Warren Gamaliel Harding (1865 - 1923) MP

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Birthplace: Blooming Grove, Ohio, United States
Death: Died in San Francisco, CA, USA
Cause of death: Heart Attack or Stroke
Occupation: 29th President of the United States, President of the United States 1921-1923, Senator from Ohio 1915-1921
Managed by: Jeremy Allen Shelledy
Last Updated:

About Warren Gamaliel Harding

Warren G. Harding was the 29th President of the United States.

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Before his nomination, Warren G. Harding declared, "America's present need is not heroics, but healing; not nostrums, but normalcy; not revolution, but restoration; not agitation, but adjustment; not surgery, but serenity; not the dramatic, but the dispassionate; not experiment, but equipoise; not submergence in internationality, but sustainment in triumphant nationality...."

A Democratic leader, William Gibbs McAdoo, called Harding's speeches "an army of pompous phrases moving across the landscape in search of an idea." Their very murkiness was effective, since Harding's pronouncements remained unclear on the League of Nations, in contrast to the impassioned crusade of the Democratic candidates, Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Thirty-one distinguished Republicans had signed a manifesto assuring voters that a vote for Harding was a vote for the League. But Harding interpreted his election as a mandate to stay out of the League of Nations.

Harding, born near Marion, Ohio, in 1865, became the publisher of a newspaper. He married a divorcee, Mrs. Florence Kling De Wolfe. He was a trustee of the Trinity Baptist Church, a director of almost every important business, and a leader in fraternal organizations and charitable enterprises.

He organized the Citizen's Cornet Band, available for both Republican and Democratic rallies; "I played every instrument but the slide trombone and the E-flat cornet," he once remarked.

Harding's undeviating Republicanism and vibrant speaking voice, plus his willingness to let the machine bosses set policies, led him far in Ohio politics. He served in the state Senate and as Lieutenant Governor, and unsuccessfully ran for Governor. He delivered the nominating address for President Taft at the 1912 Republican Convention. In 1914 he was elected to the Senate, which he found "a very pleasant place."

An Ohio admirer, Harry Daugherty, began to promote Harding for the 1920 Republican nomination because, he later explained, "He looked like a President."

Thus a group of Senators, taking control of the 1920 Republican Convention when the principal candidates deadlocked, turned to Harding. He won the Presidential election by an unprecedented landslide of 60 percent of the popular vote.

Republicans in Congress easily got the President's signature on their bills. They eliminated wartime controls and slashed taxes, established a Federal budget system, restored the high protective tariff, and imposed tight limitations upon immigration.

By 1923 the postwar depression seemed to be giving way to a new surge of prosperity, and newspapers hailed Harding as a wise statesman carrying out his campaign promise--"Less government in business and more business in government."

Behind the facade, not all of Harding's Administration was so impressive. Word began to reach the President that some of his friends were using their official positions for their own enrichment. Alarmed, he complained, "My...friends...they're the ones that keep me walking the floors nights!"

Looking wan and depressed, Harding journeyed westward in the summer of 1923, taking with him his upright Secretary of Commerce, Herbert Hoover. "If you knew of a great scandal in our administration," he asked Hoover, "would you for the good of the country and the party expose it publicly or would you bury it?" Hoover urged publishing it, but Harding feared the political repercussions.

He did not live to find out how the public would react to the scandals of his administration. In August of 1923, he died in San Francisco of a heart attack.

Facts:

Personal:

• First Lady: Florence "Fossie" Mabel Kling Harding, Wife

• Number of Children: 1

• Education Level: College

• School Attended: Ohio Central College

• Religion: Baptist

• Profession: Teacher, Insurance Salesman, Reporter, Publisher

Public Service:

• Dates of Presidency: 3/4/1921 - 8/2/1923

• Presidency Number: 29

• Number of Terms: 1

• Why Presidency Ended: Death

• Party: Republican

• His Vice President(s): Calvin Coolidge

• Senator: Ohio (1915-1921)

• State Legislative Service: OH (1899-1903)

• Other Offices: Lieutenant Governor of Ohio

Trivia:

Did You Know?

