Simon I de Montfort, I (c.1025 - 1087) MP

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Nicknames: "/Simon/I", "de Montfort-l'Amauri", "Baron De Montfort", "l'Aîné", "Simon I /Montfort/", "Simon I Of /Montfort/"
Place of Burial: Épernon, Centre, France
Birthplace: Eure, Montfort, Haute-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Épernon, Normandie, France
Occupation: Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury, Sire de Montfort, Comte de Montfort
Managed by: Terry Jackson (Switzer)
Last Updated:

About Simon I de Montfort, I

Simon I de Montfort, Seigneur de Montofort-l'Amaury

born 1014-1025, died 25 Sept 1087

married (1) Isabelle "Bardoul" de Broyes or de Nogent

(2) unknown

(3) Agnes d'Evreux

Children:

ssee FMG list below

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PARIS%20REGION%20NOBILITY.htm#SimonIIMontfortAmaurydied1087

The Seigneurs de Montfort-l'Amaury were vassals of the Comtes de Beaumont[sur-Oise], as shown by the charter dated to before 1091 under which "Mainerium, fratrem Symonis de Monte Forti" donated property, with the consent of "…comiteque Belli Montis Ivonis"

SIMON de Montfort, son of AMAURY Seigneur de Montfort & his wife Bertrade --- (-25 Sep [1087], bur Epernon[135]). "Amalricus miles" founded the priory of Saint-Thomas d´Epernon, with the consent of "conjugis mee…Bertredis…et filiorum meorum…Simonis…atque Mainerii", by charter dated [11 Apr 1052/Jul 1053][136]. He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Montfort and completed the construction of the castle known as Montfort-l'Amaury which was started by his father[137]. "Mainerium, fratrem Symonis de Monte Forti" donated property, with the consent of "Simone fratre eius comiteque Belli Montis Ivonis", by charter dated to before 1091, which also names "domnus Simon, filio suo Amalrico"[138].

m firstly ISABELLE de Broyes dame de Nogent-le-Roi, daughter of HUGUES I "Bardoul" de Broyes & his wife Alvidis ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. The Historia of Monk Aimon records that "dominam de Novigento" married the lord of "Montifortem et Sparnomum", although the passage is confused as it appears to refer to the paternal grandparents of Simon, husband of Isabelle[139].

m secondly ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.

m thirdly AGNES d'Evreux, daughter of RICHARD Comte d'Evreux [Normandie] & his wife Godechildis ---. Orderic Vitalis says she was uterine sister of Ralph de Tosny who "carried her away by night" and gave her in marriage to Simon de Montfort, receiving in return Simon's daughter Isabel as his wife[140]. In other passages he names her and specifies that she was the daughter of Richard and sister of Guillaume[141].

Simon & his first wife had three children:

1. AMAURY de Montfort (1056-killed in battle [1089]). "Mainerium, fratrem Symonis de Monte Forti" donated property, with the consent of "Simone fratre eius comiteque Belli Montis Ivonis", by charter dated to before 1091, which also names "domnus Simon, filio suo Amalrico"[142]. He succeeded his father in [1087] as Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury. Orderic Vitalis records that he was mortally wounded in a combat with two knights when invading the lands of Guillaume de Breteuil[143].

2. ISABELLE de Montfort . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Dame de Nogent-le-Roi. Orderic Vitalis calls her "Isabel de Conches", says she was "generous, daring and gay" but "in war she rode armed as a knight among the knights", and recounts that Helvise Ctss d'Evreux was offended by her "slighting remarks" which led to a bitter war between their husbands[144]. After her husband died, she repented "the mortal sin of luxury in which she had indulged in her youth" and became a nun at Haute-Bruyère[145]. m RAOUL [III] de Tosny Sire de Conches, son of ROGER [I] de Conches & his [first wife ---] (-24 Mar [1102], bur Conches Saint-Pierre).

