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Jewish Families from Koloveč, Bohemia, Czech Republic

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This project seeks to list representatives of all of the Jewish families from the Bohemian town of Koloveč (Kollautschen) in the Czech Republic.

About

Koloveč is a market town (městys) in Domažlice District in the Plzeň Region of the Czech Republic.

Jewish history

The first evidence of Jews in Koloveč is from approximately 1800. According to church records, the Jew Salomon Schwarzkopf together with his wife Anna, the daughter of Michal Ofner from Kanice, lived there under the protection of the Manor of Bystřice Their first child Josef was born in the year 1800. They had further children: Abraham, Jacob, Marie, Ester, Samuel, Ezekial, Lenora, Elisabeth and Heřman. The witnesses at circumcision were Izak Hutter from Kanice, Izak Mandelbaum from Chudenice, Samson Roth from Osvračin, and Volf Hutter from Kanice. The circumcision was carried out by Josef Bacharach from Osvračin.

In the year 1830, the family of Josef Schwarz, son of Salomon Schwarz and married to Rose, the daughter of Abraham Hutter from Hradiště, lived in Koloveč. Their children were: Anna, Abraham, Volf and Izak, the first one being born in 1821 and the last in 1838. Circumcision in this family was carried out by Izak Lövy from Nahošice.

Around 1850, the slaughterer Herman Schwarz with his wife Rose, née Klinger from Hrádek at Sušice, lived in Koloveč. Their children were Samuel and Anna.

There is also the family of the merchant Herman Bloch and his wife Katharina née Kierschner. Their children were Adam and Josef. A third child died two days after birth.

We also find there the merchant Herman Raušer with his wife Cecilie née Goldscheider from Šlovice. Their children were Emilie/Emily and Pavlina/Paulina

A further family is Jachim Weil with his wife Barbara née Fantl from Dlouhá Ves. Their children were Klára and Pavla. Weil was a merchant

In 1861 the records show the merchant Samuel Hutter with his wife Rosalie née Löwith from Puzlitz. In this family just one child is noted: Jonathan Hutter, born in 1861.

In 1830, the wedding of Josef Schwarz from Koloveč with Rose Hutter from Kanice is recorded.

In 1849, the wedding of Šalamoun Fischl, a textile merchant from Merklin and Anna Schwarz from Koloveč is recorded.

Between 1811 and 1856, eight people died in Koloveč. They were Rebecca Schwarzkopf, aged 67; Ezekiel Schwarzkopf, aged 4 ½ ; Abraham Schwarzkopf, aged 27; Ðalamoun Schwarzkopf, aged 74; Anna Schwarz, aged 72; Josef Bloch, aged 1 month; Isák Löwy, aged 52; and Abraham Bloch, aged 2 days.

According to other records up to 1891, 85 people died in Koloveč and in the surrounding area. Between 1839 and 1895, 217 children were born, and in the period from 1850 to 1895 there were 29 weddings. The records provide a register of deaths, births and weddings in Koloveč, Radonice, Kanice, Úboče, Lštění, Všepadla and Hradiště.

In the 1860s, Jakub Eckstein was living in Koloveč. He was a merchant and he had three children. Also living there were: Volf Schwarz, a merchant with six children; Jachim Mestik with one child; the merchant Isak Hutter with five children; Šalamoun Hahn, a merchant with four children; the merchant Ignác Hutter with one child; the merchant Šimon Hutter with six children; the merchant Šimon Schwarz with four children; the merchant Karel Glaser with one child. He is shown as the owner of a match factory. Around 1890, Jindřich Frank with four children, and also the teacher Leopold Schleisner were living in Koloveč.

A prayer house was established in Koloveč approximately 50 years ago [Editor: i.e. in about 1880]. The previous prayer house was in Kanice, where the following Jews lived: from 1844, Samuel Hutter with seven children; Jakub Fleischel with three children; Samuel Sommer with two children; Samuel Sonnenschein with six children; Heřman Löwith; Samuel Kohn; Daniel Kohn; Heřman Kohn with four children; Heřman Körper; and also Abraham Sonnenschein, Philip Hutter and Adam Hutter.

The prayer house in Kanice was also frequented by Jews from Úboč: Emanuel Hahn (since 1846) who had 10 children; Jonáš Hahn, a merchant, who had four children; Eliáš Hahn, who had three children; the merchant Mojžíš Hahn, who had seven children; Heřman Hahn and Alexander Bloch.

From Všepadla, the prayer house was frequented by the Jewish merchant Isak Hahn with six children, and Hašl Bloch.

From Lštění, the prayer house was frequented by the merchant David Eckstein with eight children, Jakub Eckstein, Isak Liebermann and the glazier Ferdinand Bart. Jakub Eckstein later moved home to Koloveč, where he was the supervisor in the match factory that was founded by his brother Bernard Eckstein. The match factory was one of the first in the region. Eckstein later founded further match factories in Nahošice at Bližejov, Domažlice, Spálené Poříčí and Pilsen. In Pilsen there is still a street named after this factory - - Sirková ulice (Match Street) - near the Hotel Lipsko

The prayer house in Kanice was also frequented by Josef Hutter, Samuel Hutter and Leopold Kapper from Hradiště.

There was a large Jewish settlement in Radonice, where there was a prayer house and a Jewish school. Around 1839, the travelling representative Abraham Hauser lived there with four children, Jakub Hauser with eight children, the slaughterer Isak Stein with six children, Josef Hauser with two children, Alexander Hauser with six children, Jachim Stein with 10 children, Marek Stein with two children, the teacher Josef Krauskopf, and the travelling representative Mojžíč Gibián with eight children. Around 1880, the glazier Adolf Heller as well as Eliaš Stein and Adam Hutter lived in Radonice. In the 1860s, Abraham Zucker and the teacher Heřman Austerlitz lived there. The majority of these Jews were travelling merchants.

The prayer house in Koloveč, which was established at a later date, was in house number 72, which the Jews bought from Václav Bozděch and called it “at Valečkas”. The house was bought by members of the community and the cost was shared according to each member's ability to pay.

The prayer house in Koloveč still exists today [Editor: i.e. in the 1930s]. It is a small, nicely arranged room, where there is an altar and benches, with a door connecting to a smaller room for the women.

Cemetery

The Jewish cemetery for Jews from Koloveč was in Puclice and is said to have been founded 150 years ago. Before that time, they used the cemetery in Poběžovice (Ronšperg).

[http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh274.html]