• He was the first president to ride to his inauguration in an automobile.

• While in office, he was the first president to visit both Alaska and Canada.

• He was considered personally popular but allowed his cabinet members to take over his presidency.

• He was a newspaper editor in Marion, Ohio.

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Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 until his death from a heart attack or stroke, in 1923. A Republican from Ohio, Harding was an influential newspaper publisher. He served in the Ohio Senate (1899–1903) and later as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio (1903–1905) and as a U.S. Senator (1915–1921).

His political leanings were conservative, which enabled him to become the compromise choice at the 1920 Republican National Convention. During his presidential campaign, held in the aftermath of World War I, he promised a return to "normalcy". In the 1920 election, he defeated his Democratic opponent, fellow Ohioan James M. Cox, in the largest presidential popular vote landslide in American history since the popular vote tally began to be recorded in 1824: 60.36% to 34.19%.

Harding headed a cabinet of notable men such as Charles Evans Hughes, Andrew Mellon, Herbert Hoover and Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall, who was jailed for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal. In foreign affairs, Harding signed peace treaties that built on the Treaty of Versailles (which formally ended World War I). He also led the way to world Naval disarmament at the Washington Naval Conference of 1921–22. Harding has been consistently ranked by scholars as one of the worst U.S. Presidents.

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Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician, and the twenty-ninth President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923, his term ending as he died from a heart attack at age 57. A Republican from Ohio, Harding was an influential newspaper publisher. He served in the Ohio Senate (1899–1903) and later as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio (1903–1905) and as a U.S. Senator (1915–1921).

His political leanings were conservative, which enabled him to become the compromise choice at the 1920 Republican National Convention. During his presidential campaign, held in the aftermath of World War I, he promised a return to "normalcy"; and, in the 1920 election, he defeated his Democratic opponent, fellow Ohioan James M. Cox, in the biggest landslide in American history—60.36% to 34.19%.

Harding headed a cabinet of notable men such as Charles Evans Hughes, Andrew Mellon, Herbert Hoover and Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall, who was jailed for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal. In foreign affairs, Harding signed peace treaties that built on the Treaty of Versailles (which formally ended World War I). He also led the way to world Naval disarmament at the Washington Naval Conference of 1921–22.

By many, Harding is ranked as one of the least successful U.S. Presidents, despite having been immensely popular while in office.

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[Harding.Warren.Gamaliel.President.ftw] Won the 1920 election - the first in which women participated - over James M.Cox and Eugene V. Debs by a popular vote of 16,143,407 to 9,130,328 and919,799, and an electoral vote of 404 to 127 and 0. Chose as vice-presidenthis successor Calvin Coolidge.[harding.abraham.1740.descend.strange-tripp.ged]

[Phoebe Tripp.ged] Warren Harding was a handsome humble man with snow white hair and dark eye brows. When he was 24 he had a nervous breakdown and spent several weeks in Dr. Kellogg's sanatorium in Battle Creek, Michigan. He once gambled away an entire set of antique White House China. He was the first president who's wife could have voted for him. In large measure and possibly because he found it difficult to say no, Harding let Congress and his cabinet run the nation, and brought in so many of his old friends that they became known asthe Ohio gang'. Many were crooks. Harding's unexpected death after two years in office touched off rumors, scandals, arrests, and suicides. Speculation drifted across the country - had he had actually committed suicide, or that first lady Florence Harding poisoned him.

Graduated from Ohio Central College at Iberia, Ohio. Newspaper editor, politician. Bought the Marion Star in 1884. Served in state senate, 1899-1902 and as lieutenant governor; served in United States Senate, 1915-21. Was nominated as "dark horse" candidate in 1920. Administration was corrupt, with many rumored scandals; he died suddenly while on a national tour. Convened Washington Disarmament Conference, resulting in treaty. Picked strong cabinet members. Teapot Dome scandal involving others in administration marred his presidency. Died in office.