3. GUILLAUME de Montfort (-27 Aug 1101). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. He was elected Bishop of Paris in 1095, consecrated in 1096[146].

Simon & his third wife had four children:

4. RICHARD de Montfort (-killed in battle [Nov 1092], bur Epernon[147]). Orderic Vitalis records that he succeeded his half-brother in [1089] as Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury and "was relentless in his attempts to take vengeance on Guillaume de Breteuil for Amaury's fate"[148]. He was mortally wounded in an attack on Conches, during the war between Raoul [III] de Tosny and Guillaume Comte d'Evreux triggered by the enmity between their wives[149].

5. SIMON [II] de Montfort (-24 or 25 Sep after 1104). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. He succeeded his brother in [1092] as Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "VII Kal Oct" of "Symon de Monteforti"[150]. The necrology of Saint-Père-en-Vallée records the death "VIII Kal Oct" of "Simon miles de Monteforti"[151].

6. BERTRADE de Montfort (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Remy-l’Honoré, Yvelines). Her parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[152]. The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe whom he abducted from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[153]. William of Tyre records this marriage[154]. Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[155]. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[156]. Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[157]. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][158]. m firstly (1089, divorced [15 May 1092]) as his fifth wife, FOULQUES IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou, son of GEOFFROY II Comte de Gâtinais, Seigneur de Château-Landon & his wife Ermengarde d'Anjou (1043-14 Apr 1109). m secondly (Paris 1092, before 27 Oct) bigamously as his second wife, PHILIPPE I King of France, son of HENRI I King of France & his third wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire). King Philippe I was excommunicated by Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun 16 Oct 1094 for this bigamous second marriage. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104.

7. AMAURY de Montfort (-[18/19] Apr after 1136). His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[159]. He succeeded his brother after [1104] as Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury. He succeeded as Comte d'Evreux.

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Wikipedia:

Simon I de Montfort born about 1025 in Montfort l'Amaury, Ile de France, France and died 1087. He is buried in Epernon, Normandy, France. He was the son of Amaury de Montfort (c 1000-1031) and Bertrade de Gometz.

Progeny

Simon I first married Isabel de Broyles (b. 1034, Broyes, Marne, France), daughter of Hugh Bardoul. Their children were:

   * Amauri de Montfort (c. 1056-1089)
   * Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort (b. 1057), who married Raoul II de Tosny.[1]

Simon I's second marriage was to Agnes d'Evreux (b. 1030), daughter of Richard d'Evreux of Rouen, Normandy. Their children were:

   * Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1059-1117), became Queen of France.
   * Richard de Montfort (c. 1066-1092), slain in attack on abbey at Conches.
   * Simon II de Montfort (c. 1068-1101)
   * Amaury III of Montfort(c. 1070-1137), married Richude (Richilde) de Hainault and Agnes de Garland.
   * Guillaume de Montfort (c. 1073-1101)
   * Adeliza de Montfort (b. 1075)[2]

Montfort-l'Amaury is a commune in the Yvelines department in the Île-de-France region in north-central France. It is located in the south-western suburbs of Paris 20 km (12 mi) N of Rambouillet.

The name originates from Amaury I de Montfort, the first dynasty of the Comtes de Montfort.

The commune has slopes in the north which includes the Rambouillet Forest which covers 220 km2 (85 sq mi). The city is located on a rocky area of 183 m above sea level.

History

King Robert II built a castle in 996 in the hills of Montfort. The castle was destroyed by the English during the Hundred Years' War. Montfort-l'Amaury was the stronghold of the Montfort family from the start of the 9th century. Amaury I built the ramparts.

The Comté de Montfort was related to the Duchy of Brittany following the marriage of Yolande de Dreux-Montfort with Arthur of Brittany in 1294. The crown returned to France when Brittany became a part of France under Francis I.

