Richard de Lucy (c.1089 - 1179) MP

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Nicknames: "Loyal de Lucy", "Richard de Lucie"
Birthplace: Luce, Normandy, France
Death: Died in Erith, Priory Lesnes Abbey, Kent, England
Occupation: Justiciar of King Henry II., Justiciar of England, Sheriff of Essex, Chief Justiciar of England, Cheif Justice of England of chipping ongar, Justiciar of England/Knight, Sheriff of the County of Essex, then he was made Chief Justiciar of England
Managed by: Bianca May Evelyn Brennan
Last Updated:

About Richard de Lucy

http://www.1066.co.nz/library/battle_abbey_roll2/subchap127.htm --------------------------------------------------------------------------- RICHARD DE LUCY (ADRIAN1) was born Abt. 1089 in (originally from) Lucé, near Domfront, Normandy, France., and died 14 July 1179 in Lesnes Abbey, Erith, Kent, England - buried in the Chapter House of his Abbey. Although Lesnes Abbey no longer exists, his tomb could still be seen in 1630, and upon the belt of the figure of a knight the fleur-de-lis, the rebus or name device of the Lucys was sculptured in many places. He married ROESIA OR ROHAISE OR ROYSIA of BOULOGNE Abt. 1109, it is believed in Thorney Green, Suffolk, England. She was born Abt. 1092, it is believed, in Carshalton, Surrey, England and died before 1151 and was buried at either Faversham Abbey, Kent or Holy Trinity Priory, Aldgate, London. Faversham Abbey, the burial place of Richard de Lucy's wife, was built by Stephen and Matilda to found a royal mausoleum for the House of Blois. They hoped that the dynasty would rule over England for generations to come. In fact it began, and ended, with them.

Notes for RICHARD DE LUCY:

RICHARD DE LUCY (d. 1179), called the "loyal," chief justiciar of England, appears in the latter part of Stephen's reign as sheriff and justiciar of the county of Essex. He became, on the accession cf Henry II., chief justiciar conjointly with Robert de Beaumont, earl of Leicester; and after the death of the latter (1168) held the office without a colleague for twelve years. The chief servant and intimate of the king he was among the first of the royal party to incur excommunication in the Becket controversy. In 1173 he played an important part in suppressing the rebellion of the English barons, and commanded the royalists at the battle of Fornham. He resigned the justiciarship in 1179, though pressed by the King to continue in office, and retired to Lesnes Abbey in Kent, which he had founded and where he died. Lucy's son, Godfrey de Lucy (d. 1204), was bishop of Winchester from 1189 to his death in September 1204; he took a prominent part in public affairs during the reigns of Henry II., Richard I. and John.

Richard de Lucy (d. 1179) , chief justiciary; maintained the cause of Stephen in Normandy against Geoffrey of Anjou; recalled to England, 1140; chief justiciary jointly with Robert de Beaumont , earl of Leicester (1104-1168), 1153-66; sole chief justiciary, 1166-79; excommunicated by Thomas Becket in 1166 and 1169 for his share in drawing up the constitutions of Clarendon (1164); commanded for Henry II in the insurrection of 1173.

In April 1173 when Prince Henry rebelled against his father, King Henry II, Richard de Lucy together with Humphrey de Bohun III invaded Scotland in an attack against King William the Lion who supported Prince Henry and the destruction of the bishop's palace at Durham. They burned Berwick and penetrated deeply into Scotland. But when they learned of the landing of Robert de Beaumont (earl of Leicester and friend of Prince Henry) in Suffolk (29 September 1173), they made a truce with William the Lion and marched against Beaumont.

Chief justiciar of England under Henry II, he came from Lucé near Domfront in western Normandy, and probably entered royal service under Henry I. He is recorded as a supporter of Stephen from about the year 1140, succeeding Geoffrey de Mandeville as justiciar and sheriff of Essex (1143).

Henry II made him and Robert de Beaumont, second earl of Leicester, chief justiciars jointly (c. 1155), and after Leicester's death in 1168 Lucy held the office alone. As one of the king's chief councilors he must be given part of the credit for the important legislation of the period, and during the struggle with Becket he was singled out by the king's enemies as a principal author of the Constitutions of Clarendon (1164).

His role in holding together those loyal to the king in the great revolt of 1173-1174 was crucial. In 1179 he resigned his office and entered the religious life at Lesnes Abbey, Erith, Kent, founded by himself in 1178 in penance for his part in the events leading to Becket's death. He had been excommunicated by Becket in 1166 and again in 1169, and the archbishop's murder had been in part provoked by his refusal to life the sentences he had passed upon his enemies. Richard de Lucy died at Lesnes on July 14, 1179. (Encyclopedia Brittanica)

Richard de Lucy (Richardo de Luceio - presumed son of Adrian) is first mentioned in February 1131 together with his mother Aveline, kinswomen and heiress of William Ghot or Goth, in the charter of Seéz. In October 1138, Richard de Lucy was the Castellan of Falaise during the 18 day siege by Geoffrey, Earl of Anjou and was recalled to England in 1140 becoming the Constable of the Tower of London in 1151. He built his castle at Ongar in 1153. Richard de Lucy is recorded as Lord Gouviz and Baron Cretot and militarily responsible for the the Baliwick of Passeis, near Domfrort, of which Lucé forms a part, in 1172.

