Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March

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Roger de Mortimer, Sir, 2nd Earl of the March, KG

Also Known As: "Roger Mortimer", "Roger Mortimer Earl of March II", "Earl Of March", "2nd Earl of March"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ludlow, Shropshire, England
Death: Died in Rouvray, Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
Place of Burial: Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Lord Mortimer and Elizabeth de Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton
Husband of Philippa Montacute, Countess
Father of Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March; Margery de Mortimer, b. 1352 and Beatrice De Mortimer
Brother of John de Mortimer; Wales de Mortimer and Cecily de Mortimer
Half brother of Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel

Occupation: 2nd Earl of March, Knight and Founder of the Knights of Garter, rode into France 1359, An English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War., 2nd Earl
Managed by: Private User
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About Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March

Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March

Sir Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, 4th Baron Mortimer, KG (11 November 1328 – 26 February 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War.

He was the son of Sir Edmund Mortimer (d. 1331) and Elizabeth de Badlesmere, and grandson of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.

The Mortimer family lands and titles were lost after the first Earl of March's revolt and death by hanging in 1330, which was followed the next year by the death of Roger's father. Roger thus grew up with uncertain prospects, and re-acquired the family honours only gradually.

Around 1342, he received back Radnor, and the next year the old family baronial seat at Wigmore, Herefordshire.

As a young man he distinguished himself in the wars in France, fighting at Crécy and elsewhere in the campaign of 1347. Afterwards he was given livery of the rest of his lands, was one of the knights admitted at the foundation of the Order of the Garter,[1] and was summoned to parliament as a baron both in 1348.

In 1354, the sentence passed against Mortimer's treacherous grandfather, the first earl, was reversed, and the next year he was summoned to parliament as Earl of March. Also in 1355, he received a number of important appointments, including Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports, and he accompanied an expedition of Edward III to France.

On 19 October 1356, his grandmother Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville, widow of the first earl, died, and Roger inherited her vast estates, including Ludlow Castle, which was thereafter the Mortimer family seat and power base.

In the following years, he became a member of the Royal Council and was appointed Constable at the castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth in Shropshire, and Corfe in Dorset.

In 1359, and continuing into 1360, he was Constable of Edward III's invasion of France. He fought in the failed siege of Reims and captured Auxerre. The English forces then moved into Burgundy, where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray, near Avallon.

Roger married Philippa de Montagu (1332–1381), daughter of William Montagu, 1st Earl of Salisbury, and Catherine Grandison and had by her at least four children:

  • Roger Mortimer, who died young;
  • Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March;
  • Margery Mortimer.[2]
  • Janet Mortimer, who married Andrew Gray, father of Andrew Gray, 1st Lord Gray.

Mortimer also had at least one illegitimate child:[3]

  • Sir Thomas Mortimer, who acted as deputy for his nephew Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March, in Ireland (1382–1383) and stood trial for the slaying of Richard II's commander, Sir Thomas Molineux after the Battle of Radcot Bridge (1387).

Heraldic Coat of Arms: Barry Or and azure, on a chief of the first three pallets between two gyronnies based on the second, over all an inescucheon argent.

