Capt. Thomas Stockett

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Capt. Thomas Stockett

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Canterbury, Kent, England
Death: May 04, 1671 (41)
Anne Arundel County, Province of Maryland
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Stockett, Jr., Esq. and Frances Stockett
Husband of Mary Wells and Mary Yate
Ex-husband of Mary Yate
Father of Elizabeth Plummer; George Stockett; John Stockett; Thomas Stockett, Jr.; Frances Duvall and 4 others
Brother of John Stockett; Damaris Bland; Colonel Lewis Stockett; Frances Stockett; Jane Stockett and 4 others

Occupation: Baltimore County Magistrate, High Sheriff Anne Arundel County, Magistrate, Sheriff
Managed by: David Ray D'atri
Last Updated:

About Capt. Thomas Stockett

Stockett Family
From County Kent came four Royalists, all brothers, to Maryland where they were attached to the retinue of Charles, Prince of Wales, afterwards Charles II of England. During their exile they sustained heavy losses through the destruction and confiscation of their estates by the Puritans. Upon the restoration of the Stuarts and their return to England, they were unable to redeem their Kentish lands, and as a consequence sought Maryland for a new start and outlook.
Of the four brothers, Lewis, Henry, Francis and Thomas, Colonel Lewis Stockett was the only one of the brothers to be listed at the Visitation of Kent in 1619. He was the second but first surviving son. Their father, Thomas Stockett, Esq., married his first cousin, Frances Aylesworth both being grandchildren of Lewis Stockett, a member of the Elizabethan Court and the designer and constructor of many castles and forts built during her reign.
The following was recorded by Joseph Tilley, one-time registrar of All Hallow's Parish, Anne Arundel County, and throws much light upon the history of the family:
"about or in ye year of our Lord 1667 or 8 I became acquainted with 3 gentn yt were brethren & then dwellers here in Maryland the Elder of them went by ye name of Collo Lewis Stockett & ye second by ye name of Captn Thomas Stockett, ye third was Doctr Francs Stockett & ye Fourth Brother was Mr Henry Stockett. These men were but ye newly seated or seting in Anne Arundell County & they had much business wth the Lord Baltimore then ppetor of ye Province. My house standing convenient they were often entertained there: they told mee yt they were Kentish Men or Men of Kent & yt for that they had been concerned for King Charles ye first, were out of favour wth ye following Govenmt they Mortgaged a Good an estate to follow King Charles the second in his exile & at their Return they had not money to redeem their mortgage wch was ye cause of their coming hither". signed Joseph Tilley
The foregoing is not only significant from the viewpoint of family history, but historically it definitely proves that many Maryland emigrants were of the aristocracy and sought the Province for political and religious freedom as well as economic incentives. Charles I was convicted of treason by the Puritan Parliamentary, mostly through the power of personal enemies, and was beheaded at Whitehall on January 30, 1649. Many of his sympathizers that were able to escape from Britain found refuge in Italy, Holland and France. At the decline of Puritan control and after several fruitless attempts by the Royalists to overthrow the Commonwealth, they were ultimately successful. Charles the son and heir returned from exile and arrived at Whitehall on May 29, 1660. The Stockett brothers were therefore in exile about 10 years, as the preposition "with" would indicate that they were near him and his court at St. Germaine on the outskirts of Paris.
The arms used by the Stockets of County Kent and which were engraved on the tombs of some of the early members in Maryland are described as "Or, a lion rampant sable on a chief of the last a tower triple towered argent between two bezants". Crest: "On a stump of a tree argent a lion sejant sable".* (*For the English background, see, "Visitation of Kent 1619 ", pub. by Harleian Soc., London. This author, a descendant of Capt. Thomas Stockett, has seen and handled the original patent of the Stockett arms granted to Lewis Stockett, Esq., grandfather of the four Maryland emigrants, filed at the College of Arms, London.)
The Stockett brothers settled first at the head of Chesapeke Bay in Baltimore County then certainly the outpost of the Province, but later removed to Anne Arundel where their descendants continued to dwell for several generations.
Lewis Stockett, on June 27, 1664, was commissioned colonel and commander-chief of all forces upon the Isle of Kent and extending from that locale to the head of the Bay. No marriage has been proved, and insofar as it is known, he left no issue in Maryland.
In 1660, Francis Stockett, Chirurgeon, represented Baltimore County in the General Assembly. At a meeting of the Council held on April 24, 1661, he was ordered to accompany an expediton to aid the Susquehannock Indians as "chirugeon". On May 18, 1661, he, Samuel Goldsmith, George Goldsmith and Godfrey Bayley, Burgesses from Baltimore County, offered apologies for their conduct in March 1659/60. He was living as late as June 21, 1682, when he was named as the executor of the will of his, Henry Stockett. No marriage has been proved, and insofar as it is known, he left no issue in Maryland.

