum Family and Others However the Name is Spelled and to Their Spouses ....., 1963, pg. XVI, XX, XXI,2, 3. ". . .Dr. Charles A.Yocum of Reading, Pa. . . .

Dr. Yocum's Paper. . . "The first account which is given of any person by the name of Yocum settling within the limits of the United States of America, was that of Peter Yocum and Julia (Judith) wif wife, who came to America with the Swedish settlement at Philadelphia in 1638. This colony, numbereing several hundred souls, was sent here by Gustavus Adolphus, then King of Sweden and Norway." (The wife of Peter Jccam, who came to America as the imgrant, was Margaret, Judith was the wife of Peter Pterson Yocom, the third of the name and second of the line in this country, H.C.S). . . . 

Notes on Anderson, etc. Yocum, etc. By Isaac C. Sutton pg. 87 - Peter Yocum was a Dane from Schleswig-Holstein, who came on the ship Sawn with the Swedish settlers in 1643 and settled at Upland, now Chester, in Delaware county, Pa. He married Judith Nilsson....

Peter was sent with a letter in 1655 from Gov. Rising to Governor Stuyvesant of New Netherlands, explaining his action from the Royal Navy of Sweden as he had taken possession of the Fort near New Castle, Delaware, known as Fort Casimir in 1651. Peter traveled on foot alone with an Indiana guide. He never returned but died in New Amesterdam......

Peter Joachim, a soldier from Slevig-Holstein, landed with Governor Prinz at Fort Elsborg on the Delaware River in 1643. The Pennsylvania Yocums trace their line back to Peter Joachim, or Joachimson as he signed himself in a document reproduced in the history. - Amandus Johnson's Swedish Settlements of the Delaware, (Philadelphia Colonial Society, 1911, 2 vol.) He was literate as 'he signed his name with a flourish in an Indiana document."...

This constitutes the first of our genealogical puzzles. In 1638. King Gustavus Adolphus of Norway and Sweden sent a group to establish a Scandinavian colony in America. Among them were Peter Jachim or Yoccum, aged 20, and Moses, very probably a brother, aged 18 years. Peter married a woman named Margaret, surname and date of marriage unknown. There is not record of any issue from this marriage.. He died in 1694 aged 74 years and is buried at Morlaton. Moses died in 1687, aged 67 and is buried in Swedes Churchyard or Gloria Dei. THere is record of neither wife or children. In 1643, the immigrant Peter Jacumbbe, a "Dane from Schleswig-Holstein" age not stated came to Philadelphia and married a Swedish wife named Judith Nillson and settled among the Swedes already there. Later, he was sent on a diplomatic mission to Governor Peter Stuyvesant of New Amsterdam by Governor Rising of Pennsylvania, concerning the capture of Fort Casimir, situated in one of the three southern counties of Pennsylvania, now the state of Delaware, thus recognizing the suzerainty of the Dutch over that area at that time. (See account of Isaac C. SUtton pn page. XVII). He died while on this mission, leaving an only child, a son named Peter Peterson Yocum b. in 1654. Our puzzle is this: Why did he settle among the earlier Yocum immigrants? Why did his only son Peter Peterson Yocum name his first two sons Peter and Moses in that order? My surmise is that the answer to both questions lies in the probable fact that they were a closely related family group. The immigrants spelling the name Jachim, Joachim, Joakum indicates that they belonged to and of the Germanic tribes of Celts. Especially, this applies to the branches of the family who removed from Pennsylvania to the northern neck of Virginia.

Peter Yocom (Yocum) 1613-1694 m. Margaret born in in 1618. [presumably Sweden, as he and Moses of Sweden and Norway established a colony in America in the years between 1635 and 1640. This was named New Sweden, but became Philadelphia later. He died 13 Jan. 1694 aged 74 years and is buried at Morlatton, now in Philadelphia. Following his death his widow presented a warant for land. It is recorded in the Archives of Pennsylvania 2nd Series Vol. 19 pg. 266 viz: Margaret Yocom widow of Peter Yocom (also (Yoakham) presented a copy of a warrant for property dated 4 Jun 1684 for 500 acres at a half penny per acre. On 19 October 1683 Peter Yokum gave a deed of conveyance for 200 acres of land. A very early sketch of the area now forming Southern Philadelphia is found in the Sons of the Revolution Library in Los Angles, California. It shows the location of the residence of Peter Joccum as about two miles south of the Schuylkill River, at about the center of its sigmoid curve to the west and south, before emptying into the Delaware River. At present it would lie directly opposite a large old cemetery - apparently one of Philadelphia's earliest. There is not record of a wife or family of his brother Moses, who is buried in Swedes Churchyard, Upper Merion, Pa. While no children are of record as such, it is quite probable that the existed and are represented by those of the name, who lived in the three "lower counties of Pennsylvania, "now the state of Delaware (See not from Delalwalre Archives).

