Colonel Augustine Warner, II

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Colonel Augustine Warner, II

Also Known As: "Augustine Warner Jr", "Augustine Warner II"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia, British Colonial America
Death: June 19, 1681 (37-39)
Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia, British Colonial America
Place of Burial: Naxera, Gloucester County, Virginia, British Colonial America
Immediate Family:

Son of Colonel Augustine Warner and Mary Warner
Husband of Mildred Warner
Father of Mary Smith; Augustine Warner, III; Robert Warner; Sarah Howard; George Warner and 3 others
Brother of Sarah Towneley and unknown Cant

Occupation: Colonel, Speaker of Virginia House of Burgesses
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Colonel Augustine Warner, II


In the winter of 1642, Augustine Warner I arrived in Jamestown with twelve new settlers for the Virginia Colonies. For bringing these colonists to the new frontier, Warner was given a “head Grant” of 600 acres in Gloucester, Virginia. He eventually expanded his acreage at his new plantation, WARNER HALL, to several thousand acres prior to his death in 1674.

During his life he was Justice of York, Justice of Gloucester, and a member of the King’s Council in Virginia. Augustine Warner was the great, great grandfather of George Washington, and an ancestor of Robert E. Lee. Queen Elizabeth II is a direct descendant of Augustine Warner I through the Bowes-Lyon family and the Earl of Strathmore. Warner Hall is referred to as the home of the Queen’s American ancestors.

Augustine Warner II (1642 – 1681) inherited Warner Hall upon the death of his father in 1674, and further developed the plantation house and property. Augustine Warner II, like his father, was a member of the King’s Council and also served as Speaker of The House of Burgesses in Williamsburg. Augustine Warner II (1642-1681) inherited Warner Hall upon the death of his father in 1674, and further developed the plantation house and property.

Augustine Warner II died at the age of 39 on June 19, 1681, predeceasing his wife, Mildred Reade Warner, who he had married by 1666.

In 1676, Nathaniel Bacon came to Gloucester after burning Jamestown and made Warner Hall his headquarters. It was at Warner Hall that Bacon invited the “Oath of Fidelity” of his fellow countrymen.

All of Augustine Warner II ‘s sons died young and when Augustine himself died in 1681 at the age of 39, he left three daughters, Mary, Mildred and Elizabeth. Mary went on to marry John Smith, of Purton, on the York, and their son, Augustine Smith was said to have been one of the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe who accompanied Governor Spotswood on his famous expedition across the Blue Ridge Mountains in 1716.

Mildred Warner married Lawrence Washington and their son, Augustine, married Mary Ball. Augustine and Mary became the proud parents of George Washington, who was named after his great-grandfather, George Reade, founder of Yorktown. Perhaps the most recognized patriot in American history, General George Washington led the Colonies to independence from the British in the Revolution of 1776. General George Washington continued his role as a great patriot in 1789 and become the first President of the United States of America. In a famous funeral phrase, Henry Lee declared that Washington was “first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

Elizabeth, the third daughter of Augustine Warner II, became the wife of John Lewis and inherited Warner Hall. Their son, John Lewis II (1702-1754) was a member of His Majesty’s Council, and was prominent in Gloucester County. The Lewis Family occupied Warner Hall for generations and members of the family immigrated to all parts of the United States. Lewis family descendants built a number of important Virginia homes including Belle Farm, Eagle Point, Abingdon and Severn Hall. Colonel Fielding Lewis of Belle Farm, was the grandson of Elizabeth and John Lewis. Col. Lewis was married twice, first to Catherine Washington, and after her death, to Elizabeth (Betty) Washington, sister of George. One of Fredericksburg’s most beautiful and historic homes, Kenmore, was built by Fielding Lewis for his wife Betty.

As the Warner – Lewis family grew over the years so did the size of the house. From the time of Augustine Warner II, to his daughter Elizabeth and her husband John Lewis, the family and plantation prospered. Warner Hall came to consist of a large center structure with two separate detached brick dependencies. The east building was the plantation kitchen and laundry, and the west building was the tutor’s quarters, plantation schoolroom and shipping office.