Captain Thomas Stockett (16__-1671) and his Descendants
Thomas Stockett emigrated to Maryland with his brothers and settled at the head of Chesapeake Bay, certainly at that time the outposts of the Province. According to a Treaty of Peace begun at Spes Utia on May 16, 1661, it was agreed that the Susquehanna Indians should apply at the house of Captain Thomas Stockett for "ticketts" to pass "further among the English Plantacons" and that the Susquehannas should deliver all runaways to Captain Thomas Stockett. {1.} At this time he was addressed as Captain and there is every reason to believe that his commission as a military officer had been granted by the lord Proprietary.
On May 21, 1661, he was commissioned a Magistrate for Baltimore County and a Gentleman of the Quorum. {2.} From 1661 to 1664 inclusive, he represented Baltimore County in the General Assembly at St. Mary's City.{3.} On September 17, 1664, it was ordered that Colonel Nathaniel Uties, Captain Thomas Stockett and Francis Wright confer with the Sasquesabanough (sic) Indians.
It was while living on the frontier with Colonel George Wells, the Gouldsmiths, the Uties and others as his neighbours that he met Mary, the younger sister of Colonel Wells, who ultimately became his wife. The will of Richard Wells Sr., dated June 22, 1667 bequeathed personalty to his daughter "Mary the wife of Thomas Stockett". {4.}
Children of Thomas and Mary (Wells) Stockett
1. Thomas Stockett married twice. q.v.
2. Frances Stockett married Mareen Duvall the Elder.*
3. Elizabeth Stockett married Thomas Plummer as his second wife.
4. Mary Stockett married 1683 at the home of her step-father to Mark Richardson by Henry Dryfield.
(* For ancestry and descendants, see, "Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation".)

He did not remain indefinitely on the frontier, but ultimately established his seat in South River Hundred where a number of conservative Anglican families had settled, counterbalancing the liberal elements in Middle Neck Hundred or the Puritan settlement a little farther North. And there on or near his plantation stood the oldest Episcopal Church in Anne Arundel County---later to become the parish church of All Hallow's. His wife returned to the Anglican faith and at the parish church are found the births and baptisms of their children.
On March 13, 1665/6, as Captain Thomas Stockett he was nominated for High Sheriff of Anne Arundel and duly elected or commissioned within a short time. He held that office continually until his death in 1671.{5.}
On February 8, 1667/8, at a meeting of the Council several orders were issued relative to the raising of a detachment of militia to march against the Indians at which time Captain Thomas Stockett was ordered to raise 25 barrels of corn and 3,800 weight of meat out of the county.{6.}
On March 13, 1688/9, at Herrington he was elected by the freeholders a Burgess for Anne Arundel.{7.} In 1670 he was commissioned the Deputy Surveyor of Anne Arundel by Jerome Whyte, Esq., the Surveyor General.{8.}While Jerome Whyte was on a trip to England, he appointed Captain Thomas Stockett the Acting Surveyor General of the Province as of April 16, 1670.{9.} His will dated April 23, 1671, was admitted to probate on May 3, 1671, in Anne Arundel by Thomas Besson and Thomas Hedges.{10}
To wife Mary the entire real and personal estate during life.
To son Thomas and an unborn child, if son, all land at death of wife.
To daughters (unamed) all personal estate at death of wife.
To Cousen Henry White "I bequeath my Sorrell Sone Coalt".
To..."I do give and bequeth unto my dear and loving Brother ffrancis Stockett my Silver Seale with the Arms of our family Engraved thereon".
Executors__Brothers Francis Stockett, Henry Stockett and Richard Wells.

About 1672 Madam Stockett married George Yate, Esq., of South River Hundred, who succeeded her deceased husband as Deputy Surveyor for Anne Arundel County. Issue resulted (q.v.)
For over a hundred years or more the descendants of Captain Thomas Stockett were centered around "The Obligation" in All Hallow's Parish and to a lesser extent around "Doden another plantation of the South River area.The former was granted originally to Captain Stockett in 1671 by Cecilius, 2d Baron Baltimore of Baltimore, for 663 acres and descended to his only son and heir, Thomas Stockett II. Before his death Thomas Stockett II discovered some surplus continguous land and requested a resurvey, and it was also possible that the initial survey contained more than the stipulated 663 acres. He, however, died in 1732 before the actual resurvey was made. Benjamin Stockett and Lewis Stockett, sons of Thomas Stockett II, were willed the plantation equally, though their father had already alienated several farms. They petitioned His Lordship's Land Office on September 4, 1735, to effect the resurvey which brought "The Obligation" up to 1,157 acres. it was bounded by "Brewerton", "Bessenden", "Larkin's Hills", "White Plaines" and "Doden" through which flowed Stockett Run. In the eighteenth century the plantation was always styled "The Obligation" , but in more recent years it has been referred to as merely "Obligation".
Sources:{1.}Md Archives, vol. 8, p. 421; {2.}Ibid. p. 424; {3.}Ibid. vol. 1 pp. 396, 426, 441, 460, 525; {4.}Wills Liber 1, folio 287 {5.}Md Archives, vol. 3, pp. 539, 541; vol. 2, p. 155; vol. 5, pp. 4, 28, 70 vol. 51, pp. 321, 328; {6.}Ibid. vol. 5, p. 22 {7.}Ibid. vol. 51, p. 325; {8.}Ibid. vol. 5, p. 81; {9.}Ibid. vol. 57, p. 500; {10.}Wills Liber 1, folio 430.

