Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March

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Roger 2nd Earl of March de Mortimer

Nicknames: "Roger Mortimer", "Roger Mortimer Earl of March II", "Earl Of March", "2nd Earl of March"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ludlow, Shropshire, England
Death: Died in Rouvray, Cote-d' Orleans, France
Place of Burial: Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Edmund de Mortimer and Elizabeth de Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton
Husband of Philippa de Montagu
Father of Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Eal of March; Margery de Mortimer, b. 1352 and Beatrice De Mortimer
Brother of John de Mortimer; Wales de Mortimer and Cecily de Mortimer
Half brother of Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel

Occupation: 2nd Earl of March, Knight and Founder of the Knights of Garter, rode into France 1359, An English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War., 2nd Earl
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Roger 2nd Earl of March de Mortimer

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Mortimer,_2nd_Earl_of_March

Roger Mortimer (1329-1360) Lord Mortimer 2nd Earl of March Born: 1329, possibly at Wigmore Castle, Herefordshire Died: 26th February 1360 at Roveray, Burgundy


The grandfather of this knight, Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, remarkable in history for his ambitious and guilty career, and for his ignominious end in November 1330, had several sons. Edmund Mortimer, the eldest, died in 1331, leaving, by Elizabeth, his wife (one of the daughters of Bartholomew "Le Riche," and sister and co-heiress of Giles, successively Lords Badlesmere), Roger Mortimer, his only surviving son, then in his third year.

The family estates having been forfeited by the attainder of the first Earl, Roger Junior obtained, during his minority and through the influence of his step-father, William De Bohun, Earl of Northampton, grants from the crown of a part of the inheritance of his ancestors, and particularly the Castle of Wigmore, the most ancient of their possessions. His probable adroitness and courage in the jousts at Windsor, which shortly preceded the institution of the Most Noble Order of the Garter (for he had had no opportunity of otherwise distinguishing himself) appear to have acquired for him, at the early age of seventeen, the enviable honour of being one of its founders. Having, two years afterwards, in 1346, attended King Edward III and the Prince of Wales on their brilliant expedition into France, he is said to have received knighthood upon their landing at La Hogue, either from the hands of the sovereign, or those of the young prince immediately after his own investiture with that dignity.

It may be presumed that our knight justified, at the Battle of Crécy, the high opinion which had been formed of him. For, towards the close of the same year, the King thought fit, in consideration of his laudable services, to receive his homage, although still within age, and to grant him livery of the remainder of his lands, with the exception of those held in dower by his mother, the Countess of Northampton.

In 1352, Roger was again employed in France and obtained, in two years later, a reversal, in parliament, of the judgment against his grandfather, upon the ground of the illegality of that sentence, which had been given without oyer of his defence; and he thereupon assumed the style of Earl of March. An inquisition having been taken of the lands of which his ancestor had died seized, they were fully restored to him. In 1355, he was appointed Warden of the Cinque Ports and Constable of Dover Castle, and then attended the King on his expedition into France; and, again, in that of 1359 which terminated in a peace.

Before, however, the peace had been fully concluded, the young Earl died at Roveray, in Burgundy, on the 26th February 1360, whilst in command of the forces on that station; and his remains, having been brought to England, were interred at Wigmore Priory.

By Philippa, his wife (daughter of William Montacute, the 1st Earl of Salisbury), who died in 1381, he left an only son, Edmund, who became the 3rd Earl of March, and intermarried with the Lady Philippa Plantagenet, daughter and sole heiress of Prince Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence. Their son and heir, Roger Mortimer, the 4th Earl, was, in right of his mother, Philippa, declared, in parliament, heir-presumptive to the Crown, failing issue of King Richard II. The pretensions of his descendants to the English throne were eventually asserted by his great-grandson, Edward Plantagenet, as King Edward IV.

Edited from George Frederick Beltz's "Memorials of the Most Noble Order of the Garter" (1861).

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Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March (c.1328 – February 26, 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War.

He was the son of Sir Edmund de Mortimer (died 1332) and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. His paternal grandparents were Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville (1286–1356), daughter of Piers de Geneville and Jeanne of Lusignan.

Contents [hide] 1 Inheritance 2 Military career 3 Earldom 4 Other honours 5 References


Inheritance The Mortimer family lands and titles were lost after the first Earl of March's revolt and death by hanging in 1330, which was followed the next year by the death of Roger's father. Roger thus grew up with uncertain prospects, and re-acquired the family honours only gradually.