References

  1. ^ Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis; Lines 50-25, 98A-24, 118-23, 125-28
  2. ^ http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PARIS%20REGION%20NOBILITY.htm#SimonIIMontfortAmaurydied1087B

_________________

Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was born in 1025 at Montfor-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France. He was the son of Amauri I, 1st seigneur de Montfort and Bertrade (?).2,3 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was a witness where Bertrade (?) consented, with her children, to her husband's gifts to Marmoutier of Senicourt, near Chartres, and the churches of Olmets, Helmoret, Rambouillet, and Prouvais in 1053.4 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort married Agnes d' Évereux, daughter of Richard, 2nd comte d' Évereux and Adelaide de Barcelona; His 3rd.5 2nd Seigneur of Montfort at France between 1053 and 1087.2 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort married Isabeau de Broyes, dame de Nogent, daughter of Hugh Bardoul, seigneur de Brozes, circa 1055; His 1st.2,6 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort attested a charter of Henry I to St. Germain-des-Près as "Sig. Simonis de Monteforti" in 1058.2 He took a leading part in persuading Duke William to recall Ralph de Tosny and Hugh de Grandmesnil from exile in 1063.2 He was a witness where Hugh I, seigneur de Grandmesnil recalled from exile by the efforts of Simon, 2nd Seigneur de Montfort, in 1063. Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was a witness where Ralph de Tosny of Flamstead recalled from exile by the efforts of Simon, 2nd Seigneur de Montfort, in 1063. Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was attested an Act for the Abbey of Coulombs while with Duke William and his court on 13 April 1066 at Fécamp, Normandy, France.2 He confirmed with his wife, unnamed, a gift by Richard Fitz-Herluin of certain lands in "villa sancti Hilari" to the same abbey (of Coulombs), the said lands being part of the inheritance of Simon's wife, in 1066 at Muelan, Normandy, France.2 He witnessed a charter of Philip I to St. Martin-des-Champs as "Simon de Monteforti" in 1067 at Paris, France.2 He attested, with his son Amauri, another charter of Philip confirming the gift to St. Magloire by "quidam miles de castro qui Montefortis vocatur Symon nomine" of the churches of St. Peter and St. Laurence situate "in eodem castro" as "S. Simonis de castro Montefortis ... S. Almarici Simonis filii" in 1072.2 He was a witness where Amauri II "the Strong", 3rd seigneur de Montfort joined his father in attesting a charter of Philip I in 1072.7 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort died in 1087 at or shortly before at age 62 years.5 He was the predecessor of Amauri II "the Strong", 3rd seigneur de Montfort; 3rd Seigneur of Montfort.7 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was buried in Epernon, Eure-et-Loire, Centre, France.

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p352.htm

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BIOGRAPHY: REF RFC. Seigneur de Montfort l'Amauri, France. Count of Montfort, Seigneur de Montfort l'Amauri. REF AR7. Seigneur of Montfort L'Amaury in France.

BIOGRAPHY: The Montfort Family

BIOGRAPHY: family associated with an ancient lordship in the Île-de-France (Montfort-l'Amaury); this lordship first became famous in French and English history because of its association with members of the family, which held it in the 13th century; it was transmitted to a junior branch of the Capetian house of Dreux, which furnished dukes of Brittany in the 14th-15th century.

Montfort-l'Amaury took its name from Amaury, or Amalric (d. c. 1053), the builder of the castle there, whose father had been invested with the lordship by Hugh Capet. Amaury's grandson Simon (d. 1181 or later) married Amicia, ultimately the heiress of the English earldom of Leicester, and it was through their son, the crusader Simon de Montfort , that the family first attained real prominence. By his wife Alice de Montmorency he left four sons: Amaury de Montfort (see below), who succeeded to Montfort-l'Amaury and to his father's titles in Languedoc; Simon de Montfort, who became earl of Leicester and played a major role in English affairs; Guy de Bigorre (d. 1220); and Robert (d. 1226).