In the contest between Stephen and the Empress Maud, he maintained his allegiance to Stephen and obtained a significant victory near Wallingford Castle. Upon resolving the dispute, the Tower of London and the Castle of Winchester were on the advice of the clergy, placed in the hands of Richard de Lucy, binding him by solemn oath and the hostage of his son to deliver them up on the death of King Stephen to King Henry. Once fulfilled, Richard de Lucy was constituted Sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire in 1156.

More About RICHARD DE LUCY:

Fact 1: February 1130/31, Henry I in charter for Séez Catherdral mentions Richard de Lucy and his mother Aveline, the neice and heiress of William Goth.

Fact 2: 1 October 1138, Recorded as Constable of Falaise, Normandy - which he held stoutly against an 18 day seige by Geoffrey, Earl of Anjou, resulting in the Lordship of Dice, Norfolk from Henry I.

Fact 3: 1140, Recalled to England and replaced by Robert Marmion as Castellan of Falaise

Fact 4: had at least 2 sons (Godfrey & Geoffrey - a Herbert who died without issue is also mentioned) & 4 daughters. His brother Walter de Lucy was Abbot of Battle Abbey and his second son Godfrey de Lucy, became Bishop of Winchester.

Fact 5: 1153, Constable of the Tower of London

Fact 6: Bet. 1153 - 1154, He built his castle at Ongar, Essex, the land recorded in Doomsday as originally given to Count Eustace de Boulogne. Granted Chipping Ongar, Essex by William, son of King Stephen and his wife, Maud of Boulogne. He later became the Sheriff of both Essex and Hertfordshire in 1156.

Fact 7: 1166, Excommunicated by Becket: 1166 & 1169.

Fact 8: Richard's English inheritance included Diss & Stowe in E.Anglia, Newington in Kent & Chipping Ongar, Essex

Fact 9: Richard de Lucy also recorded as Lord of Gouviz & Baron of Cretot

Fact 10: 11 June 1178, Richard de Lucy laid his foundation stone at Lesnes Abbey

Fact 11: 1162, appointed Lord Justiciary of England, the highest post of honour that could be held by a subject and in 1173 constituted Lieutenant of England.

Notes for ROESIA OR ROHAISE OR ROYSIA OF BOULOGNE:

Queen Maud, wife of King Stephen of England, was the heiress of the Boulogne family and therefore was closely related to Sir Richard Lucy's wife (providing the gift of Chipping Ongar).

More About RICHARD DE LUCY and ROESIA or ROYSIA:

Marriage: Abt. 1109, possibly at Thorney Green, Suffolk, England

Children of RICHARD DE LUCY and ROESIA or ROYSIA are:

i. AVELINE3 DE LUCY, b. Abt. 1114, Lucé, Near Maine, Normandy, France.

ii. DIONISIA DE LUCY, b. Abt. 1118, Lucé, Near Maine, Normandy, France; m. ARNOLD MOUNTENAY, France.

iii. GEOFFREY DE LUCY, b. Abt. 1118, Ongar, Essex, England; d. Bet. 1170 - 1173.

iv. WALTER DE LUCY, b. Abt. 1123, Lucé, Near Maine, Normandy, France.

v. GODFREY DE LUCY, b. Abt. 1124, Lucé, Near Maine, Normandy, France; d. 11 September 1204, Buried: Outside Winchester lady-chapel which he commissioned..

8. vi. SIR. WILLIAM DE LUCY, b. Abt. 1126, Diss, Norfolk, England.

vii. ALICE DE LUCY, b. Abt. 1129, Lucé, Near Maine, Normandy, France; d. England.

viii. MATILDA DE LUCY, b. Abt. 1136, Diss, Norfolk, England; d. Abt. 1200.
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http://www.rickmansworthherts.freeserve.co.uk/webpage10.htm

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Sir Richard de LUCY Kt. Justiciar of England (1098-1179) [Pedigree]

Son of Adrian LUCY and Avelina

      REF AR7. Justiciar of King Henry II.
   b. ABT 1098
   r. Chipping Ongar, Essex, Eng.
   r. Diss, Norfolk, Eng.
   d. 14 Jul 1179
   d. 1179

Married Rohese (1090-)

Children:

Aveline de LUCY m. Gilbert de MONTFITCHET (-1186)

Maud de LUCY m. Walter FitzRobert Lord of Dunmow Castle (1130-1198)

Alice LUCY (1129-) m. Odonell d' UMFRAVILLE Lord Prudhoe, Otterbourne, Harbottle, & Riddesdale (1125-1182)

References:

1. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came

        to America before 1700",
        Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition.
        The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of
        sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"

2. Genealogical Server, www.genserv.com",

        Cliff Manis.

