Capt. George Lamberton

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George Lamberton

Birthdate:
Birthplace: St. Mary's Whitechapel, London, Middlesex, England
Death: 1646 (42)
North Atlantic Ocean (Lost at sea aboard the ship "Fellowship", immortalized by Longfellow in his poem "Phantom Ship".)
Immediate Family:

Son of Christopher Lamberton and Mary Margaret Lamberton
Husband of Margaret Lamberton
Father of Obedience Lamberton; Patience Bishop; Elizabeth Trowbridge; Hannah Allyn; Hope Cheney and 3 others
Half brother of Elizabeth Stanford

Occupation: Merchant, Captain, He was a sea captain and merchant. Capt. George Lamberton was one of the merchan, Captain of the "Phantom" ship / Merchant, Sea Captain, Puritan Settler of New England
Managed by: Ivy Jo Smith
Last Updated:

About Capt. George Lamberton

Virkus, Frederick A. The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy. Vol. 1, p. 767.:

Capt. Geo. Lamberton, of the "Phantom Ship"

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900

Posted by: Susan Tow Date: March 24, 1999 at 20:40:24

A listing of Captain George Lamberton's children in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume LXVIII, published in 1914, as follows:

  • 1. Elizabeth, born abt 1632, died 1716, Married first Daniel Sellivant, 2nd William Trowbridge.
  • 2. Hannah, born abt 1634, Married first Samuel Wells, second Capt. John Allyn
  • 3. Hope, born abt 1636, married first Samuel Ambrose. She divorced him after abandonment. Hope had a daughter Abigail by her first husband. Abigail Ambrose married John Clark III. Second, in 1698, a William? Herbert and 3rd, William Cheney of Middletown, CT.
  • 4. Deliverance (the only son), born abt 1638. died after 1662, without children
  • 5. Mercy, baptised 17 Jan 1640/41. Married Shubael Painter
  • 6. Desire, baptised 14 Mar 1641/42, married Lt. Thomas Cooper Jr.
  • 7. Obedience, baptised 9 Feb 1644/45, married Lt. Samuel Smith.

George was lost at sea in 1646, so all the children were very young.

It is interesting that Mary, first wife of Lt-Governor James Bishop has been rumored to be a daughter of Capt. Lamberton. The rumor is apparantly based on a passage in the trial of Mrs. Godman for witchcraft in 1653. I can't follow the language, but it does say that the trial record seems to indicate that 'Mrs. Bishop' was either the sister of Hannah Lamberton or of her mother Margaret Lamberton Goodyear.

It is possible that the Mrs Bishop the trial refers to is the wife of James Bishop's brother, Henry. Henry's wife was named Patience, which certainly fits with the other Lamberton girls. But she was not included in the division of Lamberton property, which was divided among the six documented daughters when their mother died.

Anyway, this probably confuses as much as it helps.

The above information in included in the secion of the NEHGR that covers the Painter family. It also says that more info on the Lamberton family is included in Volume 2, in the section on the Converse family. I don't have a copy of that... so it may help you more.

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George Lamberton (son of Christopher Lamberton and Mary Denis) was born Abt. 1604 in England, and died 1646. He married Margaret Lewen on January 06, 1628/29 in St Marys, Whitechapel, London, England, daughter of Henry Lewen.

Notes for George Lamberton:

He attempted a settlement.

Lost at sea on the 'Ghost Ship' which departed New Haven Jan 1646 . George Lamberton of New Haven, CT, was probably a merchant from London, England. He, and in the company of others, tried to establish a settlement in Delaware, but were resisted by the Swedes who had settled there.

Failing in this they built or had built a ship in Rhode Island to be used in trade with England and other countries. They named the ship "Fellowship".

In the winter of 1645/6 the Fellowship was chartered by "The Company of Merchants of New Haven". Captain George Lamberton was in command. The ship was laden with peas, wheat, hides from West India, plate and beaver pelts. Seventy persons were on board.

The loading of the ship was delayed so that it was not ready to sail until winter. In order to get to sea they had to chop through ice for three miles. The ship was never heard from again.

THE PHANTOM SHIP

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

  • In Mather's Magnalia Christi,
  • Of the old colonial time,
  • May be found in prose the legend
  • That is here set down in rhyme.

-

  • A ship sailed from New Haven,
  • And the keen and frosty airs,
  • That filled her sails in parting
  • Were heavy with good men's prayers.

-

  • "O Lord! If it be thy pleasure"-
  • Thus prayed the old divine-
  • "To bury our friends in the ocean,
  • Take them, for they are thine!"

-

  • But Master Lamberton muttered,
  • And under his breath said he,
  • "This ship is so crank and walty
  • I fear our grave she will be!"

-

  • And the ships that came from England
  • When the winter months were gone,
  • Brought no tidings of this vessel!
  • Nor of Master Lamberton.

-

  • This put the people to praying
  • That the Lord would let them hear
  • What in his greater wisdom
  • He had done to friends so dear.

-

  • And at last our prayers were answered:
  • It was in the month of June
  • An hour before sunset
  • Of a windy afternoon.

-

  • When, steadily steering landward,
  • A ship was seen below,
  • And they knew it was Lamberton, Master,
  • Who sailed so long ago.

-

  • On she came with a cloud of canvas,
  • Right against the wind that blew,
  • Until the eye could distinguish
  • The faces of the crew.

-

  • Then fell her straining top mast,
  • Hanging tangled in the shrouds,
  • And her sails were loosened and lifted,
  • And blown away like clouds.

-

  • And the masts, with all their rigging,
  • Fell slowly, one by one,
  • And the hulk dialated and vanished,
  • As a sea-mist in the sun!

-

  • And the people who saw thus marvel
  • Each said unto his friend,
  • That this was the mould of thier vessel,
  • And thus her tragic end.

-

  • And the pastor of the village
  • Gave thanks to God in Prayer,
  • That, to quiet their troubled spirits,
  • He had sent this Ship of Air.

AncestryUK.com Family Heritage International

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HISTORY of the families of "LAMBERTON/LAMBERT/LAMBTON/LAMPTON"

The families "LAMBERTON" , "LAMBERT", "LAMBTON" and "LAMPTON" can trace their roots back over 1000 years to Durham in England.

Over the centuries, the families have produced some notable characters incl;

  • WILLIAM LAMBERTON, Bishop of St Andrews, who crowned Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland
  • GEORGE LAMBERTON who bought Philadelphia from the American Indians
  • GENERAL JOHN LAMBERT , Cromwell's understudy during the English civil war
  • JOHN GEORGE LAMBTON, first Governor General of Canada
  • REAR ADMIRAL BENJAMIN LAMBERTON, of the American Navy

Origins of the names LAMBERTON/LAMBERT/LAMBTON/LAMPTON

  • They all derive from the Anglo saxon words;
    • "LAM" - meaning young of a sheep
    • "TUN" - originally used to describe a "fence", then an "enclosure". It was subsequently used to describe an "estate", and eventually it evolved into the word "town"
    • "ER" - in olde english, meant "a relation of" or "related to".
  • "LAMTUN", now spelt "LAMBTON" meant "The Estate of the Lambs". "LAMPTON" is another spelling of the same place found on the first map drawn of Lambton, Durham, England, after the Rising of the North in 1569.
  • "LAMERTUN", now spelt "LAMBERTON" meant "Related to the Estate of the Lambs", and refers to another branch of the same original family from Lambton, Durham that settled in Berwickshire in Scotland approx 1095 A.D.. The Durham branch of the Lamberton family, shortened their name to "LAMBERT" after the Rising of the North in 1569.

