William Brock (1764 - 1820)

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Birthdate:
Death: Died in Canada West
Occupation: Head of the Bank of W. Brock & Brothers, in the City of London
Managed by: Kerry L. Cunningham
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About William Brock

NAME: WILLIAM BROCK

SURNAME: Brock......GIVEN NAMES: William ......SEX: M

BIRTH: 23 JUN 1764 in Guernsey, Channel Islands

DEATH: 1820 in Canada West

MARRIAGE: Sarah PITT (aka Sally)b:

Married:

CHILDREN

NO ISSUE

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NOTES:


William, born June 23rd 1764.

Head of the Bank of W. Brock & Brothers, in the City of London.

. Married Sarah Maria Pitt (called Sally), cousin of Lord Rivers and a relative of Lord Chatham. No descendants, but they raised their three orphan nephews Potenger;

Died in London

According to an article of the English Genealogist, Issue 22, Pg 22&23 Sir Isaac had a brother by the name of William (1764-1820)

He immigrated to Canada, was married to a woman named Sally and a son named William

1817 December 3: Grant of 600 acres to Daniel Delisle Brock, William Brock, John Lavery Brock, Irving Brock (4 brothers of Sir Isaac Brock), Monaghan Township

William was born in 1764.

He was a merchant banker in London and with his brother, Irving, was engaged in trade with Russia, Sweden and Prussia on the Baltic Sea.

William took a keen interest in Isaac's career and gave him money to purchase his various commissions. William intended the money as gifts, but unknown to William the cost of each purchase was entered on the company's financial records as loans. Some eight hundred ships insured for 40% of their value suffered various misadventures in the Baltic Sea including being lost at sea, taken by privateers and seized when they arrived in port. Napoleon said "England is a nation of shopkeepers," and he set up a blockade of Europe to prevent Britain from trading with European countries. Some of the above-mentioned shipping disasters resulted from Napoleon's blockade.

In 1811 because of its various shipping misfortunes, William's company suffered a financial collapse and went into receivership which resulted in all outstanding loans being called in including the amounts William used to purchase Isaac's commissions.

This demand for repayment of money they did not have plunged the Brock family into serious financial straits. 

Father: Jean (John) Brock b: 24 JAN 1729 in St Peter Port, Guernsey, Channel Islands, England

Mother: Elizabeth de Lisle b: 1733 in Guernsey, Channel Islands

Marriage 1 Sarah Maria (Sally) Pitt b: ABT 1764

Children

William Brock b: ABT 1784

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=hazeys&id=I2444

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. William was born in 1764. He was a merchant banker in London and with his brother, Irving, was engaged in trade with Russia, Sweden and Prussia on the Baltic Sea.

William took a keen interest in Isaac's career and gave him money to purchase his various commissions. 

William intended the money as gifts, but unknown to William the cost of each purchase was entered on the company's financial records as loans. Some eight hundred ships insured for 40% of their value suffered various misadventures in the Baltic Sea including being lost at sea, taken by privateers and seized when they arrived in port. Napoleon said "England is a nation of shopkeepers," and he set up a blockade of Europe to prevent Britain from trading with European countries.

Some of the above-mentioned shipping disasters resulted from Napoleon's blockade. 

In 1811 because of its various shipping misfortunes, William's company suffered a financial collapse and went into receivership which resulted in all outstanding loans being called in including the amounts William used to purchase Isaac's commissions. This demand for repayment of money they did not have plunged the Brock family into serious financial straits.

SIBLINGS OF SIR ISAAC BROCK

History gives us antecedents and a place in time.

John Brock, was born on the 24th of January, 1729. He married Elizabeth de Lisle, daughter of the bailiff of Guernsey and the couple had fourteen children, four girls and ten boys. John, a mid-shipman died at Dinan, France at the age of forty-eight. In chronological order their children were:

1. Elizabeth born in 1756 died in youth.

2. Rebecca born in 1758 died in youth.

3. John was born in 1759. He joined the 8th Regiment of Foot (King's) as an ensign. Later he became a brevet lieutenant-colonel in the 81st Regiment. He was killed in a duel at Capetown, South Africa in 1801.