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Mortimer,_2nd_Earl_of_March

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 39
  • Mortimer, Roger de (1327-1360) by Thomas Frederick Tout
  • MORTIMER, ROGER (V) de, second Earl of March (1327?–1360), was the son of Edmund Mortimer (d. 1331), and of his wife Elizabeth Badlesmere, and was born about 1327 (Doyle, Official Baronage, ii. 467). This was during the lifetime of his famous grandfather Roger Mortimer IV, first earl of March [q. v.] But the fall and execution of his grandfather, quickly followed by the death of his father, left the infant Roger to incur the penalties of the treason of which he himself was innocent. But he was from the first dealt with very leniently, and as he grew up he was gradually restored to the family estates and honours. About 1342 he was granted the castle of Radnor, with the lands of Gwrthvyrion, Presteign, Knighton, and Norton, in Wales, though Knucklas and other castles of his were put under the care of William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton (d. 1360) [q. v.], who had married his mother (Dugdale, Baronage, i. 147). Next year he received livery of Wigmore, the original centre of his race. On 12 Sept. 1344 he distinguished himself at the age of seventeen at a tournament at Hereford (Murimuth, p. 159, Rolls Ser.) He took a conspicuous part in the famous invasion of France in 1346 (Froissart, iii. 130, ed. Luce). Immediately on the landing of the expedition at La Hogue on 12 July Edward III dubbed his son Edward, prince of Wales, a knight, and immediately afterwards the young prince knighted Roger Mortimer and others of his youthful companions (G. le Baker, p. 79 ; cf. Murimuth, p. 199, and Eulogium Hist. iii. 207). He fought in the third and rearmost line of battle at Crecy along with the king. For his services against the French he received the livery of the rest of his lands on 6 Sept. 1346. He was one of the original knights of the Garter (G. le Baker, p. 109, cf. Mr. Thompson's note on pp. 278-9; cf. Beltz, Memorials of the Order of the Garter, pp. 40-1), and on 20 Nov. 1348 was first summoned to parliament, though only as Baron Roger de Mortimer (Lords' Report on Dignity of a Peer, iv. 579). He was conspicuous in 1349 by his co-operation with the Black Prince in resisting the plot of the French to win back Calais (G. le Baker, p. 104). In 1354 he obtained a reversal of the sentence passed against his grandfather, and received the restoration of the remaining portions of the Mortimer inheritance, which had been forfeited to the crown (Rot. Parl. ii. 255 ; Knighton, c. 2607, apud Twysden, Decem Scriptores; Dugdale, i. 147). Unable to wrest the lordship of Chirk from Richard Fitzalan, earl of Arundel, he contracted with him that his son Edmund should marry Richard's daughter, Alice (ib.) This marriage, however, never took place. He was already popularly described as Earl of March. At last, on 20 Sept. 1355 (Lords' Report, iv. 604), he was formally summoned to parliament under that title. Various offices were conferred on him in 1355, including the wardenship of Clarendon, the stewardship of Roos and Hamlake, and the constableship of Dover Castle, with the lord wardenship of the Cinque ports (Doyle, ii. 467). In 1355 he started on the expedition of the Duke of Lancaster to France, which was delayed on the English coast by contrary winds and ultimately abandoned (Avesbury, p. 425-6, Rolls Ser.) Later in the same year he accompanied the expedition led by Edward III himself (ib. p. 428). His estates were now much increased by his inheriting the large property of his grandmother, Joan de Genville, the widow of the first earl, who died about this time. These included the castle of Ludlow, now finally and definitively annexed to the possessions of the house of Mortimer, and henceforth the chief seat of its power (Dugdale, Baronage, i. 148). He became a member of the royal council. In 1359 he was made constable of Montgomery, Bridgnorth, and Corfe castles, and keeper of Purbeck Chase. He also accompanied Edward III on his great invasion of France, which began in October 1359. In this he acted as constable, riding in the van at the head of five hundred men at arms and a thousand archers Froissart, v. 199, ed. Luce. Froissart, with characteristic inaccuracy, always calls him 'John'). He took part in the abortive siege of Rheims. He was then sent on to besiege Saint-Florentin, near Auxerre. He captured the town and was joined by Edward (ib. v. 223, but cf. Luce's note, p. lxix). Mortimer then accompanied Edward on his invasion of Burgundy. But on 26 Feb. 1360 he died suddenly at Rouvray, near Avalon (Monasticon, vi. 353). His bones were taken to England and buried with those of his ancestors in Wigmore Abbey (ib.; cf. however 'Chronicon Brevius' in Eulogium Hist. iii. 312, which says that he was buried in France). His obsequies were also solemnly performed in the king's chapel at Windsor.
  • The family panegyrist describes Mortimer as 'stout and strenuous in war, provident in counsel, and praiseworthy in his morals' (Monasticon, vi. 352). He married Philippa daughter of William de Montacute, second earl of Salisbury [q. v.] Their only son was Edmund de Mortimer II, third earl of March [q. v.] Philippa survived her husband, and died on 5 Jan. 1382, and was buried in the Austin priory of Bisham, near Marlow. Her will is printed in Nichols's 'Roval Wills,' pp. 98-103.
  • [Galfridus le Baker, ed. Thompson; Murimuth and Avesbury (Rolls Ser.); Eulogium Historiarum (Rolls Ser.); Froissart's Chroniques, ed. Luce (Soc. de l'Histoire de France); Dugdale's Monasticon, vi. 352-3; Dugdale's Baronage, i. 147-8; Doyle's Official Baronage, ii. 469; Barnes's History of Edward III; Lords' Report on the Dignity of a Peer, vol. iv.]
  • From: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Mortimer,_Roger_de_(1327-1360)_(DNB00)

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Roger Mortimer (1329-1360) Lord Mortimer 2nd Earl of March Born: 1329, possibly at Wigmore Castle, Herefordshire Died: 26th February 1360 at Roveray, Burgundy


The grandfather of this knight, Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, remarkable in history for his ambitious and guilty career, and for his ignominious end in November 1330, had several sons. Edmund Mortimer, the eldest, died in 1331, leaving, by Elizabeth, his wife (one of the daughters of Bartholomew "Le Riche," and sister and co-heiress of Giles, successively Lords Badlesmere), Roger Mortimer, his only surviving son, then in his third year.