In 1740, a fire destroyed the original 17th century Warner home, but the Lewis family rebuilt their residence on the same foundations. The property remained in the Lewis family until the 1830’s. In 1849, the center section of the original Lewis house suffered a devastating fire, leaving the two brick east and west dependencies and out buildings. Before the turn of the century, the Cheney family acquired the property and built the present wood-framed Colonial Revival mansion that was popular in that era, on the original foundation and of the same floor plan as the Lewis house.

Listed by both the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission, The Inn at Warner Hall continues to be of major architectural and genealogical significance in American history. Warner Hall has long been considered one of the premier properties in the Virginia Tidewater area. The property is located 3 ½ miles from U.S. Route 17, and Colonial Williamsburg and the Hampton Roads area are just 30 minutes away. The State capital of Richmond and the Norfolk Harbor are approximately a one hour drive.

https://www.warnerhall.com/words-from-our-innkeepers/a-brief-histor...

11/17/2018

————————— Augustine Warner Jr. is the common ancestor of George Washington and Queen Elizabeth II.[2]

Colonel Augustine Warner II succeeded his father and became political friends with Nathaniel Bacon, who was educated at Oxford and a Barrister in London. Bacon staged the first actual American Revolution in 1676, as he organized an army of three hundred to four hundred pioneers to cope with the Indians North of the York River. He was involved in a private fur deal spanning the entire Virginia frontier. By the end of the decade, Bacon's troops had taken care of all the Indian tribes. They marched on Jamestown as Governor William Burkeley fled, and sailed to the Eastern Shore. Nathaniel Bacon and his troops soon set up their headquarters at Warner Hall after the burning of Jamestown in 1676. This Virginia Colony was in charge of matters North of the York to the Potomac River. Beyond the Potomac, lay the Maryland Colony. It was at Warner Hall, where he sent notices for the people to assemble to take the "Oath of Fidelity" of his fellow countrymen. Bacon contracted Malaria and died within a year his troops then fleeing the Colony.

Augustine Warner II inherited Warner Hall at the death of his father in 1674. He married Mildred Reade, the daughter of George Reade, founder of Yorktown, and after her death, Elizabeth Martian. Augustine II was speaker of the House of Burgesses during Bacon's Rebellion in 1676, and also was a member of the Council.

When Augustine Warner II died, he left three daughters his son dying June 19, 1681. Mary became the wife of John Smith, of Purton, on the York, and their son Augustine Smith was said to have been one of the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe with Governor Spotswood, on his famous expedition across the Blue Ridge in 1716. Mildred, another daughter of Augustine Warner II, married Lawrence Washington, of Westmoreland, and her second husband was George Gale. Her three Washington children were John, who built Highgate, Augustine, father of George Washington (first President of the United States), and Mildred. Augustine Washington married Mary Ball, and named his son George for his great grandfather, George Reade, who founded Yorktown.

Elizabeth, the third daughter of Augustine Warner II, became the wife of John Lewis and inherited Warner Hall. Their son, John Lewis II was a member of His Majesty's Council, and was prominent in the county. For generations the Lewises lived here, and members of the family emigrated to all parts of the United States. Their descendants built Belle Farm, Eagle Point, Abingdon, Severby, and Severn Hall, all in Virginia. Elizabeth and John Lewis I's grandson, Colonel Fielding Lewis, of Belle Farm, married Catherine Washington, and after her death married Elizabeth Washington, also known as Betty, sister of George. He built beautiful Kenmore for her, in Fredericksburg.

Children of Colonel Augustine Warner and Mildred Reade

  1. Mary Warner+
  2. Mildred Warner+ b. 1670/71, d. 26 Mar 1701
  3. Elizabeth Warner+1 b. 24 Nov 1672, d. 5 Feb 1720

Alternate Death Date: 6/9/1681


Settled in Virginia 1650 ?

Augustine Warner, Jr. (1642/3–June 19, 1681) was a Virginia politician and landowner. He served in the House of Burgesses 1666–77 and was its Speaker in two separate sessions in 1676 and 1677, before and after Bacon's Rebellion. He then served on the Governor's Council from about October 1677 until his death.

