Rudolf von Habsburg, römisch-deutscher König (1218 - 1291) MP

‹ Back to von Habsburg surname

View Rudolf von Habsburg, römisch-deutscher König's complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Rudolf von Habsburg, römisch-deutscher König
  • Request to view Rudolf von Habsburg, römisch-deutscher König's family tree

Share

Nicknames: "also known as Rudolph of Habsburg"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Limburg Breisgan, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Death: Died in Germersheim, Pfalz, Bayern Lande, Germany
Occupation: Römisch-deutscher König, Gf RUDOLF IV von Habsburg, Gf von Kyburg, Ldgf von Thurgau, German King (1.10.1273-91) =Rudolf I -cr Aachen 24.10.1273, Duke of Austria and Styria (1276-82), King of the Romans
Managed by: David Cash, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Rudolf von Habsburg, römisch-deutscher König

Rudolph I of Germany

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rudolph I, also known as Rudolph of Habsburg (German: Rudolf von Habsburg, Latin Rudolfus) May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was King of the Romans from 1273 until his death. He played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the German feudal dynasties.

Early life

Rudolf was the son of Albert IV, Count of Habsburg, and Hedwig, daughter of Ulrich, Count of Kyburg, and was born in Limburg im Breisgau. At his father's death in 1239, Rudolf inherited the family estates in Alsace and Aargau. In 1245 he married Anne, daughter of Burkhard III, Count of Hohenberg. As a result, Rudolf became an important vassal in Swabia, the ancient Alemannic stem duchy.

Rudolf paid frequent visits to the court of his godfather, the Emperor Frederick II, and his loyalty to Frederick and his son, Conrad IV of Germany, was richly rewarded by grants of land. In 1254 he was excommunicated by Pope Innocent IV as a supporter of King Conrad, due to ongoing political conflicts between the Emperor, who held the Kingdom of Sicily and wanted to reestablish his power in Northern Italy, especially in Lombardy, and the Papacy, whose States lay in between and feared being overpowered by the Emperor.

[edit]Rise to power

The disorder in Germany after the fall of the Hohenstaufen afforded an opportunity for Rudolph to increase his possessions. His wife was an heiress; and on the death of his childless maternal uncle, Hartmann VI, Count of Kyburg, in 1264, he seized Hartmann's valuable estates. Successful feuds with the bishops of Strassburg and Basel further augmented his wealth and reputation, including rights over various tracts of land that he purchased from abbots and others. He also possessed large estates inherited from his father in the regions now known as Switzerland and Alsace.

These various sources of wealth and influence rendered Rudolph the most powerful prince and noble in southwestern Germany (where the tribal duchy Swabia had disintegrated, leaving room for its vassals to become quite independent) when, in the autumn of 1273, the princes met to elect a king after the death of Richard of Cornwall. His election in Frankfurt on 29 September 1273, when he was 55 years old, was largely due to the efforts of his brother-in-law, Frederick III of Hohenzollern, Burgrave of Nuremberg. The support of Albert II, Duke of Saxony (Wittenberg) and of Louis II, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Duke of Upper Bavaria, had been purchased by betrothing them to two of Rudolph's daughters. As a result, Otakar II (1230-78), King of Bohemia, a candidate for the throne and grandson of Philip of Swabia, King of Germany (being the son of the eldest surviving daughter), was almost alone in opposing Frederick. Another candidate was Frederick of Meissen (1257-1323), a young grandson of the excommunicated Emperor Frederick II who did not yet have a principality of his own as his father yet lived.

[edit]King of Germany

Rudolph was crowned in Aachen Cathedral on 24 October 1273. Friedrich Schiller in Der Graf von Habsburg ("The Count of Habsburg") presents a fictionalized rendering of the feast King Rudolf held following his coronation. To win the approbation of the Pope, Rudolph renounced all imperial rights in Rome, the papal territory, and Sicily, and promised to lead a new crusade. Pope Gregory X, in spite of Otakar's protests, not only recognized Rudolph himself, but persuaded Alfonso X, King of Castile (another grandson of Philip of Swabia), who had been chosen German king in 1257 as the successor to William of Holland, to do the same. Thus, Rudolph surpassed the two heirs of the Hohenstaufen dynasty that he had earlier served so loyally.

In November 1274 it was decided by the Diet of the Realm in Nuremberg that all crown estates seized since the death of the Emperor Frederick II must be restored, and that Otakar must answer to the Diet for not recognizing the new king. Otakar refused to appear or to restore the provinces of Austria, Styria, Carinthia and Carniola, which he had claimed through his first wife, a Babenberg heiress, and which he had seized while disputing them with another Babenberg heir, Hermann VI, Margrave of Baden. Rudolf refuted Otakar's succession to the Babenberg patrimony, declaring that the provinces reverted to the crown due to the lack of male-line heirs (a position that conflicted with the provisions of Privilegium Minus). King Otakar was placed under the state ban; and in June 1276 war was declared against him. Having persuaded Otakar's ally Henry I, Duke of Lower Bavaria, to switch sides, Rudolph compelled the Bohemian king to cede the four provinces to the control of the royal administration in November 1276. Rudolf then invested Otakar with Bohemia, betrothed one of his daughters to Otakar's son Wenceslaus, and made a triumphal entry into Vienna. Otakar, however, raised questions about the execution of the treaty, made an alliance with some Polish chiefs, and procured the support of several German princes, including his former ally, Henry of Lower Bavaria. To meet this coalition, Rudolph formed an alliance with Ladislaus IV, King of Hungary, and gave additional privileges to the citizens of Vienna. On 26 August 1278 the rival armies met on the banks of the River March in the Battle of Dürnkrut and Jedenspeigen where Otakar was defeated and killed. Moravia was subdued and its government entrusted to Rudolph's representatives, leaving Kunigunda, the Queen Regent of Bohemia, in control of only the province surrounding Prague, while the young Wenceslaus was again betrothed to one of Rudolf's daughters.

Rudolph's attention next turned to the possessions in Austria and the adjacent provinces, which were taken into the royal domain. He spent several years establishing his authority there but found some difficulty in establishing his family as successors to the rule of those provinces. At length the hostility of the princes was overcome. In December 1282, in Augsburg, Rudolph invested his sons, Albert and Rudolph, with the duchies of Austria and Styria and so laid the foundation of the House of Habsburg. Additionally, he made the twelve-year-old Rudolf Duke of Swabia, which had been without a ruler since Conradin's execution. The 27-year-old Duke Albert (married since 1274 to a daughter of Count Meinhard II of Tirol (1238-95)) was capable enough to hold some sway in the new patrimony.

In 1286 King Rudolf fully invested the Duchy of Carinthia, one of the provinces conquered from Otakar, to Albert's father-in-law Meinhard. The princes of the realm did not allow Rudolf to give everything that was recovered to the royal domain to his own sons, and his allies needed their rewards too.

Turning to the west, in 1281 he compelled Philip, Count Palatine of Burgundy, to cede some territory to him, then forced the citizens of Bern to pay the tribute that they had been refusing, and in 1289 marched against Philip's successor, Otto IV, compelling him to do homage.

In 1281 his first wife died. On 5 February 1284 he married Isabella, daughter of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy, his western neighbor.

Rudolph was not very successful in restoring internal peace to Germany. Orders were indeed issued for the establishment of landpeaces in Bavaria, Franconia and Swabia, and afterwards for the whole of Germany. But the king lacked the power, resources, or determination, to enforce them, although in December 1289 he led an expedition into Thuringia where he destroyed a number of robber-castles.

In 1291 he attempted to secure the election of his son Albert as German king. However, the princes refused claiming inability to support two kings, but in reality, perhaps, leery of the increasing power of the Habsburgs.

