David Lindsay, 9th Lord of Crawford, 1st Earl of Crawford

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David Lindsay, 9th Lord of Crawford, 1st Earl of Crawford

Also Known As: "Earl of /Crawford/", "William de Lindsay", "1st Earl of Crawford", "David /Lindsay/", "First Earl of Crawford"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Glenesk, Angusshire, Scotland
Death: August 12, 1407 (47-48)
Castle of Finhaven, Angusshire, Scotland (United Kingdom)
Place of Burial: Grey Friars Church, Dundee, Angus, Scotland
Immediate Family:

Son of Alexander Lindsay of Glenesk and Catherine Stirling, of Glenesk
Husband of Elizabeth Stewart, Countess of Crawford
Father of Elizabeth Lindsay, of Crawford; William Lindsay, of Cairney; Marjorie Elizabeth Douglas née Lindsay; Alexander Lindsay, 2nd Earl of Crawford; David Lindsay, Jr., Lord of Newdos and 3 others
Brother of Baron Alexander Lindsay; Christine Lindsay and Eupheme Lindsay of Glenesk
Half brother of Joneta / Janet Cockburn and William Lindsay

Occupation: Earl 1 of Crawford, Admiral of Scotland, of Glenesk, 1st Earl of Crawford, Scottish Ambassador to England in 1349; Custodian of Edinburgh Castle; Custodian of Berwick Castle; Scottish Ambassador to England in 1351., Lord of Crawford, L6NQ-VDD
Managed by: Anne Brannen
Last Updated:

About David Lindsay, 9th Lord of Crawford, 1st Earl of Crawford

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Lindsay,_1st_Earl_of_Crawford

David Lindsay of Glenesk, 1st Earl of Crawford (c. 1360 – 1407) was a Scottish peer who was created Earl in 1398.

Life

Crawford was the son of Sir Alexander Lindsay of Glenesk and Katherine Stirling. Succeeding his father in 1381, he was known until his elevation to the peerage as Sir David Lindsay of Glenesk.

Many historians believe that Lindsay was also the organiser for the Battle of the Clans at Perth in 1396. Additionally, Lindsay was a noted jousting champion who fought the English champion Lord Welles in a remarkable duel on St. George's Day 1390. In the duel, Lindsay unhorsed Welles so easily that the crowd began yelling that he had nailed himself to his saddle. To prove he had not, Lindsay jumped off his horse and then back on, while still wearing his full suit of armour. After he realized Welles was wounded he rushed to his aid and helped him to a nearby hospital. He visited Welles every day while he was recovering and they became good friends.

Lord Crawford died at Finavon Castle in 1407 and was buried at the church of the Greyfriars at Dundee.[1]

Marriage and issue

He married Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of King Robert II and Euphemia de Ross. They had seven children:

  • Alexander Lindsay, 2nd Earl of Crawford (c. 1387–1438)
  • Gerard Lindsay (d. 1421)
  • Ingelram Lindsay, Bishop of Aberdeen (d. 1458)
  • Marjorie Lindsay, married Sir William Douglas of Lochleven. They were parents of Catherine Douglas.
  • David Lindsay, Lord of Newdosk (1407–?)
  • Elizabeth Lindsay (1407–?), married Robert Erskine, 1st Lord Erskine and had issue.
  • Isabella Lindsay (1407–?), married Sir John Maxwell.

Notes

1^ James Balfour Paul, Scots Peerage, vol iii, p. 17. Edinburgh 1904

Sources

Balfour Paul, Sir James-The Scots Peerage-IX Vols. Edinburgh 1904 Grant, Neil. Scottish Clans and Tartans. New York, Octopus Publishing Group Limited: 2000. ISBN 1-58574-094-2

-------------------=-

Sir David de Lindsay took part in a famous tournament at London Bridge in 1390 in the presence of Richard II of England. Lindsay won the day and the admiration of the English king. On 21 April 1398 he was created Earl of Crawford. He was Lord High Admiral of Scotland in 1403 and sent as ambassador to Englind in 1406. Son of Sir David de Lindsay and Marjory. [Clans & Tartans, p. 154]


Sir David, Knight Banneret, received Strathnairn Castle possibly as dowry from his marriage to the daughter of the King. Her name is not known, but she is variously referred to as Jean and Elizabeth, and Sir David is style "frater regis".

Many historians believe that Lindsay was also the organiser for the Battle of the Clans at Perth in 1396.

Additionally, Lindsay was a noted jousting champion who fought the English champion Lord Welles in a remarkable duel on St. George's Day. In the duel, Lindsay unhorsed Welles so easily that the crowd began yelling that he had nailed himself to his saddle. To prove he had not, Lindsay jumped off his horse and then back on, while still wearing his full suit of armor.