Early life

Warner's exact birth date is unclear; different sources cite July 3, 1642 and October 20, 1643. He was the only son of Augustine Warner, who immigrated from England in 1628 and patented the plantation called "Austin's Desire" in Gloucester County, Virginia in 1642, building Warner Hall on the property. Warner Sr. served on the Council from 1659 until his death in 1674.[1][2]

The younger Warner went to London in 1658 and attended the Merchant Taylors' School. He returned to Virginia after finishing his education and married Margaret Reade, daughter of George Reade, a member of the Council. They settled on a farm in Gloucester County, living there until he inherited Warner Hall in 1674.[1]

[edit] Bacon's Rebellion

In March 1676 the General Assembly called by Governor Sir William Berkeley in 1661 held its last session. Warner was elected Speaker, replacing Robert Wynne, who died the previous year. On May 10, as the Nathaniel Bacon crisis was building, Berkeley dissolved the House of Burgesses and called new elections. It is not known if Warner served in the new House that met in June.[1]

Fighting began in late July. Warner remained loyal to Berkeley, joining his forces. Bacon captured Jamestown and burned it on September 19, then crossed the York River and seized Warner Hall. Bacon died in October, but the rebellion continued until early January 1677.[1]

Warner served on a court-martial headed by Berkeley on January 11, 1677. Berkeley called for elections, and Warner was elected Speaker of the new House when it convened in February. The Assembly met until early April. It revoked all acts of the June 1676 Assembly, and then reenacted some.[1]

[edit] Later years

In late September – early October 1677 Warner was appointed to the Council. Although he was aligned with the "Green Spring faction" of Berkeley loyalists after Berkeley's removal as governor, he was not removed from the Council, unlike such diehards as Philip Ludwell and Thomas Ballard.[1]

Warner sued William Byrd I, a sometime ally of Bacon, for the damage the rebels had done to Warner Hall. Byrd claimed in his defense that he was Bacon's captive, not his supporter, and was not responsible.[1]

Warner died June 19, 1681, and was interred at Warner Hall.

Colonel Augustine Warner

M, #2280, b. 3 June 1642, d. 19 June 1681

Colonel Augustine Warner|b. 3 Jun 1642\nd. 19 Jun 1681|p228.htm#i2280|Captain Augustine Warner|b. 28 Sep 1611\nd. 24 Dec 1674|p17617.htm#i176168|Mary Towneley|b. 13 May 1614\nd. 11 Aug 1662|p17617.htm#i176169|||||||Lawrence Towneley|d. 12 Feb 1654/55|p17622.htm#i176218|Jennet Halstead||p17622.htm#i176219|

Last Edited=5 Dec 2008

Colonel Augustine Warner was born on 3 June 1642 at York County, Virginia, U.S.A.. He was the son of Captain Augustine Warner and Mary Towneley.1 He married Mildred Reade, daughter of Colonel George Reade and Elizabeth Martiau, in 1670/71. He died on 19 June 1681 at age 39 at Warner Hall, Virginia, U.S.A..

Colonel Augustine Warner held the office of Speaker of the House of Burgesses [Virginia].

Children of Colonel Augustine Warner and Mildred Reade

  1. Mary Warner+
  2. Mildred Warner+ b. 1670/71, d. 26 Mar 1701
  3. Elizabeth Warner+1 b. 24 Nov 1672, d. 5 Feb 1720

Alternate Death Date: 6/9/1681


Settled in Virginia 1650 ?

Augustine Warner, Jr. (1642/3–June 19, 1681) was a Virginia politician and landowner. He served in the House of Burgesses 1666–77 and was its Speaker in two separate sessions in 1676 and 1677, before and after Bacon's Rebellion. He then served on the Governor's Council from about October 1677 until his death.