Source: Anne Arundel Gentry; A Genealogical History of Some Early Families of Anne Arundel County, Maryland by Henry Wright Newman; Published by the author, Annapolis, Maryland 1971 vol. 2 pp. 373-374, 377-379. ---


Capt. Thomas Stockett was an associate of Dr. Richard Wells, who was vested in the shipping industry for transport of goods between England and Maryland.
Dr. Richard Wells

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/charles_ii_king.shtml

Came to America with his brothers, Francis, Henry and Lewis after exile in France with Charles II.

See: Visitation of Kent, Harlein Society Publishers, vol. 42, p. 184.

(...carries the lineage to an ancestor to the time of Elizabeth who served at her court as Surveyor of the Works.

(exerpt from To Maryland From Overseas by Harry Wright Newman, Baltimore Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc. 1986, p. 165.


ID: I35207

  • Name: Thomas Stockett
  • Given Name: Thomas
  • Surname: Stockett
  • Sex: M
  • _UID: 45006B41C2B9CD4FA1A9B3D0FC6A3010FBD2
  • Change Date: 30 Apr 2006

The Maryland Calendar Of Wills Compiled And Edited by Jane Baldwin (Jane Baldwin Cotton) Wills From 1635 (Earliest probated) To 1685 Volume I; Family Line Publications Westminster, Maryland 1988, p. 60

Stockett, Thomas, A. A. Co., 23rd Apr., 1671; 4th May, 1671.

  • To wife Mary, entire estate, real and personal, during life.
  • To son Thomas and unborn child. if son, all real estate at death of wife afsd.
  • To daus, (unnamed) all personal property at death of said wife.
  • To cous. Henry White, personalty.
  • Exs.: Brothers Francis and Henry Stockett and Richard Wells.
  • Test: Thos. Beson, Jr., Thos. Hedge. 1. 430.

Thomas Stocket 2.294 A AA #32986 #32986 (between entries for Jul 24 1676 and Oct 13 1676)

Cites rent on land in Baltimore.

List of accounts: Capt. Thomas Beeson, Esq. Chew, the Leany, James White, Richard Tydings, Mr. Glooper, William Crosse, Richard Cheincy, the Chancellor Robert Goldsbery, Mr. Francklin, William Sinick, Thomas Morris, Thomas Parsons, Abraham Birkhead, Mr. Thomas Taylor, Mr. John Welsh, Thomas Linthicum, Benjamin Wells, Mr. Yates, Mr. Maynard, Charles Seven, Henry Bennett, David Stewart, Thomas Besson, Jr., John Watkins, John Gray, Mr. Jenifer, John Larkin, Richard Snoden, Patrick Hall, William Mitchell, Nathaniell Smith, Henry Archer, Mr. Robert Willson, Henry Beedle for his predecessors, William Toulson, George Symons, James Hunter, Francis Smith, Leonard Weyman, Anthony Gongo, Henry Woolchurch, Dr. Henry Lewis, Henry Ridgely, Nathaniell Dolton, John Giles, John Browne, Sr. of New England, Patrick Hall, George Paskall, John Grange, James Frizell, Robert Goldsbery, William Jones, Oliver Hollaway, William Harry, William Russell, Thomas Chandler, Marin du Vail, John Shaw, Thomas Hooker, Anthony Demondidue, Thomas Daborne, William Leaver, Micall Offley, widdow Gardiner, William Roper, Mr. Pawson, Alexander Humphrey, Robert Proctor, Richard Davor, Ralph Hawkins, Henry Hall, Dr. Samuell Lane, Thomas Morris, Thomas Bucknam, Robert Goodwin, James Connaway, William Mitchell, John Crosse, Edward Selby, John Macubin, Samuell Rimiger, John Barnwell, Mr. Francis Holland, William Richardson, Capt. William Burgesse, Mr. Owens, Mr. Richard Ewans, John Hawkins, Nicholas Gazaway, Dr. Jones, Mr. Nathaniell Heathcote, John Hillen, William Jones, Mr. Robert Ridgely, Matthew Selly, Richard Deavor, Robert Dauvers, Mr. Robert Carvile, Thomas Pratt, Nathaniel Smith, John Champ, Abell Browne, Mr. Thomas Hedge, Anthony Holland, Mr. John Welsh, Mr. Edward Maynard, Martin Shepperd, John Watkins, Henry White, Esq. Calvert, Marke Cordea, Nicholas Waterman, Mr. Christopher Rowsby, Mr. David Poole, Richard Keene, John Mercer, John Beamon, Mr. Daniell Jenifer, Richard Arnold, John Gunns.

Executors: Francis Stocket (also Francis Stockett, gentleman), Henry Stocket (also Henry Stockett, gentleman).

Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin, Winter 1987, Vol. 28, #1-pp. 36, 38 - "..He wrote his Will 23 Apr 1671..the estate was devised to wife Mary upon whose death, the land was to descend to their only son Thomas (1667-1732). Unnamed daughters are mentioned and 'Child of my wife now goesth with' and 'To my Dear and loving Brother Francis Stockett.' Bequests were also made to 'my Loving Brother Mr Richard Wells'. and to my cousen (sic) Henry White."