Around 1342, he received back Radnor, and the next year the old family baronial seat at Wigmore, Herefordshire.

Military career As a young man he distinguished himself in the wars in France, fighting at Crécy and elsewhere in the campaign of 1347. Afterwards he was given livery of the rest of his lands, was one of the original Knights of the Garter, and was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1348.

Earldom In 1354, the sentence passed against Mortimer's treacherous grandfather, the first earl, was reversed, and the next year he was summoned to parliament as Earl of March. Also in 1355 he received a number of important appointments, including Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports, and accompanied Edward III's expedition to France.

Other honours Around this time his grandmother, Joan de Geneville, widow of the first earl, died, and Roger inherited her large estate, including Ludlow Castle, which was thereafter the Mortimer family seat and power base.

In the following years he became a member of the Royal Council, and was appointed Constable at the castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth in Shropshire, and Corfe in Dorset.

In 1359, and continuing into 1360, he was Constable of Edward III's invasion of France, fighting in the failed siege of Reims and capturing Auxerre. The English forces then moved into Burgundy, where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray near Avallon.

Roger married Philippa Montacute, daughter of William Montacute, 1st Earl of Salisbury and had by her three children:

Roger Mortimer, who died young; Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March; Margery Mortimer, who married John Touchet, "Lord Audley".

Peerage of England Preceded by Roger Mortimer (forfeit in 1330) Earl of March (restored) 1348–1360 Succeeded by Edmund Mortimer

References DNB entry - R. R. Davies, ‘Mortimer, Roger (VI), second earl of March (1328–1360)’, first published Sept 2004, 1010 words

-------------------- http://www.thepeerage.com/p10255.htm#i102546

Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March1 M, #102546, b. circa 1330, d. 1360

Last Edited=22 May 2004 Consanguinity Index=0.1%

    Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March was born circa 1330. He was the son of Sir Edmund de Mortimer and Elizabeth de Badlesmere.1 He died in 1360.
    Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March gained the title of 2nd Earl of March.

Child of Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March+ b. 1 Feb 1352, d. 27 Dec 1381 Citations [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 373. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

-------------------- Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March (c.1328 – 26 February 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War.

He was the son of Sir Edmund de Mortimer (died 1332) and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. His paternal grandparents were Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville (1286–1356), daughter of Piers de Geneville and Jeanne of Lusignan.

Inheritance

The Mortimer family lands and titles were lost after the first Earl of March's revolt and death by hanging in 1330, which was followed the next year by the death of Roger's father. Roger thus grew up with uncertain prospects, and re-acquired the family honours only gradually.

Around 1342, he received back Radnor, and the next year the old family baronial seat at Wigmore, Herefordshire.

Heraldic Coat of Arms: Barry Or and azure, on a chief of the first three pallets between two gyronnies based of the second, over all an inescucheon argent. Military career

As a young man he distinguished himself in the wars in France, fighting at Crécy and elsewhere in the campaign of 1347. Afterwards he was given livery of the rest of his lands, was one of the original Knights of the Garter, and was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1348. Earldom

In 1354, the sentence passed against Mortimer's treacherous grandfather, the first earl, was reversed, and the next year he was summoned to parliament as Earl of March. Also in 1355 he received a number of important appointments, including Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports, and accompanied Edward III's expedition to France. Other honours

Around this time his grandmother, Joan de Geneville, widow of the first earl, died, and Roger inherited her large estate, including Ludlow Castle, which was thereafter the Mortimer family seat and power base.

In the following years he became a member of the Royal Council, and was appointed Constable at the castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth in Shropshire, and Corfe in Dorset.

In 1359, and continuing into 1360, he was Constable of Edward III's invasion of France, fighting in the failed siege of Reims and capturing Auxerre. The English forces then moved into Burgundy, where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray near Avallon.

Roger married Philippa Montacute, daughter of William Montacute, 1st Earl of Salisbury and had by her three children:

   * Roger Mortimer, who died young;
   * Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March;
   * Margery Mortimer, who married John Touchet, "Lord Audley".

-------------------- Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March (c.1328 – 26 February 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War. He was the son of Sir Edmund de Mortimer (died 1332) and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. His paternal grandparents were Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville (1286–1356), daughter of Piers de Geneville and Jeanne of Lusignan. Inheritance

The Mortimer family lands and titles were lost after the first Earl of March's revolt and death by hanging in 1330, which was followed the next year by the death of Roger's father. Roger thus grew up with uncertain prospects, and re-acquired the family honours only gradually.