Early life

Warner's exact birth date is unclear; different sources cite July 3, 1642 and October 20, 1643. He was the only son of Augustine Warner, who immigrated from England in 1628 and patented the plantation called "Austin's Desire" in Gloucester County, Virginia in 1642, building Warner Hall on the property. Warner Sr. served on the Council from 1659 until his death in 1674.[1][2]

The younger Warner went to London in 1658 and attended the Merchant Taylors' School. He returned to Virginia after finishing his education and married Margaret Reade, daughter of George Reade, a member of the Council. They settled on a farm in Gloucester County, living there until he inherited Warner Hall in 1674.[1]

[edit] Bacon's Rebellion

In March 1676 the General Assembly called by Governor Sir William Berkeley in 1661 held its last session. Warner was elected Speaker, replacing Robert Wynne, who died the previous year. On May 10, as the Nathaniel Bacon crisis was building, Berkeley dissolved the House of Burgesses and called new elections. It is not known if Warner served in the new House that met in June.[1]

Fighting began in late July. Warner remained loyal to Berkeley, joining his forces. Bacon captured Jamestown and burned it on September 19, then crossed the York River and seized Warner Hall. Bacon died in October, but the rebellion continued until early January 1677.[1]

Warner served on a court-martial headed by Berkeley on January 11, 1677. Berkeley called for elections, and Warner was elected Speaker of the new House when it convened in February. The Assembly met until early April. It revoked all acts of the June 1676 Assembly, and then reenacted some.[1]

[edit] Later years

In late September – early October 1677 Warner was appointed to the Council. Although he was aligned with the "Green Spring faction" of Berkeley loyalists after Berkeley's removal as governor, he was not removed from the Council, unlike such diehards as Philip Ludwell and Thomas Ballard.[1]

Warner sued William Byrd I, a sometime ally of Bacon, for the damage the rebels had done to Warner Hall. Byrd claimed in his defense that he was Bacon's captive, not his supporter, and was not responsible.[1]

Warner died June 19, 1681, and was interred at Warner Hall.

Colonel Augustine Warner

M, #2280, b. 3 June 1642, d. 19 June 1681

Colonel Augustine Warner|b. 3 Jun 1642\nd. 19 Jun 1681|p228.htm#i2280|Captain Augustine Warner|b. 28 Sep 1611\nd. 24 Dec 1674|p17617.htm#i176168|Mary Towneley|b. 13 May 1614\nd. 11 Aug 1662|p17617.htm#i176169|||||||Lawrence Towneley|d. 12 Feb 1654/55|p17622.htm#i176218|Jennet Halstead||p17622.htm#i176219|

Last Edited=5 Dec 2008

Colonel Augustine Warner was born on 3 June 1642 at York County, Virginia, U.S.A.. He was the son of Captain Augustine Warner and Mary Towneley.1 He married Mildred Reade, daughter of Colonel George Reade and Elizabeth Martiau, in 1670/71. He died on 19 June 1681 at age 39 at Warner Hall, Virginia, U.S.A..

Colonel Augustine Warner held the office of Speaker of the House of Burgesses [Virginia].

Children of Colonel Augustine Warner and Mildred Reade

  1. Mary Warner+
  2. Mildred Warner+ b. 1670/71, d. 26 Mar 1701
  3. Elizabeth Warner+1 b. 24 Nov 1672, d. 5 Feb 1720

Alternate Death Date: 6/9/1681


Settled in Virginia 1650 ?


Augustine Warner, Jr. (1642/3–June 19, 1681) was a Virginia politician and landowner. He served in the House of Burgesses 1666–77 and was its Speaker in two separate sessions in 1676 and 1677, before and after Bacon's Rebellion. He then served on the Governor's Council from about October 1677 until his death.