Plummer Family of Maryland and Indiana Quakers Chronicles of Baltimore by Col. J. Thomas Scharf, 1874, p. 9-"In 1659 Baltimore Co. was established. Capt. Thomas Stockett & Mr. Henry Stockett, styled commissioners of the county, took up land."

MARYLAND GENEALOGIES by Gen. Publ. Co., Inc. 1980, p. 138, consolidation of articles from Maryland Historical magazines-"Thomas Stockett's sons, Francis, Thomas, Henry & Lewis all came to America. The three brothers, Thomas, Henry and Francis Stockett moved to Anne Arundel Co. and owned and lived in 'Dodom' and 'Obligation properties' "

The Maryland and Delaware Genealogist, Vol. XXVII No. 1, Winter 1986 (Jan.-Feb.-Mar) p.5: 1666 Officials, Justices: Thos. Stockett, Sheriff -- 1668-1669 Officials, Justices: Thos. Stockett, Sheriff -- Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, by J. D. Warfield. (Baltimore, MD, 1905. Reprinted Regional Publ. Co., Baltimore, MD, 1967 pages 37-39 1776 Census Maryland (Thomas Noble Stockett) p. 9

Excerpts from Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties by Warfield, pp. 93-98

The Early Settlers of Maryland-An Index to Names of Immigrants Compiled from Records of Land Patents, 1633-1680, in the Hall of records, Annapolis, Maryland, Edited. By Gust Skordas. Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Company, 1968, p. 443 -

Thomas Stockett, Liber Q, Folio 62, Transported 1658, Brother to Francis

Maryland Calendar of Wills, Vol. I, p. 60-61

Morris A. Plummer, 186 Barbara Dr., Greenwood, In. 46143-1038 /1993

West, Janet, 7430 Iron Gate, Canton, Mi. 48187-2113 -1993 -

".Capt. Thomas Stockett, and two brothers emigrated to MD in 1638, followed six years later by another brother, Lewis. An entry in All Hallows Parish records states that these brothers were from Kent, Eng. They were loyal to King Charles I and therefore out of favor with the then government. They mortgaged their entire estate to follow King Charles II in his exile and upon their return had no money to redeem their mortgage so they came to Maryland, Hoping to start a new life."

Also see George Alsop's "Alsop's Character of Maryland" and Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland: J. D. Warfield rep. 1973,.p. 94 &

Filing case A, MD Hist. Soc., also

Calvert Co. Gen. newsletter Vol. VI, #2 May 1992, p. 7.

"Capt. Thomas Stockett was in the Assembly 1661-66. He was also a Judge of the County Court until 1668, in which year he was appointed High Sheriff of Anne Arundel County, to which he had removed from Harford Co. These brothers were thought to have been the sons of Thomas and Frances (Aylesworth) Stockett II of Canterbury, Eng., who were granch. of Lewis Stockett, a member of the household of Queen Elizabeth I. -

MD Gen. Soc. Bulletin, Winter 1987, Vol. 28, #1. These brothers were thought to have been the sons of Thomas and Frances (Aylesworth) Stockett of Canterbury, Eng., who were granch. of Lewis Stockett, a member of the household of Queen Elizabeth I.

Whirt's Magna Carta, Vol. 6, pp. 1696-97-98

The MD Gen. Bulletin & Rev. Journal, Vol. 4 # 3 July 1933

Part of MD Gen. Bulletin Vol. 1 to 5

Library of Congress F180 M34 Gen. of the Family of Stockett 1558-1892 by Frank H. Stockett, p. 5:

".(Lewis) with his brothers Thomas, Henry, and Francis, emigrated to the Province of Maryland in 1658."

The Royal Ancestors of the Desc. of Mareen Duvall, the Elder and Frances Stockett, Contributed by Barrett L. McKown, Registrar, Society of Maureen Duval Desc. (founded Dec. 9, 1926 by Dr. Wirt Adams Duvall in Baltimore, MD).

Maryland Gen. Soc. Bulletin, Vol. 35, No. 2, Spring, 1994, pp. 206-214 - "Thomas Plummer's married to Elizabeth Stockett introduces us to the Stocketts, a most interesting colonial family. The immigrants to this country were four Royalist brothers, Lewis, Henry, Francis and Thomas. They were grandchildren of Lewis Stockett who was a member of the household of Queen Elizabeth I. During the Commonwealth in England, these brothers spent ten years in exile in France attached to the retinue of Charles, Prince of Wales, afterwards Charles II of England. During their absence, their estates were confiscated and destroyed by the Puritans. They had mortgaged their holdings to follow the king and upon their return had not sufficient resources left to redeem them, so they came to the colonies to begin a new life. Elizabeth Stockett's father was Captain Thomas Stockett (16..-1671) who settled at the head of the Chesapeake Bay in what is now Harford County, then an outpost of the province. He had been commissioned by the Lord Proprietary as a military officer and it was agreed in the Treaty of Peace with the Indians on 16 May 1661, that the Susquehannocks would apply at his home for "tickets" to pass further among the English plantations and the Indians should deliver all runaways to him. While living on the frontier, he married Mary Wells, daughter of neighbor George Wells, about 1665. The couple moved to South River Hundred near the site of the oldest Episcopal Church in Anne Arundel County-later to become known as All Hallows. The births and baptisms of their children appear in those registers. His plantation was known as "The Obligation." He was High Sheriff of Anne Arundel Co. from 1665 until his death in 1671. In 1670, Jerome Whyte, Surveyor General, went on a trip to England and appointed Captain Thomas to act as Acting Surveyor General in his absence. His will, dated 23 April 1671, was proved 3 May 1671. After his death, his widow, Mary, married George Yates and had other children." NOTE: states married. Mary Wells, dau. of George Wells.This is a likely a misquote of the Anne Arundel Gentry by Newman, p.377, which states: "It was while living on the frontier (at the head of Chesapeake Bay) with Colonel George Wells...and others as his neighbors that he (Captain Thomas Stockett) met Mary Wells, the younger sister of Colonel Wells, who ultimately became his wife. The marriage occurred about 1665. The will of his father-in-law, Richard Wells, Sr., dated June 22, 1667 bequethed personalty to his daughter "Mary the wife of Thomas Stockett" "" Pedigree chart gives Mary Wells father as Dr. Richard Wells-H.S. MD Gen. Soc. Bulletin, Vol. 32, No. 3, pp. 308-313, Summer 1991

