Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl Leicester

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Robert (lst Earl of Leicester) de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Comte de Meulan

Also Known As: "Ist Earl Leicester", "Comte de Meulan", "Knight"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Pont-Audemer, Beaumont, Normandy, France
Death: Died in Préaux, Normandy, France
Place of Burial: Abbey of Preux, Monchy-le-Preux, Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Roger de Vieilles de Beaumont, comte de Meulan and Adeline, comtesse de Meulan
Husband of Elizabeth de Vermandois, countess of Leicester
Father of Eleanor de Beaumont; Havoise de Beaumont; Aubreye De Beaumont; Sir Robert de Beaumont, Knight, Earl of Leicester, Justiciar of England; Waleran IV de Beaumont, comte de Meulan, 1st Earl of Worcester and 9 others
Brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick and Aubreye de Beaumont, Abess de St Léger-de-Préaux, later of Eton
Half brother of William de Mauduit, I and Gunfrid de Mauduit

Occupation: Count of Meulan, 1st Earl of Leicester, Eart of Beaumont (Bellmont)
Managed by: Terry Jackson (Switzer)
Last Updated:

About Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl Leicester

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester and Count of Meulan (1049 – 5 June 1118)

Parents:

Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan, daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan, and an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick.

Children:

1. Emma de Beaumont (born 1102)
2. Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (born 1104)
3. Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (born 1104)
4. Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (born c. 1106)
5. Adeline de Beaumont, married two times:
        i. Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle;
        ii. Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
6. Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Château-neuf-Thimerais.
7. Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102)
8. Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I of England. Married two times:
        i. Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke;
        ii. Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Beaumont,_1st_Earl_of_Leicester

     Robert de Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester was a powerful English and French nobleman, revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers speak highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.

He accompanied William the Conqueror to England in 1066, where his service earned him more than 91 lordships and manors. When his mother died in 1081, Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in Normandy, also the title of Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He did homage to Philip I of France for these estates and sat as French Peer in the Parliament held at Poissy.

At the Battle of Hastings Robert was appointed leader of the infantry on the right wing of the army.

He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New Forest, when William Rufus received his mysterious death wound, 2 August 1100. He then pledged alligience to William Rufus' brother, Henry I of England, who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of Evreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence that they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the King; their raid was very successful for they collected a vast booty.

According to Henry of Huntingdon, Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem." His wife Isabella remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey.

Family and children

He was the eldest son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan, daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan, and an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick.

In 1096 he married (Isabel) Elizabeth de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh Magnus a younger son of the French king and Adèle of Vermandois. Their children were:

  1. Emma de Beaumont (born 1102)
  2. Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan (born 1104)
  3. Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (born 1104)
  4. Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (born c. 1106)
  5. Adeline de Beaumont, married two times:
        i. Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle;
        ii. Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
  6. Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Château-neuf-Thimerais.
  7. Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102)
  8. Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I of England. Married two times:
        i. Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke;
        ii. Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

About his father, Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094)

He was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror.

Life

Roger was nicknamed Barbatus or La Barbe because he wore a moustache and beard while the Normans usually were clean shaven. This peculiarity is recognized in the thirty-second panel of the Bayeux Tapestry where he is depicted sitting at a feast with Duke William on his left hand, Odo, brother of William and Bishop of Bayeux, in the centre.

Planché tells us that "he was the noblest, the wealthiest, and the most valiant seigneur of Normandy, and the greatest and most trusted friend of the Danish family." There is an explanation for this - as an older cousin who had never rebelled against the young Duke, he was part of the kinship group of noblemen that William relied upon in governing Normandy and fighting off frequent rebellion and invasions. The historian Frank McLynn notes that William relied on relatives descended via his mother (namely his half-brothers and brothers-in-law) and on relatives descended from the Duchess Gunnora's sisters, since his own paternal kin had proved unreliable.