Tall, regarded as handsome, with silver gray hair. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/nfexhard.html for an audio treat plus more information about Warren G. HARDING. Won the 1920 election - the first in which women participated - over James M. Cox and Eugene V. Debs by a popular vote of 16,143,407 to 9,130,328 and 919,799, and an electoral vote of 404 to 127 and 0. Chose as vice-president his successor Calvin Coolidge. Biography: Before his nomination, Warren G. Harding declared, "America's present need is not heroics, but healing; not nostrums, but normalcy; not revolution, but restoration; not agitation, but adjustment; not surgery, but serenity; not the dramatic, but the dispassionate; not experiment, but equipoise; not submergence in internationality, but sustainment in triumphant nationality...." A Democratic leader, William Gibbs McAdoo, called Harding's speeches "an army of pompous phrases moving across the landscape in search of an idea." Their very murkiness was effective, since Harding's pronouncements remained unclear on the League of Nations, in contrast to the impassioned crusade of the Democratic candidates, Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Thirty-one distinguished Republicans had signed a manifesto assuring voters that a vote for Harding was a vote for the League. But Harding interpreted his election as a mandate to stay out of the League of Nations. Harding, born near Marion, Ohio, in 1865, became the publisher of a newspaper. He married a divorce, Mrs. Florence Kling De Wolfe. He was a trustee of the Trinity Baptist Church, a director of almost every important business, and a leader in fraternal organizations and charitable enterprises. He organized the Citizen's Cornet Band, available for both Republican and Democratic rallies; "I played every instrument but the slide trombone and the E-flat cornet," he once remarked. Harding's undeviating Republicanism and vibrant speaking voice, plus his willingness to let the machine bosses set policies, led him far in Ohio politics. He served in the state Senate and as Lieutenant Governor, and successfully ran for Governor. He delivered the nominating address for President Taft at the 1912 Republican Convention. In 1914 he was elected to the Senate, which he found "a very pleasant place." An Ohio admirer, Harry Daugherty, began to promote Harding for the 1920 Republican nomination because, he later explained, "He looked like a President." Thus a group of Senators, taking control of the 1920 Republican Convention when the principal candidates deadlocked, turned to Harding. He won the Presidential election by an unprecedented landslide of 60 percent of the popular vote. Republicans in Congress easily got the President's signature on their bills. They eliminated wartime controls and slashed taxes, established a Federal budget system, restored the high protective tariff, and imposed tight limitations upon immigration. By 1923 the postwar depression seemed to be giving way to a new surge of prosperity, and newspapers hailed Harding as a wise statesman carrying out his campaign promise--"Less government in business and more business in government." Behind the facade, not all of Harding's Administration was so impressive. Word began to reach the President that some of his friends were using their official positions for their own enrichment. Alarmed, he complained, "My...friends...they're the ones that keep me walking the floors nights!" Looking wan and depressed, Harding journeyed westward in the summer of 1923, taking with him his upright Secretary of Commerce, Herbert Hoover. "If you knew of a great scandal in our administration," he asked Hoover, "would you for the good of the country and the party expose it publicly or would you bury it?" Hoover urged publishing it, but Harding feared the political repercussions. He did not live to find out how the public would react to the scandals of his administration. In August of 1923, he died in San Francisco of a heart attack. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------Won the 1920 election - the first in which women participated - over James M.Cox and Eugene V. Debs by a popular vote of 16,143,407 to 9,130,328 and919,799, and an electoral vote of 404 to 127 and 0. Chose as vice-president

his successor Calvin Coolidge.

[harding.amos.descend.strange-tripp.ged]

[Phoebe Tripp.ged] Warren Harding was a handsome humble man with snow white hair and dark eye brows. When he was 24 he had a nervous breakdown and spent several weeks in Dr. Kellogg's sanatorium in Battle Creek, Michigan. He once gambled away an entire set of antique White House China. He was the first president who's wife could have voted for him. In large measure and possibly because he found it difficult to say no, Harding let Congress and his cabinet run the nation, and brought in so many of his old friends that they became known asthe Ohio gang'. Many were crooks. Harding's unexpected death after two years in office touched off rumors, scandals, arrests, and suicides. Speculation drifted across the country - had he had actually committed suicide, or that first lady Florence Harding poisoned him.