Peter Jacumbe Yocum ? - ca. 1655 m. Judith Nilsson at Upland, Delaware county, Pa. (Jonas + Yertrude or Gertude) Born. A Dane from Schelwing-Holstein, who "came on the ship 'Swan' with the Swedish settlers in 1643 and settled at Uppland, now Chester in Delaware co., Pa. He married Judith Niellson . . who was the Swedish daughter of Jonas Nilsson, a sailor who come r in 1843 on the ship "Gyllene Har" (Godlen Sea), presumably to welcome his grandson, Peter Peterson Yocum.

Peter was sent with a letter in 1655 from Goernor Rising to Governor Stuyvessant of New Netherlands, explaining his action from the Royal Navy of Sweden, as he had taken possession of the Port near New Castle, Delaware, known as Fort Casimir, in 1651. Peter travelled on foot alone with an Indiana guide. He never returned, but died in New Amsterdam (Isaac C. Sutton account

From here on, accounts of the family in New Sweden, Pa. are a nearly identical as seems humanly possible, although much too incomplete form which to construct a satisfactory Family history. His will follows: "Wills Proved at Philadelphia."."

--------------------

His commanding officer was Governor John Johan Printz who he followed to New Sweden in 1642 aboard the ship SWAN. New Sweden was founded by Peter Minuit 5 years before and only had 30 people at Fort Christian, now Wilmington, DE. Peter was stationed at Fort Elsborg near New Salem, NJ. He became a freeman in 1648 and started farming Aronamek at Kingessing, PA. That same year he single handedly destroyed Fort Beversreede the small trading fort the Dutch had set up across the river from Aronameck to compete against the Swedes for the Indian fur trade. Peter sided with the settlers against Gov. Printz who left with 25 settlers and returned to Sweden. A new Governor (Johan Rising) was sent and Peter soon became his courier. Rising captured the newly built Dutch fort (Casimer) at New Castle on the Delaware river and sent Peter Jochim with an Indian guide to New Amsterdam, NY to negotiate with Gov. Peter Stuyvesant. Peter never returned. It is said this gruff man was killed by poisoned whiskey. A year later the Dutch attacked the Swedish settlements along the Deleware and took them over without a shot being fired. Gove. Rising was sent a bill from gov. Stuyvesant of 127 florins for Peter's burial.

-------------------- http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Jochimsson-1:

Peter Jochimsson (often went by surname Jochim) and his Yocum Descendants

by Dr. Peter Stebbins Craig Fellow, American Society of Genealogists Fellow, Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania Historian, Swedish Colonial Society

Originally published in Swedish Colonial News, Volume 1, Number 15 (Spring 1997)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Peter Jochimsson, born in Schleswig in Holstein, was enrolled in Gothenburg in September 1642 to serve as a soldier in New Sweden at a wage of ten guilders per month. He sailed to the colony on the Fama, the same ship that carried the new Governor, Johan Printz.

In New Sweden, Peter Jochim (as he was usually called) was first assigned to the new Fort Elfsborg near the mouth of present Salem Creek NJ. Later, when the Dutch in 1648 built Fort Beversrede at Passyunk on the Schuylkill, he was transferred to Fort Korsholm on the Schuylkill. The Dutch commander complained that in September 1648 Peter Jochim "contemptuously pulled the palisades of Fort Beversrede apart and broke through them, making use of great insolence by words as well as deeds." The Swedes built a house in front of the Dutch fort, blocking its view from the river. They also prevented Dutch freemen from settling in the area, effectively preserving the trade with the Indians for themselves.

Stuyvesant countered in 1651 by abandoning Fort Beversrede and Fort Nassau (on the east side of the Delaware) and building a new fort at present New Castle (Fort Casimir). To counter this move, Printz sought declarations from the Indians that the new fort was built illegally on land sold by the Indians to the Swedes. Peter Jochimsson was instrumental in obtaining the needed affidavit from the Indians, which was signed at Fort Elfsborg on 3 July 1651.

Shortly thereafter, Peter Jochim married Ella Stille, daughter of Olof Stille. They made their home at Aronameck on the west shore of the Schuylkill. Their first child was born in 1652, and on 1 November 1652 Peter Jochim was granted his discharge and made a freeman.

As a freeman, Peter Jochim joined his father-in-law and 20 other freemen in filing a protest with Governor Printz on 27 July 1653, seeking relief from the Governor's oppressive treatment of the freemen, particularly the Finns. This was the last straw for the tormented Governor, who packed up his substantial belongings and returned to Sweden via New Amsterdam and Amsterdam.

Upon the arrival of the new Governor, Johan Rising, in May 1654, the Dutch fort surrendered to the Swedes without a shot being fired. Peter Jochim then found his services in demand once more. As one ofthe few freemen who could read and write and being well-known to the Dutch, Peter Jochim was chosen by Rising to travel overland to New Amsterdam (Manhattan) to deliver a diplomatic letter to Governor Stuyvesant and to find out his intentions towards New Sweden. Peter Jochim and his Indian guide Taques left on 27 May 1654. Taques returned on 25 June with a letter from Jochim reporting that he had become ill in Manhattan and was too sick to return. Shortly thereafter, Rising received a bill from Stuyvesant for 127 guilders for Jochim's burial.