Wace, the 12th century historian, says that "at the time of the invasion of England, Roger was summoned to the great council at Lillebonne, on account of his wisdom; but that he did not join in the expedition as he was too far advanced in years." Although Roger could not fight, he did not hesitate in contributing his share of the cost, for he provided at his own expense sixty vessels for the conveyance of the troops across the channel. Furthermore, his eldest son and heir fought bravely at Hastings as noted in several contemporary records. As a result, Roger's elder sons were awarded rich lands in England, and both eventually were made English earls by the sons of the Conqueror.

Family and children

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

  1. Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.
  2. Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.
  3. William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).
  4. Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

Roger de Beaumont in Literature

Roger de Beaumont appears as a minor character (the overlord of the secondary hero) in Georgette Heyer's historical novel The Conqueror. His family appears little in the book, but reference is made to Roger's wife and daughters and his eldest son.

External links

   * Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 50-24, 151-24.
   * Beaumont genealogy , to be used with caution (check soc.genealogy.medieval): http://www.stirnet.com/HTML/genie/british/bb4ae/beaumont01.htm
   * The Conqueror and His Companions: Robert de Beaumont (link now broken)

Sources

   * Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.
   * J.R. Planché. The Conqueror and His Companions. London: Tinsley Brothers, 1874.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Beaumont

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From http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Robert_de_Beaumont,_1st_Earl_of_Leicester:

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of LeicesterEarl of Leicester

The title Earl of Leicester was created in the 12th century in the Peerage of England , and is currently a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, created in 1837....

and Count of Meulan (1049 – 5 June, 1118) was a powerful English and French nobleman, revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers speak highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.

He accompanied William the ConquerorWilliam I of England

William I , better known as William the Conqueror , was Duke of Normandy from 1035 and English monarchy from later 1066 to his death. William is sometimes also referred to as "William II" in relation to his position as the second Duke of Normandy of that name....

to England in 1066, where his service earned him more than 91 lordships and manors. When his mother died in 1081, Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in NormandyNormandy

Normandy is a geographical region corresponding to the former Duchy of Normandy. It is situated along the coast of France south of the English Channel between Brittany and Picardy and comprises territory in northern France and the Channel Islands....

, also the title of Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He did homage to Philip I of FrancePhilip I of France

Philip I , called the Amorous, was List of French monarchs from 1060 to his death. His reign, like that of most of the early House of Capet, was extraordinarily long for the time....

for these estates and sat as French Peer in the Parliament held at PoissyPoissy

ap_size=270px|adjustable_map =Poissy_map.png|mapcaption=Location within Paris inner and outer suburbs|lat_long=|r?gion=?le-de-France |d?partement=Yvelines | arrondissement=Saint-Germain-en-Laye|...

.

At the Battle of HastingsBattle of Hastings

The Battle of Hastings was the decisive Normans victory in the Norman Conquest of England. It was fought between the Norman army of William I of England, and the English people army led by Harold Godwinson....

Robert was appointed leader of the infantry on the right wing of the army.

He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New ForestNew Forest

The New Forest is an area of southern England which includes the largest remaining tracts of unenclosed pasture land, heath and forest in the heavily-populated South East England....

, when William RufusWilliam II of England

William II , the third son of William I of England, was Kingdom of England from 1087 until 1100, with powers also over Duchy of Normandy, and influence in Kingdom of Scotland....

received his mysterious death wound, 2 August 1100. He then pledged alligience to William Rufus' brother, Henry I of EnglandHenry I of England

Henry I was the fourth son of William I the Conqueror. He succeeded his elder brother William II of England as King of England in 1100 and defeated his eldest brother, Robert Curthose, to become Duke of Normandy in 1106....

, who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of Evreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence that they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the King; their raid was very successful for they collected a vast booty.

According to Henry of HuntingdonHenry of Huntingdon

Henry of Huntingdon was an English historians in the Middle Ages and archdeacon of Huntingdon....

, Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem." His wife Isabella remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of SurreyWilliam de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey

William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey , was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred. He is more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey....