[edit]Persecution of the Jews

In 1286, Rudolf I instituted a new persecution of the Jews, declaring them servi camerae ("serfs of the treasury"), which had the effect of negating their political freedoms. Along with many others, Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg, perhaps the greatest rabbi of the time, left Germany with family and followers, but was captured in Lombardy and imprisoned in a fortress in Alsace. Tradition has it that a large ransom of 23,000 marks silver was raised for him (by the ROSH), but Rabbi Meir refused it, for fear of encouraging the imprisonment of other rabbis. He died in prison after seven years. Fourteen years after his death a ransom was paid for his body by Alexander ben Shlomo (Susskind) Wimpfen, who was subsequently laid to rest beside the Maharam. [1]

[edit]Death

Rudolph died in Speyer on July 15, 1291, and was buried in the Speyer Cathedral. Although he had a large family, he was survived by only one son, Albert, afterwards the German king Albert I. Most of his daughters outlived him, apart from Katharina who had died in 1282 during childbirth and Hedwig who had died in 1285/6.

Rudolph's reign is most memorable for his establishment of the House of Habsburg, which henceforth held sway over the southeastern and southwestern parts of the realm. In the rest of Germany, he left the princes largely to their own devices.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante finds Rudolph sitting outside the gates of Purgatory with his contemporaries, who berate him as "he who neglected that which he ought to have done".

[edit]Family and children

He was married twice. First, in 1245, to Gertrude of Hohenberg and second, in 1284, to Isabelle of Burgundy, daughter of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy and Beatrice of Champagne. All children were from the first marriage.

Albert I of Germany (July 1255 – 1 May 1308), Duke of Austria and also of Styria.

Hartmann (1263, Rheinfelden–21 December 1281), drowned in Rheinau.

Rudolph II, Duke of Austria and Styria (1270–10 May 1290, Prague), titular Duke of Swabia, father of John the Patricide of Austria.

Matilda (ca. 1251/53, Rheinfelden–23 December 1304, Munich), married 1273 in Aachen to Louis II, Duke of Bavaria and became mother of Rudolf I, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

Katharina (1256–4 April 1282, Landshut), married 1279 in Vienna to Otto III, Duke of Bavaria who later (after her death) became the disputed King Bela V of Hungary and left no surviving issue.

Agnes (ca. 1257–11 October 1322, Wittenberg), married 1273 to Albert II, Duke of Saxe-Wittenberg and became the mother of Rudolf I, Elector of Saxony.

Hedwig (d. 1285/86), married 1270 in Vienna to Otto VI, Margrave of Brandenburg and left no issue.

Clementia (ca. 1262–after 7 February 1293), married 1281 in Vienna to Charles Martel of Anjou, the Papal claimant to the throne of Hungary and mother of king Charles I of Hungary, as well as of queen Clementia of France, herself the mother of the baby king John I of France.

Guta (Jutte/Bona) (13 March 1271–18 June 1297, Prague), married 24 January 1285 to King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia and became the mother of king Wenceslaus III of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary, of queen Anna I of Bohemia, duchess of Carinthia, and of queen Elisabeth I of Bohemia, countess of Luxembourg.

King Rudolf also had an illegitimate son, Albrecht I of Schenkenberg, Count of Löwenstein.

[edit]References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Karl-Friedrich Krieger, Rudolf von Habsburg, Darmstadt: Primus Verlag, 2003, 294 S.

--------------------

Wikipedia:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_I._%28HRR%29

Rudolf I. (HRR)

aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie

Wechseln zu: Navigation, Suche

Disambig-dark.svg Dieser Artikel erläutert den ersten römisch-deutschen König aus dem Hause Habsburg, nicht zu verwechseln mit dem ersten gleichnamigen Grafen Rudolf I. (Habsburg) († um 1063).

Rudolf von Habsburg, Grabplatte im Dom zu Speyer

Rudolf von Habsburg (* 1. Mai 1218 auf Burg Limburg bei Sasbach am Kaiserstuhl; † 15. Juli 1291 in Speyer) war als Rudolf IV. Graf von Habsburg, Kyburg und Löwenstein sowie Landgraf im Thurgau. Als Rudolf I. war er ab 1273 der erste römisch-deutsche König aus dem Geschlecht der Habsburger, von 1276 bis 1286 zudem Herzog von Kärnten und Krain sowie von 1278 bis 1282 Herzog von Österreich und der Steiermark.

Rudolf war der erste der – allerdings nur von Bernd Schneidmüller so genannten – „Grafenkönige“. Seine Leistungen wurden bereits von seinen Zeitgenossen anerkannt. Er beendete das Interregnum, besiegte den böhmischen König Ottokar II. und setzte den Landfrieden sowie die Hofrechtsprechung in Teilen des Reiches wieder durch. Im Rahmen seiner Möglichkeiten stärkte er das Königtum trotz der herausragenden Stellung der Kurfürsten. Außerdem legte er die Grundlage für die Macht seiner Familie. Er gilt außerdem als eine der populärsten Herrscherfiguren des deutschen Mittelalters.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

[Anzeigen]

   * 1 Leben
         o 1.1 Familie
         o 1.2 Die Zeit als Graf von Habsburg (ca. 1240-1273)
         o 1.3 Die Königswahl von 1273
         o 1.4 Stärkung der königlichen Machtposition und Beginn der Revindikationspolitik (1273-1277)
         o 1.5 Kampf gegen den König von Böhmen (1273–1278)
               + 1.5.1 Feldzüge gegen Ottokar II. Přemysl
         o 1.6 Grundlagen der Macht der Habsburger in Österreich (1276–1283)
         o 1.7 Überwindung des Interregnums: Die Revindikationspolitik Rudolfs
   * 2 Tod und Ausblick
   * 3 Wappen
   * 4 Ehen und Nachkommen
   * 5 Literarisches Nachwirken
   * 6 Quellen
   * 7 Literatur
   * 8 Weblinks
   * 9 Einzelnachweise

Leben [Bearbeiten]

Familie [Bearbeiten]

Rudolf entstammte dem Grafengeschlecht der Habsburger, dessen unzusammenhängender Besitz sich im Gebiet des Elsass und der Nordostschweiz befand. Die Habsburger verfolgten eine Politik der Anlehnung an das Königshaus der Staufer. Rudolf war der Sohn Albrechts IV. von Habsburg und dessen Gemahlin Hedwig von Kyburg († nach 1263). 1232 und 1238/9 kam es zwischen seinem Vater und dessen Bruder Rudolf III. zu einer Teilung des Familienbesitzes. Albrecht erhielt jedoch den größeren Teil des Besitzes in Form der Ländereien im Aargau und Frickgau, die Vogtei über das Kloster Muri, das Umland der Habsburg (Eigenamt) und den Großteil der elsässischen Ländereien. Von den Besitzungen im Zürichgau erhielt Albrecht den nördlichen Teil. Im Jahr 1239 übergab Albrecht seine Herrschaft an seine Söhne Rudolf IV. und den wohl noch minderjährigen Hartmann und begab sich auf einen Kreuzzug nach Palästina.