Early life

Warner's exact birth date is unclear; different sources cite July 3, 1642 and October 20, 1643. He was the only son of Augustine Warner, who immigrated from England in 1628 and patented the plantation called "Austin's Desire" in Gloucester County, Virginia in 1642, building Warner Hall on the property. Warner Sr. served on the Council from 1659 until his death in 1674.[1][2]

The younger Warner went to London in 1658 and attended the Merchant Taylors' School. He returned to Virginia after finishing his education and married Margaret Reade, daughter of George Reade, a member of the Council. They settled on a farm in Gloucester County, living there until he inherited Warner Hall in 1674.[1]

[edit] Bacon's Rebellion

In March 1676 the General Assembly called by Governor Sir William Berkeley in 1661 held its last session. Warner was elected Speaker, replacing Robert Wynne, who died the previous year. On May 10, as the Nathaniel Bacon crisis was building, Berkeley dissolved the House of Burgesses and called new elections. It is not known if Warner served in the new House that met in June.[1]

Fighting began in late July. Warner remained loyal to Berkeley, joining his forces. Bacon captured Jamestown and burned it on September 19, then crossed the York River and seized Warner Hall. Bacon died in October, but the rebellion continued until early January 1677.[1]

Warner served on a court-martial headed by Berkeley on January 11, 1677. Berkeley called for elections, and Warner was elected Speaker of the new House when it convened in February. The Assembly met until early April. It revoked all acts of the June 1676 Assembly, and then reenacted some.[1]

[edit] Later years

In late September – early October 1677 Warner was appointed to the Council. Although he was aligned with the "Green Spring faction" of Berkeley loyalists after Berkeley's removal as governor, he was not removed from the Council, unlike such diehards as Philip Ludwell and Thomas Ballard.[1]

Warner sued William Byrd I, a sometime ally of Bacon, for the damage the rebels had done to Warner Hall. Byrd claimed in his defense that he was Bacon's captive, not his supporter, and was not responsible.[1]

Warner died June 19, 1681, and was interred at Warner Hall.

Colonel Augustine Warner

M, #2280, b. 3 June 1642, d. 19 June 1681

Colonel Augustine Warner|b. 3 Jun 1642\nd. 19 Jun 1681|p228.htm#i2280|Captain Augustine Warner|b. 28 Sep 1611\nd. 24 Dec 1674|p17617.htm#i176168|Mary Towneley|b. 13 May 1614\nd. 11 Aug 1662|p17617.htm#i176169|||||||Lawrence Towneley|d. 12 Feb 1654/55|p17622.htm#i176218|Jennet Halstead||p17622.htm#i176219|

Last Edited=5 Dec 2008

Colonel Augustine Warner was born on 3 June 1642 at York County, Virginia, U.S.A.. He was the son of Captain Augustine Warner and Mary Towneley.1 He married Mildred Reade, daughter of Colonel George Reade and Elizabeth Martiau, in 1670/71. He died on 19 June 1681 at age 39 at Warner Hall, Virginia, U.S.A..

Colonel Augustine Warner held the office of Speaker of the House of Burgesses [Virginia].

Children of Colonel Augustine Warner and Mildred Reade

  1. Mary Warner+
  2. Mildred Warner+ b. 1670/71, d. 26 Mar 1701
  3. Elizabeth Warner+1 b. 24 Nov 1672, d. 5 Feb 1720

Alternate Death Date: 6/9/1681


Settled in Virginia 1650 ?


Augustine Warner, Jr. (1642/3–June 19, 1681) was a Virginia politician and landowner. He served in the House of Burgesses 1666–77 and was its Speaker in two separate sessions in 1676 and 1677, before and after Bacon's Rebellion. He then served on the Governor's Council from about October 1677 until his death.

Early life

Warner's exact birth date is unclear; different sources cite July 3, 1642 and October 20, 1643. He was the only son of Augustine Warner, who immigrated from England in 1628 and patented the plantation called "Austin's Desire" in Gloucester County, Virginia in 1642, building Warner Hall on the property. Warner Sr. served on the Council from 1659 until his death in 1674.[1][2]

The younger Warner went to London in 1658 and attended the Merchant Taylors' School. He returned to Virginia after finishing his education and married Margaret Reade, daughter of George Reade, a member of the Council. They settled on a farm in Gloucester County, living there until he inherited Warner Hall in 1674.[1]

[edit] Bacon's Rebellion

In March 1676 the General Assembly called by Governor Sir William Berkeley in 1661 held its last session. Warner was elected Speaker, replacing Robert Wynne, who died the previous year. On May 10, as the Nathaniel Bacon crisis was building, Berkeley dissolved the House of Burgesses and called new elections. It is not known if Warner served in the new House that met in June.[1]