Graduated from Ohio Central College at Iberia, Ohio. Newspaper editor, politician. Bought the Marion Star in 1884. Served in state senate, 1899-1902 and as lieutenant governor; served in United States Senate, 1915-21. Was nominated as "dark horse" candidate in 1920. Administration was corrupt, with many rumored scandals; he died suddenly while on a national tour. Convened Washington Disarmament Conference, resulting in treaty. Picked strong cabinet members. Teapot Dome scandal involving others in administration marred his presidency. Died in office.

Tall, regarded as handsome, with silver gray hair. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/nfexhard.html for an audio treat plus more information about Warren G. HARDING. Won the 1920 election - the first in which women participated - over James M. Cox and Eugene V. Debs by a popular vote of 16,143,407 to 9,130,328 and 919,799, and an electoral vote of 404 to 127 and 0. Chose as vice-president his successor Calvin Coolidge. Biography: Before his nomination, Warren G. Harding declared, "America's present need is not heroics, but healing; not nostrums, but normalcy; not revolution, but restoration; not agitation, but adjustment; not surgery, but serenity; not the dramatic, but the dispassionate; not experiment, but equipoise; not submergence in internationality, but sustainment in triumphant nationality...." A Democratic leader, William Gibbs McAdoo, called Harding's speeches "an army of pompous phrases moving across the landscape in search of an idea." Their very murkiness was effective, since Harding's pronouncements remained unclear on the League of Nations, in contrast to the impassioned crusade of the Democratic candidates, Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Thirty-one distinguished Republicans had signed a manifesto assuring voters that a vote for Harding was a vote for the League. But Harding interpreted his election as a mandate to stay out of the League of Nations. Harding, born near Marion, Ohio, in 1865, became the publisher of a newspaper. He married a divorce, Mrs. Florence Kling De Wolfe. He was a trustee of the Trinity Baptist Church, a director of almost every important business, and a leader in fraternal organizations and charitable enterprises. He organized the Citizen's Cornet Band, available for both Republican and Democratic rallies; "I played every instrument but the slide trombone and the E-flat cornet," he once remarked. Harding's undeviating Republicanism and vibrant speaking voice, plus his willingness to let the machine bosses set policies, led him far in Ohio politics. He served in the state Senate and as Lieutenant Governor, and successfully ran for Governor. He delivered the nominating address for President Taft at the 1912 Republican Convention. In 1914 he was elected to the Senate, which he found "a very pleasant place." An Ohio admirer, Harry Daugherty, began to promote Harding for the 1920 Republican nomination because, he later explained, "He looked like a President." Thus a group of Senators, taking control of the 1920 Republican Convention when the principal candidates deadlocked, turned to Harding. He won the Presidential election by an unprecedented landslide of 60 percent of the popular vote. Republicans in Congress easily got the President's signature on their bills. They eliminated wartime controls and slashed taxes, established a Federal budget system, restored the high protective tariff, and imposed tight limitations upon immigration. By 1923 the postwar depression seemed to be giving way to a new surge of prosperity, and newspapers hailed Harding as a wise statesman carrying out his campaign promise--"Less government in business and more business in government." Behind the facade, not all of Harding's Administration was so impressive. Word began to reach the President that some of his friends were using their official positions for their own enrichment. Alarmed, he complained, "My...friends...they're the ones that keep me walking the floors nights!" Looking wan and depressed, Harding journeyed westward in the summer of 1923, taking with him his upright Secretary of Commerce, Herbert Hoover. "If you knew of a great scandal in our administration," he asked Hoover, "would you for the good of the country and the party expose it publicly or would you bury it?" Hoover urged publishing it, but Harding feared the political repercussions. He did not live to find out how the public would react to the scandals of his administration. In August of 1923, he died in San Francisco of a heart attack. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------Won the 1920 election - the first in which women participated - over James M.Cox and Eugene V. Debs by a popular vote of 16,143,407 to 9,130,328 and919,799, and an electoral vote of 404 to 127 and 0. Chose as vice-president

his successor Calvin Coolidge.