Die Zeit als Graf von Habsburg (ca. 1240-1273) [Bearbeiten]

Im Jahr 1240 erfuhr die Familie vom Tod Albrechts IV. und Rudolf trat, als vierter Graf von Habsburg, das Erbe an. Zu Beginn der 1240er Jahre trat Rudolf vermutlich in Beziehung zu König Konrad IV., um seine Ländereien als Lehen zu empfangen. 1241 hielt sich Rudolf am Hof Kaiser Friedrichs II. in Faenza auf. Im Jahr 1243 begann Rudolf eine Fehde mit Hugo III. von Tiefenstein/Teufen um Vogteirechte von Besitzungen der Klöster Stein am Rhein und Sankt Blasien, an deren Ende Hugo wohl im Auftrag Rudolfs ermordet wurde. Rudolf konnte bei seinem Vorgehen auf das Wohlwollen der Staufer hoffen. Diese benötigten nach der Absetzung Friedrichs II. durch Papst Innozenz IV. 1245 Rudolf als mächtigen Gefolgsmann im süddeutschen Raum, zumal sich Rudolfs Bruder Albrecht, Domherr in Basel, und Rudolf III. sich dem päpstlichen Lager anschlossen. Rudolf wurde aufgrund seiner Parteinahme für die Staufer mit dem Kirchenbann belegt. 1252 scheint Rudolf Konrad IV. für einige Zeit nach Italien begleitet zu haben. Etwa zwei Jahre später geriet Rudolf mit den Bischöfen von Basel und Straßburg in militärische Auseinandersetzungen um die Städte Breisach und Rheinfelden, wofür er von Konrad mit der Vogtei über Sankt Blasien und Freie im Schwarzwaldgebiet ausgestattet wurde. Zur selben Zeit heiratete er Gertrud von Hohenberg, seit 1273 Anna genannt. Nach dem Tode König Konrads IV. und dem Machtverlust der Staufer wurde Rudolf wahrscheinlich vom Kirchenbann gelöst.[1]

1261 unterstützte Rudolf Walter von Geroldseck, den Bischof von Straßburg, in seinem Zwist mit den Bürgern der Stadt Straßburg. Nach Abschluss eines Waffenstillstandes zwischen den kriegführenden Parteien wechselte er auf die Seite der Stadtbürger. Gemeinsam mit seinem Vetter Gottfried eroberte er die von Walter besetzten Reichsstädte Colmar, Kaisersberg und Mülhausen, deren Besitz für Rudolf im folgenden Jahr im Vorfrieden von St. Arbogast gesichert wurde.[2] Um 1262 errichtete Rudolf bei Schlettstadt die Burg Ortenberg als Residenz.

Im Jahr 1264 weitete sich der seit 1259 schwelende Zwist Rudolfs mit dem Grafen Peter II. von Savoyen um das Erbe Hartmanns des Älteren von Kiburg aus. Hartmann der Ältere entstammte Rudolfs Familie mütterlicherseits und war mit der Schwester Peters, Margarethe, verheiratet. Die Grafen von Savoyen veranlassten Hartmann Teile seiner Güter an seine Frau zu übergeben. Rudolf stützte die Ansprüche des Bruders Hartmanns des Älteren, Hartmanns des Jüngeren auf dessen Erbe. Dieser verstarb 1263 ohne männliche Erben. Nach dem Tod Hartmanns des Älteren 1264 besetzte Rudolf Hartmanns Güter (Thurgau, Zürichgau, Kloster Sankt Gallen) sowie die Güter von dessen Frau. Peter von Savoyen verklagte ihn aus diesem Grund bei der Kirche. Papst Klemens IV. drohte Rudolf daraufhin mit dem Kirchenbann, falls er die Ländereien Margarethes nicht zurückgeben sollte. Im Jahr 1265 fiel Rudolf im Gebiet Peters ein und errang zunächst einige Erfolge, allerdings konnte keine der Parteien eine entscheidenden Sieg erringen. Im September 1267 wurde Rudolf im Besitz des kiburgischen Erbes bestätigt. Er erhielt außerdem die Vormundschaft über die Witwe und Tochter Hartmanns des Jüngeren, dessen Erbe somit faktisch unter seine Herrschaft kam.[3]

Mit der Inbesitznahme des Kiburger Erbes stieg Rudolf zum mächtigsten Fürsten des nordschweizer Raums auf. In den Jahren 1266/67 errang er entscheidende Siege über die Regensberger und Toggenburger Adelsgeschlechter. Im Herbst 1267 zog Rudolf nach Verona zum Heerlager des Staufers Konradin, nahm jedoch nicht am Feldzug zur Eroberung des Königreichs Sizilien teil.

Im folgenden Jahr begannen langwierige Auseinandersetzungen Rudolfs mit dem Bischof Heinrich III. von Basel, in denen es hauptsächlich um die Herrschaft über die Städte Rheinfelden und Breisach ging. Ab 1271 wurde Rudolf von den Grafen von Freiburg, Fürstenberg und Sulz sowie den Herren von Lupfen unterstützt, während sich der Straßburger Bischof und der Graf von Pfirt Heinrich anschlossen. Rudolf konnte in den Jahren 1271 bis 1273 seine Herrschaft über das Kloster Sankt Gallen erweitern. Um eine Entscheidung zu erzwingen, belagerte er 1273 die Stadt Basel, unter deren Bürgerschaft er Anhänger besaß. Am 20. September wurde Rudolf von Burggraf Friedrich III. von Nürnberg von seiner bevorstehenden Wahl zum römisch-deutschen König unterrichtet. Daraufhin beendete Rudolf die Kampfhandlungen und schloss einen Waffenstillstand mit Heinrich III.

Die Königswahl von 1273 [Bearbeiten]

Nach dem Ende des staufischen Königtums 1254 wechselten sich Könige und Gegenkönige im Reich ab. Das durch die unklaren Machtpositionen dieser Herrscher entstandene Machtvakuum, nicht ganz korrekt Interregnum genannt, setzte sich mit der Doppelwahl von 1256/57 fort. Die beiden gewählten Könige Richard von Cornwall und Alfons von Kastilien konnten keine allgemeine Anerkennung im Reich erlangen. Diese als Interregnum bezeichnete Zeitspanne wurde von den Zeitgenossen als von Rechtsbrüchen und dem Fehlen königlicher Zentralgewalt geprägtes Zeitalter wahrgenommen.[4] Richard von Cornwall starb im April 1272. Daraufhin forderte Alfons von Papst Gregor X. die Bestätigung seiner Königswahl (päpstliche Approbation). Gregor X. arbeitete jedoch auf einen allgemeinen Kreuzzug zur Unterstützung der Christen in Palästina unter Führung des römisch-deutschen Kaisers hin. Da Alfons hierfür aus seiner Sicht nicht die nötige Anerkennung im Reich besessen haben dürfte, verweigerte er die Approbation und bereitete so den Weg für eine Neuwahl.[5]

Bald darauf wandten sich Karl von Anjou für seinen Neffen Philipp III., den König von Frankreich, und der Böhmenkönig Ottokar II. Premyšl an den Papst, um ihre Wahl zum König zu erreichen. Beide nahmen kaum Rücksicht auf die Wünsche der Kurfürsten, denen der Papst jedoch die Entscheidung zugunsten eines Kandidaten überließ. Andere mögliche Kandidaten wie der Pfalzgraf und Herzog von Oberbayern Ludwig der Strenge oder der Thüringer Friedrich der Freidige waren aufgrund ihrer politischen bzw. verwandtschaftlichen Nähe zu den Staufern aus Sicht der Kurie unwählbar. Gegen Ende des Jahres 1272 begann Erzbischof Werner von Mainz mit Verhandlungen innerhalb der rheinischen Kurfürstengruppe zum Ausgleich von Interessenkonflikten und zur Einigung auf einen Kandidaten. Am 1. September 1273 war er bereits mit Ludwig dem Strengen zu der Übereinkunft gelangt, entweder Siegfried von Anhalt oder Rudolf von Habsburg zu wählen, vorausgesetzt, dass die Wahl Ludwigs sich als nicht möglich erweisen sollte. Gründe für die Auswahl Rudolfs werden in seiner starken Position im Südwesten des Reiches und seiner Kriegserfahrung gesehen. Er schien geeignet, mögliche Auseinandersetzungen mit Ottokar Premyšl oder eventuell auch Philipp III. zu bestehen und verfügte aufgrund seiner Nähe zu den Staufern auch beim staufischen Anhang im früheren Herzogtum Schwaben Sympathien besaß.[6] Am 11. September bekundeten die drei geistlichen Kurfürsten und der Pfalzgraf, dass sie bei der Wahl gemeinsam stimmen wollten. Etwa zu diesem Zeitpunkt dürften sie auch Kontakte zum Herzog von Sachsen und dem Markgrafen von Brandenburg geknüpft haben, in denen man sich auf die Wahl Rudolfs einigte.[7]