Fighting began in late July. Warner remained loyal to Berkeley, joining his forces. Bacon captured Jamestown and burned it on September 19, then crossed the York River and seized Warner Hall. Bacon died in October, but the rebellion continued until early January 1677.[1]

Warner served on a court-martial headed by Berkeley on January 11, 1677. Berkeley called for elections, and Warner was elected Speaker of the new House when it convened in February. The Assembly met until early April. It revoked all acts of the June 1676 Assembly, and then reenacted some.[1]

[edit] Later years

In late September – early October 1677 Warner was appointed to the Council. Although he was aligned with the "Green Spring faction" of Berkeley loyalists after Berkeley's removal as governor, he was not removed from the Council, unlike such diehards as Philip Ludwell and Thomas Ballard.[1]

Warner sued William Byrd I, a sometime ally of Bacon, for the damage the rebels had done to Warner Hall. Byrd claimed in his defense that he was Bacon's captive, not his supporter, and was not responsible.[1]

Warner died June 19, 1681, and was interred at Warner Hall.

Colonel Augustine Warner

M, #2280, b. 3 June 1642, d. 19 June 1681

Colonel Augustine Warner|b. 3 Jun 1642\nd. 19 Jun 1681|p228.htm#i2280|Captain Augustine Warner|b. 28 Sep 1611\nd. 24 Dec 1674|p17617.htm#i176168|Mary Towneley|b. 13 May 1614\nd. 11 Aug 1662|p17617.htm#i176169|||||||Lawrence Towneley|d. 12 Feb 1654/55|p17622.htm#i176218|Jennet Halstead||p17622.htm#i176219|

Last Edited=5 Dec 2008

Colonel Augustine Warner was born on 3 June 1642 at York County, Virginia, U.S.A.. He was the son of Captain Augustine Warner and Mary Towneley.1 He married Mildred Reade, daughter of Colonel George Reade and Elizabeth Martiau, in 1670/71. He died on 19 June 1681 at age 39 at Warner Hall, Virginia, U.S.A..

Colonel Augustine Warner held the office of Speaker of the House of Burgesses [Virginia].

Children of Colonel Augustine Warner and Mildred Reade

  1. Mary Warner+
  2. Mildred Warner+ b. 1670/71, d. 26 Mar 1701
  3. Elizabeth Warner+1 b. 24 Nov 1672, d. 5 Feb 1720

Alternate Death Date: 6/9/1681


Settled in Virginia 1650 ?


- GTE NET

Colonel Augustine Warner II succeeded his father and became political friends with Nathaniel Bacon, who was educated at Oxford and a Barrister in London. Bacon staged the first actual American Revolution in 1676, as he organized an army of three hundred to four hundred pioneers to cope with the Indians North of the York River. He was involved in a private fur deal spanning the entire Virginia frontier. By the end of the decade, Bacon's troops had taken care of all the Indian tribes. They marched on Jamestown as Governor William Burkeley fled, and sailed to the Eastern Shore. Nathaniel Bacon and his troops soon set up their headquarters at Warner Hall after the burning of Jamestown in 1676. This Virginia Colony was in charge of matters North of the York to the Potomac River. Beyond the Potomac, lay the Maryland Colony. It was at Warner Hall, where he sent notices for the people to assemble to take the "Oath of Fidelity" of his fellow countrymen. Bacon contracted Malaria and died within a year his troops then fleeing the Colony.

Augustine Warner II inherited Warner Hall at the death of his father in 1674. He married Mildred Reade, the daughter of George Reade, founder of Yorktown, and after her death, Elizabeth Martian. Augustine II was speaker of the House of Burgesses during Bacon's Rebellion in 1676, and also was a member of the Council.