Around 1342, he received back Radnor, and the next year the old family baronial seat at Wigmore, Herefordshire.

Heraldic Coat of Arms: Barry Or and azure, on a chief of the first three pallets between two gyronnies based of the second, over all an inescucheon argent. Military career

As a young man he distinguished himself in the wars in France, fighting at Crécy and elsewhere in the campaign of 1347. Afterwards he was given livery of the rest of his lands, was one of the original Knights of the Garter, and was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1348. Earldom

In 1354, the sentence passed against Mortimer's treacherous grandfather, the first earl, was reversed, and the next year he was summoned to parliament as Earl of March. Also in 1355 he received a number of important appointments, including Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports, and accompanied Edward III's expedition to France. [edit] Other honours

Around this time his grandmother, Joan de Geneville, widow of the first earl, died, and Roger inherited her large estate, including Ludlow Castle, which was thereafter the Mortimer family seat and power base.

In the following years he became a member of the Royal Council, and was appointed Constable at the castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth in Shropshire, and Corfe in Dorset.

In 1359, and continuing into 1360, he was Constable of Edward III's invasion of France, fighting in the failed siege of Reims and capturing Auxerre. The English forces then moved into Burgundy, where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray near Avallon.

Roger married Philippa Montacute, daughter of William Montacute, 1st Earl of Salisbury and had by her three children:

   * Roger Mortimer, who died young;
   * Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March;
   * Margery Mortimer, who married John Touchet, "Lord Audley".where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray  near Avallon.

-------------------- 2nd Earl of March Fought at Crecy and elsewhere in France - 1347 An original Knight of the Garter Summonded to Parliament in 1348 1355 Constible of Dover Castle, Warden of the Cinque Ports 1355 - Expedition to France with Edward III Inherited Ludlow Castle Constible of castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth, Corfe 1359-60 Constable of invasion in France Siege of Reims, captured Auxerre Died at Rouvray, near Aallon -------------------- Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March (c.1328 – 26 February 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War.

He was the son of Sir Edmund de Mortimer (died 1332) and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. His paternal grandparents were Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville (1286–1356), daughter of Piers de Geneville and Jeanne of Lusignan.

Inheritance

The Mortimer family lands and titles were lost after the first Earl of March's revolt and death by hanging in 1330, which was followed the next year by the death of Roger's father. Roger thus grew up with uncertain prospects, and re-acquired the family honours only gradually.

Around 1342, he received back Radnor, and the next year the old family baronial seat at Wigmore, Herefordshire.

Heraldic Coat of Arms: Barry Or and azure, on a chief of the first three pallets between two gyronnies based of the second, over all an inescucheon argent.

Military career

As a young man he distinguished himself in the wars in France, fighting at Crécy and elsewhere in the campaign of 1347. Afterwards he was given livery of the rest of his lands, was one of the original Knights of the Garter, and was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1348.

Earldom

In 1354, the sentence passed against Mortimer's treacherous grandfather, the first earl, was reversed, and the next year he was summoned to parliament as Earl of March. Also in 1355 he received a number of important appointments, including Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports, and accompanied Edward III's expedition to France.

Other honours

Around this time his grandmother, Joan de Geneville, widow of the first earl, died, and Roger inherited her large estate, including Ludlow Castle, which was thereafter the Mortimer family seat and power base.

In the following years he became a member of the Royal Council, and was appointed Constable at the castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth in Shropshire, and Corfe in Dorset.

In 1359, and continuing into 1360, he was Constable of Edward III's invasion of France, fighting in the failed siege of Reims and capturing Auxerre. The English forces then moved into Burgundy, where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray near Avallon.

Roger married Philippa Montacute, daughter of William Montacute, 1st Earl of Salisbury and had by her three children:

   * Roger Mortimer, who died young;
   * Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March;
   * Margery Mortimer, who married John Touchet, "Lord Audley".where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray  near Avallon.
view all 12

Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March's Timeline

1328
November 11, 1328
Ludlow, Shropshire, England
1351
February 1351
Age 22
Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
1352
1352
Age 23
Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
1354
1354
Age 25
Donyatt, Somersetshire, England
1355
1355
Age 26
1360
February 26, 1360
Age 31
Rouvray, Cote-d' Orleans, France
1991
November 8, 1991
Age 31
1992
July 21, 1992
Age 31
November 20, 1992
Age 31
????
2nd Earl of March