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Jewish Families from Třebíč (Trebic, Trebitsch), Moravia

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  • Herman Kohn (1828 - d.)
  • Simon Kohn (1837 - d.)
  • Israel Hermann (1793 - 1877)
    Israel Hermann was Familianten No. 52 in Trebic.
  • Markus Diamand (1772 - 1829)
    Markus Diamand was Familianten #244 in Trebic, Moravia. Following his death on 21 March 1829, his familianten status was transferred to one Herman Lowenthal (19 August 1829). When he married Barbara ...
  • Jacob Isak Beer (1800 - 1876)

This project seeks to list representatives of all of the Jewish families from the Moravian town of Třebíč (Trebic, Trebitsch) in the Czech Republic. See Trebic cemetery database.

  1. Jehuda Adler ( -1838)
  2. Bernard Austerlitz (1785-1871)
  3. Bernhard Bachrach (1801-1877)
  4. Abraham Bäck (1809)
  5. Samuel Barth ( -1801)
  6. Bella Elisabeth Bassist (1808-1882)
  7. Ascher Bauer (1811-1886)
  8. Nathan Baumgarten (1795-1885)
  9. Naftali Beer (1782-1856)
  10. Selig Beinkeles (1774-1839)
  11. Joachim Benesch (1823-1907)
  12. Hersh Berger (1784-1866)
  13. Simon Bergmann (1790-1878)
  14. Meir Bodascher (1794-1871)
  15. Juda Bondy (1847-1922)
  16. Mordechai Braun ( - 1831)
  17. Vögele Brock (1791-1871)
  18. Aron Brtnitz (1779-1814)
  19. Marta But(d)schowitz (1813-1900)
  20. Jakob Coref (Goldschmied) (1741-1801)
  21. Josef Coref (Gottlein) ( -1831)
  22. Jonathan Dürrheim (1849-1935)
  23. R. Zelig Eibeschutz (Wohlmuth) (1725-1806)
  24. Hermann Epstein (1819-1896)
  25. Samuel Exel ( -1876)
  26. Moritz Felix (1838-1913)
  27. Josefa Fischer (1812-1897)
  28. Filipp Fleischer (1797-1874)
  29. Cäcilie Friedmann (1806-1860)
  30. Adolf Freund (1845-1927)
  31. Alexander Fried (1848-1935)
  32. Bertha Fuchs (1886-1942)
  33. Josef Fürst (1832-1914)
  34. Naftali Gänsler (1803-1885)
  35. Cvi Hirsch Glaser (?-1843)
  36. Herrman Glasner (1845-1922)
  37. Hermann Gottlein (1837-1927)
  38. Abraham Götz (1775-1828)
  39. Markus Grünberger (1781-1851)
  40. Helena Lea Habrofsky (1812-1878)
  41. Wolf Hauser (1810-1899)
  42. Joseph Heimer (1765-1836)
  43. Israel Herrmann (1793-1877)
  44. Samuel Herschmann (1842-1910)
  45. Abraham ha-Kohen Jellinek (?-1840)
  46. Aharon ha-Levi Jellinek (1779-1849)
  47. Sara Jerusalem (1774-1852)
  48. Philipp Joffe (1834-1903)
  49. Jakob Kantor (1804-1893)
  50. Markus Klein (1819-1882)
  51. Leopold Kohn (1804-1882)
  52. Juda Kohnberger (1775-1848)
  53. Markus Kohnstein (1820-1892)
  54. Joachim Konrad (1799-1878)
  55. R. Adolf Kurrein (1848-1919)
  56. Moritz Lederer (1841-1921)
  57. Selig Ledofsky (1809-1893)
  58. Leopold Leirer (1817-1891)
  59. Pinkas Löw (1797-1883)
  60. Salomon Löwenstamm (1787-1862)
  61. Isaias Löwenthal (1771-1852}
  62. Albert Mandler (1886-1942)
  63. Salomon Neuner (1802-1877)
  64. Juda Ornstein (1773-1824)
  65. Jehonatan Pächter (1813-1899)
  66. Samuel Pick (1820-1893)
  67. Alexander Pokorny (1863- )
  68. R. Joachim Josef Pollak (1798-1879)
  69. Alois Pollataschek (1844-1908)
  70. Naftali Polnauer (1818-1879)
  71. Jakob Prager (1801-1873)
  72. Sara Mariane Prinz (1804-1892)
  73. Juda Lejb Putzker (1812-1875)
  74. Salomon Reckendorf (1780-1846)
  75. Joachim Reich (1787-1863)
  76. Isaias Reiniger (1761-1826)
  77. Jakob Reinisch (1836-1904)
  78. Moses Löw Rosenberg (1802-1883)
  79. Moses Rosenthal (1767-1835)
  80. Josef Rosner ( - 1832)
  81. Jakob Schnabel (1766-1849)
  82. Leopold Schnek (~1781-1852)
  83. Isak Schnurmacher (1801-1885)
  84. Samuel Schrötter (1803-1866)
  85. Dr. Simon Schuschny (1821-1890)
  86. Eva Schwarz (1812-1912)
  87. Herman Sofer (1811-1883)
  88. Wilhelm Sorer (1820-1875)
  89. Lazar Spira (1787-1866)
  90. Veit Spira (1774-1819)
  91. Salomon Stein (1809-1864)
  92. Salomon Steinhardt (1856-1926)
  93. Rachel Stiassny (1813-1873)
  94. Izak Herman Subak (1811-1893)
  95. Abraham Taussig (1797-1881)
  96. Markus Tichy (1817-1884)
  97. Moses Triescher (1823-1885)
  98. Josef Walentin (1816-1894)
  99. Abraham Wallis (1820-1899)
  100. Samuel Weisl (1823-1907)
  101. Markus Wertheimer (1789-1851)
  102. Abraham Wessely (1791-1873)
  103. Moses Wiener (1827-1891)
  104. Naftali Winkler (1829-1898)
  105. David Zeissel (1835-1910)
  106. Simon Zerkowitz (c1755-1817)