There are numerous other spellings of the name to be found in Scotland.

One thousand years ago "LAMTUN", was used to describe an area of land to the north of Chester le Street (an early Roman settlement) on the north bank of the River Wear in north east England. Still owned by the original family, it is now known as the "LAMBTON" Estates, home of the "Earls of Durham".

"LAMERTUN" was used to describe an area of land on the north bank of the River Tweed, 70 miles north, now in Scotland,

Family surnames were not in use at the beginning of the millennium, and place names were used to differentiate individuals e.g. John de (of) Lamtun, first mentioned on a charter of Finchale Abbey in 1189 A.D., and William de (of) Lambertun, first mentioned on a charter of King David I of Scotland in 1136 A.D.

The relationship between the two branches of the family are shown by their Coats of Arms;

LAMBTON Arms - Sable, (Black) a fess between three lambs argent

LAMBERTON Arms - Gules (Red), a chevron between three lambs argent

(Gules (red), a chevron Argent (white) denote the arms of the Earl of Carrick - Robert the Bruce)

The fact that both Coats of Arms carry "three lambs argent" show that they were originally, two branches of the same family.

Both branches of the family are thought to have evolved from the Monks of St Cuthbert who resided at Chester le Street for over 100 years between 883 - 995 A.D. prior to moving to Durham, where they built Durham Cathedral, now a World Heritage site. (It was common practice for the clergy to marry and have children at that time - even the Bishop of Durham is recorded as having a daughter!)

With the invasion of William the Conquerer in 1066, it is thought that some of the monks moved 70 miles north, to the north bank of the River Tweed, where they settled at the then derelict site of Coldingham Abbey, and some settled at the hamlet now known as "LAMBERTON", just north of Berwick.

The first recorded mention of the name "LAMBERTUN" is on a charter of King Edgar of Scotland in 1095 A.D., when he granted lands at Coldingham and its appurtenants, including Lambertun, to the Monks of St Cuthbert. At the same time, he gave Berwick and it's appurtenants to the Bishop of Durham. The border between England and Scotland was drawn between Berwick and Lamberton, and suggests a dispute between the monks and the Bishop of Durham, which was to lead to the War for Scottish Independence, 200 years later.

In 1136 A.D., a "William de (of) Lamberton" is recorded as a witness on a charter of King David I of Scotland for a toft at Berwick and a fishing in the Tweed.

In 1190 A.D., an "Adam de (of) Lamberton" left lands at Lamberton to his grandson, "Galfrid de (of) Hesswelle". Hessewelle refers to a village now known as Haswell, near Durham. The monks at Haswell moved to Finchale Abbey, next to the Lambton estates.

By 1300 A.D., the "Lambertons" are recorded as holding lands in the counties of Berwick, Lanark, Edinburgh, Fife, Forfar, and Stirling.

WILLIAM LAMBERTON - BISHOP OF ST ANDREWS

In 1298 A.D.William Lamberton was appointed Bishop of St Andrews by the Pope. He became the most powerful bishop of the wealthiest See in Scotland. In the absence of a Scottish king, he was appointed as principal guardian of the Kingdom of Scotland with responsibility for all of the crown castles in Scotland in 1299 A.D.

It was William Lamberton who backed and financed William Wallace (Braveheart), in his fight for Scottish independence against King Edward I of England.

"The Clergy saved Scotland's freedom. They later preached for it, spent for it, died for it on the gibbet, and imperilled their immortal souls by frequent and desparate perjuries" (- Source; History of Scotland V1 - Andrew Lang.)

When William Wallace was hung drawn and quartered, it was William Lamberton who as Bishop of St Andrews, crowned Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland. He was later tried at Newcastle, and escorted by Sir William de Wessington (an ancestor of George Washington, First President of the United States of America and a neighbour of the Lambtons) to Nottingham and was later put into irons at Winchester. On 11-12th August 1308, he swore fealty to King Edward II, and promised to to persue the king's enemies in Scotland, agreed to a ransom-fine of £6000 to be paid in instalments and promised to remain within the bounds of the see of Durham., but by 16th March 1309 he was attending King Robert I parliament at St Andrews, in Scotland.

After the battle of Bannockburn, in June 1314, when the English were routed by the Scots, King Edward II tried unsuccessfully to get William Lamberton deposed as Bishop of St Andrews, by Pope Clement V.

William Lamberton rebuilt the Cathedral buildings at St Andrews, which was dedicated at a ceremony remembered as a national thanksgiving for Scottish independence, attended by the Scottish King, seven bishops, fifteen abbots, and "nearly all" the nobility of the realm were present.

He rebuilt the "palace" or castle at St Andrews, and the fortified manor houses at Inchmurdo, Monimail, Dairsie, Torry, Muckhart , Kettins, Monymusk, Lynton, Lasswade, and Stow in Wedale.

He died on May 20th 1328 A.D. and was buried on the north side of the high alter of his cathedral on 7th June 1328.

A ROYAL MARRIAGE AT "LAMBERTON"

In an effort to unite the thrones of England and Scotland, in July 1503, Margaret Tudor, daughter of King Henry VII, of England married King James IV of Scotland at "Lamberton". The following extract from "Tales of the Borders" describes the scene;

"Early in July, in the year 1503, Lamberton moor presented a proud and right noble spectacle. Upon it was outspread a city of pavilions, some of them covered with cloth of the gorgeous purple and glowing crimson, and decorated with ornaments of gold and silver. To and fro, upon brave steeds, richly caparisoned, rode a hundred lords and their followers, with many a score of gay and gallant knights and their attendant gentlemen. Fair ladies too, the loveliest and noblest in the land were there. The sounds of music rolled over the heath. The lance gleamed, and the claymore flashed, and the war steeds neighed, as the notes of the bugle rang loud for the tournament. It seemed as if the genius of chivalry had fixed its court upon Lamberton"

The marriage-treaty of the Princess Margaret of England with James IV of Scotland stipulated that she should, without any expense to the bridegroom, be delivered to the Scottish king's commissioners at Lamberton church; and she is said by tradition to have been married here. In 1517 she returned to Lamberton-Kirk a widowed Queen. In 1573 a convention, which led to the siege of Edinburgh castle, was made at this church between Lord Ruthven and Sir William Durie, the marshal of Berwick

THE RISING OF THE NORTH

In 1569, the peoples of the north of England rose up in rebellion in support of Mary, Queen of Scots, descended from King James IV of Scotland, as the rightful heir to the English throne, after Queen Elizabeth I.