Amaury de Montfort (d. 1241), defeated in war, lost all his rights in Languedoc to King Louis VIII (1229) and was compensated with the office of constable of France (1231). Captured by the Muslims in the Holy Land (1239), he was released in 1241 but died at Otranto in Apulia on his way home.

Guy (d. 1228), who was with his brother at Zara and in Syria, also took a large part in the Albigensian crusade, receiving the fiefs of Rabastens and St. Antonin. He ceded his rights in Languedoc to the French crown in 1226.

John de Montfort (d. 1249), Amaury's son and successor, left only a daughter, Beatrice (d. 1312), who was married in 1259 to Count Robert IV of Dreux. Their daughter Yolande (d. 1322) was married first, in 1285, to Alexander III of Scotland and second, in 1294, to Arthur II of Brittany, to whom she brought the Montfort lands. Their son John de Montfort (d. 1345), whose elder brothers accorded him only the Montfort title, contested the duchy of Brittany with Charles of Blois; and his son was recognized duke of Brittany, as John IV, by the Treaty of Guérande (1365). Thenceforward he and his descendants John V (d. 1442), Francis I (d. 1450), Peter II (d. 1457), Arthur III (d. 1458; see Richemont, Arthur, constable de), and Francis II (d. 1488) constituted the House of Montfort as dukes of Brittany. But Francis II left only an heiress, Anne of Brittany (d. 1514). Her marriages to Charles VIII and Louis XII of France were followed by the marriage of Claude (her daughter by Louis) to King Francis I; this union secured the Montfort possessions to the French crown.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

BIOGRAPHY: Simon de Montfort and the Barons' War

The main crisis of the reign came in 1258 and was brought on by a cluster of causes. The Savoyard and Lusignan court factions were divided; there were reverses in Wales; the costs of the Sicilian affair were mounting; and there was perceived to be a crisis in local government. In May 1258 the king was compelled to agree to a meeting of Parliament and to the appointment of a joint committee of dissident barons and his own supporters, 12 from each side, which was to recommend measures for the reform of the kingdom. In the Provisions of Oxford, drawn up in June, a scheme was set out for the creation of a council of 15 to supervise royal government. Parliament was to be held three times a year, at which the 15 would meet with 12 barons representing "the community" (le commun in the original French). The office of justiciar was to be revived, and he, with the chancellor and treasurer, was to account annually before the council. The new justiciar was to hear complaints throughout the country against royal officials. Sheriffs were to be local men, appointed for one year. The households of the king and queen were to be reformed. The drafting of further measures took time. In October 1259 a group calling itself the Community of Bachelors, which seems to have claimed to represent the lesser vassals and knights, petitioned for the fulfillment of the promises of the magnates and king to remedy its grievances. As a result the Provisions of Westminster were duly published, comprising detailed legal measures that in many cases were in the interests of the knightly class.

The Provisions of Oxford led to two years in which the king was under tutelage; he was less even than the first among equals because he was not free to choose his own councillors. The Oxford settlement, however, began to break down in 1260. There were divisions among the king's opponents, notably between the Earl of Gloucester and the ambitious Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, Henry's brother-in-law. The king's eldest son, Edward, at first backed the unpopular Lusignans, whose exile had been demanded, but then came to an agreement with Simon de Montfort before being reconciled to his father. In 1261, when a papal bull released Henry from his oath to support the Provisions of Oxford, he dismissed the baronial sheriffs, castellans, and other officials imposed on him. Simon de Montfort, by now the undisputed leader of the opposition, raised rebellion, but an agreement was reached to submit the dispute to the arbitration of Louis IX of France. The verdict of the Mise of Amiens in 1264, however, was so favourable to Henry III that Simon de Montfort could not accept it.