The Jewish Quarter of Třebíč is an exceptional testimony to the cultural traditions related to the Diaspora in central Europe, and bears witness to the coexistence of and interchange of values between two different cultures, Jewish and Christian, over many centuries. The World Heritage site is in the town of Třebíč, and it has three distinct components: the Jewish Quarter, the Jewish cemetery and St Procopius Basilica, all situated on the north bank of the River Jihlava. The Jewish Quarter rises from the river up on the hillside. The urban layout is characterized by two main streets, linked with the riverside through a number of small medieval alleys, some of which go through the houses. The buildings are vernacular in character, consisting generally of a vaulted ground floor and one or two upper floors with wooden ceilings. Some of the facades have features dating from the Renaissance or Baroque period, but many are of later date, until the 20th century. Because of political constraints, the Jewish quarter was limited in space. Its natural limits meant that this area was never fully fenced, although there was separation (eruf ) until 1875, after which Jews were free to move and buy property elsewhere. As a result, wealthy people moved out, and the area remained in the hands of the poor. Characteristically the area is organized in condominiums. At street level there was often a shop or a workshop, the upper levels being reserved for residential use. There is no special typology for a Jewish house, which is characterized more in terms of the use of a limited space and the condominium structures. This leads to linkage of different houses through acquisition of spaces from neighbouring buildings. In Třebíč the area has preserved all essential social functions, synagogues, schools, etc., as well as a leather factory. The oldest mention of a synagogue is in 1590; the present Old (Front) Synagogue, from 1639-42, a simple Baroque building, is today used as a Hussite church. The New (Rear) Synagogue dates from the 18th century; it has been restored and serves as a museum and meeting room. In the 16th century, orders were issued to expel the Jews from the Jewish Quarter but these were not carried out. As a whole the authorities were more tolerant here than elsewhere in Europe. Earlier the Jews were involved in money lending, but they also worked in some crafts (tanning, bead-firing, glove-making, soap-making). From the 17th century they were mainly involved in trade and crafts of this kind. From the beginning, the Jewish Quarter had its own self-government with an elected magistrate and two councillors. In 1849, it had its own administration led by a mayor, and it was called Zamošti ('over the bridge'). In the 1920s the area was merged with Třebíč, and the population became progressively mixed. In 1890, there were some 1,500 Jews in this area, but in the 1930s only 300. All Jewish residents were deported during the Second World War, and none are left at present. The Jewish Cemetery is situated above the Jewish Quarter, behind the hill. Access for carriages was arranged via a special road. The current cemetery has two parts, the first part from the 15th century and the second from the 19th. There are some 4,000 stones and some of them bear important carvings. At the entrance there is a ceremonial hall, built in 1903, which is still intact. The Jewish Quarter was sited in the focal point of the commercially expanding settlement, close to the monastery and the ford across the river. Not having any defences, it went through the same fate as the rest of the town, and had to suffer of many attacks and destructions, such as those in the 15th century by the Hungarian king. In favourable years, the site developed and prospered allowing the necessary facilities to be built. In the 16th century, orders were issued to expel the Jews but these were not carried out. As a whole the authorities were here much more tolerant than elsewhere in Europe. In earlier years, the Jews were involved in money lending, but also working in some crafts: tanning, bead firing, glove making, and soap making. From the 17th century on, they were mainly involved in trade and such crafts. There were further destructive events in the subsequent centuries, including fires and frequent floods - in areas close to the river. From the beginning, the Jewish Quarter had its own self-government with an elected magistrate and two councillors. In 1849, it had its own administration led by a mayor, and it was called Zamosti (lit. over the bridge). In the 1920s, the area was merged with the town of Trebic, and the population started being mixed. In 1890, there were nearly 1,500 Jews in this area, but in the 1930s only 300 were of Jewish faith. All Jewish residents were deported during the Second World War, and none are left at present. The houses are now owned by people of non- Jewish faith.