Amongst them were the three sons of Nicholas Lamberton, of Owton (Oxton, Owlton)Manor near Hartlepool in Durham. (Hartlepool was the original seat of Robert the Bruce's family). His son's names were Robert, George, and Clement. Whilst the rebellion came to nothing, Queen Elizabeth I ordered the execution of many of the villagers of Durham who were involved. The "Lamberton" brothers were amongst the first to be arrested and immediately thrown into Durham jail. Robert, the eldest, was sentenced to death although he escaped execution.

In 1543, Nicholas Lamberton had entailed Owton manor on his three sons, Robert, George, and Clement, successively. Nicholas Lamberton's signature is shown on the deeds of the property, now in Durham County Records office. His son's names however are shown as "Lambert" on all official records presumably on instructions of the Bishop of Durham and George Bowes (If the English monarchy had known they were part of the Lamberton family who had crowned Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland, they would all have probably faced execution).

Robert narrowly escaped the scaffold at York, being "stayed for the second execution". He was attainted and his lands seized by Queen Elizabeth I.

Nicholas Lamberton's widow, Anne married Sir Thomas Hylton, of Hylton Castle, and Robert, George and Clement Lamberton became his stepsons. William and Edward Hylton, John Davenport - preacher at Hylton Castle and George Lamberton were amongst the FOUNDING FATHERS OF AMERICA

Nicholas Lamberton's sister, Elizabeth Lamberton, married John Lambert, of Calton in Craven in Yorkshire in England . One of her descendents, John Lambert, was to become General John Lambert, Cromwell's understudy during the civil war, which was to lead to the execution of King Charles I..

The "Lambert" Coat of arms carries "three lambs argent" in one quartile denoting they were related to the original Lamberton family.

A FAMILY FEUD

Whilst the Lambton branch of the family had been calling themselves Lords of Lambton in the Palatinate of Durham (virtually a separate kingdom ruled by the Bishops) for centuries, the family was not recognised by the English monarchy until 1614, when King James VI of Scotland became King James I of England. He knighted William Lambton as Sir William Lambton at Newmarket..

During the civil war, the Lambton family were on Royalist's side and the Lambert family were Roundhead's, (i.e. parliamentarians)

At the battle of Marston Moor on 2nd July 1644, Sir William "Lambton", was captain of a troop of horse on the Royalist side.

Leading the Roundhead cavalry, was General John "Lambert".

"gallantly though they fought, the Royalists suffered overwhelming defeat. It is estimated that they lost 3000 men"

"Lambert" killed "Lambton"

General John Lambert became the leader of the parliamentary forces in the north of England. He became the second most powerful man in the united kingdom It was Lambert who drafted the Instrument of Government that proclaimed Cromwell as Lord Protector after the execution of King Charles I.

When Cromwell died, and his son Richard resigned as the new Lord Protector, it was Lambert who surrounded Parliament with his troops, and dissolved the Rump parliament at sword point as Cromwell had done in 1653. This left Lambert as being in the position of a military dictator, and the most powerful man in the United Kingdom.

Without funds to pay his troops, he was forced to submit to the Rump parliament he had dismissed. He was arrested and sent to the Tower of London. He was one of the few men ever to escape from the Tower , but was eventually caught and sentenced to death, the death sentence being commuted to imprisonment during the King's pleasure.

He was sent to Guernsey , then transferred to Plymouth Sound and spent the last twenty four years of his life in prison? - There is now evidence to suggest he ended his life at Plymouth, America.

AMERICAN PIONEERS.

After the Rising of the North and the Civil War, with the restoration of the monarchy, and the coronation of King Charles II, the Lamberton branches of the family were deprived of their lands, many were forced to flee, some to Ireland, and many further afield.

George Lamberton, a descendent of George Lamberton of Owton in Durham, is shown on the Puritan map of New Haven, now in Connecticut in the USA, as early as 1642. (The earliest settlers arrived on the Mayflower in 1620). He is listed as a merchant, trading along the eastern seaboard of America.

In 1642, New Amsterdam,( now New York), had been settled by the Dutch, and the Delaware, further south, had been claimed by the Swedes.

"In the spring of 1641, a small company sent out by Nathaniel Turner and George Lamberton of New Haven, entered this area of international conflict They bought the lands between Racoon Creek and Cape May on the eastern shore and perhaps other lands on the west bank from the Indians. To the original purchase, George Lamberton added land at the junction of the Delaware and the Schukylkill rivers" - (Source; The New Haven Colony by Isabel Macbeath Calder, Yale University Press 1934. Swedish settlements on the Delaware- Johnson)

GEORGE LAMBERTON HAD BOUGHT "PHILADELPHIA" FROM THE AMERICAN INDIANS!

(A small mining village still exists on the Lambton Estates in England called - "Philadelphia". It means "City of brotherly love!".)

THE PHANTOM SHIP

Eighteen months after "Lambert" had slain "Lambton" at the Battle of Marston Moor in England, and unknown to George Lamberton, he set sail for England on the first transatlantic vessel ever built in America, ploughing it's way through the ice in New Haven harbour and tackling the stormy Atlantic.

According to New Haven colonial records, the vessel neither reached it's port of destination nor returned to it's port of departure. No one has been able to determine the fate of the ship, although after a lapse of many months a "mirage" of the ship was said to have appeared over the harbour at New Haven where George Lamberton had left his wife and his daughters, Mercy, Desire, Obedience, Deliverance, Elizabeth, Hannah, and Hope, behind.

It is presumed that George Lamberton had the land deeds for Philadelphia with him, and it is interesting to note that the same land, which was to become Pennsylvania, was granted to William Penn by King Charles II in 1681.

It is also interesting to note that King Charles II and his brother the Duke of York twice visited General John Lambert, George Lamberton's relative, in prison, once in 1671, and again in 1677, No one knows the purpose of these meetings considering John Lambert was still under the sentence of death that could be implemented at the whim of the king at any time.

What is known is that General John Lambert's son in law was chosen as Governor of Pennsylvania in 1688, and the General John Lambert's wife had been a friend of William Penn..

No one knows what happened to George Lamberton, or the real story behind the "Phantom" ship, but today there are more "Lambertons" in America than in England and Scotland combined.

CANADIAN PIONEERS

Despite their royalist sympathies, the "Lambton" branch of the family did not give up the fight for true democracy.

Henry Lambton, 1666 A.D, was one of the magistrates who successfully fought the battle of the freeholders of the County and City of Durham for the right to send representatives to the House of Commons. William Lambton represented the county under three monarchs and in seven parliaments. He is described as "one of the rustiest independent old fellows of the House of Commons". The "Lambton" family were to represent Durham in no less than 44 parliaments.

In 1787, William Henry Lambton entered the House of Commons and became one of the founders of a society known as "The Friends of the People". Their aim was to restore freedom of election and a more equal representation of the people in Parliament, as well as to secure to the people a more frequent exercise of their right of electing their representatives.

John George Lambton, introduced the Reform Act in 1832 into parliament to give the vote to the new industrial towns. He was made the first Earl of Durham, and was appointed the first Governor General of Canada in 1838.. It was John George Lambton who negotiated the independence of Canada within the Commonwealth.