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From www.thePeerage.com

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of LeicesterEarl of Leicester

The title Earl of Leicester was created in the 12th century in the Peerage of England , and is currently a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, created in 1837....

and Count of Meulan (1049 – 5 June, 1118) was a powerful English and French nobleman, revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers speak highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.

He accompanied William the ConquerorWilliam I of England

William I , better known as William the Conqueror , was Duke of Normandy from 1035 and English monarchy from later 1066 to his death. William is sometimes also referred to as "William II" in relation to his position as the second Duke of Normandy of that name....

to England in 1066, where his service earned him more than 91 lordships and manors. When his mother died in 1081, Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in NormandyNormandy

Normandy is a geographical region corresponding to the former Duchy of Normandy. It is situated along the coast of France south of the English Channel between Brittany and Picardy and comprises territory in northern France and the Channel Islands....

, also the title of Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He did homage to Philip I of FrancePhilip I of France

Philip I , called the Amorous, was List of French monarchs from 1060 to his death. His reign, like that of most of the early House of Capet, was extraordinarily long for the time....

for these estates and sat as French Peer in the Parliament held at PoissyPoissy

The following is an excerpt from Cokayne's The Complete Peerage, rev.

ed., vol. XII, postscript to Appendix L, pp. 47-48: "Companions of the

Conqueror" (regarding the 1066 Battle of Hastings). These are the proven

companions of William.

       1. ***Robert de Beaumont***, later first Earl of Leicester. 
       2. Eustace, Count of Boulogne. 
       3. William, afterwards third Count of Evreux. 
       4. Geoffrey of Mortagne, afterwards Count of Perche. 
       5. William Fitz Osbern, afterwards first Earl of Hereford. 
       6. Aimeri, Vicomte of Thouars. 
       7. Hugh de Montfort, seigneur of Montfort-sur-Risle. 
  • **

A note about Simon De Montfort from Catholic Encyclopedia:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10540a.htm

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Pedigree Resource File Ver a la persona en el modo de cuadro genealógico

name:

Robert I /de Beaumont/ 1st Earl of Leicester


sexo:

male

nacimiento:

aproximadamente 1049 

Beaumont-le-Roger, Eure, Normandy, France

defunción:

5 June 1118 

Abbey of Preaux, Normandy, France

entierro:

Abbey of Preaux, Normandy, France

matrimonio:

1096 

Padres

Padre:

Roger /de Beaumont/ Seigneur de Pont-Audemer


madre:

Adeline /de Meulan/


Matrimonios (1)

cónyuge:

Isabel Elizabeth /de Vermandois/ Countess of Leicester


matrimonio:

1096 

Ocultar hijos (8)

hijo 1:

Adeline /de Beaumont/


sexo:

female

nacimiento:

aproximadamente 1096 

Leicester, Leicestershire, England

defunción:

hijo 2:

Isabel Elizabeth /de Beaumont/


sexo:

female

nacimiento:

aproximadamente 1098 

Leicester, Leicestershire, England

defunción:

6 January 1147 / 1148 

Carmarthen, Carmarthenshire, Wales

hijo 3:

Maud (Matilda) /de Beaumont/


sexo:

female

nacimiento:

aproximadamente 1100 

Meulan, Yvelines, Ile-de-France, France

defunción:

después de 1189 

hijo 4:

Eleanor /de Beaumont/


sexo: female nacimiento: 1100

                     Leicester, Leicestershire, England 

defunción:

hijo 5:

Robert II /de Beaumont/ 2nd Earl of Leicester sexo: male nacimiento: 1104

                      Leicestershire, England 

defunción: 5 April 1168

                    England 

hijo 6:

Waleran /de Beaumont/ Earl of Worchester sexo: male nacimiento: 1104

                         Beaumont, Normandy, France 

defunción: 10 April 1166

hijo 7:

Alice /de Beaumont/ sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1105 defunción: 11 July 1191

hijo 8:

Hugh /de Beaumont/ Earl of Bedford sexo: male nacimiento: aproximadamente 1117

                      Leicestershire, England 

defunción:

Notas (1) Robert de Beaumon; allegedly 1st Earl of Leicester of the c 1102 creation. [Burke's Peerage]

_______________________

On Leicester, Earldom of [Burke's Peerage, p. 1671]:

Robert de Beaumont, a companion in arms of William I (The conqueror) at Hastings was granted after the Conquest much land in the Midlands of England, but most of it was in Warwickshire rather than Leicestershire. Indeed his younger brother becam Earl of Warwick. Robert also held territory in Normandy and is usmaclly referred to as Count of Meulan. He was a leading political figure in the reigns of William II and Henry I and on the death of one Ives de Grandmesnil in the First Crusade, the funds for campaigning in which Ives had raised from Robert on the security of his estates, [Robert] came into ful possession of them, including a sizabel part of Leicester. The rest of the town was granted him by Henry I and it is possible that he became Earl of Leicester.

__________________________

ROBERT DE BEAUMONT, SEIGNEUR OF BEAUMONT, PONT-AUDEMER, BRIONNE AND VATTEVILLE in Normandy, and from 1081 COUNT OF MEULAN in the French Vexin, son and heir, born circa 1046. When very young he accompanied Duke William to England and distinguished himself at the battle of Hastings, and received large grants of lands in co. Warwick, with smaller holdings in cos. Leicester, Northants, and Wilts. On 14 July 080, as Robert de Bellomonte, he witnessed the foundation charter of Lessay, and next year he inherited from his mother's family the comté of Meulan. Thereafter he is continuously styled Count (Comes) of Meulan. After the death of the Conqueror he adhered to William Rufus, and was high in favour at his court. He quarrelled with Robert of Normandy about the castellanship of Brionne, in consequence of the exchange of Brionne for Ivry made by his father. He was imprisoned, but was released at the intercession of his father Roger, who eventually succeeded in obtaining Brionne in fee. He succeeded to the greater part of his father's lands in Normandy, including Beaumont, Pont-Audemer, Vatteville and Brionne. This paternal inheritance, added to his French comté and his great possessions in cos. Warwick and Leicester, made him one of the most powerful vassals of the Crown. He became one of the chief lay ministers of William Rufus, with whom he sided against Robert Courtheuse in 1098, and when William invaded the French Vexin in 1097 he received his troops in his fortresses of the comté of Meulan. After the death of William Rufus he became one of the chief advisers of Henry I. On the death of Ives de Grandmesnil on Crusade, Robert retained his estates, which Ives had mortgaged to him circa 1102. Thereby he acquired one-quarter of the town of Leicester, the whole of which was later granted to him by the King. Robert thus added largely to his already vast possessions. In 1104 he was one of the Norman barons who adhered to Henry on his arrival in Normandy. He was present in the King's army at Tenchebrai, 28 September 1106. In 1110 he was besieged at Meulan by Louis VI, who took the castle by storm, but in the following year he retaliated by a raid on Paris, which he plundered. After obtaining the whole town of Leicester he is said to have become EARL OF LEICESTER, but, being already Count of Meulan, was never so styled. There is no contemporary record that'he had the third penny of the pleas of the county, but he doubtless acquired, with the Grandmesnil fief, the third penny of the issues of the Mint at Leicester. He married, in 1096, Isabel, called also Elizabeth, daughter of Hugh DE CREPl, called Hug "le Grand," COUNT OF VERMANDOIS. He died 5 June 1118, and was buried with his ancestors in the chapter house of Préaux. His widow married, very shortly after his death, William (DE WARINNE), EARL OF SURREY. [Complete Peerage VII:523-6] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Accompanied William the Conqueror in the invasion of England in 1066, and having greatly distinguished himself at the Battle of Hastings, was rewarded with vast possessions in England, receiving ninety one great lordships or manors, mostly in Warwickshire. Upon the death of his mother in 1081 he became Comte de Meullant in France, about 1107 was probably created Earl of Leicester in England by Henry I., and d. 5 June 1118, aged nearly eighty years. (P) He m. (1) GODECHILDE DE TOENI, daughter of Ralph de Toeni, Seigneur de Conches in Normandy; they had no children and were divorced. (P) He m. (2), about 1096, ISABEL DE VERMANDOIS, daughter of Hugh the Great, Comte de Vermandois in France. --- J Gardner Bartlett, *Newberry Genealogy*, Boston, 1914, p 5 He was married to ISABEL OF VERMANDOIS in 1096.