3. "The Complete Peerage",

        Cokayne.

4. "Ancestors of American Presidents",

    "Magna Charta Sureties, 1215",
        F. L. Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr., William R. Beall, 1999, 5th Ed..    Gary Boyd Roberts.

5. "Ancestry of the Presidents of the Church".

5.

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Richard de Lucy (b. 1089, d. 14 Jul 1179)

Richard de Lucy (son of Adrian de Lucy and Aveline Goth) was born 1089 in Luce Normandy413, and died 14 Jul 1179. He married Rohaise on 1109 in Thorney Green Suffolk England.

More About Richard de Lucy:

Ancestral File Number: 9HQ3-HL.

Burial: Priory of Lesnes Kent England.

Christening: Thorney Green Suffolk England.

Record Change: 01 Jan 2003

More About Richard de Lucy and Rohaise:

Marriage: 1109, Thorney Green Suffolk England.

Children of Richard de Lucy and Rohaise are:

Aveline de Lucy, b. 1110.

Maud de Lucy, b. 1112.

+Geoffrey de Lucy, b. Abt. 1120, Luce, Normandy, France.

alice de Lucy, b. 1129, France.

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/b/a/l/William-Balcam-VICTORIA/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1918.html

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Richard de Luci (1089 - 14. July 1179) (also Richard de Lucy) was first noted as Sheriff of the County of Essex.

His wife Rohese, who is named in several documents, might have been a sister of Faramus of Boulogne. When Henry II came to the throne in 1154, he was made Chief Justiciar of England jointly with Robert de Beaumont, Earl of Leicester. When de Beaumont died in 1168, Richard continued to hold the office in his own right.[1]

He resigned his office between September 1178 and Easter of 1179,[1] and retired to Lesnes Abbey in Kent, where he died and was buried three months later 14 July 1179.

His brother Walter de Lucy was abbot of Battle Abbey.[2] His second son was Godfrey de Lucy (d. 1204), Bishop of Winchester.

His mother was Aveline, the niece and heiress of William Goth. In February 1130/31, Henry I in the charter for Séez Cathedral refers to Richard de Luci and his mother Aveline.

An early reference to the de Luci family refers to the render by Henry I of the Lordship of Dice, Norfolk to Richard de Lucie, Governor of Falais, Normandy, after defending it with great valour and heroic conduct when besieged by Geoffrey, Earl of Anjou. Later in 1153-4 he was granted Chipping Ongar, Essex by William, son of King Stephen and his wife, Maud of Boulogne where be built Ongar castle. He later became the Sheriff of both Essex and Hertfordshire in 1156.

-------------------- His wife Rohese, who is named in several documents, was a sister of Faramus of Boulogne. When Henry II came to the throne in 1154, he was made Chief Justiciar of England jointly with Robert de Beaumont, Earl of Leicester. When de Beaumont died in 1168, Richard de Luci continued to hold the office in his own right.[1]

He resigned his office between September 1178 and Easter of 1179, [1] and retired to Lesnes Abbey in Kent, where Richard de Luci died and was buried three months later on 14 July 1179.

His brother Walter de Luci was abbot of Battle Abbey. [2] His second son was Godfrey de Luci (d. 1204), Bishop of Winchester.

His mother was Aveline, the niece and heiress of William Goth. In February 1130/31, Henry I in the charter for Séez Cathedral refers to Richard de Luci and his mother Aveline.

An early reference to the de Luci family refers to the render by Henry I of the Lordship of Dice, Norfolk to Richard de Luci, Governor of Falaise, Normandy, after defending it with great valour and heroic conduct when besieged by Geoffrey, Earl of Anjou.

Later in 1153-4 he was granted Chipping Ongar, Essex by William, son of King Stephen and his wife, Maud of Boulogne where be built Ongar Castle. He later became the Sheriff of both Essex and Hertfordshire in 1156.

One of the members of his household was Roger fitzReinfrid, the brother of Walter de Coutances. Roger became a royal judge and later donated land to Lesnes Abbey, which had been founded by de Luci.[3]

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Richard de Lucy "The Loyal", Justiciar of England's Timeline

1089
1089
Luce, Normandy, France
1109
1109
Age 20
Thorney Green, Suffolk, England.
1112
1112
Age 23
England
1116
1116
Age 27
Of Luce Near, Maine, Normandy, France
1118
1118
Age 29
Luce, Near Maine, Normandy, France
1118
Age 29
Luce, Normandy, France
1121
1121
Age 32
Luce, Normandie, France
1122
1122
Age 33
Luce, Near Maine, Normandy, France
1123
1123
Age 34
<Luce, Near Maine, Normandy, France>
1126
1126
Age 37
Dunmow, Essex, England