When Augustine Warner II died, he left three daughters his son dying June 19, 1681. Mary became the wife of John Smith, of Purton, on the York, and their son Augustine Smith was said to have been one of the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe with Governor Spotswood, on his famous expedition across the Blue Ridge in 1716. Mildred, another daughter of Augustine Warner II, married Lawrence Washington, of Westmoreland, and her second husband was George Gale. Her three Washington children were John, who built Highgate, Augustine, father of George Washington (first President of the United States), and Mildred. Augustine Washington married Mary Ball, and named his son George for his great grandfather, George Reade, who founded Yorktown.

Elizabeth, the third daughter of Augustine Warner II, became the wife of John Lewis and inherited Warner Hall. Their son, John Lewis II was a member of His Majesty's Council, and was prominent in the county. For generations the Lewises lived here, and members of the family emigrated to all parts of the United States. Their descendants built Belle Farm, Eagle Point, Abingdon, Severby, and Severn Hall, all in Virginia. Elizabeth and John Lewis I's grandson, Colonel Fielding Lewis, of Belle Farm, married Catherine Washington, and after her death married Elizabeth Washington, also known as Betty, sister of George. He built beautiful Kenmore for her, in Fredericksburg.


Information from: www.glenncourt.com Sources: Bradney, History of Monmouthshire, vol. 1, p. 153; Duke, Kenmore and the Lewises, pp. 4–11; Harris, "John Lewis," pp. 195–205; Hotten, Original Lists of Persons of Quality, pp. 79, 103, 108; Lewis, Lewis Patriarchs, pp. 74–82; Moses, Welsh Lineage, pp. 1–20 ff.; New England Historical & Genealogical Register, vol. 18, p. 81; Nugent, Cavaliers and Pioneers, vol. 1, p. 229; Sorley, Lewis of Warner Hall, pp. 17–29, 293–300, 445–68; St. Teilo's parish register; VA tombstone records.


Great-grandfather of Pres George Washington. His daughter, Mildred Warner, married Capt Lawrence Washington, and their son Capt Augustine Washington was the father of the President. He was a member of the King's Council; Speaker of the House of Burgesses in 1675. He married Mildred, daughter of George Reade and Elizabeth Martain Great-grandfather of Pres George Washington. His daughter, Mildred Warner, married Capt Lawrence Washington, and their son Capt Augustine Washington was the father of the President. He was a member of the King's Council; Speaker of the House of Burgesses in 1675. He married Mildred, daughter of George Reade and Elizabeth Martain

- Find-A-Grave


Replaced his father in the House of Burgesses. In 1676 he was elevated to the speaker of the house and the governor's council.

Great-grandfather of Pres George Washington. His daughter, Mildred Warner, married Capt Lawrence Washington, and their son Capt Augustine Washington was the father of the President. He was a member of the King's Council; Speaker of the House of Burgesses in 1675. He married Mildred, daughter of George Reade and Elizabeth Martain

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GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1643; Birth city: York Co; Birth state: VA 1,4725::2986580

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@R-1550049838@ Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection - Individual Records [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. 1,4725::0

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Birth year: 1643; Birth city: York Co; Birth state: VA 1,4725::2986580

GEDCOM Source

@R-1550049838@ Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Gale Research. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010. 1,7486::0

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@R-1550049838@ Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection - Individual Records [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1643; Birth city: York Co; Birth state: VA 1,4725::2986580

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@R-1550049838@ Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection - Individual Records [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. 1,4725::0

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Birth year: 1643; Birth city: York Co; Birth state: VA 1,4725::2986580

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@R-1550049838@ Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Gale Research. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010. 1,7486::0

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Place: Virginia; Year: 1628; Page Number: 31 1,7486::4015014

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@R-1550049838@ Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection - Individual Records [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. 1,4725::0

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Birth year: 1642; Birth city: Warner Hall; Birth state: VA 1,4725::2695363

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Augustine Warner II (3 June 1642–19 June 1681) Augustine Warner II

3 June 1642–19 June 1681

(Age 39)

Gloucester, Virginia, British Colonial America

"The Life Summary of Augustine Warner II"