From: "Earldoms In Fee"

EARLDOM of LEICESTER

Robert de Beaumont, heir of a prominent Norman Family, was with the Conqueror at Hastings and received large grants of land in Warwickshire, and to a lesser extent in the county of Leicester and elsewhere. In the year 1081 he inherited through his mother the Comte' of Meulan (Mellent) and became generally known as Count of Meulan. Succeeding later to his father's large inheritance in Normandy, he became one of the wealthiest vassals of the Crown, both in England and in Normandy. He took the side of William II and later, with his brother, was prominent in securing Henry's accession. He was greatly trusted by that King.

Ivo de Grandmesnil, who had been a strong supporter of Robert of Normandy when the latter invaded England at the instigation of his partisians in the baronage, was the holder of a considerable fief in the county of Leicester and also had a quarter interest in the revenues of the borough. Grandmesnil's confiscated Leicester interests, after peacehad been made between Henry and Duke Robert, were given in custody to Robert de Beaumont. Ivo then agreed to mortgage these interests to Robert de Beaumont provided the latter would use his influence with the King for Ivo's rehabilitation and would in the meantime provide Ivo with funds to go on Crusade. The King was adroitly persmacded by Robert of Mellent not only to grant him Ivo's Leicester interest (at the King's disposition as a result of Ivo's part in rebellion), but to give him also the royal interest in the rest of the Leicester borough farm. Robert is said then to have become Earl of Leicester. There is no comtemporary record of his creation or of any use of this title, and doubt has accordingly been expressed about the existance of his earldom at this date. (In charters Robert was described as Comte de Meulan, but never as Earl of Leicester). The possession by Robert of the earldom can, however, be reasonably inferred from the events immediately following his death. He died on 5 June 1118 and was buried with his ancestors at Preaux, leaving three sons, Waleran and Robert (twins) and Hugh, who is said later to have been made Earl of Bedford. If so he was deprived almost at once. (Hugh of Bedford was the weakling of a strong family. Promise of creation is more likely than actmacl girding and putting in possession. In any event it would be lost with the fief in 1141). As so frequently happened on the death of a great tenant-in-chief during the first century after the Conquest, the Norman and french fiefs and the English fiefs were separated. The former went to the elder twin Waleran, who was thenceforth styled Count of Meulan, while the latter went to Robert, the younger twin. Robert is found styling himself Earl of Leicester as early as 1119. He was at that time only about fifteen years of age, so that he was either created an earl at a very tender age immediately after his father's death (which is unlikely), or was regarded as succeeding his father in the earldom (which is probable) as well as in the English lands.

sandy@mosquitonet.com

_________________________

Robert de Beaumont (d 1118) count of Meulan, feudal statesman, was son of Roger de Beaumont ('de Bellomonte' in the latinized form) and grandson of Humfrey de Vielles, who had added to his paternal fief of Pont Audemer, by the gift of his brother, that of Beaumont, afterwards 'Beaumont-le-Roger' (including Vielles), from which his descendants took their name. Roger de Beaumont had married Adeline, the aughter of Warleran, count of Meulan ('de Mellente') in France, and was allied paternally to the ducal house of Normandy, of which he was a trusted counsellor. Being advanced in years at the time of the invasion of England, he remained in Normandy at the head of the council, and sent his sons with William. Of these, Robert fought at Senlac (14 Oct 1066), though confused with his father by Wace (Roman de Rou, 1. 18462):

Rogier II Veil, cil. de Belmont, Assalt Engleis el primier front.