4. Ferdinand was born in 1760. He served in the 60th Regiment of Foot, the famous Royal American Regiment, which was raised in the colonies at the time of the conflict with France and served with distinction during the American Revolution. Ferdinand was killed by a Spaniard at age nineteen at the defence of Baton Rouge on the Mississippi River.

5. Peter Henry was born in 1761 and died an infant.

6. Daniel De Lisle was born on December 10th, 1762. In 1795 he was elected a jurat [* See Below] of the royal court. He went to London in connection with trade and other ancient privileges of the island. Afterwards he assumed the very influential position of lieutenant-bailiff or chief magistrate of Guernsey. He was responsible for building Elizabeth College which today is a very popular boys' school.

7.-------------------------------------- William------------------------------------

was born in 1764. He was a merchant banker in London and with his brother, Irving, was engaged in trade with Russia, Sweden and Prussia on the Baltic Sea. William took a keen interest in Isaac's career and gave him money to purchase his various commissions. William intended the money as gifts, but unknown to William the cost of each purchase was entered on the company's financial records as loans. Some eight hundred ships insured for 40% of their value suffered various misadventures in the Baltic Sea including being lost at sea, taken by privateers and seized when they arrived in port. Napoleon said "England is a nation of shopkeepers," and he set up a blockade of Europe to prevent Britain from trading with European countries. Some of the above-mentioned shipping disasters resulted from Napoleon's blockade. In 1811 because of its various shipping misfortunes, William's company suffered a financial collapse and went into receivership which resulted in all outstanding loans being called in including the amounts William used to purchase Isaac's commissions. This demand for repayment of money they did not have plunged the Brock family into serious financial straits. 

8. Peter was born in 1765 and died young with no issue.

9. Elizabeth was born in 1767. She married John Elisha Tupper of Guernsey, and they had three sons and one daughter: (a) one of the sons, Ferdinand Brock Tupper, wrote The Life and Career of Major-General Isaac Brock in 1847. Ferdinand had no children.

(b) Henry Bingham Tupper inherited the portrait of Isaac Brock from his Uncle Irving. Henry married and had a son who also married and had a son who died while young.

(c) Henry Tupper was born in 1809. He married and had one daughter Henrietta Tupper.

10. Frederick born in 1768 married a Miss Levat. They had no children.

11. Isaac born October 6th, 1769; died October 13th, 1812.

Savery was very proud to discover wherever he went in the province, that Isaac's cherished memory "lived in the hearts of the people." He visited Isaac's grave at Fort George, where he had the good fortune to dine on August 16th, the fifth anniversary of Brock's capture of Fort Detroit, with 49 guests. Brock's regiment was the 49th.

None of the Brock men had any male children, and the brothers' properties were inherited by their daughters. Daniel's went to his only child, Sophia Brock, a spinster. William bequeathed his properties to his wife, Sarah Maria, who left the land in turn to her daughters, Mary Brock Pottinger and Julien Jane Pottinger. Savery's two daughters, Rosa Barnes and Betsey de Jersey Carey, were co-heiresses. None of the Brock family ever lived on these lands and over a period of time they were all sold.

Economic difficulties had always plagued the Brock brothers. The financial mainstay of the family was businessman, William, who purchased a number of Isaac's military commissions. William had intended these purchases as gifts, but unbeknownst to him the monies were listed as debts in the company's books. While William's business interests flourished, no one worried about these outstanding loans, but as Napoleon's embargoes on British goods flowing into Europe began to affect trade negatively, all debts were called in and the Brock brothers found themselves in financial difficulties. The brothers were more than grateful, therefore, when Isaac's fame brought them largesse as well as land, when the British parliament granted each brother a life pension of two hundred pounds.

Brock's brothers all died young. Savery, the last to go, died in 1847 of "a disease of the brain."

http://www.uppercanadahistory.ca/brock/brock10.html

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