Early Families of So. MD, Vo.. II-The Plummer Family, Elise Greenup Jourdan, Knoxville, Tenn., Sep. 1993-p. 2 email Sep., 1998 NLJdork@aol.com

  • Birth: 2 APR 1635 in Bekesbourne, Kent, England
  • Death: BEF 4 MAY 1671 in Anne Arundel County, MD
  • Father: Thomas Stockett b: 7 DEC 1595 in Bekesbourne, Kent, England
  • Mother: Frances Aylesworth

Marriage 1 Mary Welles b: ABT 1631 in Norfolk County, VA

  • Married: ABT 1665 in Anne Arundel County, MD

Children

  • 1. Mary Stockett b: ABT 1666
  • 2. Thomas Stockett b: 17 APR 1667 in All Hallows Parish, South River Hundred, Anne Arundel, MD
  • 3. Frances Stockett b: AFT 23 APR 1671 in Anne Arundel County, MD
  • 4. Elizabeth Stockett b: ABT 1646
  • IMMIGRANT

Capt. Thomas STOCKETT •Born: Apr 2, 1635, Berkesbourne, Kent, ENG

•Marriage: Mary WELLS before 1665

•Died: After Apr 23, 1671, , Anne Arundel, MD, USA

CHILDREN Elizabeth Thomas Frances Mary Unknown child (maybe born after Capt Thomas' death?)


Thomas Stockett immigrated to Anne Arundel Co., Maryland in 1658 with his brothers, Francis and Henry.

Their elder brother, Lewis Stockett joined them in 1664.

They were from Kent(shire), England.

They had apparently been from the strictest faithful followers of Charles I and II. When Charles II was exiled, they mortgaged their property and followed him. At their return, they had no money to redeem their mortgage.

They immigrated to America to get a new start. There they received grants of land from the newly restored Calvert government located near the Susquehanna River in Harford County, MD.

Thomas obtained a patent for land called "Bourne." Brother Henry's was called "Rapalta" and Dr. Francis Stockett's was " Delph" and "Delph Island".

It is thought that these Stockett sons are the children of Thomas and Frances Aylesworth Stockett II of Canterbury, England. This Thomas and Frances were first cousins. They also were grandchildren of a Lewis Stockett who "was a member of the household of Queen Elizabeth I."

Thomas Stockett/Stocket held many highly respected positions in his Maryland home.

He served in the Lower House at St. Marys on April 17, 1661 in Maryland and continued as a delegate through 1666.


He was a Justice of Baltimore Co. from 1661-1668.

In 1668 he was appointed High Sheriff of Anne Arundel Co, to which he and his brothers Henry and Francis then moved.

They purchased land located on a stream adjacent to the Patuxent River they named "Stockett's Run.

Thomas, himself, owned 400 acres in Baltimore Co. and 664 acres called "Obligation" north of Arundel Manor which was on the south/east of "Stocket's Run". (Surveyed Jul. 19, 1669)

He held the title of Deputy Surveyor General (1670-1671), Captain, and High Sheriff at the time of his death in 1671.

His other two brothers remained on Stockett's Run and died in residence there.

The Coat of Arms they used in Maryland was "a lion rampant, sa. on a chief of the last, tower triple towred, ar. between two bezants."

One of his "indentured servants", George Aslop, published early historical and geographical accounts of Maryland life. In his writings, he mentioned the kind treatment he received from Capt. Thomas Stockett and the abundance in the Stockett Mansion.


• Will, Apr 23, 1671, , Anne Arundel, MD, USA. Thomas Stockett's will leaves his estate to his widow, Mary, where son Thomas is to inherit it after her death.

He mentions unnamed daughters and the unborn child his wife was carrying: "Child my wife now goeth with".

He also names his brothers Francis Stocket and Richard Wells (obviously a brother-in-law).

• Probate, May 4, 1671, Anne Arundel, MD, USA. He names his brothers, Francis and Henry, and brother-in-law Richard Wells the executors of his will. He gave the profits of his estate to his wife.