Burggraf Friedrich von Nürnberg wurde zu Rudolf gesandt, um von ihm eine Bestätigung der Wahlbedingungen der Kurfürsten zu erlangen. Rudolf musste sich gegenüber den Kurfürsten verpflichten, dass er das seit der Stauferzeit entfremdete Reichsgut wieder zurückführen und Reichsgüter nur mit Zustimmung der (Kur-)Fürsten veräußern würde. Des Weiteren sollte er das Reich befrieden und die zahlreichen Fehden beenden sowie ungerechte Zölle beseitigen.[8]

Nachdem Rudolf den Bedingungen der Kurfürsten zugestimmt hatte, traten diese zur Wahl in Frankfurt am Main zusammen. Da jedoch von Ottokar Premyšl eine Ablehnung der Wahl angenommen wurde, ließ man Heinrich von Niederbayern als siebten Kurfürsten wählen. Hierdurch war die Gesamtzahl von sieben Kurfürsten erreicht und der 55-jährige Rudolf konnte am 1. Oktober 1273 in Frankfurt gewählt werden. Der böhmische Gesandte lehnte die Wahlentscheidung ab. Ottokar Premyšl beklagte in einem Protestbrief an den Papst die mangelnde Eignung Rudolfs für das Amt des römischen Königs.

Rudolf zog nach der Benachrichtigung durch Friedrich von Nürnberg zunächst nach Dieburg und wurde am 2. Oktober in Frankfurt empfangen. Auf dem Weg nach Aachen bekam er die Reichsinsignien ausgehändigt und wurde am 24. Oktober zusammen mit seiner Gattin im Aachener Münster von Engelbert II., dem Erzbischof von Köln, nach dem traditionellen Zeremoniell gesalbt und gekrönt.

Stärkung der königlichen Machtposition und Beginn der Revindikationspolitik (1273-1277) [Bearbeiten]

Nach seiner Wahl zum König begann Rudolf, seine Machtstellung zu stärken. Hierzu verheiratete er entsprechend vor der Wahl erfolgter Verhandlungen seine Töchter Matilde und Agnes mit Ludwig dem Strengen und Herzog Albrecht von Sachsen.

Um die Approbation des Papstes zu seiner Wahl zu erlangen, sandte Rudolf im Dezember 1273 seinen Kanzler Otto, Propst von Sankt Wido in Speyer, zu Gregor X. in Lyon. Durch eine zweite Gesandtschaft gelang es ihm, dem Papst vorzuspiegeln, er wolle sich dem geplanten Kreuzzug nach Palästina anschließen. Er versprach, die Italienpolitik der Staufer nicht zu erneuern und von früheren Königen der Kurie gewährte Privilegien zu bestätigen. Zudem erkannte er die päpstliche Vermittlung in seinem Konflikt mit Peter von Savoyen an und erklärte sich zu Verhandlungen über ein Heiratsprojekt mit Karl von Anjou bereit. Rudolf erhielt auch auf dem Konzil von Lyon die Unterstützung der anwesenden deutschen Geistlichen. Hierdurch wurden die von Ottokar vorgetragenen Beschwerden in den Augen des Papstes unwesentlich. Am 26. September 1274 erteilte er die Approbation zu Rudolfs Königswahl. Im folgenden Jahr ließ auch Alfons von Kastilien, der bisher mit böhmischer Unterstützung auf seinem Thronrecht bestanden hatte, seine Ansprüche fallen.[9]

Um im Reich einen allgemeinen Frieden zu erhalten, bestätigte Rudolf Einzelheiten des Mainzer Reichslandfriedens von 1235. So erklärte er bereits am 26. Oktober 1273 alle in der Zeit des Interregnums nicht gesetzmäßig erhobenen Zölle für ungültig, was besonders die Gebiet am Rhein betraf. Rudolf erneuerte auch das Amt des Hofrichters. Auf seinen Reisen durch das Reich ließ er die regionalen Machthaber per Eid zur Einhaltung des Friedens verpflichten. Waren diese hierzu nicht bereit, leitete Rudolf militärische Aktionen gegen sie ein. Von den Chronisten werden Rudolfs Maßnahmen weitgehend positiv beurteilt. Erfolge konnte er aber vorerst nur in den südwestlichen Gebieten des Reichs erlangen, wo es ihm gelang, selbst bedeutendere Fürsten wie den Markgrafen von Baden zur Aufgabe von Zöllen zu bewegen.

Gemeinsam mit der Wahrung des Landfriedens verfolgte Rudolf die Wiederherstellung entfremdeten Reichsguts (Revindikationspolitik). Wahrscheinlich erließ er auf dem Speyrer Reichstag im Dezember 1273 einen Rechtsspruch, der die Rückgabe ungesetzlich angeeigneten Reichsguts anordnete. Gesichert ist, dass bis zum Nürnberger Hoftag im November 1274 die Definition des zurückzugebenden Reichsguts erfolgte. Hiernach waren von der Revindikation diejenigen Güter betroffen, die Friedrich II. vor seiner Absetzung innegehabt hatte und solche, die seitdem an das Reich heimgefallen waren. Die Feststellung der unrechtmäßigen Inbesitznahme von Reichsgut wurde den Reichsvögten übertragen. Zur Verwaltung des Reichsguts führte Rudolf das Amt des Landvogts ein. Dieser war auf bestimmten Reichsgütern angesiedelt und hatte für die Einziehung von Steuern, die Einstellung von Verwaltungspersonal und die Sicherung des Friedens zu sorgen. Landvögte wurden vor allem im Südwesten des Reiches eingesetzt, während im Norden die Herzöge von Sachsen und Braunschweig 1277 mit der Verwaltung des Reichsguts beauftragt wurden. [10]

Kampf gegen den König von Böhmen (1273–1278) [Bearbeiten]

Die größte Schwierigkeit für Rudolf während seiner ersten Regierungsjahre lag in dem Konflikt mit Ottokar II. Přemysl. Dieser verweigerte Rudolfs Anerkennung, da er seine Besitzungen im österreichischen Raum in der Zeit des Interregnums unter anzweifelbaren Umständen erworben hatte. Die österreichischen Besitzungen hätten also im Fall einer Anerkennung Rudolfs im Zuge der Revindikationspolitik eingezogen werden können. Es wird vermutet, dass Ottokar bereits nach dem Hoftag in Speyer 1273 zur Rückgabe seiner österreichischen Ländereien an das Reich aufgefordert wurde.[11] Da Ottokar weiterhin die Belehnung mit seinen Besitzungen durch Rudolf ablehnte, wurde ihm auf dem Nürnberger Hoftag im November 1274 das Recht auf seine Lehen aberkannt, was auch Böhmen und Mähren einschloss. Um ihm Gelegenheit zur Rechtfertigung zu geben, wurde Ottokar auf den Reichstag in Würzburg zu Beginn des folgenden Jahres vorgeladen. Er erschien jedoch nicht und sandte erst im Mai 1275 Bischof Wernhard von Seckau auf den Reichstag in Augsburg. Wernhards provokantes Auftreten bewirkte, dass Ottokars Ländereien für an das Reich heimgefallen erklärt wurden und über Ottokar im selben Jahr in die Reichsacht verhängt wurde.[12]