The family estates having been forfeited by the attainder of the first Earl, Roger Junior obtained, during his minority and through the influence of his step-father, William De Bohun, Earl of Northampton, grants from the crown of a part of the inheritance of his ancestors, and particularly the Castle of Wigmore, the most ancient of their possessions. His probable adroitness and courage in the jousts at Windsor, which shortly preceded the institution of the Most Noble Order of the Garter (for he had had no opportunity of otherwise distinguishing himself) appear to have acquired for him, at the early age of seventeen, the enviable honour of being one of its founders. Having, two years afterwards, in 1346, attended King Edward III and the Prince of Wales on their brilliant expedition into France, he is said to have received knighthood upon their landing at La Hogue, either from the hands of the sovereign, or those of the young prince immediately after his own investiture with that dignity.

It may be presumed that our knight justified, at the Battle of Crécy, the high opinion which had been formed of him. For, towards the close of the same year, the King thought fit, in consideration of his laudable services, to receive his homage, although still within age, and to grant him livery of the remainder of his lands, with the exception of those held in dower by his mother, the Countess of Northampton.

In 1352, Roger was again employed in France and obtained, in two years later, a reversal, in parliament, of the judgment against his grandfather, upon the ground of the illegality of that sentence, which had been given without oyer of his defence; and he thereupon assumed the style of Earl of March. An inquisition having been taken of the lands of which his ancestor had died seized, they were fully restored to him. In 1355, he was appointed Warden of the Cinque Ports and Constable of Dover Castle, and then attended the King on his expedition into France; and, again, in that of 1359 which terminated in a peace.

Before, however, the peace had been fully concluded, the young Earl died at Roveray, in Burgundy, on the 26th February 1360, whilst in command of the forces on that station; and his remains, having been brought to England, were interred at Wigmore Priory.

By Philippa, his wife (daughter of William Montacute, the 1st Earl of Salisbury), who died in 1381, he left an only son, Edmund, who became the 3rd Earl of March, and intermarried with the Lady Philippa Plantagenet, daughter and sole heiress of Prince Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence. Their son and heir, Roger Mortimer, the 4th Earl, was, in right of his mother, Philippa, declared, in parliament, heir-presumptive to the Crown, failing issue of King Richard II. The pretensions of his descendants to the English throne were eventually asserted by his great-grandson, Edward Plantagenet, as King Edward IV.

Edited from George Frederick Beltz's "Memorials of the Most Noble Order of the Garter" (1861).

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  • Sir Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl March, Constable of Dover, Bridgnorth, Corfe, Montgomery, & Trim Castles1,2,3,4,5,6,7
  • M, #12923, b. 11 November 1328, d. 26 February 1360
  • Father Sir Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Lord Mortimer2,8,9 b. c 1306, d. 17 Dec 1331
  • Mother Elizabeth de Badlesmere2,8,9 b. c 1313, d. 8 Jun 1356
  • Sir Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl March, Constable of Dover, Bridgnorth, Corfe, Montgomery, & Trim Castles was born on 11 November 1328 at Ludlow, Shropshire, England; Age 24 or 25 in 1356.2,4,7 He married Philippa de Montacute, daughter of Sir William de Montacute, 1st Earl of Salisbury, 3rd Lord Montagu, Earl Marshal of England and Katharine de Grandison, circa 1351; They had 3 sons (Roger; Sir Edmund, 3rd Earl of March, Earl of Ulster; & Sir Thomas).3,4,5,6,7 Sir Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl March, Constable of Dover, Bridgnorth, Corfe, Montgomery, & Trim Castles died on 26 February 1360 at Rouvray, Avalon, Côte d'Or, Burgundy, France, at age 31; Buried eventually at Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire.2,4,7
  • Family Philippa de Montacute b. c 1332, d. 5 Jan 1382
  • Children
    • Sir Walter Mortimer+
    • Sir Thomas Mortimer, Chief Justice of Ireland3,4,5,7 d. b 9 Jan 1403
    • Sir Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Lord Mortimer & Connaught, Earl of Ulster, Marshal of England, Chief Governor of Ireland, Ambassador to France+10,4,7 b. 1 Feb 1352, d. 27 Dec 1381
    • Sir Edward Mortimer b. c 1354, d. b 1400
  • Citations
  • [S3647] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, by F. L. Weis, 4th Ed., p. 40.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 525.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 103-104.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 192-193.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 253-254.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 118.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 172-173.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 191-192.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 171-172.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 525-526.
  • From: http://www.our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p431.htm#i12923