After her death the land was to go to his son, Thomas, and his personal estate to his daughters. He and his wife were apparently expecting when he wrote his will as he requested his land be divided between two sons, if his next was a son. (The sex of this last child is unknown.) He also gave a silver "Dram Cupp" with his name upon it to his brother-in-law, Richard Wells.


Capt. married Mary WELLS, daughter of Dr. Richard WELLS and Francis WHITE, before 1665. (Mary WELLS was born after 1640 in VA, USA, died in Jan 1698 in , Anne Arundel, MD, USA and was buried on Jan 21, 1698 in Davidsonville, Anne Arundel, MD, US.)

NOTES ON CHARLES I Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

Charles was the second son of King James VI of Scotland, but after his father inherited the English throne in 1603, he moved to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life. He became heir apparent to the English, Irish and Scottish thrones on the death of his elder brother, Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, in 1612. An unsuccessful and unpopular attempt to marry him to a Spanish Habsburg princess culminated in an eight-month visit to Spain in 1623 that demonstrated the futility of the marriage negotiations. Two years later he married the Bourbon princess Henrietta Maria of France instead.

After his succession, Charles quarreled with the Parliament of England, which sought to curb his royal prerogative. Charles believed in the divine right of kings and thought he could govern according to his own conscience. Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent, and perceived his actions as those of a tyrannical absolute monarch. His religious policies, coupled with his marriage to a Roman Catholic, generated the antipathy and mistrust of reformed groups such as the Puritans and Calvinists, who thought his views too Catholic. He supported high church ecclesiastics, such as Richard Montagu and William Laud, and failed to successfully aid Protestant forces during the Thirty Years' War. His attempts to force the Church of Scotland to adopt high Anglican practices led to the Bishops' Wars, strengthened the position of the English and Scottish parliaments and helped precipitate his own downfall.

From 1642, Charles fought the armies of the English and Scottish parliaments in the English Civil War. After his defeat in 1645, he surrendered to a Scottish force that eventually handed him over to the English Parliament. Charles refused to accept his captors' demands for a constitutional monarchy, and temporarily escaped captivity in November 1647. Re-imprisoned on the Isle of Wight, Charles forged an alliance with Scotland, but by the end of 1648 Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army had consolidated its control over England. Charles was tried, convicted, and executed for high treason in January 1649. The monarchy was abolished and a republic called the Commonwealth of England was declared. In 1660, the English Interregnum ended when the monarchy was restored to Charles's son, Charles II

NOTES ON CHARLES II Charles II's father, King Charles I, was executed 30 January 1649 Although the Parliament of Scotland proclaimed Charles II King on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth, and the country was a de facto republic, led by Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the United Provinces and the Spanish Netherlands.

A political crisis that followed the death of Cromwell in 1658 resulted in the restoration of the monarchy, and Charles was invited to return to Britain.

Charles's English parliament enacted laws known as the Clarendon Code, designed to shore up the position of the re-established Church of England. He acquiesced to the Clarendon Code even though he favored a policy of religious tolerance. The major foreign policy issue of his early reign was the Second Anglo-Dutch War. In 1670, he entered into the secret treaty of Dover, an alliance with his first cousin King Louis XIV of France. Louis agreed to aid Charles in the Third Anglo-Dutch War and pay Charles a pension, and Charles secretly promised to convert to Catholicism at an unspecified future date. Charles attempted to introduce religious freedom for Catholics and Protestant dissenters with his 1672 Royal Declaration of Indulgence, but the English Parliament forced him to withdraw it. In 1679, Titus Oates's revelations of a supposed "Popish Plot" sparked the Exclusion Crisis when it was revealed that Charles's brother and heir (James, Duke of York) was a Catholic. The crisis saw the birth of the pro-exclusion Whig and anti-exclusion Tory parties. Charles sided with the Tories, and, following the discovery of the Rye House Plot to murder Charles and James in 1683, some Whig leaders were executed or forced into exile. Charles dissolved the English Parliament in 1681, and ruled alone until his death on 6 February 1685. He was received into the Roman Catholic Church on his deathbed.

Charles II was popularly known as the Merry Monarch, in reference to the general relief at the return to normality after over a decade of rule by Oliver Cromwell and the Puritans.

Charles II was succeeded by his brother James.

NOTES FROM MARYLAND ARCHIVES STOCKETT, THOMAS (?-1671). BORN: in Eng-

land, probably in Kent; younger son. IMMI- 
GRATED: in 1658, as a minor or young adult trans- 
ported by his brother Francis Stockett (ca. 1634-
1687). RESIDED: in Baltimore County; Anne
Arundel County by 1666, at "Obligation," All
Hallow's Parish, late 1660s to death. FAMILY
BACKGROUND. FATHER: probably Thomas Stock- 
ett. MOTHER: probably Frances Ayleworth.
BROTHERS: Francis Stockett (ca. 1634 -1687); Henry
(?-1682), who was also transported to Maryland
by his brother in 1658 and who married Katharine
(last name unknown); probably Col. Lewis, who
immigrated by 1664 but apparently did not re- 
main long in Maryland; possibly John; possibly
Ayleworth. SISTER, possibly Jane. MARRIED by 1667
Mary (?-1699), daughter of Richard Wells (?-
1667) and wife Frances. Mary was the niece of
Jerome White (?-by 1677). Her brothers were
Richard; Benjamin; George Wells (?-1696); John;
Robert; and William. Her sisters were Anne (?-
by 1675), who married John Stansby (?-ca. 1682/
83); Martha; Frances; and Elizabeth. Mary Wells
Stockett subsequently married by 1675 George
Yates (?-1691) of Anne Arundel County. CHIL-
DREN. SON: Thomas (1667-1732), who married
first, in 1689, Mary Sprigg (?-1693/94), sister of
Thomas Sprigg (by 1670-by 1739), and second,
in 1700, Damans Welch. DAUGHTERS, more thAN