Rudolf versuchte zu dieser Zeit, Ottokars Position durch Verbindungen zu benachbarten Fürsten zu schwächen. Durch die Heirat seines Sohnes Albrecht mit Elisabeth von Görz-Tirol kurz nach dem Nürnberger Hoftag konnte er sich die Grafen Meinhard und Albrecht von Görz-Tirol zu Bündnispartnern machen. 1274 begannen Verhandlungen mit dem Königreich Ungarn, die 1275 zur Ehe zwischen Rudolfs Tochter Clementia und König Ladilslaus’ IV. Bruder Andreas führten. Sie führten auch 1276 zum Abschluss eines Bündnisses gegen Ottokar im Juni 1276 mit der Hofpartei um Joachim Guthkeled. Ebenso belehnte Rudolf im Februar 1275 Philipp von Spanheim mit dem Herzogtum Kärnten, welches Ottokar nach dem Tod von Philipps Bruder in Besitz genommen hatte.

Weitere Unterstützung fand er beim Patriarchen von Aquileja und den Bischöfen von Regensburg und Passau sowie Erzbischof Friedrich von Salzburg. Friedrich machte sich den Umstand zunutze, dass viele Adlige in Ottokars Ländern mit dessen autoritärer Regierung unzufrieden waren und versuchte diese dazu zu bringen, Rudolf zu unterstützen. Daraufhin griff Ottokar Ende 1274 das Erzstift Salzburg an.

Kurzzeitig ging auch Heinrich von Niederbayern 1275 auf Rudolfs Seite über, da Rudolf ihm das Mitkurrecht zusicherte. Nach der Zusicherung von Hilfe durch den Kölner Erzbischof und vermutlich auch die anderen rheinischen Kurfürsten zu Beginn des Jahres 1276, unterwarf er im Mai 1276 den aufrührerischen Markgrafen von Baden, der angeblich Geldzahlungen aus Böhmen erhalten hatte. Ende Mai schlichtete er den Streit zwischen den Brüdern Ludwig dem Strengen und Heinrich von Niederbayern. Im Sommer 1276 verhängte Erzbischof Werner von Mainz den Kirchenbann über Ottokar.[13]

Feldzüge gegen Ottokar II. Přemysl [Bearbeiten]

→ Hauptartikel: Feldzüge Rudolfs I. gegen Ottokar II. Přemysl

Anfang Oktober 1276 zogen die Tiroler Grafen nach Kärnten und Krain. In kurzer Zeit fielen der Kärntner und Krainer Adel von Ottokar ab. Bald darauf trat der Adel der Steiermark in Verhandlungen mit Rudolf. Durch eine Übereinkunft mit Heinrich von Niederbayern konnte Rudolf die Donau als Transportweg nutzen. So gelang ihm der schnelle Vormarsch nach Wien, das von einem engen Vertrauten Ottokars, Paltram vor dem Freithofe, gehalten wurde. Ottokar befand sich zu dier Zeit im Gebiet um das Marchfeld. Seine Autorität war bereits derart geschwächt, dass er den Abfall der österreichischen Ministerialen nicht verhindern konnte. Ungarische Angriffe schwächten Ottokars Stellung weiter. Noch im Oktober wurde ein Waffenstillstand geschlossen. Ein Schiedsgericht entschied am 21. November, dass Ottokar auf seine Rechte auf Österreich, Steiermark, Kärnten, Krain, die Windische Mark, Eger und Pordenone verzichten musste. Ottokar musste Rudolfs Königtum anerkennen und Böhmen und Mähren als Lehen empfangen. Ein Sohn Rudolfs sollte eine Tochter Ottokars heiraten und eine Tochter Rudolfs Ottokars Sohn Wenzel.[14]

Am 25. November empfing Ottokar seine Lehen von Rudolf. Ottokar soll hierzu in prunkvollen Gewändern erschienen sein, während Rudolf in einem grauen Wams auf einem schlichten Holzschemel sitzend die Belehnung vorgenommen haben soll. Dies hätte eine umso größere Demütigung für Ottokar bedeutet.[15] Aus dem Frieden von Wien ergab sich für Rudolf das Problem, dass er die wegen der Mitgift für seine Tochter verpfändeten Besitzungen nördlich der Donau zwangsläufig an die Přemysliden verlieren musste. König Ottokar war in seiner Ehre verletzt worden und hatte außerdem mit dem Aufstand seiner böhmischen Vasallen Boreš von Riesenburg und Zawiš von Falkenstein zu kämpfen.

In der folgenden Zeit kam es daher wiederholt zu Auseinandersetzungen wegen der Nichteinhaltung von Abmachungen. In zwei weiteren Friedensverträgen vom 6. Mai und 12. September 1277, ausgehandelt von Friedrich von Nürnberg, wurden Rudolf auch Besitzungen nördlich der Donau zuerkannt. Im April und Mai des folgenden Jahres kam es in Österreich zu Aufständen von Anhängern Ottokars, die ab Juni von böhmischen Truppen unterstützt wurden.

Während Rudolf noch mit der Aufstellung einer Armee beschäftigt war, fiel Ottokar mit überlegenen Truppen in Österreich ein. Er verlor jedoch entscheidende Zeit bei der Belagerung strategisch unbedeutender Orte. So konnte sich Rudolf mit seinen ungarischen Verbündeten vereinen und Ottokar zur Entscheidungsschlacht auf dem Marchfeld zwingen. Am 26. August trafen hier die etwa gleichstarken Heere aufeinander. Rudolf selbst geriet während der Schlacht in Lebensgefahr, als ihn ein feindlicher Ritter aus dem Sattel warf. Der König entkam nur durch die Hilfe eines nordschweizer Ritters. Die Schlacht wurde schließlich durch eine kleine Gruppe von Berittenen entschieden, die sich auf Anordnung Rudolfs bis zu ihrem Eingreifen verborgen hatten. Ottokar starb nach der Schlacht durch die Hand persönlicher Feinde.

Rudolf trennte sich kurz nach der Schlacht auf dem Marchfeld von den Ungarn. Er zog nach Mähren, wo ihm die wichtigen Städte und Bischof Bruno von Olmütz huldigten. Unter dem Vorsitz des Erzbischofs von Salzburg wurden die Friedensverhandlungen Ende Oktober zum Abschluss gebracht. Während die Přemysliden ihre Ansprüche auf die österreichischen Besitzungen aufgeben mussten, erhielten sie Böhmen und Mähren als Reichslehen. Die Vormundschaft Wenzels wurde auf fünf Jahre Otto dem Langen übergeben. Rudolf durfte Mähren fünf Jahre einbehalten, um seine Kriegskosten decken zu können. Zur Sicherung des Friedens wurden Rudolfs Tochter Guta mit Wenzel und Rudolfs Sohn Rudolf mit Wenzels Schwester Agnes vermählt. Rudolfs Tochter Hedwig heiratete Otto den Kleinen von Brandenburg, den Bruder Ottos des Langen.