Civil war was inevitable. In May 1264 Simon won a resounding victory at Lewes, and a new form of government was set up. Representatives of the boroughs were summoned to Parliament for the first time early in 1265, along with knights of the shire. Simon's motive for summoning Parliament was undoubtedly political: he needed support from many elements of society. In May 1265 the young Edward, held hostage since 1264 to ensure fulfillment of the terms of the peace of Lewes, escaped and rallied the royalist forces, notably the Welsh marcher lords who played a decisive part throughout these conflicts. In August, Simon was defeated and slain at Evesham.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

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Simon I, seigneur de Montfort1

b. 1025, d. 1087

Father Amauri I, 1st seigneur de Montfort2,3 b. 993, d. circa 1053

Mother Bertrade (?)2,3 b. 995

    Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was born in 1025 at Montfor-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France. He was the son of Amauri I, 1st seigneur de Montfort and Bertrade (?).2,3 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was a witness where Bertrade (?) consented, with her children, to her husband's gifts to Marmoutier of Senicourt, near Chartres, and the churches of Olmets, Helmoret, Rambouillet, and Prouvais in 1053.4 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort married Agnes d' Évereux, daughter of Richard, 2nd comte d' Évereux and Adelaide de Barcelona; His 3rd.5 2nd Seigneur of Montfort at France between 1053 and 1087.2 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort married Isabeau de Broyes, dame de Nogent, daughter of Hugh Bardoul, seigneur de Brozes, circa 1055; His 1st.2,6 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort attested a charter of Henry I to St. Germain-des-Près as "Sig. Simonis de Monteforti" in 1058.2 He took a leading part in persuading Duke William to recall Ralph de Tosny and Hugh de Grandmesnil from exile in 1063.2 He was a witness where Hugh I, seigneur de Grandmesnil recalled from exile by the efforts of Simon, 2nd Seigneur de Montfort, in 1063. Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was a witness where Ralph de Tosny of Flamstead recalled from exile by the efforts of Simon, 2nd Seigneur de Montfort, in 1063. Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was attested an Act for the Abbey of Coulombs while with Duke William and his court on 13 April 1066 at Fécamp, Normandy, France.2 He confirmed with his wife, unnamed, a gift by Richard Fitz-Herluin of certain lands in "villa sancti Hilari" to the same abbey (of Coulombs), the said lands being part of the inheritance of Simon's wife, in 1066 at Muelan, Normandy, France.2 He witnessed a charter of Philip I to St. Martin-des-Champs as "Simon de Monteforti" in 1067 at Paris, France.2 He attested, with his son Amauri, another charter of Philip confirming the gift to St. Magloire by "quidam miles de castro qui Montefortis vocatur Symon nomine" of the churches of St. Peter and St. Laurence situate "in eodem castro" as "S. Simonis de castro Montefortis ... S. Almarici Simonis filii" in 1072.2 He was a witness where Amauri II "the Strong", 3rd seigneur de Montfort joined his father in attesting a charter of Philip I in 1072.7 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort died in 1087 at or shortly before at age 62 years.5 He was the predecessor of Amauri II "the Strong", 3rd seigneur de Montfort; 3rd Seigneur of Montfort.7 Simon I, seigneur de Montfort was buried in Epernon, Eure-et-Loire, Centre, France.5

Family 1

Isabeau de Broyes, dame de Nogent b. circa 1033?

Children

Isabel de Montfort-l'Amaury, dame de Nogent+ b. c 1055?8,9,1

Amauri II "the Strong", 3rd seigneur de Montfort b. 1056?, d. c 10892

Eve de Montfort+ b. 1057?6

Family 2

Agnes d' Évereux b. circa 1042?

Children

Bertrade de Montfort, comtessa d' Anjou+ b. 1060, d. 14 Feb 11175,10

Richard, 4th seigneur de Montfort b. 1062?, d. 10925

Simon II "le Jeune", 5th seigneur de Montfort b. 1064?5

Amauri III, 6th seigneur de Montfort+ b. c 1080, d. 18 or 19 April2

Citations

[S1278] K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants, pg. 596.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VII:App.D:710.

[S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé), Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., VI:72.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VII:App.D:708.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VII:App.D:711.