one, including Frances, who married Maureen

Duvall (ca. 1661-by 1735). PRIVATE CAREER. ED- 
UCATION: literate. RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION: An- 
glican. SOCIAL STATUS AND ACTIVITIES: AcCOrd-

ing to a contemporary, Thomas and his brothers

Francis, Henry, and Col. Lewis were staunch sup- 
porters of King Charles II and followed him into
exile in 1651. When amnesty was declared, the
brothers returned to England to gather their re- 
maining possessions and then emigrated to Mary- 
land. OCCUPATIONAL PROFILE: planter. PUBLIC

CAREER. LEGISLATIVE SERVICE: Lower House,

Baltimore County, 1661 (did not attend), 1662,

1663-1664. OTHER PROVINCIAL OFFICE: deputy
surveyor general, 1670-1671 (while Jerome White
(?-by 1677) was absent). LOCAL OFFICES: justice,
Baltimore County, 1661-1664 (quorum, 1661-
1664); sheriff, Anne Arundel County, 1666-1670.
MILITARY SERVICE: captain, by 1671. WEALTH

DURING LIFETIME. LAND AT FIRST ELECTION: prob-

ably 400 acres in Baltimore County. SIGNIFICANT

CHANGES IN LAND BETWEEN FIRST ELECTION AND

DEATH: surveyed 663 acres in Anne Arundel

County, 1669. WEALTH AT DEATH. DIED: between
April 23 and May 4, 1671, in Anne Arundel Coun- 
ty. PERSONAL PROPERTY: TEV, at least 53,486 and
probably as much as 85,865 pounds of tobacco (in- 
cluding 3 servants, 1 slave, and books); FB, prob- 
ably 23,361 pounds of tobacco. LAND: 1,263 acres
in Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties.

GEDCOM Source

MH:S500012 Charles Edward Martin Martin - Able Web Site <p>MyHeritage family tree</p><p>Family site: Martin - Able Web Site</p>Family tree: 69838871-1 69838871-1 Discovery MH:SC501016 Captain Thomas Stockett, Ship's Captain Captain Thomas Stockett, Ship's Captain 22 DEC 2015 Added by confirming a Smart Match 3


GEDCOM Note

Joseph Tilley, a contemporary and registrar of All Hollow's Parish wrote this entry into the registry: "About or in the year of our Lord 1667/ 68 I became acquainted with 4 Gents that were Brethren and then dwellers here in Maryland, the Elder of them went by the name of Collo? Lewis Stockett and the second by the name of Capt. Thomas Stockett, the third was Doctr? Francis Stockett and the fourth Brother was Mr. Henry Stockett . These men were but the newly seated or setting in Anne Arundel County (Maryland) and they had much business with the Lord Baltimore then pp etor? of the Province. My house standing convenient they were often entertained there. They told me that they were Kentich Men or Men of Kent (shire, England) and for that they had been concerned for King Charles the First, were out of favor with the following Government they mortgaged a Good an estate to follow King Charles the second in his exile and at their return they had no money to redeem their mortgage which was the cause of their coming hither." They are thought to be sons of Thomas and Frances (Aylesworth II) of Canterbury, England who were first cousins and grandchildren of Lewis Stockett, a member of the household of Queen Elizabeth the First. Holding membership in the Church of England, he served in the Lower House and was a Justice in Baltimore County, England (1661-1664) where he owned a 400 acre tract. "Obligation" a 663 acre tract north of Anne Arundell Manor was surveyed for him, 23 April 1671, witnessed by Thomas Beson Jr. and Thomas Hodge, the estate was devised? to wife, Mary, upon his (Thomas Stockett) death, the land was to descent to their only son, Thomas (1667-1732.) Unnamed daughters are mentioned and "Child of my wife no goeth with" and To my Dear and loving Brother Francis Stockett my Silver Seale with the arms of our family Engraven thereon." Bequests were also made to "my Loving Brother, Mr Richard Wells" of a silver dram with my name thereon and to my cousin (sic) Henry White."