Grundlagen der Macht der Habsburger in Österreich (1276–1283) [Bearbeiten]

Nachdem die Reichsgüter Ottokars an das Reich zurückgefallen waren, belehnte Rudolf mit Einverständnis der Kurfürsten 1282 seine Söhne Albrecht und Rudolf mit Österreich, Steiermark, Krain und der Windischen Mark und erhob sie in den Reichsfürstenstand. Schon 1276 hatte er geistliche Fürsten überzeugt, Güter im selben Einzugsbereich an seine Söhne zu vergeben. Mit der „Rheinfelder Hausordnung“ (1. Juni 1283) bestimmte Rudolf, dass diese Güter nur durch Albrecht und seine Erben beherrscht werden sollten; sein Bruder Rudolf sollte zum Ausgleich eine Entschädigung erhalten. Die Grundlage der späteren Herrschaft der Habsburger war damit geschaffen. Der Versuch, Albrecht die Thronnachfolge zu sichern, scheiterte daran, dass es Rudolf nie gelang, zum Kaiser gekrönt zu werden. Damit hätte Rudolf noch zu seinen Lebzeiten Albrecht die römisch-deutsche Königskrone sichern können. Doch gab es während Rudolfs Regierungszeit insgesamt acht Päpste, zwei fest vereinbarte Krönungstermine kamen nie zustande. Erst Heinrich VII. sollte es gelingen, sich zum Kaiser krönen zu lassen.

Überwindung des Interregnums: Die Revindikationspolitik Rudolfs [Bearbeiten]

Rudolf verkündet auf einem Hoftag den Landfrieden, aus der Chronik der Bischöfe von Würzburg des Lorenz Fries, Mitte 16. Jahrhunderts

Rudolf erneuerte nicht einfach den Reichslandfrieden von 1235 – dafür fehlten ihm zu Beginn seiner Herrschaft schlicht die Machtmittel. So war er darauf angewiesen regional begrenzte Friedensabsprachen zu initiieren. Er handelte im Westen und Süden des Reiches mit den Territorialherren einzelne örtlich und zeitlich begrenzte Landfrieden aus (z. B. 1276 in Österreich oder 1281 den bayerischen, fränkischen und rheinischen Landfrieden). Auch in entfernteren Reichsgebieten versuchte er sich durchzusetzen (1289/90 ließ er in Thüringen z. B. 66 Raubritterburgen zerstören). Im März 1287 erschien es Rudolf endlich möglich, einen allgemeinen Landfrieden zu verkünden.

Am 9. August 1281 ließ er auf dem Hoftag zu Nürnberg förmlich feststellen, dass alle nach der Absetzung Friedrichs II. durchgeführten Schenkungen oder Verfügungen über Reichsgüter nichtig seien, es sei denn, die Mehrheit der Kurfürsten billigten die Verfügungen. Er setzte Landvögte ein, die unberechtigt angeeignete Reichsgüter finden sollen und als Vertreter des Königs agieren. Diese Landvogteien waren ein wichtiges Instrument zur Revindikation des Reichsguts. Rudolf ließ das gesamte Reichsgut in solche Verwaltungseinheiten aufteilen und gab den Vögten weitreichende Befugnisse. Damit war auch eine effektive Verwaltung des Reichsguts gesichert – etwas, was in den europäischen Monarchien wie Frankreich oder England längst existierte.

In „königsnahen“ Territorien, also vor allem im Südwesten des Reiches, hat er einigen Erfolg zu verbuchen. In königsfernen Territorien (wie dem Norden) versuchte er mit Hilfe Verbündeter die Städte zu schützen und Reichsgüter wieder in Besitz zu bringen – hier konnte er jedoch keinen nennenswerten Erfolg erringen. Seine Ansprüche auf die burgundische Pfalzgrafschaft konnte er zwar 1289 erfolgreich durchsetzen, seine Nachfolger konnten Burgund jedoch nicht auf Dauer gegen Frankreich halten, welches seit der späten Stauferzeit eine aggressive Expansionspolitik im Westen des Reiches betrieb.

Tod und Ausblick [Bearbeiten]

Historisierende Darstellung Rudolfs aus dem 19. Jahrhundert in der Vorhalle des Doms zu Speyer

Rudolf verstarb am 15. Juli 1291 in Speyer. Vor allem auf Grund der Befürchtungen der Kurfürsten, Albrecht könnte – gestützt auf seine Hausmacht – zu mächtig werden, wurde nicht der einzig überlebende Sohn Albrecht sein Nachfolger, sondern Graf Adolf von Nassau. Bis zu dessen Wahl gab es jedoch erneut ein Interregnum von fast einem Jahr. Unmittelbar aus der Zeit nach dem Tod Rudolfs datieren mehrere später als bedeutend angesehene Landfriedensverträge und Handfesten, die in dieser Zeit der Unsicherheit auch gegen die von ihm eingesetzten Vögte gerichtet waren. Zu diesen Verträgen zählen die Handfeste Wilhelm von Montforts an die Bürger der Fürstabtei St. Gallen am 31. Juli und der Bundesbrief der alten Eidgenossenschaft im August.

Rudolfs Grab befindet sich im Speyerer Dom. Der Sargdeckel (siehe Abbildung am Beginn des Artikels) zeigt ein lebensnahes Abbild des Königs, das laut Info des Domkapitels des Speyerer Doms bereits vor seinem Tode geschaffen wurde. Das Gesicht zeigt die für die Habsburger charakteristische markante Nase und ist vom Alter und von den Sorgen des Herrschers gezeichnet. Im Mittelalter waren solche lebensgetreue Darstellungen unüblich; in der Regel zeigten Herrscherbilder den Typ des jugendlichen Königs in der Blüte seiner Jahre ohne persönliche Erkennungsmerkmale. Nur in der zweiten Hälfte des 13.Jahrhunderts wurden individuellere Darstellungen geschaffen. Sie gilt als eine herausragende künstlerische Leistung dieser Zeit. Der Sargdeckel wurde entfernt, als Anfang des 18. Jahrhunderts die Gräber mit neuen Platten bedeckt wurden und wird heute in der Krypta des Domes ausgestellt.

Wappen [Bearbeiten]

Das Wappen Rudolfs als Römischer König, Graf von Habsburg und Landgraf im Elsass in der Chronik von Johannes Stumpf von 1548

Als römisch-deutscher König führte Rudolf in seinem Wappen den Reichsadler mit seinem persönlichen Wappen auf der Brust. Dieses setzte sich zusammen aus dem Wappen der Grafen von Habsburg, ein roter, blau gekrönter Löwe auf goldenem Grund und dem Wappen der Landgrafschaft Oberelsass, drei goldene Kronen, diagonal gespiegelt an einem goldenen diagonalen Band.

Ehen und Nachkommen [Bearbeiten]

Rudolf von Habsburg heiratete um 1253 im Elsass Gertrud von Hohenberg (* um 1225; † 1281), mit der er vierzehn Kinder hatte, unter anderem:

   * Mathilde (1251–1304)
   ∞ 1273 in Heidelberg mit Ludwig II. von Oberbayern, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein (1229–1294)
   * Albrecht I. (1255–1308)
   ∞ 1276 in Wien mit Elisabeth von Tirol (1262–1313)
   * Katharina (1256?–1282)
   ∞ 1279 in Wien mit Otto III., Herzog von Niederbayern (1261–1312)
   * Agnes (1257–1322)
   ∞ 1273 in Wittenberg mit Albrecht II. von Sachsen-Wittenberg (1298)
   * Hedwig (um 1259–1285/86)
   ∞ 1279 in Lehnin mit Otto IV. von Brandenburg (1264–1308/09)
   * Clementia (Klementia) (um 1262–1293)
   ∞ 11. Januar 1281 mit Karl Martell, Titularkönig von Ungarn († 1295), Sohn Karls II. von Neapel aus dem Adelsgeschlecht der Anjou
   * Hartmann (1263–1281)
   verlobt mit Prinzessin Johanna, Tochter Königs Eduard I. von England
   * Rudolf II. (1270–1290)
   ∞ 1289 in Prag mit Agnes von Böhmen, Tochter Königs Ottokar II. Přemysl
   * Guta (Jutta) (1271–1297)
   ∞ 1285 in Prag mit Wenzel II., König von Böhmen (1271–1305)
   * Karl (*/† 1276)