He distinguished himself early in the day by a charge on the right wing in which he was the first to break down the English palisade. On William's march into the midlands in 1068, he was rewarded with large grants in Warwickshire and Warwick Castle was entrusted to his brother Henry. He then practically disappears for more than twenty years. He is strivem in 1079 to reconcile Robert with his father, the Conqueror, and shortly afterwards he succeeded, in right of his mother, to his uncle Hugh, count of Meulan. On the death of the Conqueror (1089) he and his brother espoused the cause of Rufus, and were thenceforth high in his favour. Presuming on his power, the count of Meulan is said to have haughtily demanded from Robert, then duke of Normandy, the castellanship of Ivry, which his father had consented to exchange for that of Brionne. The duke, resenting the request, arrested him, and handed over Brionne to Robert de Meules. At the intercession of the count's aged father he was released on payment of a heavy fine, and restored to the castellanship of Brionne. But he was compelled to recover the castle by a desperate siege. His father, Roger, not long after entered the abbey of St Peter of Preaux (founded by his father and himself), and the count, succeedeing to the family fiefs of Beaumont and Pont Audemer, was now a powerful vassal in England, in Normandy, and in France. He and Robert de Belesme, according to Mr Freeman, though 'of secondary importance in the tale of the conquest and of the reign of the first William, became most prominent laymen of the reign of the second.' In the struggle between Robert and William Rufus (1096) he sided actively in Normandy with the latter, and on William invading France to recover the Vexin (1097) he threw in his lot with his castle of Meulan opened the way for him to Paris. he was now the king's chief adviser, and when Helias of Maine offered to come over to him, dissmacded him from accepting the offer. He and his brother were present at William's death, and they both accompanied Henry in his hasty ride to London. The count, adhering strenuously to Henry in the general rising which followed, became his 'specially trusted counsellor,' and persmacded him in the Whitsun germot of 1101 to temporise discreetly with his opponents by promising them all that they asked for. Ivo de Grantmesnil, who had been a leading rebel, was tried and sentenced the following year (1102), and sought the influence of the powerful count, 'qui praecipuus erat inter consiliarios regis,' for the mitigation of his penalty. The cunning minister agreed to intervene, and to advance him the means for a pilgrimage, on receiving in pledge his Leicstershire fiefs, with the town of Leicester, all which he eventually refused to return. Having thus added to his already large possessions, he attained the height of wealth and prosperity, and is distinctly stated by Orderic to have been created earl of Leicester ('inde consul in Anglia factus'). But of this the Lords' committee 'found no evidence.' Nor does he appear to have been so styled, though he posessed the tertius denarius, and though that dignity devolved upon his son. He was now (1103) despatched by Henry on a mission to Normandy, where from his seat of beaumont he intriqued in Henry's interest. On Henry coming over in 1104 he headed his party among the Norman nobles, and was again in close attendance on him during his visit of 1105, and at the great battle of Tenchebrai (28 Sep 1106), in which he commanded the second line of the king's army. He was again in Normandy with the king 3 Feb 1113, persmacding him to confirm the monks of St Evreul in their possessions. The close of his life, according to Henry of Huntingdon, was embittered by the infidelity of his wife, but the details of the story are obscure. He is also said by Henry to have been urged on his death-bed to restore the lands he had unjustly acquired, but to have characteristically replied that he would leave them to his sons that they might provide for his salvation. He died 5 June 1118, and was buried with his fathers in the chapter-house of Preaux. ' On the whole,' says Mr Freeman, 'his character stands fair.' Almost the last survivor of the conquest generation, he strangley impressed the imagination of his contemporaries by his unbroken porsperity under successive kings, by his stady advance in wealth and power, while those around him were being ruined, but above all by his unerring sagacity. 'A cold and crafty statesman . . . . the Achitophel of his time,' he was deemed, says Henry of Huntindon, 'sapientissimus omnium hinc usque in Jerusalem,' and, according to William of Malmesbury, was appealed to 'as the Oracle of God.' In the contest with Anselm he took the same line as his son in the contest with Becket, intervening to save him from the vengence of Rufus, and in the council of Rockingham (1095) opposing his deposition, yet steadily supporting the right of the crown in the question of investitures. For this, indeed, he was excommunicated. Eadmer (94) complains that he disliked the English and prevented their promotion in the church. He is said to have introduced, after Alexios Comnenos, the fashion of a single meal a day in the place of the Saxon profuseness. His benefactions to the church were samm, but a Leicester he rebuilt St Mary's as a foundation for secular canons. The charter by which he confirmed to his 'merchants' of Leicester their guild and customs will be found in Mr Thompson's 'Essay on Municipal History,' but the story of his abolishing trial by duel is, though accepted, probably unfounded. He had married, late in life (1096-7), Elizabeth (or Ysabel), saughter of Hugh the Great of Vermandois (or of Crepy) and niece of Philip of France. She married, at his death, William de Warenne, having had by him, with five daughters, three sons, Robert and Waleran; and Hugh, 'cognamento Pauper' who received the earldom of Bedford from Stephen. [Dictionary of National Biography II:64-66]