Ella Stille Jochim, widowed at the age of 20, married Hans Månsson later in 1654. He took over operation of the Aronameck plantation and raised her two children by Peter Jochim as his own. In addition, Ella had six additional sons, the eldest of whom, John Hansson, was bom in 1655. Hans Månsson died in Senamensing NJ c. 1690. Thereafter, Ella and her sons by her second marriage adopted the surname of Steelman. Ella died in 1718 at the home of her youngest son, Eric Steelman, in Gloucester County NJ.

Peter Jochim and Ella Stille had two children:

1. Peter Petersson, born in 1652, grew up in a household where his closest friend was his half-brother, John Hansson Steelman, born in 1655. Both became Indian traders with John Hans Steelman becoming a big-time operator, establishing trading posts in Maryland and Pennsylvania. Peter, however, remained at Aronameck, which became his own in 1681 when Hans Månsson, having moved to New Jersey, sold the tract to Peter Petersson Yocum, the new surname which Peter had adopted. It was derived, of course, from his father's patronymic. The new spelling can be blamed on the English clerks. Although many spelling variations are to be found, the surname became standardized as Yocum, except among descendants of Jonas, who chose the Yocom spelling.

Peter Petersson Yocum was married c. 1675 to Judith, daughter of Jonas Nilsson. Aside from farming and trading with the Indians, Peter also served as an Indian interpreter for William Penn in the negotiation of new treaties and owned a small gristmill on Mill Creek, a creek just south of present Woodlands Cemetery. He died in 1702 and by his will asked to be buried at Gloria Dei Church in Philadelphia. His widow Judith moved to Berks County with two of her younger sons. She died at Manatawny in Berks County in 1727 and is buried at St. Gabriels Church in Douglassville.

Peter Petersson Yocum and Judith Jonasdotter Nilsson had ten children:

Peter Yocum, born 1677, died 1753 in Upper Merion Township; married Elizabeth; one surviving son. Måns Yocum, born 1678, died 1722 at Aronameck in Kingsessing; married Margaret Boon; no children. Catharine Yocum, born 1681, died 1723; married Swan Justis; 5 children. Charles Yocum, born. 1682, died 1741, Kingsessing; married Ann Supplee; one son and one daughter. Swan Yocum, born 1685, died 1758, Kingsessing; married Joanna Collins; two surviving sons. Julia Yocum, born 1687, not traced. Jonas Yocum, born 1689, died 1760, Douglass Township, Berks County; married Hannah Enochson; survived by two sons and three daughters. Anders Yocum, born 1693, died after 1734, Kingsessing; married Elizabeth Trollup; survived by one son and three daughters. John Yocum, born 1696, died 1727, Berks County; never married. Maria Yocum, born c. 1699; married William Morgan. 2. Elizabeth Petersdotter, born in 1654, moved from her home as a teenager to help in the household of her uncle, Anders Stille, living on Christina River. Here she met and married John Ogle, an English soldier who had participated in the English conquest of the Delaware in 1664. John Ogle and Rev. Jacob Fabritius were indicted in 1675 for inciting the Swedes and Finns to riot in opposition to orders of the New Castle Court to build a dike and road for Hans Block, a Dutchman.

John Ogle and Anders Stille made their homes at Christiana Bridge, Christina River. Ogle, a big speculator in lands and tobacco, died insolvent in the winter of 1683/4. Adding to his widow's troubles was a 1684 raid by Colonel James Talbot from Maryland which resulted in the destruction of her hay and the building of a Maryland "fort" on her property. Elizabeth Ogle and Anders Stille then sold their property and moved to White Clay Creek. She lived at the "Hopyard," which had been surveyed for her husband the year before. Unable to pay all of the estate's debts, Elizabeth Ogle was discharged from all further debts of her husband on 17 June 1690 by the New Castle Court. Meanwhile, her brother Peter Petersson Yocum in 1687 had purchased the "Hopyard" to protect it from creditors. Elizabeth died before 12 Sept. 1702 when John Hans Steelman and Judith Yocum, as executors of the Yocum estate, sold the property.

John and Elizabeth Ogle had two sons:

Thomas Ogle, bom c. 1672, died 1734 in White Clay Creek Hundred, New Castle County; married [1] Mary Crawford, [2] widow Elizabeth Graham., John Ogle, born c. 1674, died 1720 in White Clay Creek Hundred; married widow Elizabeth Harris.

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Peter Jochimson's Timeline

1620
1620
Örebro, SCHLESWIG, Sverige
1650
October 9, 1650
Age 30
Northumberland, England
1651
1651
Age 31
PA, USA
1653
1653
Age 33
Aronameck,Philadelphia,Pennsylvania,USA
1654
September 1654
Age 34
New Amsterdam (Manhatten / New York, New York, NY)
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New Amsterdam ( New York, New York, NY)