In zweiter Ehe heiratete Rudolf im Mai 1284 in Besancon Agnes (Isabella) von Burgund (* um 1270; † 1323)

Unehelicher Sohn Rudolfs war Albrecht, Graf von Löwenstein-Schenkenberg

Literarisches Nachwirken [Bearbeiten]

   * Friedrich Schiller dichtete 1803 in der Phase des Zusammenbruchs des Heiligen Römischen Reiches infolge der Eroberungskriege Napoleons [16] die politisch motivierte Ballade Der Graf von Habsburg mit der Anfangszeile Zu Aachen in seiner Kaiserpracht ....[17] In dieser Ballade behauptete Schiller, dass Rudolf I. zum Kaiser gewählt und in Aachen gekrönt wurde. Tatsächlich war es eine Königswahl. Rudolf wurde nie durch den Papst zum Kaiser gekrönt, sondern blieb zeitlebens römisch-deutscher König. Unter anderem vertonten Franz Schubert (D 990)[18], Carl Loewe und Johann Friedrich Reichardt Schillers Ballade.[19]

Quellen [Bearbeiten]

   * Oswald Redlich: Regesta Imperii VI, 1. Rudolf I. 1273-1291. Innsbruck 1898. Onlineversion der Regesta Imperii.

Literatur [Bearbeiten]

   * Johann Franzl: Rudolf I. Der erste Habsburger auf dem deutschen Königsthron, Wien 1986
   * Karl-Friedrich Krieger: Rudolf von Habsburg, Darmstadt 2003.
   * Oswald Redlich: Rudolf von Habsburg. Das deutsche Reich nach dem Untergang des alten Kaisertums, Innsbruck 1903 (und Nachdrucke). Immer noch grundlegend.
   * Brigitte Vacha (Hrsg.): Die Habsburger. Eine Europäische Familiengeschichte, Graz/Wien/Köln 1992, ISBN 3-222-12107-9.
   * Johann Loserth: Rudolf I.. In: Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB). Band 29. Duncker & Humblot, Leipzig 1889, S. 478–493.
   * Wilhelm Baum: RUDOLF I. von Habsburg. In: Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL). Band 24, Nordhausen 2005, ISBN 3-88309-247-9, Sp. 1242–1250.

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

Commons Commons: Rudolf I. – Album mit Bildern und/oder Videos und Audiodateien

   * Literatur von und über Rudolf I. (HRR) im Katalog der Deutschen Nationalbibliothek (Datensatz zu Rudolf I. (HRR) • PICA-Datensatz • Apper-Personensuche)
   * Constantin von Wurzbach: Rudolph, deutscher Kaiser oder richtiger König. Nr. 275. In: Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich.  Bd 7 (1861). Verlag L. C. Zamarski, Wien 1856–1891, S. 127–135 (auf Wikisource).
   * www.genealogie-mittelalter.de: Rudolf I., deutscher König und Graf von Habsburg
   * „Regesta Imperii“ Rudolfs
   * Urkunde Rudolphs von Habsburg für Kloster Engelberg, 25. Januar 1274 als Fotografie in den Beständen des Lichtbildarchivs älterer Originalurkunden an der Philipps-Universität Marburg mit Wiedergabe des Siegels.

Einzelnachweise [Bearbeiten]

  1. ↑ Karl-Friedrich Krieger: Rudolf von Habsburg. S. 63–66 (Rudolfs Beziehungen zu den Staufern)
  2. ↑ Der Frieden beinhaltete ebenso die Anerkennung weiterer Herrschaftsrechte Rudolfs sowie die Zahlung einer Kriegsentschädigung durch den Straßburger Bischof und wurde auch von König Richard von Cornwall anerkannt. Nach seiner Wahl zum König gab Rudolf die Städte Colmar, Kaisersberg und Mülhausen an das Reich zurück. Krieger, S. 70
  3. ↑ Krieger, S. 76–77
  4. ↑ Die neuere Forschung bestätigt für das Interregnum zwar eine zumindest in bestimmten Regionen erhöhte Gewalttätigkeit, sieht die Veränderungen im Vergleich zur Stauferzeit jedoch als nicht so gravierend an. Krieger, S. 44, 56
  5. ↑ Krieger, S. 90
  6. ↑ Zu den Gründen für die Entscheidung zugunsten Rudolfs siehe: Krieger, S. 100
  7. ↑ Zum Vorspiel der Wahl siehe: Krieger, S. 90-98
  8. ↑ Krieger, S. 108-109
  9. ↑ Krieger, S. 115-118
 10. ↑ Zum Beginn der Lanfriedens- und Revindikationspolitik siehe: Krieger, S. 118-127
 11. ↑ Krieger, S. 127
 12. ↑ Krieger, S. 127-129
 13. ↑ Zu den machtpolitischen Auseinandersetzungen vor Rudolfs erstem Feldzug gegen Ottokar siehe: Krieger, S. 130-137
 14. ↑ Zu Rudolfs erstem Feldzug siehe: Krieger, S. 138-142
 15. ↑ Die Authentizität dieser Überlieferung ist umstritten. Krieger, S. 142
 16. ↑ Berliner Zeitung vom 5. August 2006.
 17. ↑ Text bei Literaturwelt.com
 18. ↑ http://www.baerenreiter.com/html/schubert-lieder/schubert_vol4.htm
 19. ↑ http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=14496

Vorgänger Amt Nachfolger

Alfons von Kastilien Römisch-deutscher König

1273–1291 Adolf von Nassau

Ottokar II. Přemysl Herzog von Kärnten und Krain

1276–1286 Meinhard II.

Herzog von Österreich und der Steiermark

1278–1282 Albrecht I. und Rudolf II.

Normdaten: PND: 11860371X – weitere Informationen

--------------------

Rudolph I of Germany

Rudolph I, also known as Rudolph of Habsburg, May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was King of the Romans from 1273 until his death. He played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the German feudal dynasties.

Rudolf was the son of Albert IV, Count of Habsburg, and Hedwig, daughter of Ulrich, Count of Kyburg, and was born in Limburg im Breisgau. At his father's death in 1239, Rudolf inherited the family estates in Alsace and Aargau. In 1245 he married Gertrude, daughter of Burkhard III, Count of Hohenberg. As a result, Rudolf became an important vassal in Swabia, the ancient Alemannic stem duchy.

Rudolf paid frequent visits to the court of his godfather, the Emperor Frederick II, and his loyalty to Frederick and his son, Conrad IV of Germany, was richly rewarded by grants of land. In 1254 he was excommunicated by Pope Innocent IV as a supporter of King Conrad, due to ongoing political conflicts between the Emperor, who held the Kingdom of Sicily and wanted to reestablish his power in Northern Italy, especially in Lombardy, and the Papacy, whose States lay in between and feared being overpowered by the Emperor.

The disorder in Germany after the fall of the Hohenstaufen afforded an opportunity for Rudolph to increase his possessions. His wife was an heiress; and on the death of his childless maternal uncle, Hartmann VI, Count of Kyburg, in 1264, he seized Hartmann's valuable estates. Successful feuds with the bishops of Strassburg and Basel further augmented his wealth and reputation, including rights over various tracts of land that he purchased from abbots and others. He also possessed large estates inherited from his father in the regions now known as Switzerland and Alsace.