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND PIONEERS

In 1825, John George Lambton financed the first expedition of settlers to New Zealand, then only inhabited by the mouris who frightened the settlers off. They sailed onto Sydney, Australia where they were amongst the first non-convict settlers.

Today, "Lambertons", Lamberts and Lambtons can be found living throughout New Zealand and Australia.

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS

Evidence of the Lamberton branch of the family's sea faring skills can be found alongside Wellesley in India, and in South Africa during the Boer War. The most recent example was Benjamin Lamberton of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania who fought alongside Commodore Dewey at the Battle of Manila in the American Navy. He became a Rear Admiral of the South Atlantic squadron and had a United States Destroyer named after him, the USS LAMBERTON

Copyright, all rights reserved.

Notes on Bishop William Lamberton;

Source; The Scottish Nation – William Anderson 1862 publ. A. Fullerton & Co, Edinburgh

LAMBERTON, a surname derived from the lands of that name in Berwickshire, now the property of a family of the name of Renton. in Carr's History of Coldingham Priory (page 144) it is stated that a Saxon named Lambert is supposed to have settled here with his followers, and so gave rise to the tun or village, either before the Conquest or within thirty years subsequent to it, as two places adjoining each other bore this name in 1098, when King Edgar bestowed them on the monks of Durham. The manorial tenant, who held a part of these lands of the prior of Durham, assumed from them the name of Lamberton.

In the reign of David I, William de Lamberton was witness to a charter of Earl Henry, son of that monarch, confirming Cospatrick's (Gospatrick’s) gift of the villages of Edrom and Nesbit to St. Cuthbert's monks. Henry de Lamberton was one of the barons appointed in 1292, to examine the claims which Robert Bruce advanced to the Scottish crown, and on 28th August, 1296, he swore fealty to Edward I. at Berwick. Robert de Lamberton also swore fealty to the same monarch, within the chapel of Berwick castle, in June of the same year.

From this ancient family, which has been long extinct, probably sprung the famous William Lamberton, bishop of St. Andrews, the most distinguished person of the name, by whose advice and assistance the immortal Bruce was encouraged in his efforts to deliver Scotland from the English yoke.

He was previously parson of Campsie and chancellor of the diocese of Glasgow, and was consecrated, in 1298, bishop of St. Andrews. On his election he had a dispute with the Culdees, who pretended a right, from old times, to elect the bishop of St. Andrews, but the Pope decided the matter against them. Bishop Lamberton's name appears in many ancient writs. He was one of the regents for Baliol, when the latter was the prisoner of Edward 1. in England.

After Sir William Wallace had, by the jealousy of the nobles, been forced to relinquish the government, Bishop Lamberton, Robert Bruce, earl of Carrick, and John Comyn the younger, were appointed guardians of the kingdom, in name and place of Baliol. They immediately besieged Stirling castle, then held for the English, and it shortly after capitulated.

In 1305, after the judicial murder of Wallace, a parliament was held at London, in which the Scottish nation was represented by ten commissioners, Bishop Lamberton being one of them. To his keeping, the English king committed the eldest son of the steward of Scotland, who had been given to him as a hostage. When Edward heard of the assassination of Comyn at Dumfries, he demanded back the youth, but instead of restoring his charge, the bishop delivered him over to Bruce. He had entered into a secret league with the latter to support his cause, and he placed the crown on his head, on his first coronation at Scone, 27th March 1306. He had enabled Sir James Douglas, then one of his pages, to join the patriot king, as related in his life. (See page 50 of this volume.)

After the defeat of Bruce at Methyen, and the dispersion of his followers, the bishop of St. Andrews was taken prisoner. Being found clad in armour, he was carried in chains to England, imprisoned in the castle of Winchester, and only saved from the gallows by the sacred character of his office. The allowance made to a prisoner of his rank shows the value of money in those days. He received daily, for his own expenses, sixpence ; for a man servant to attend him, threepence; for his footboy, a halfpenny; and for a chaplain, three halfpence.

On the death of Edward 1. in 1307, having made submission to Edward ll., and sworn fealty to him, he was allowed to return to Scotland. He has been accused of unsteadiness and vacillation in his political conduct, but he lived in turbulent and difficult times, and he certainly exerted all his influence and power, which, as the head of the national church, were very great, to place Bruce upon the throne. By his support of the claims of that heroic monarch, the latter, even when his fortunes were at the worst, secured the favour of the Scottish clergy, and was, in consequence, enabled to set the excommunication of the Pope at defiance.

After the victory of Bannockburn, Bishop Lamberton devoted himself to his ecclesiastical duties with great zeal, and munificently expended his revenues in promoting the prosperity of the church. Besides repairing and enlarging the castle of St. Andrews, he built the houses of Monimail, Torry, Dairsie, Inclimurtach, Muckhart, Kettins, Linton, Monymusk, and Stow. He built also ten churches, in his diocese, and finished and consecrated the cathedral in 1318. He adorned the chapter house with curious seats and ceiling, furnished the canons with vestments for their service, and their library with books. He also built a palace for the bishop in St. Andrews. He purchased from the abbot and monks of Reading in Yorkshire, and bestowed on the canons regular of his own cathedral, the island of May in the mouth of the frith of Forth, which King David 1. had given to the said monks, and built a cell upon it for them.

He died ill 1328, and was buried at the north side of the great altar of the High church of St. Andrews.

VISITING THE VILLAGE OF LAMBERTON, SCOTLAND

The village of Lamberton is the first village you come to when crossing the border from England into Scotland on the Great North Road (A1). Drive through the "whale's jawbone", a reminder of Lamberton's seafarers, up the hill to the ruins of Lamberton Kirk (Church). Looking towards the sea you can see Hilton's Bay. Visit the nearby beautiful seaside village of Coldingham and you can see the ruins of Coldingham Priory and the church. Cross the border to the nearby fascinating walled city of Berwick which changed hands between the English and the Scots thirteen times during the Border wars.

For more information concerning the Lamberton/Lambert/Lambton/Lampton familes, please contact Webmaster@AncestryUK.com detailing your interest.


George Lamberton of New Haven, CT was probably a merchant from London, England. He, and in the company of others, tried to establish a settlement in Delaware, but were resisted by the Swedes who had settled there.

Failing in this they built or had built a ship in Rhode Island to be used in trade with England and other countries. They named the ship "Fellowship".

In the winter of 1645/6 the Fellowship was chartered by "The Company of Merchants of New Haven". Captain George Lamberton was in command. The ship was laden with peas, wheat, hides from West India, plate and beaver pelts. Seventy persons were on Board.

The loading of the ship was delayed so that it was not ready to sail until winter. In order to get to sea they had to chop through ice for three miles. The ship was never heard from again.

The ship disappeared in 1646, whose fate is the theme of Longfellow's poem "The Phantom Ship" (presented earlier).


(f/g) Capt George Lamberton Birth: 1604 Whitechapel Greater London, England Death: 1646

Margaret Lewen's first husband. Died by 1647 or 1648.