29th President of the United States

Baptist

B.S. Ohio Central College -------------------- Before his nomination, Warren G. Harding declared, "America's present need is not heroics, but healing; not nostrums, but normalcy; not revolution, but restoration; not agitation, but adjustment; not surgery, but serenity; not the dramatic, but the dispassionate; not experiment, but equipoise; not submergence in internationality, but sustainment in triumphant nationality...."

A Democratic leader, William Gibbs McAdoo, called Harding's speeches "an army of pompous phrases moving across the landscape in search of an idea." Their very murkiness was effective, since Harding's pronouncements remained unclear on the League of Nations, in contrast to the impassioned crusade of the Democratic candidates, Governor James M. Cox of Ohio and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Thirty-one distinguished Republicans had signed a manifesto assuring voters that a vote for Harding was a vote for the League. But Harding interpreted his election as a mandate to stay out of the League of Nations.

Harding, born near Marion, Ohio, in 1865, became the publisher of a newspaper. He married a divorcee, Mrs. Florence Kling De Wolfe. He was a trustee of the Trinity Baptist Church, a director of almost every important business, and a leader in fraternal organizations and charitable enterprises.

He organized the Citizen's Cornet Band, available for both Republican and Democratic rallies; "I played every instrument but the slide trombone and the E-flat cornet," he once remarked.

Harding's undeviating Republicanism and vibrant speaking voice, plus his willingness to let the machine bosses set policies, led him far in Ohio politics. He served in the state Senate and as Lieutenant Governor, and unsuccessfully ran for Governor. He delivered the nominating address for President Taft at the 1912 Republican Convention. In 1914 he was elected to the Senate, which he found "a very pleasant place."

An Ohio admirer, Harry Daugherty, began to promote Harding for the 1920 Republican nomination because, he later explained, "He looked like a President."

Thus a group of Senators, taking control of the 1920 Republican Convention when the principal candidates deadlocked, turned to Harding. He won the Presidential election by an unprecedented landslide of 60 percent of the popular vote.

Republicans in Congress easily got the President's signature on their bills. They eliminated wartime controls and slashed taxes, established a Federal budget system, restored the high protective tariff, and imposed tight limitations upon immigration.

By 1923 the postwar depression seemed to be giving way to a new surge of prosperity, and newspapers hailed Harding as a wise statesman carrying out his campaign promise--"Less government in business and more business in government."

Behind the facade, not all of Harding's Administration was so impressive. Word began to reach the President that some of his friends were using their official positions for their own enrichment. Alarmed, he complained, "My...friends...they're the ones that keep me walking the floors nights!"

Looking wan and depressed, Harding journeyed westward in the summer of 1923, taking with him his upright Secretary of Commerce, Herbert Hoover. "If you knew of a great scandal in our administration," he asked Hoover, "would you for the good of the country and the party expose it publicly or would you bury it?" Hoover urged publishing it, but Harding feared the political repercussions.

He did not live to find out how the public would react to the scandals of his administration. In August of 1923, he died in San Francisco of a heart attack. http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/warrenharding/

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Warren G. Harding, 29th President of the USA's Timeline

1865
November 1, 1865
Blooming Grove, Ohio, United States
1891
July 8, 1891
Age 25
1899
1899
- 1903
Age 33
Ohio, United States
1904
January 11, 1904
- January 8, 1906
Age 38
Ohio, United States
1915
January 4, 1915
- March 4, 1921
Age 49
Ohio, United States
1921
March 4, 1921
- August 2, 1923
Age 55
United States
1923
August 2, 1923
Age 57
San Francisco, CA, USA
August, 1923
Age 57
Harding Memorial, Marion, Ohio, United States
????
????
- present
Ohio Central College