Fuentes (3) 1. Burke's Peerage and Baronage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley, Editor-In-Chief {1999} 2. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Ed, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additons by Walter Lee Shippard Jr, 1999 3. Royalty for Commoners, 2nd Ed; Roderick W Stuart {1988}

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Cita de este registro

"Pedigree Resource File", database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/STF8-BQV : accessed 2013-08-31), entry for Robert I /de Beaumont/ 1st Earl of Leicester. -------------------- Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (1040/50-5 June 1118) was a powerful Norman nobleman, one of the Companions of William the Conqueror during the Norman Conquest of England, and was revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers spoke highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.

Contents

 [hide] 1 Origins

2 Fights at Battle of Hastings 3 Inheritance 4 Career 5 Loss of Normandy lands 6 Marriage & progeny 6.1 Sons 6.2 Daughters

7 Death 8 Sources 9 External links 10 References

Origins[edit]

He was born between 1040-1050, the eldest son of Roger de Beaumont (1015-1094) by his wife Adeline of Meulan (d.1081), a daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan, and was an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick (c.1050-1119)

Fights at Battle of Hastings[edit]

Robert de Beaumont was one of only about 15 of the Proven Companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, and was leader of the infantry on the right wing of the Norman army, as evidenced in the following near contemporary account by William of Poitiers:

"A certain Norman, Robert, son of Roger of Beaumont, being nephew and heir to Henry, Count of Meulan, through Henry's sister Adeline, found himself that day in battle for the first time. He was as yet but a young man and he performed feats of valour worthy of perpetual remembrance. At the head of a troop which he commanded on the right wing he attacked with the utmost bravery and success".[1]

His service earned him the grant of more than 91 English manors confiscated from the defeated English, as listed in the Domesday Book of 1086.

Inheritance[edit]

When his mother died in 1081, Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in Normandy, and the title, Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He paid homage to King Philip I of France for these estates and sat as a French Peer in the Parliament held at Poissy.

Career[edit]

He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New Forest in Hampshire when King William II Rufus (1087-1100) was shot dead accidentally by an arrow on 2 August 1100. He pledged allegiance to William II's brother, King Henry I (1100-1135), who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

Loss of Normandy lands[edit]

On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of Évreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the king; their raid was successful and they collected a vast booty.