Find A Grave contributor JMC adds: George Lamberton was a merchant gentleman and sea captain. They married 1-6-1629 in England. They immigrated to America and were a founding family of New Haven Conn. Captain Lamberton died at sea in 1646 on board the "great ship" he commanded. His ship was the theme of Longfellow's poem "Phantom Ship"

Find A Grave contributor Tammy (Gunnels) Potter adds: Birth 1604 in St Marys Whitechapel, London Death 1646

Find A Grave contributor Fran Chancellor adds: his father: Christopher Lamberton baptized 11 MAR 1580 All Hallows Honey Lane London, England his father: Rychard Lamberton SOURCE: England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 Indexing Project #PO2061-1 Source Film #845242 ----------------------------------------------------- Rychard Lambarton m Cassandre Dighton 03 JUL 1578 All Hallows Honey Lane London, England SOURCE: England, Marriages, 1538-1973 Indexing # MO2061-1 Source Film #94512


Family links:

Spouse:
 Margaret Lewen Goodyear (1613 - 1655)
Children:
 Elizabeth Lamberton Selivant / Trowbridge (____ - 1716)

Burial: Body lost at sea Created by: Linda Mac Record added: Mar 01, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 34334787 -tcd


Virkus, Frederick A. The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy. Vol. 1, p. 767.:

Capt. Geo. Lamberton, of the "Phantom Ship"

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900

Posted by: Susan Tow Date: March 24, 1999 at 20:40:24

A listing of Captain George Lamberton's children in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume LXVIII, published in 1914, as follows:

   1. Elizabeth, born abt 1632, died 1716, Married first Daniel Sellivant, 2nd William Trowbridge.
   2. Hannah, born abt 1634, Married first Samuel Wells, second Capt. John Allyn
   3. Hope, born abt 1636, married first <nowiki>-----</nowiki> Herbert, second William Cheney. Hope had a daughter Abigail by her first husband. Abigail Herbert married John Clark.
   4. Deliverance (the only son), born abt 1638. died after 1662, without children
   5. Mercy, baptised 17 Jan 1640/41. Married Shubael Painter
   6. Desire, baptised 14 Mar 1641/42, married Lt. Thomas Cooper Jr.
   7. Obedience, baptised 9 Feb 1644/45, married Lt. Samuel Smith.

George was lost at sea in 1646, so all the children were very young.

It is interesting that Mary, first wife of Lt-Governor James Bishop has been rumored to be a daughter of Capt. Lamberton. The rumor is apparantly based on a passage in the trial of Mrs. Godman for witchcraft in 1653. I can't follow the language, but it does say that the trial record seems to indicate that 'Mrs. Bishop' was either the sister of Hannah Lamberton or of her mother Margaret Lamberton Goodyear.

It is possible that the Mrs Bishop the trial refers to is the wife of James Bishop's brother, Henry. Henry's wife was named Patience, which certainly fits with the other Lamberton girls. But she was not included in the division of Lamberton property, which was divided among the six documented daughters when their mother died.

Anyway, this probably confuses as much as it helps.

The above information in included in the secion of the NEHGR that covers the Painter family. It also says that more info on the Lamberton family is included in Volume 2, in the section on the Converse family. I don't have a copy of that... so it may help you more.

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George Lamberton (son of Christopher Lamberton and Mary Denis) was born Abt. 1604 in England, and died 1646. He married Margaret Lewen on January 06, 1628/29 in St Marys, Whitechapel, London, England, daughter of Henry Lewen.

Notes for George Lamberton:

He attempted a settlement.

Lost at sea on the 'Ghost Ship' which departed New Haven Jan 1646 . George Lamberton of New Haven, CT, was probably a merchant from London, England. He, and in the company of others, tried to establish a settlement in Delaware, but were resisted by the Swedes who had settled there.

Failing in this they built or had built a ship in Rhode Island to be used in trade with England and other countries. They named the ship "Fellowship".

In the winter of 1645/6 the Fellowship was chartered by "The Company of Merchants of New Haven". Captain George Lamberton was in command. The ship was laden with peas, wheat, hides from West India, plate and beaver pelts. Seventy persons were on board.

The loading of the ship was delayed so that it was not ready to sail until winter. In order to get to sea they had to chop through ice for three miles. The ship was never heard from again.

AncestryUK.com Family Heritage International

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HISTORY of the families of "LAMBERTON/LAMBERT/LAMBTON/LAMPTON"

The families "LAMBERTON" , "LAMBERT", "LAMBTON" and "LAMPTON" can trace their roots back over 1000 years to Durham in England.

Over the centuries, the families have produced some notable characters incl;

   WILLIAM LAMBERTON, Bishop of St Andrews, who crowned Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland
   GEORGE LAMBERTON who bought Philadelphia from the American Indians
   GENERAL JOHN LAMBERT , Cromwell's understudy during the English civil war
   JOHN GEORGE LAMBTON, first Governor General of Canada
   REAR ADMIRAL BENJAMIN LAMBERTON, of the American Navy

Origins of the names LAMBERTON/LAMBERT/LAMBTON/LAMPTON

   They all derive from the Anglo saxon words;
       "LAM" - meaning young of a sheep
       "TUN" - originally used to describe a "fence", then an "enclosure". It was subsequently used to describe an "estate", and eventually it evolved into the word "town"
       "ER" - in olde english, meant "a relation of" or "related to".
   "LAMTUN", now spelt "LAMBTON" meant "The Estate of the Lambs". "LAMPTON" is another spelling of the same place found on the first map drawn of Lambton, Durham, England, after the Rising of the North in 1569.
   "LAMERTUN", now spelt "LAMBERTON" meant "Related to the Estate of the Lambs", and refers to another branch of the same original family from Lambton, Durham that settled in Berwickshire in Scotland approx 1095 A.D.. The Durham branch of the Lamberton family, shortened their name to "LAMBERT" after the Rising of the North in 1569.

There are numerous other spellings of the name to be found in Scotland.

One thousand years ago "LAMTUN", was used to describe an area of land to the north of Chester le Street (an early Roman settlement) on the north bank of the River Wear in north east England. Still owned by the original family, it is now known as the "LAMBTON" Estates, home of the "Earls of Durham".

"LAMERTUN" was used to describe an area of land on the north bank of the River Tweed, 70 miles north, now in Scotland,

Family surnames were not in use at the beginning of the millennium, and place names were used to differentiate individuals e.g. John de (of) Lamtun, first mentioned on a charter of Finchale Abbey in 1189 A.D., and William de (of) Lambertun, first mentioned on a charter of King David I of Scotland in 1136 A.D.

The relationship between the two branches of the family are shown by their Coats of Arms;

LAMBTON Arms - Sable, (Black) a fess between three lambs argent

LAMBERTON Arms - Gules (Red), a chevron between three lambs argent

(Gules (red), a chevron Argent (white) denote the arms of the Earl of Carrick - Robert the Bruce)

The fact that both Coats of Arms carry "three lambs argent" show that they were originally, two branches of the same family.

Both branches of the family are thought to have evolved from the Monks of St Cuthbert who resided at Chester le Street for over 100 years between 883 - 995 A.D. prior to moving to Durham, where they built Durham Cathedral, now a World Heritage site. (It was common practice for the clergy to marry and have children at that time - even the Bishop of Durham is recorded as having a daughter!)