When Augustine Warner II was born on 3 June 1642, i

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Life Sketch

In the winter of 1642, Augustine Warner I arrived in Jamestown with twelve new settlers for the Virginia Colonies. For bringing these colonists to the new frontier, Warner was given a “head Grant” of 600 acres in Gloucester, Virginia. He eventually expanded his acreage at his new plantation, WARNER HALL, to several thousand acres prior to his death in 1674. During his life he was Justice of York, Justice of Gloucester, and a member of the King’s Council in Virginia. Augustine Warner was the great, great grandfather of George Washington, and an ancestor of Robert E. Lee. Queen Elizabeth II is a direct descendant of Augustine Warner I through the Bowes-Lyon family and the Earl of Strathmore. Warner Hall is referred to as the home of the Queen’s American ancestors. Augustine Warner II (1642 – 1681) inherited Warner Hall upon the death of his father in 1674, and further developed the plantation house and property. Augustine Warner II, like his father, was a member of the King’s Council and also served as Speaker of The House of Burgesses in Williamsburg. Augustine Warner II (1642-1681) inherited Warner Hall upon the death of his father in 1674, and further developed the plantation house and property. Augustine Warner II died at the age of 39 on June 19, 1681, predeceasing his wife, Mildred Reade Warner, who he had married by 1666. In 1676, Nathaniel Bacon came to Gloucester after burning Jamestown and made Warner Hall his headquarters. It was at Warner Hall that Bacon invited the “Oath of Fidelity” of his fellow countrymen. All of Augustine Warner II ‘s sons died young and when Augustine himself died in 1681 at the age of 39, he left three daughters, Mary, Mildred and Elizabeth. Mary went on to marry John Smith, of Purton, on the York, and their son, Augustine Smith was said to have been one of the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe who accompanied Governor Spotswood on his famous expedition across the Blue Ridge Mountains in 1716. Mildred Warner married Lawrence Washington and their son, Augustine, married Mary Ball. Augustine and Mary became the proud parents of George Washington, who was named after his great-grandfather, George Reade, founder of Yorktown. Perhaps the most recognized patriot in American history, General George Washington led the Colonies to independence from the British in the Revolution of 1776. General George Washington continued his role as a great patriot in 1789 and become the first President of the United States of America. In a famous funeral phrase, Henry Lee declared that Washington was “first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.” Found at: http://www.warnerhall.com/words-from-our-innkeepers/a-brief-history...

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My Linage

Augustine Warner II MY 10TH GREAT-GRANDFATHER

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Col. Augustine Warner II (3 June 1642 – 19 June 1681) Great-grandfather of Pres. George Washington.

His daughter, Mildred Warner, married Capt. Lawrence Washington, and their son Capt Augustine Washington was the father of the President.

He was a mem

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AUGUSTINE WARNER II Augustine Warner Jr. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Augustine Warner Jr. Augustine Warner Jr.gif Portrait of Col. Augustine Warner Jr. 15th Speaker of the Virgi

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Memorial Great-grandfather of Pres George Washington. His daughter, Mildred Warner, married Capt Lawrence Washington, and their son Capt Augustine Washington was the father of the President. He was a member of


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<p><p>Augustine Warner</p></p><p>http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&amp;guid=ae6a827f-4132-4cfa...</p>

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<p>Historically Significant Descendants* of Augustine Warner</p><p>http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=33faddd1-4a87-4ccb-868...</p>

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<p>Augustine Warner</p><p>http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=dbf89953-b414-48da-b5ea-7...</p>

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Colonel Augustine Warner, II's Timeline

1642
June 3, 1642
Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia, British Colonial America
1643
October 20, 1643
Age 1
Gloucester, Virginia, British Colonial America
October 20, 1643
Age 1
Gloucester, Virginia, British Colonial America
October 20, 1643
Age 1
Warmer Hall, Gloucester, Virginia, British Colonial America
October 20, 1643
Age 1
Gloucester, Virginia
October 20, 1643
Age 1
Gloucester, Virginia
20, 1643
Warner Hall, Gloucester, Virginia, British Colonial America
1658
1658
Age 15
London, England, United Kingdom
1658
Age 15
London, England, United Kingdom
1663
1663