Marriage & progeny[edit]

In 1096 he married Elizabeth (or Isabel) de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh Magnus (1053-1101) a younger son of the French king and Adelaide,_Countess_of_Vermandois (1050-1120). After his death Isabella remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey. He had the following progeny:

Sons[edit] 1.Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, 1st Earl of Worcester (b. 1104), eldest twin and heir. 2.Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester & Earl of Hereford (b. 1104), twin 3.Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (b. circa 1106)

Daughters[edit] 1.Emma de Beaumont (born 1102) 2.Adeline de Beaumont, married twice: 1.Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle; 2.Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)

3.Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Châteauneuf-Thimerais. 4.Agnes de Beaumont, a nun 5.Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102) 6.Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I. Married twice: 1.Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke; 2.Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

Death[edit]

According to Henry of Huntingdon, Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem."

Sources[edit]

Portal icon Normandy portal Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.

External links[edit] The Conqueror and His Companions: Robert de Beaumont

References[edit] -------------------- Count of Meulan/Mellent

1st Earl of Leicester (1st creation)

links

  • FamilySearch AFN: 9FTX-N3

-------------------- He was born between 1040-1050, the eldest son of Roger de Beaumont (1015-1094) by his wife Adeline of Meulan (d.1081), a daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan, and was an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick (c.1050-1119)

Fights at Battle of Hastings[edit]

Robert de Beaumont was one of only about 15 of the Proven Companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, and was leader of the infantry on the right wing of the Norman army, as evidenced in the following near contemporary account by William of Poitiers:

"A certain Norman, Robert, son of Roger of Beaumont, being nephew and heir to Henry, Count of Meulan, through Henry's sister Adeline, found himself that day in battle for the first time. He was as yet but a young man and he performed feats of valour worthy of perpetual remembrance. At the head of a troop which he commanded on the right wing he attacked with the utmost bravery and success".[1]

His service earned him the grant of more than 91 English manors confiscated from the defeated English, as listed in the Domesday Book of 1086.

Inheritance[edit]

When his mother died in 1081, Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in Normandy, and the title, Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He paid homage to King Philip I of France for these estates and sat as a French Peer in the Parliament held at Poissy.

Career[edit]

He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New Forest in Hampshire when King William II Rufus (1087-1100) was shot dead accidentally by an arrow on 2 August 1100. He pledged allegiance to William II's brother, King Henry I (1100-1135), who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

Loss of Normandy lands[edit]

On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of Évreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the king; their raid was successful and they collected a vast booty.

Marriage & progeny[edit]

In 1096 he married Elizabeth (or Isabel) de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh Magnus (1053-1101) a younger son of the French king and Adelaide, Countess of Vermandois (1050-1120). After his death Isabella remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey. He had the following progeny:

Sons[edit] 1.Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, 1st Earl of Worcester (b. 1104), eldest twin and heir. 2.Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester & Earl of Hereford (b. 1104), twin 3.Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (b. circa 1106)

Daughters[edit] 1.Emma de Beaumont (born 1102) 2.Adeline de Beaumont, married twice: 1.Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle; 2.Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)

3.Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Châteauneuf-Thimerais. 4.Agnes de Beaumont, a nun 5.Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102) 6.Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I. Married twice: 1.Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke; 2.Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

Death[edit]

According to Henry of Huntingdon, Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem." He was the last surviving Norman nobleman to have fought in the Battle of Hastings

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Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl Leicester's Timeline

1046
December 6, 1046
Pont-Audemer, Beaumont, Normandy, France
1066
October 14, 1066
Age 19
Senlac Hill, Sussex, England
1096
1096
Age 49
France
1100
1100
Age 53
Cheshire, Dunham Massey, England
1102
1102
Age 55
Leicester, Leicestershire, England
1104
1104
Age 57
Leicester, UK
1104
Age 57
Leicester, Leicestershire, England
1104
Age 57
Leicester, Leicester, England
1105
1105
Age 58
Leicester, Leicestershire, England
1105
Age 58
Leicester, Leicester, England, United Kingdom