With the invasion of William the Conquerer in 1066, it is thought that some of the monks moved 70 miles north, to the north bank of the River Tweed, where they settled at the then derelict site of Coldingham Abbey, and some settled at the hamlet now known as "LAMBERTON", just north of Berwick.

The first recorded mention of the name "LAMBERTUN" is on a charter of King Edgar of Scotland in 1095 A.D., when he granted lands at Coldingham and its appurtenants, including Lambertun, to the Monks of St Cuthbert. At the same time, he gave Berwick and it's appurtenants to the Bishop of Durham. The border between England and Scotland was drawn between Berwick and Lamberton, and suggests a dispute between the monks and the Bishop of Durham, which was to lead to the War for Scottish Independence, 200 years later.

In 1136 A.D., a "William de (of) Lamberton" is recorded as a witness on a charter of King David I of Scotland for a toft at Berwick and a fishing in the Tweed.

In 1190 A.D., an "Adam de (of) Lamberton" left lands at Lamberton to his grandson, "Galfrid de (of) Hesswelle". Hessewelle refers to a village now known as Haswell, near Durham. The monks at Haswell moved to Finchale Abbey, next to the Lambton estates.

By 1300 A.D., the "Lambertons" are recorded as holding lands in the counties of Berwick, Lanark, Edinburgh, Fife, Forfar, and Stirling.

WILLIAM LAMBERTON - BISHOP OF ST ANDREWS

In 1298 A.D.William Lamberton was appointed Bishop of St Andrews by the Pope. He became the most powerful bishop of the wealthiest See in Scotland. In the absence of a Scottish king, he was appointed as principal guardian of the Kingdom of Scotland with responsibility for all of the crown castles in Scotland in 1299 A.D.

It was William Lamberton who backed and financed William Wallace (Braveheart), in his fight for Scottish independence against King Edward I of England.

"The Clergy saved Scotland's freedom. They later preached for it, spent for it, died for it on the gibbet, and imperilled their immortal souls by frequent and desparate perjuries" (- Source; History of Scotland V1 - Andrew Lang.)

When William Wallace was hung drawn and quartered, it was William Lamberton who as Bishop of St Andrews, crowned Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland. He was later tried at Newcastle, and escorted by Sir William de Wessington (an ancestor of George Washington, First President of the United States of America and a neighbour of the Lambtons) to Nottingham and was later put into irons at Winchester. On 11-12th August 1308, he swore fealty to King Edward II, and promised to to persue the king's enemies in Scotland, agreed to a ransom-fine of £6000 to be paid in instalments and promised to remain within the bounds of the see of Durham., but by 16th March 1309 he was attending King Robert I parliament at St Andrews, in Scotland.

After the battle of Bannockburn, in June 1314, when the English were routed by the Scots, King Edward II tried unsuccessfully to get William Lamberton deposed as Bishop of St Andrews, by Pope Clement V.

William Lamberton rebuilt the Cathedral buildings at St Andrews, which was dedicated at a ceremony remembered as a national thanksgiving for Scottish independence, attended by the Scottish King, seven bishops, fifteen abbots, and "nearly all" the nobility of the realm were present.

He rebuilt the "palace" or castle at St Andrews, and the fortified manor houses at Inchmurdo, Monimail, Dairsie, Torry, Muckhart , Kettins, Monymusk, Lynton, Lasswade, and Stow in Wedale.

He died on May 20th 1328 A.D. and was buried on the north side of the high alter of his cathedral on 7th June 1328.

A ROYAL MARRIAGE AT "LAMBERTON"

In an effort to unite the thrones of England and Scotland, in July 1503, Margaret Tudor, daughter of King Henry VII, of England married King James IV of Scotland at "Lamberton". The following extract from "Tales of the Borders" describes the scene;

"Early in July, in the year 1503, Lamberton moor presented a proud and right noble spectacle. Upon it was outspread a city of pavilions, some of them covered with cloth of the gorgeous purple and glowing crimson, and decorated with ornaments of gold and silver. To and fro, upon brave steeds, richly caparisoned, rode a hundred lords and their followers, with many a score of gay and gallant knights and their attendant gentlemen. Fair ladies too, the loveliest and noblest in the land were there. The sounds of music rolled over the heath. The lance gleamed, and the claymore flashed, and the war steeds neighed, as the notes of the bugle rang loud for the tournament. It seemed as if the genius of chivalry had fixed its court upon Lamberton"

The marriage-treaty of the Princess Margaret of England with James IV of Scotland stipulated that she should, without any expense to the bridegroom, be delivered to the Scottish king's commissioners at Lamberton church; and she is said by tradition to have been married here. In 1517 she returned to Lamberton-Kirk a widowed Queen. In 1573 a convention, which led to the siege of Edinburgh castle, was made at this church between Lord Ruthven and Sir William Durie, the marshal of Berwick

THE RISING OF THE NORTH

In 1569, the peoples of the north of England rose up in rebellion in support of Mary, Queen of Scots, descended from King James IV of Scotland, as the rightful heir to the English throne, after Queen Elizabeth I.

Amongst them were the three sons of Nicholas Lamberton, of Owton (Oxton, Owlton)Manor near Hartlepool in Durham. (Hartlepool was the original seat of Robert the Bruce's family). His son's names were Robert, George, and Clement. Whilst the rebellion came to nothing, Queen Elizabeth I ordered the execution of many of the villagers of Durham who were involved. The "Lamberton" brothers were amongst the first to be arrested and immediately thrown into Durham jail. Robert, the eldest, was sentenced to death although he escaped execution.

In 1543, Nicholas Lamberton had entailed Owton manor on his three sons, Robert, George, and Clement, successively. Nicholas Lamberton's signature is shown on the deeds of the property, now in Durham County Records office. His son's names however are shown as "Lambert" on all official records presumably on instructions of the Bishop of Durham and George Bowes (If the English monarchy had known they were part of the Lamberton family who had crowned Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland, they would all have probably faced execution).

Robert narrowly escaped the scaffold at York, being "stayed for the second execution". He was attainted and his lands seized by Queen Elizabeth I.

Nicholas Lamberton's widow, Anne married Sir Thomas Hylton, of Hylton Castle, and Robert, George and Clement Lamberton became his stepsons. William and Edward Hylton, John Davenport - preacher at Hylton Castle and George Lamberton were amongst the FOUNDING FATHERS OF AMERICA

Nicholas Lamberton's sister, Elizabeth Lamberton, married John Lambert, of Calton in Craven in Yorkshire in England . One of her descendents, John Lambert, was to become General John Lambert, Cromwell's understudy during the civil war, which was to lead to the execution of King Charles I..

The "Lambert" Coat of arms carries "three lambs argent" in one quartile denoting they were related to the original Lamberton family.

A FAMILY FEUD

Whilst the Lambton branch of the family had been calling themselves Lords of Lambton in the Palatinate of Durham (virtually a separate kingdom ruled by the Bishops) for centuries, the family was not recognised by the English monarchy until 1614, when King James VI of Scotland became King James I of England. He knighted William Lambton as Sir William Lambton at Newmarket..