[S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé), Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., VI:632.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VII:App.D:712.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VII:App.D:710-711.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, XII/1:Tony:759.

[S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé), Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., I:16.

Simon I de Montfort

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Simon I de Montfort born about 1025 in Montfort l'Amaury, Ile de France, France and died 1087. He is buried in Epernon, Normandy, France. He was the son of Amaury de Montfort (c 1000-1031) and Bertrade de Gometz.

[edit]Progeny

Simon I first married Isabel de Broyles (b. 1034, Broyes, Marne, France), daughter of Hugh Bardoul. Their children were:

Amauri de Montfort (c. 1056-1089)

Isabel (Elizabeth) de Montfort (b. 1057), who married Raoul II de Tosny.[1]

Simon I's second marriage was to Agnes d'Evreux (b. 1030), daughter of Richard d'Evreux of Rouen, Normandy. Their children were:

Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1059-1117), became Queen of France.

Richard de Montfort (c. 1066-1092), slain in attack on abbey at Conches.

Simon II de Montfort (c. 1068-1101)

Amaury III of Montfort(c. 1070-1137), married Richude (Richilde) de Hainault and Agnes de Garland.

Guillaume de Montfort (c. 1073-1101)

Adeliza de Montfort (b. 1075)[2]

[edit]References

^ Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis; Lines 50-25, 98A-24, 118-23, 125-28

^ http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PARIS%20REGION%20NOBILITY.htm#SimonIIMontfortAmaurydied1087B

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_I_de_Montfort

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Simon I, seigneur de Montfort, married Isabeau de Broyes, dame de Nogent, daughter of Hugh Bardoul, seigneur de Brozes, circa 1055. Later he married our ancestor Agnes d' Évereux, daughter of Richard, 2nd comte d' Évereux and Adelaide de Barcelona.

Simon attested a charter of King Henry I to St. Germain-des-Près as "Sig. Simonis de Monteforti" in 1058.

Simon took a leading part in persuading Duke William to recall Ralph de Tosny of Flamstead and Hugh de Grandmesnil from exile in 1063.

Simon was attested an Act for the Abbey of Coulombs while with Duke William and his court on 13 April 1066 at Fécamp, Normandy. He confirmed with his wife, unnamed, a gift by Richard Fitz-Herluin of certain lands in "villa sancti Hilari" to the same abbey (of Coulombs), the said lands being part of the inheritance of Simon's wife at Muelan, Normandy.

Simon witnessed a charter of Philip I to St. Martin-des-Champs as "Simon de Monteforti" in 1067 in Paris. In 1072 he confirmed the gift of Philip to St. Magloire by "quidam miles de castro qui Montefortis vocatur Symon nomine" of the churches of St. Peter and St. Laurence situate "in eodem castro" as "S. Simonis de castro Montefortis ... S. Almarici Simonis filii."

Simon died in 1087 at or shortly before at age 62 years.

Simon was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through his daughter Isabel and through his son Amauri III, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p352.htm#i5258 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

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"Counts of Évreux

The first known members of the family of the counts of Évreux descended from an illegitimate son of Richard I, duke of Normandy; the comtes d'Évreux became extinct in the male line with the death of Count William in 1118.

The countship passed in right of Agnes, William's sister, wife of Simon de Montfort-l'Amaury (d. 1087) to the house of the lords of Montfort-l'Amaury. Amaury III of Montfort ceded it in 1200 to King Philip Augustus. Philip the Fair presented it (1307) to his brother Louis d'Évreux, for whose benefit Philip the Long raised the countship of Évreux into a peerage of France (1317).

Philip d'Évreux, son of Louis, became king of Navarre by his marriage with Jeanne, daughter of Louis the Headstrong, and their son Charles the Bad and their grandson Charles the Noble were also kings of Navarre. The latter ceded his countships of Évreux, Champagne and Brie to King Charles VI of France in 1404.