Thomas Stockett emigrated to Maryland with his brothers and settled at the head of Chesapeake Bay, certainly at the time the outposts of the Province. According to a Treaty of Peace begun at Spes Utia on May 16, 1661, it was agreed that the Susquehanna Indians should apply at the house of Captain Thomas Stockett for "ticketts" to pass "further among the English Plantacons" and that the Susquehannas should deliver all run aways to Captain Thomas Stockett. At this time he was addressed as Captain and there is every reason to believe that his commission as a military officer had been granted by the Lord Proprietary. On May 21, 1661, Thomas was commissioned a Magistrate for Baltimore County and a Gentleman of the Quorum. From 1661 to 1664 inclusive, he represented Baltimore County in the General Assembly at St. Mary's City. On September 17, 1664, it was ordered that Colonel Nathaniel Uties, Captain Thomas Stockett and Francis Wright confer with the Sasquesabanough "Sic" Indians. It was while living on the frontier with Colonel George Wells, the Gouldsmith, the Uties and others as his neighbours that he met Mary Wells, the younger sister of Colonel Wells, who ultimately became his wife. The marriage occurred about 1665. The will of his father-in-law, Richard Wells Sr., dated June 22, 1667, bequeathed personalty to his daughter " Mary the wife of Thomas Stockett." Thomas did not remain indefinitely on the frontier, but ultimately established his seat in South River Hundred where a number of conservative Anglican families had settled, counterbalancing the liberal elements in Middle Neck Hundred or the Puritan settlement a little farther North. There on or near his plantation stood the oldest Episcopal Church in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland, later to become the parish church of All Hallows. His wife, Mary, returned to the Anglican faith and at the parish church are found the births and baptisms of their children. On March 13, 1665/6, Captain Thomas Stockett was nominated for High Sheriff of Anne Arundel and duly elected or commissioned within a short time. He held that office continuously until his death in 1671. On February 8, 1667/8, at a meeting of the Council several orders were issued relative to the raising of a detachment of militia to march against the Indians at which time Captain Thomas Stockett was ordered to raise 25 barrels of corn and 3,800 weight of meat out of the county. On March 13, 1668/9, at Herrington he was elected by the freeholders a Burgess for Anne Arundel. In 1670 he was commissioned the Deputy Surveyor of Anne Arundel by Jerome Whyte, Esq., the Surveyor General. While Jerome Whyte was on a trip to England, he appointed Captain Thomas Stockett the Acting Surveyor General of the Province as of April 16, 167 0.

The will of Captain Thomas Stockett, dated April 23, 1671, was admitted to probate on May 3, 1671, in Anne Arundel Co., Maryland by Thomas Besson and Thomas Hedges. To wife, Mary, the entire real and personal estate during life. To son, Thomas, and an unborn child, is son, all land at death of wife. To daughters (unnamed) all personal estate at death of wife. To cousin, Henry White, "I bequeath my Siorrell Stone Coalt." To . . . "I do give and bequeath unto my dear and loving brother, Francis Stockett, my Silver Seale with the Arms of our family engraved thereon." Executors: brothers, Francis Stockett, Henry Stockett and Richard Wells.

For over a hundred years or more the descendants of Captain Thomas Stockett were centered around "The Obligation" in All Hallow's Parish and to a lesser extent around "Doden" another plantation of the South River area. The former was granted originally to Captain Stockett in 1671 by Cecilius, 2d Baron Baltimore of Baltimore, for 663 acres and descended to his only son and heir, Thomas Stockett II. Before his death Thomas Stockett II discovered some surplus continguous land and requested a resurvey, and it was also possible that the initial contained more that the stipulated 663 acres. He, however, died in 1732 before the actual resurvey was made. Benjamin Stockett and Lewis Stockett, sons of Thomas Stockett II, were willed the plantation equally, though their father had already alienated several farms. They petitioned His Lordship's Land Office on September 4, 1735, to effect the resurvey which brought "The Obligation" up to 1,157 acres. It was bounded by "Brewerton", "Bessenden ", "Larkin's Hills", "White Plaines" and "Doden" through which flowed Stockett Run. In the eighteenth century the plantation was always styled "The Obligation" but in more recent years it has been referred to as merely "Obligation." During the Commonwealth in England, Thomas Stockett spent 10 years in exile in France attached to the retinue (an attendant of a person of high stations) of Charles, Prince of Wales, afterwards Charles II of England. During his absence, his estate was confiscated and destroyed by the Puritans. He came to the colonies to begin a new life. He settled at the head of the Chesapeake Bay in what is now Harford Co., Maryland then an outpost of the Province. (Source: Chaney, Maryland Genealogi cal Society Bulletin, Vol. 35 #2, pages 206-207.)

1658: transported 1658; brother to Francis - book Q, page 62. Ref: Skordas, and seen in Maryland Archives Microfilm of Patents, Certificate s & Warrants, 1657-58 No. 59 film # 3-72-4-29,) From Patent Book Q, p age 62: Francis Stockett demands 250 acres for transporting himself, Thomas Stockett and Henry Stockett, his brothers, and Thomas Marshall and John Russell into this Province.

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Capt. Thomas Stockett's Timeline

1630
April 2, 1630
Canterbury, Kent, England
1635
July 19, 1635
Age 5
Hackington, Canterbury, Kent, England
July 19, 1635
Age 5
St. Stephen's Parish, Hackington, Kent, England
1642
1642
Age 11
Virginia from England, moving to Arundel Co., Maryland
1656
1656
Age 25
Anne Arundel County, MD, United States
1661
1661
Age 30
All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel County, Province of Maryland
1666
1666
Age 35
Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States
1667
April 17, 1667
Age 37
South River Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland
April 17, 1667
Age 37
Anne Arundel County, MD, United States