During the civil war, the Lambton family were on Royalist's side and the Lambert family were Roundhead's, (i.e. parliamentarians)

At the battle of Marston Moor on 2nd July 1644, Sir William "Lambton", was captain of a troop of horse on the Royalist side.

Leading the Roundhead cavalry, was General John "Lambert".

"gallantly though they fought, the Royalists suffered overwhelming defeat. It is estimated that they lost 3000 men"

"Lambert" killed "Lambton"

General John Lambert became the leader of the parliamentary forces in the north of England. He became the second most powerful man in the united kingdom It was Lambert who drafted the Instrument of Government that proclaimed Cromwell as Lord Protector after the execution of King Charles I.

When Cromwell died, and his son Richard resigned as the new Lord Protector, it was Lambert who surrounded Parliament with his troops, and dissolved the Rump parliament at sword point as Cromwell had done in 1653. This left Lambert as being in the position of a military dictator, and the most powerful man in the United Kingdom.

Without funds to pay his troops, he was forced to submit to the Rump parliament he had dismissed. He was arrested and sent to the Tower of London. He was one of the few men ever to escape from the Tower , but was eventually caught and sentenced to death, the death sentence being commuted to imprisonment during the King's pleasure.

He was sent to Guernsey , then transferred to Plymouth Sound and spent the last twenty four years of his life in prison? - There is now evidence to suggest he ended his life at Plymouth, America.

AMERICAN PIONEERS.

After the Rising of the North and the Civil War, with the restoration of the monarchy, and the coronation of King Charles II, the Lamberton branches of the family were deprived of their lands, many were forced to flee, some to Ireland, and many further afield.

George Lamberton, a descendent of George Lamberton of Owton in Durham, is shown on the Puritan map of New Haven, now in Connecticut in the USA, as early as 1642. (The earliest settlers arrived on the Mayflower in 1620). He is listed as a merchant, trading along the eastern seaboard of America.

In 1642, New Amsterdam,( now New York), had been settled by the Dutch, and the Delaware, further south, had been claimed by the Swedes.

"In the spring of 1641, a small company sent out by Nathaniel Turner and George Lamberton of New Haven, entered this area of international conflict They bought the lands between Racoon Creek and Cape May on the eastern shore and perhaps other lands on the west bank from the Indians. To the original purchase, George Lamberton added land at the junction of the Delaware and the Schukylkill rivers" - (Source; The New Haven Colony by Isabel Macbeath Calder, Yale University Press 1934. Swedish settlements on the Delaware- Johnson)

GEORGE LAMBERTON HAD BOUGHT "PHILADELPHIA" FROM THE AMERICAN INDIANS!

(A small mining village still exists on the Lambton Estates in England called - "Philadelphia". It means "City of brotherly love!".)

THE PHANTOM SHIP

Eighteen months after "Lambert" had slain "Lambton" at the Battle of Marston Moor in England, and unknown to George Lamberton, he set sail for England on the first transatlantic vessel ever built in America, ploughing it's way through the ice in New Haven harbour and tackling the stormy Atlantic.

According to New Haven colonial records, the vessel neither reached it's port of destination nor returned to it's port of departure. No one has been able to determine the fate of the ship, although after a lapse of many months a "mirage" of the ship was said to have appeared over the harbour at New Haven where George Lamberton had left his wife and his daughters, Mercy, Desire, Obedience, Deliverance, Elizabeth, Hannah, and Hope, behind.

It is presumed that George Lamberton had the land deeds for Philadelphia with him, and it is interesting to note that the same land, which was to become Pennsylvania, was granted to William Penn by King Charles II in 1681.

It is also interesting to note that King Charles II and his brother the Duke of York twice visited General John Lambert, George Lamberton's relative, in prison, once in 1671, and again in 1677, No one knows the purpose of these meetings considering John Lambert was still under the sentence of death that could be implemented at the whim of the king at any time.

What is known is that General John Lambert's son in law was chosen as Governor of Pennsylvania in 1688, and the General John Lambert's wife had been a friend of William Penn..

No one knows what happened to George Lamberton, or the real story behind the "Phantom" ship, but today there are more "Lambertons" in America than in England and Scotland combined.

CANADIAN PIONEERS

Despite their royalist sympathies, the "Lambton" branch of the family did not give up the fight for true democracy.

Henry Lambton, 1666 A.D, was one of the magistrates who successfully fought the battle of the freeholders of the County and City of Durham for the right to send representatives to the House of Commons. William Lambton represented the county under three monarchs and in seven parliaments. He is described as "one of the rustiest independent old fellows of the House of Commons". The "Lambton" family were to represent Durham in no less than 44 parliaments.

In 1787, William Henry Lambton entered the House of Commons and became one of the founders of a society known as "The Friends of the People". Their aim was to restore freedom of election and a more equal representation of the people in Parliament, as well as to secure to the people a more frequent exercise of their right of electing their representatives.

John George Lambton, introduced the Reform Act in 1832 into parliament to give the vote to the new industrial towns. He was made the first Earl of Durham, and was appointed the first Governor General of Canada in 1838.. It was John George Lambton who negotiated the independence of Canada within the Commonwealth.

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND PIONEERS

In 1825, John George Lambton financed the first expedition of settlers to New Zealand, then only inhabited by the mouris who frightened the settlers off. They sailed onto Sydney, Australia where they were amongst the first non-convict settlers.

Today, "Lambertons", Lamberts and Lambtons can be found living throughout New Zealand and Australia.

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS

Evidence of the Lamberton branch of the family's sea faring skills can be found alongside Wellesley in India, and in South Africa during the Boer War. The most recent example was Benjamin Lamberton of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania who fought alongside Commodore Dewey at the Battle of Manila in the American Navy. He became a Rear Admiral of the South Atlantic squadron and had a United States Destroyer named after him, the USS LAMBERTON

Copyright, all rights reserved.

Notes on Bishop William Lamberton;

Source; The Scottish Nation – William Anderson 1862 publ. A. Fullerton & Co, Edinburgh

LAMBERTON, a surname derived from the lands of that name in Berwickshire, now the property of a family of the name of Renton. in Carr's History of Coldingham Priory (page 144) it is stated that a Saxon named Lambert is supposed to have settled here with his followers, and so gave rise to the tun or village, either before the Conquest or within thirty years subsequent to it, as two places adjoining each other bore this name in 1098, when King Edgar bestowed them on the monks of Durham. The manorial tenant, who held a part of these lands of the prior of Durham, assumed from them the name of Lamberton.

In the reign of David I, William de Lamberton was witness to a charter of Earl Henry, son of that monarch, confirming Cospatrick's (Gospatrick’s) gift of the villages of Edrom and Nesbit to St. Cuthbert's monks. Henry de Lamberton was one of the barons appointed in 1292, to examine the claims which Robert Bruce advanced to the Scottish crown, and on 28th August, 1296, he swore fealty to Edward I. at Berwick. Robert de Lamberton also swore fealty to the same monarch, within the chapel of Berwick castle, in June of the same year.