In 1427 the countship of Évreux was bestowed by King Charles VII on Sir John Stuart of Darnley (c. 1365-1429), the commander of his Scottish bodyguard, who in 1423 had received the seigniory of Aubigny and in February 1427/8 was granted the right to quarter the royal arms of France for his victories over the English.

On Stuart's death (before Orléans during an attack on an English convoy) the countship reverted to the crown. It was again temporarily alienated (1569-1584) as an appanage for François, Duke of Anjou, and in 1651 was finally handed over to Frédéric Maurice de La Tour d'Auvergne, duc de Bouillon, in exchange for the principality of Sedan.

It was heavily damaged during the Second World War, and most of its center was rebuilt. The nearby Évreux-Fauville Air Base was used by the US Air Force until 1967, and since then by the French Air Force."

Source: Wikipedia.com

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Simon de MONTFORT (son of Aumarie de MONTFORT and BERTRADE) died about 1087. Seigneur of Montfort l'Armauri. Agnes d'EVREUX and Simon de MONTFORT had the following children:

child+374 i. Queen Bertrade De Montfort.

child407 ii. Richard de Montfort died in 1092. The heir of his stepbrother Amauri de Montfort through his mother, the third wife of Simon de Montfort, he strove to avenge his half-brother's death on William de Breteuil against whom he assisted Ascelin Goel in 1092, However he subseuently helped arrange a peace between the two of them. He was mortally wounded in an attack on the Abbey of Conches toward the end of 1092. (Complete Peerage Vol VII, Appendix D, p. 712)

child+408 iii. Aumarie de MONTFORT.

child409 iv. Simon de Montfort died after 1101. In 1098 he defended his castles at Montfort and Epernon successfully against William II, but was himself taken prisoner in the war. He took an active part in the siege of Montmorenci by the French army about 1101.

child410 v. William de Montfort died on 27 Aug 1101. Elected Bishop of Paris in 1095. -------------------- Simon de Montfort, Seigneur de Montfort -------------------- HM George I s 15-oldefar.

HRE Ferdinand I s 13-oldefar.

Amerikanske præsidents 18-oldefar.

PM Churchills 22-oldefar.

HM Margrethe II har 24-oldefar.

Gen Pierpont Hamiltons 24-oldefar.

Otto von Bismarcks 21-oldefar.

Red Baron 'Richthofen s 21-oldefar.

Agnes Harris '18-oldefar.

Osawatomie 'Browns 23-oldefar.

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Wives / Partnere:       Elizabeth (de) BROYES   ,   Agnes d 'Evereux (Evereux d' EVREUX) 
 Børn:       Isabel (Elizabeth) De Montfort   ,   Bertrade De Montfort (l 'Amauri)   ,   Amauri III (Amaury, IV) De Montfort   ,   Eve De Montfort

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 Sine børnebørn:       Ralph (IV) de TOENI   ,   Cecile de France   ,   Foulques (Fulk) V (9. Count) de ANJOU   ,   Florent de France   ,   Agnes d 'Evreux De Montfort   ,   Simon III (II Baron, de) MONTFORT   ;   Simon II De Montfort   ,   Guillaume Crespin (Sn. du BEC) 

Fra: http://fabpedigree.com/s078/f008757.htm

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Simon I "l'Aîné", seigneur de Montfort's Timeline

1025
1025
Eure, Montfort, Haute-Normandie, France
1055
1055
Age 30
Of, , , France
1056
1056
Age 31
Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Ile-de-France, France
1058
1058
Age 33
Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France,
1058
Age 33
Of, , Normandie
1059
May, 1059
Age 34
Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France
1066
1066
Age 41
Of,Montfort Amaury,Ile De France,France
1068
1068
Age 43
Montfort Amaury, Ile De France, France
1070
May 22, 1070
Age 45
Montfort, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France
1073
1073
Age 48
Montfort, Amaury, Ile-de-France, France