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  • Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March1
  • M, #102546, b. circa 1330, d. 1360
  • Last Edited=22 May 2004
  • Consanguinity Index=0.15%
  • Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March was born circa 1330. He was the son of Sir Edmund de Mortimer and Elizabeth de Badlesmere.1 He died in 1360.
  • He gained the title of 2nd Earl of March.
  • Child of Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March
    • Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March+ b. 1 Feb 1352, d. 27 Dec 1381
  • Citations
  • [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 373. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  • From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p10255.htm#i102546

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  • Roger Mortimer
  • Birth: Nov. 11, 1328 Ludlow, Shropshire, England
  • Death: Feb. 26, 1360, France
  • Sir Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War.
  • He was the son of Edmund de Mortimer and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. His paternal grandparents were Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville (1286–1356), daughter of Piers de Geneville and Jeanne of Lusignan.
  • The Mortimer family lands and titles were lost after the first Earl of March's revolt and death by hanging in 1330, which was followed the next year by the death of Roger's father. Roger grew up with uncertain prospects, and re-acquired the family honors gradually.
  • Around 1342, he received back Radnor, and the next year the old family baronial seat at Wigmore, Herefordshire.
  • As a young man he distinguished himself in the wars in France, fighting at Crécy and elsewhere in the campaign of 1347. After-wards he was given the rest of his lands, he was one of the original founders and seventh Knight of the Garter, and was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1348.
  • In 1354, the sentence passed against Mortimer's treacherous grandfather, the first earl, was reversed, and the next year he was summoned to parliament as Earl of March. Also in 1355 he received a number of important appointments, including Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports, and accompanied Edward III's expedition to France.
  • Around this time his grandmother, Joan de Geneville, widow of the first earl, died, and Roger inherited her large estate, including Ludlow Castle, which was thereafter the Mortimer family seat and power base.
  • In the following years he became a member of the Royal Council, and was appointed Constable at the castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth in Shropshire, and Corfe in Dorset.
  • In 1359, and continuing into 1360, he was Constable of Edward III's invasion of France, fighting in the failed siege of Reims and capturing Auxerre. The English forces then moved into Burgundy, where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray near Avallon.
  • Roger married Philippa Montagu, daughter of William Montagu, 1st Earl of Salisbury and had by her three children:
    • Roger Mortimer, who died young;
    • Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March;
    • Margery Mortimer, who married John Touchet, "Lord Audley"
  • Family links:
  • Parents:
  • Edmund Mortimer (1306 - 1331)
  • Elizabeth Badlesmere de Bohun (1313 - 1356)
  • Spouse:
  • Philippa Montagu (1333 - 1381)
  • Children:
    • Edmund Mortimer (1351 - 1381)*
    • Margery de Mortimer Touchet (1352 - 1405)*
  • Siblings:
  • Roger Mortimer (1328 - 1360)
  • Humphrey de Bohun (1341 - 1373)**
  • Elizabeth de Bohun FitzAlan (1350 - 1385)**
  • *Calculated relationship
  • **Half-sibling
  • Burial: Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire Unitary Authority, Herefordshire, England
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 57619672
  • From: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=57619672

_____________________________

  • Phillippa MONTAGUE (C. March)
  • Died: 5 Jan 1381/82, Bisham, Berkshire, England
  • Buried: Bisham, Berkshire, England
  • Father: William MONTAGUE (1º E. Salisbury)
  • Mother: Catherine De GRANDISON
  • Married: Roger MORTIMER (2º E. March) (son of Edmund Mortimer and Elizabeth De Baddlesmere) ABT 1354, Donyatt, Somersetshire, England
  • Children:
    • 1. Edmund MORTIMER (3º E. March) (m. Phillippa Plantagenet, C. Ulster)
    • 2. Roger MORTIMER
    • 3. Margery MORTIMER (m. John Audley, B. Audley)
  • From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/MONTAGUE.htm#Phillippa MONTAGUE1

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2nd Earl of March Fought at Crecy and elsewhere in France - 1347 An original Knight of the Garter Summonded to Parliament in 1348 1355 Constible of Dover Castle, Warden of the Cinque Ports 1355 - Expedition to France with Edward III Inherited Ludlow Castle Constible of castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth, Corfe 1359-60 Constable of invasion in France Siege of Reims, captured Auxerre Died at Rouvray, near Aallon

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Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March's Timeline

1328
November 11, 1328
Ludlow, Shropshire, England
1351
February 1, 1351
Age 22
Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
1352
1352
Age 23
Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
1355
1355
Age 26
1360
February 26, 1360
Age 31
Rouvray, Côte-d'Or, Bourgogne, France
1991
November 8, 1991
Age 31
1992
July 21, 1992
Age 31
November 20, 1992
Age 31
????
2nd Earl of March