From this ancient family, which has been long extinct, probably sprung the famous William Lamberton, bishop of St. Andrews, the most distinguished person of the name, by whose advice and assistance the immortal Bruce was encouraged in his efforts to deliver Scotland from the English yoke.

He was previously parson of Campsie and chancellor of the diocese of Glasgow, and was consecrated, in 1298, bishop of St. Andrews. On his election he had a dispute with the Culdees, who pretended a right, from old times, to elect the bishop of St. Andrews, but the Pope decided the matter against them. Bishop Lamberton's name appears in many ancient writs. He was one of the regents for Baliol, when the latter was the prisoner of Edward 1. in England.

After Sir William Wallace had, by the jealousy of the nobles, been forced to relinquish the government, Bishop Lamberton, Robert Bruce, earl of Carrick, and John Comyn the younger, were appointed guardians of the kingdom, in name and place of Baliol. They immediately besieged Stirling castle, then held for the English, and it shortly after capitulated.

In 1305, after the judicial murder of Wallace, a parliament was held at London, in which the Scottish nation was represented by ten commissioners, Bishop Lamberton being one of them. To his keeping, the English king committed the eldest son of the steward of Scotland, who had been given to him as a hostage. When Edward heard of the assassination of Comyn at Dumfries, he demanded back the youth, but instead of restoring his charge, the bishop delivered him over to Bruce. He had entered into a secret league with the latter to support his cause, and he placed the crown on his head, on his first coronation at Scone, 27th March 1306. He had enabled Sir James Douglas, then one of his pages, to join the patriot king, as related in his life. (See page 50 of this volume.)

After the defeat of Bruce at Methyen, and the dispersion of his followers, the bishop of St. Andrews was taken prisoner. Being found clad in armour, he was carried in chains to England, imprisoned in the castle of Winchester, and only saved from the gallows by the sacred character of his office. The allowance made to a prisoner of his rank shows the value of money in those days. He received daily, for his own expenses, sixpence ; for a man servant to attend him, threepence; for his footboy, a halfpenny; and for a chaplain, three halfpence.

On the death of Edward 1. in 1307, having made submission to Edward ll., and sworn fealty to him, he was allowed to return to Scotland. He has been accused of unsteadiness and vacillation in his political conduct, but he lived in turbulent and difficult times, and he certainly exerted all his influence and power, which, as the head of the national church, were very great, to place Bruce upon the throne. By his support of the claims of that heroic monarch, the latter, even when his fortunes were at the worst, secured the favour of the Scottish clergy, and was, in consequence, enabled to set the excommunication of the Pope at defiance.

After the victory of Bannockburn, Bishop Lamberton devoted himself to his ecclesiastical duties with great zeal, and munificently expended his revenues in promoting the prosperity of the church. Besides repairing and enlarging the castle of St. Andrews, he built the houses of Monimail, Torry, Dairsie, Inclimurtach, Muckhart, Kettins, Linton, Monymusk, and Stow. He built also ten churches, in his diocese, and finished and consecrated the cathedral in 1318. He adorned the chapter house with curious seats and ceiling, furnished the canons with vestments for their service, and their library with books. He also built a palace for the bishop in St. Andrews. He purchased from the abbot and monks of Reading in Yorkshire, and bestowed on the canons regular of his own cathedral, the island of May in the mouth of the frith of Forth, which King David 1. had given to the said monks, and built a cell upon it for them.

He died ill 1328, and was buried at the north side of the great altar of the High church of St. Andrews.

VISITING THE VILLAGE OF LAMBERTON, SCOTLAND

The village of Lamberton is the first village you come to when crossing the border from England into Scotland on the Great North Road (A1). Drive through the "whale's jawbone", a reminder of Lamberton's seafarers, up the hill to the ruins of Lamberton Kirk (Church). Looking towards the sea you can see Hilton's Bay. Visit the nearby beautiful seaside village of Coldingham and you can see the ruins of Coldingham Priory and the church. Cross the border to the nearby fascinating walled city of Berwick which changed hands between the English and the Scots thirteen times during the Border wars.

For more information concerning the Lamberton/Lambert/Lambton/Lampton familes, please contact Webmaster@AncestryUK.com detailing your interest.


George Lamberton of New Haven, CT was probably a merchant from London, England. He, and in the company of others, tried to establish a settlement in Delaware, but were resisted by the Swedes who had settled there.

Failing in this they built or had built a ship in Rhode Island to be used in trade with England and other countries. They named the ship "Fellowship".

In the winter of 1645/6 the Fellowship was chartered by "The Company of Merchants of New Haven". Captain George Lamberton was in command. The ship was laden with peas, wheat, hides from West India, plate and beaver pelts. Seventy persons were on Board.

The loading of the ship was delayed so that it was not ready to sail until winter. In order to get to sea they had to chop through ice for three miles. The ship was never heard from again.

The ship disappeared in 1646, whose fate is the theme of Longfellow's poem "The Phantom Ship" (presented earlier). -------------------- (f/g) Capt George Lamberton Birth: 1604 Whitechapel Greater London, England Death: 1646

Margaret Lewen's first husband. Died by 1647 or 1648.

Find A Grave contributor JMC adds: George Lamberton was a merchant gentleman and sea captain. They married 1-6-1629 in England. They immigrated to America and were a founding family of New Haven Conn. Captain Lamberton died at sea in 1646 on board the "great ship" he commanded. His ship was the theme of Longfellow's poem "Phantom Ship"

Find A Grave contributor Tammy (Gunnels) Potter adds: Birth 1604 in St Marys Whitechapel, London Death 1646

Find A Grave contributor Fran Chancellor adds: his father: Christopher Lamberton baptized 11 MAR 1580 All Hallows Honey Lane London, England his father: Rychard Lamberton SOURCE: England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 Indexing Project #PO2061-1 Source Film #845242 ----------------------------------------------------- Rychard Lambarton m Cassandre Dighton 03 JUL 1578 All Hallows Honey Lane London, England SOURCE: England, Marriages, 1538-1973 Indexing # MO2061-1 Source Film #94512

Family links:

Spouse:

Margaret Lewen Goodyear (1613 - 1655)

Children:

Elizabeth Lamberton Selivant / Trowbridge (____ - 1716)

Burial: Body lost at sea Created by: Linda Mac Record added: Mar 01, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 34334787 -tcd


Abigail Cole m. Daniel Sullavane, or Sillivane, of New Haven, before 1652. Sullivane m. Elizabeth, dau. of George Lamberton, of New Haven, 1654.

http://foundersofhartford.org/founders/cole_james.htm


  • Page 112 of History of the Welles Family in England: With Their Derivation in this ...By Albert Welles, H. H. Clements, Henry Winthrop Sargent
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Capt. George Lamberton's Timeline

1604
1604
London, Middlesex, England
1630
1630
Age 26
London, Middlesex, England
1632
November 5, 1632
Age 28
London, Middlesex, England
1634
1634
Age 30
London, Middlesex, England
1636
1636
Age 32
London, Middlesex, England
1638
1638
Age 34
London, London, England
1640
January 17, 1640
Age 36
New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut
1641
March 14, 1641
Age 37
New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
1643
February 9, 1643
Age 39
New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States