These various sources of wealth and influence rendered Rudolph the most powerful prince and noble in southwestern Germany (where the tribal duchy Swabia had disintegrated, leaving room for its vassals to become quite independent) when, in the autumn of 1273, the princes met to elect a king after the death of Richard of Cornwall. His election in Frankfurt on 29 September 1273, when he was 55 years old, was largely due to the efforts of his brother-in-law, Frederick III of Hohenzollern, Burgrave of Nuremberg. The support of Albert II, Duke of Saxony (Wittenberg) and of Louis II, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Duke of Upper Bavaria, had been purchased by betrothing them to two of Rudolph's daughters. As a result, Otakar II (1230-78), King of Bohemia, a candidate for the throne and grandson of Philip of Swabia, King of Germany (being the son of the eldest surviving daughter), was almost alone in opposing Frederick. Another candidate was Frederick of Meissen (1257-1323), a young grandson of the excommunicated Emperor Frederick II who did not yet have a principality of his own as his father yet lived.

Rudolph was crowned in Aachen Cathedral on 24 October 1273. Friedrich Schiller in Der Graf von Habsburg ("The Count of Habsburg") presents a fictionalized rendering of the feast King Rudolf held following his coronation. To win the approbation of the Pope, Rudolph renounced all imperial rights in Rome, the papal territory, and Sicily, and promised to lead a new crusade. Pope Gregory X, in spite of Otakar's protests, not only recognized Rudolph himself, but persuaded Alfonso X, King of Castile (another grandson of Philip of Swabia), who had been chosen German king in 1257 as the successor to William of Holland, to do the same. Thus, Rudolph surpassed the two heirs of the Hohenstaufen dynasty that he had earlier served so loyally.

In November 1274 it was decided by the Diet of the Realm in Nuremberg that all crown estates seized since the death of the Emperor Frederick II must be restored, and that Otakar must answer to the Diet for not recognizing the new king. Otakar refused to appear or to restore the provinces of Austria, Styria, Carinthia and Carniola, which he had claimed through his first wife, a Babenberg heiress, and which he had seized while disputing them with another Babenberg heir, Hermann VI, Margrave of Baden. Rudolf refuted Otakar's succession to the Babenberg patrimony, declaring that the provinces reverted to the crown due to the lack of male-line heirs (a position that conflicted with the provisions of Privilegium Minus). King Otakar was placed under the state ban; and in June 1276 war was declared against him. Having persuaded Otakar's ally Henry I, Duke of Lower Bavaria, to switch sides, Rudolph compelled the Bohemian king to cede the four provinces to the control of the royal administration in November 1276. Rudolf then invested Otakar with Bohemia, betrothed one of his daughters to Otakar's son Wenceslaus, and made a triumphal entry into Vienna. Otakar, however, raised questions about the execution of the treaty, made an alliance with some Polish chiefs, and procured the support of several German princes, including his former ally, Henry of Lower Bavaria. To meet this coalition, Rudolph formed an alliance with Ladislaus IV, King of Hungary, and gave additional privileges to the citizens of Vienna. On 26 August 1278 the rival armies met on the banks of the River March in the Battle of Dürnkrut and Jedenspeigen where Otakar was defeated and killed. Moravia was subdued and its government entrusted to Rudolph's representatives, leaving Kunigunda, the Queen Regent of Bohemia, in control of only the province surrounding Prague, while the young Wenceslaus was again betrothed to one of Rudolf's daughters.

Rudolph's attention next turned to the possessions in Austria and the adjacent provinces, which were taken into the royal domain. He spent several years establishing his authority there but found some difficulty in establishing his family as successors to the rule of those provinces. At length the hostility of the princes was overcome. In December 1282, in Augsburg, Rudolph invested his sons, Albert and Rudolph, with the duchies of Austria and Styria and so laid the foundation of the House of Habsburg. Additionally, he made the twelve-year-old Rudolf Duke of Swabia, which had been without a ruler since Conradin's execution. The 27-year-old Duke Albert (married since 1274 to a daughter of Count Meinhard II of Tirol (1238-95)) was capable enough to hold some sway in the new patrimony.

In 1286 King Rudolf fully invested the Duchy of Carinthia, one of the provinces conquered from Otakar, to Albert's father-in-law Meinhard. The princes of the realm did not allow Rudolf to give everything that was recovered to the royal domain to his own sons, and his allies needed their rewards too.

Turning to the west, in 1281 he compelled Philip, Count Palatine of Burgundy, to cede some territory to him, then forced the citizens of Bern to pay the tribute that they had been refusing, and in 1289 marched against Philip's successor, Otto IV, compelling him to do homage.

In 1281 his first wife died. On 5 February 1284 he married Isabella, daughter of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy, his western neighbor.

Rudolph was not very successful in restoring internal peace to Germany. Orders were indeed issued for the establishment of landpeaces in Bavaria, Franconia and Swabia, and afterwards for the whole of Germany. But the king lacked the power, resources, or determination, to enforce them, although in December 1289 he led an expedition into Thuringia where he destroyed a number of robber-castles.

In 1291 he attempted to secure the election of his son Albert as German king. However, the princes refused claiming inability to support two kings, but in reality, perhaps, leery of the increasing power of the Habsburgs.

In 1286, Rudolf I instituted a new persecution of the Jews, declaring them servi camerae ("serfs of the treasury"), which had the effect of negating their political freedoms. Along with many others, Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg, perhaps the greatest rabbi of the time, left Germany with family and followers, but was captured in Lombardy and imprisoned in a fortress in Alsace. Tradition has it that a large ransom of 23,000 marks silver was raised for him (by the ROSH), but Rabbi Meir refused it, for fear of encouraging the imprisonment of other rabbis. He died in prison after seven years. Fourteen years after his death a ransom was paid for his body by Alexander ben Shlomo (Susskind) Wimpfen, who was subsequently laid to rest beside the Maharam.

Rudolph died in Speyer on July 15, 1291, and was buried in the Speyer Cathedral. Although he had a large family, he was survived by only one son, Albert, afterwards the German king Albert I.

Rudolph's reign is most memorable for his establishment of the House of Habsburg, which henceforth held sway over the southeastern and southwestern parts of the realm. In the rest of Germany, he left the princes largely to their own devices.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante finds Rudolph sitting outside the gates of Purgatory with his contemporaries, who berate him as "he who neglected that which he ought to have done".

He was married twice. First, in 1245, to Gertrude of Hohenberg and second, in 1284, to Isabelle of Burgundy, daughter of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy and Beatrice of Champagne. All children were from the first marriage.

-------------------- Rudolph I, also known as Rudolph of Habsburg (German: Rudolf von Habsburg, Latin Rudolfus; 1 May 1218 - 15 July 1291) was King of the Romans from 1273 until his death. He played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the German feudal dynasties; he was the first Habsburg to acquire the duchies of Austria and Styria, territories that would remain under Habsburg rule for more than 600 years and would form the core of the present-day country of Austria.

view all 18

Rudolf I von Habsburg, Roman-German King's Timeline

1218
May 1, 1218
Limburg Breisgan, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
1218
Hapsburg - "Habichts-burg = hawk's castle"
1218
Hapsburg - "Habichts-burg = hawk's castle"
1245
1245
Age 26
Habsburg,Aargau Canton,Switzerland
1251
1251
Age 32
Habsburg,Argau,,Switzerland
1255
July, 1255
Age 37
Habsburg, Aargau, Switzerland
1256
April 4, 1256
Age 37
Of, Habsburg, Argau, Switzerland
1259
1259
Age 40
1260
1260
Age 41
Habsburg, Aargau, Switzerland
1262
1262
Age 43
Österreich