David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford (c. 1360 – 1407) was a Scottish peer who was created Earl in 1398. Many historians believe that Lindsay was also the organiser for the Battle of the Clans at Perth in 1396. Additionally, Lindsay was a noted jousting champion who fought the English champion Lord Welles in a remarkable duel on St. George's Day. In the duel, Lindsay unhorsed Welles so easily that the crowd began yelling that he had nailed himself to his saddle. To prove he had not, Lindsay jumped off his horse and then back on, while still wearing his full suit of armor.

He married Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of King Robert II and Euphemia de Ross. They had seven children: Gerard Lindsay (d. 1421) Ingelram Lindsay, Bishop of Aberdeen (d. 1458) Marjorie Lindsay, married Sir William Douglas. Alexander Lindsay, 2nd Earl of Crawford (c. 1387–1438) David Lindsay , Lord of Newdosk (1407–?) Elizabeth Lindsay (1407–?), married Robert Erskine, 1st Lord Erskine and had issue. Isabella Lindsay (1407–?), married Sir John Maxwell.

----------------------------

The title Earl of Crawford is one of the most ancient extant titles in the British Isles, having been created in the Peerage of Scotland for Sir David Lindsay in 1398.

The title has a very complex history. Crawford Castle, along with the title of Earl of Crawford, was given by Robert II to David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford.[1]

The title descended to the first Earl's descendants without much incident, until the death of David Lindsay, 8th Earl of Crawford in 1542. The eighth Earl had a son, Alexander, commonly called the Wicked Master, who frequently quarreled with his father and even tried to murder him. The Wicked Master was sentenced to death for his crime, and the eighth Earl conveyed his title to a cousin, also called David Lindsay, a descendant of the third Earl of Crawford, and excluded from the succession all of the Wicked Master's descendants. However, the ninth earl, although he had his own sons, named the Wicked Master's son David as his heir; thus, in 1558, at the ninth Earl's death, the earldom returned to the main branch of the family. The ninth Earl is frequently referred to as an interpolated Earl, as are the 17th-22nd Earls.

At the death of Ludovic Lindsay, 16th Earl of Crawford, the title was passed, despite senior heirs, to a cousin, John, who had already been created Earl of Lindsay. The earldoms of Crawford and Lindsay continued to be united until the twenty-second earl died unmarried in January 1808. The two earldoms then became dormant until the respective heirs could prove their claims to the titles. In 1843, James Lindsay, 7th Earl of Balcarres put forward his claim to the Earldom of Crawford; in 1848, the House of Lords allowed it. It was held that the seventh Earl's father, the sixth Earl, was the lawful successor to the earldom of Crawford (though he did not claim it); therefore, the sixth Earl of Balcarres was posthumously declared the twenty-third Earl of Crawford, and his son, the seventh Earl of Balcarres, became the twenty-fourth Earl of Crawford. Thereafter, these two earldoms have remained united.

The subsidiary titles associated with the Earl of Crawford and Balcarres are: Lord Lindsay of Crawford (created 1398), Lord Lindsay and Balniel (1651) and Baron Wigan of Haigh Hall (1826). The former two subsidiary titles, as well as the two Earldoms, are in the Peerage of Scotland. The Barony is in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. By virtue of the title of Baron Wigan of Haigh Hall, the Earls of Crawford and Balcarres sat in the House of Lords until the passage of the Peerage Act 1963. The present Earl sits in the House of Lords as Baron Balniel, a life peerage conferred on him in 1974 after he left the House of Commons and before the death of his father.

The Earl of Crawford is the hereditary Clan Chief of Clan Lindsay.

The family seat is Balcarres House in Colinsburgh, Fife.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Crawford
Sir David de Lindsay of Crawford was born in 1314.3 He was the son of Sir Alexander de Lindsay.2 He married Maria Abernethy, daughter of Sir Alexander Abernethy of that Ilk, circa 1325.2 He died in 1355.3

    Sir David de Lindsay of Crawford held the office of Scottish Ambassador to England in 1349.2 He held the office of Custodian of Edinburgh Castle.2 He held the office of Custodian of Berwick Castle.2 He held the office of Scottish Ambassador to England in 1351.2 He lived at Crawford, Lanarkshire, Scotland.1

Children of Sir David de Lindsay of Crawford and Maria Abernethy

Sir William de Lindsay of the Byres+ d. c 1 Jul 13933

Sir James de Lindsay of Crawford+ d. 13572

Sir Alexander de Lindsay+ d. Oct 13811

David Lindsay 3

unknown daughter de Lindsay+ 2


Citations

1. G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 507. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

2. Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 951. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.

3. Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 511.


http://www.thepeerage.com/p2116.htm#i21152

Sir David de Lindsay of Crawford1

M, #21152, b. 1314, d. 1355

Last Edited=21 May 2007

    Sir David de Lindsay of Crawford was born in 1314.3 He was the son of Sir Alexander de Lindsay.2 He married Maria Abernethy, daughter of Sir Alexander Abernethy of that Ilk, circa 1325.2 He died in 1355.3
    Sir David de Lindsay of Crawford held the office of Scottish Ambassador to England in 1349.2 He held the office of Custodian of Edinburgh Castle.2 He held the office of Custodian of Berwick Castle.2 He held the office of Scottish Ambassador to England in 1351.2 He lived at Crawford, Lanarkshire, Scotland.1

Children of Sir David de Lindsay of Crawford and Maria Abernethy

Sir William de Lindsay of the Byres+ d. 13663

Sir James de Lindsay of Crawford+ d. 13572

Sir Alexander de Lindsay+ d. Oct 13811

David Lindsay 3

unknown daughter de Lindsay+ 2

Citations

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 507. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 951. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 511.


Earldom of Crawford


Creation date 1398 Created by Robert II of Scotland Peerage Peerage of Scotland First holder David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford Present holder Robert Lindsay, 29th Earl of Crawford Heir apparent Anthony Robert Lindsay, Lord Balniel Remainder to heirs male of the body of the grantee Subsidiary titles Lord Lindsay of Crawford, Lord Lindsay and Balniel, Baron Wigan of Haigh Hall, Earl of Balcarres

David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford (c. 1360 – 1407) was a Scottish peer who was created Earl in 1398. Many historians believe that Lindsay was also the organiser for the Battle of the Clans at Perth in 1396. Additionally, Lindsay was a noted jousting champion who fought the English champion Lord Welles in a remarkable duel on St. George's Day. In the duel, Lindsay unhorsed Welles so easily that the crowd began yelling that he had nailed himself to his saddle. To prove he had not, Lindsay jumped off his horse and then back on, while still wearing his full suit of armor.

He married Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of King Robert II and Euphemia de Ross. They had seven children:

Gerard Lindsay (d. 1421) Ingelram Lindsay, Bishop of Aberdeen (d. 1458) Marjorie Lindsay, married Sir William Douglas. Alexander Lindsay, 2nd Earl of Crawford (c. 1387–1438) David Lindsay , Lord of Newdosk (1407–?) Elizabeth Lindsay (1407–?), married Robert Erskine, 1st Lord Erskine and had issue. Isabella Lindsay (1407–?), married Sir John Maxwell. [edit] ReferencesGrant, Neil. Scottish Clans and Tartans. New York, Octopus Publishing Group Limited: 2000. ISBN 1-58574-094-2 [edit] External linkshttp://www.clanlindsay.com/david_lindsay.htm Info on David Lindsay from Clan Lindsay http://www.tartans.com/modules.php.srl.op+modload,name+News,file+article,sid+225,mode+thread,order+0,thold+0.html House of Tartan page on Clan Lindsay http://hometown.aol.com/rfield/lindsay2.html Reference with information on the various marriages of these people

Catherine, married David Lindsay, first Earl of Crawford, one of the most accomplished knights of the age. He acted the principal part in the tournament at London bridge in May, 1390. Lord Welles, the English Ambassador to Scotland, at a banquet, where the Scots and English were discoursing of warlike deeds, said let words have no place. If you know not the chivalry of Englishmen appoint me a day and place where you list and you shall have experience. Whereupon, Sir David assenting, Lord Welles chose London bridge. Lindsay repaired to London with a gallant train of thirty persons, and on the appointed day appeared in the list against Lord Welles. At the sound of trumpet they, upon their barbed steeds, encountered each other with lances ground square. In this passage Lindsay sat so firmly that, notwithstanding Lord Welles's lance was broken upon his helmet, he stirred not. The spectators cried out that, contrary to the law of arms, Lindsay was bound to the saddle; whereupon he sprung to the ground, and then vaulted to his horse without assistance. In the third course he hurled Lord Welles out of the saddle to the ground. Then dismounting, he supported his adversary, and, with great humanity, visited him every day till he recovered from the effects of his fall. Lord Crawford died between the years 1407 and 1412. The oldest son of Lord Crawford and the Princess Catherine, Alexander Lindsay, second Earl of Crawford.

Source:The Descent Of General Robert Edward Lee From Robert The Bruce, Of Scotland. By Professor Wm. Winston Fontaine, of Louisville. (From the Southern Historical Society Papers)


Source= http://www.patrickspeople.co.uk/ancestors%20of%20isabella%20gordon/2152.htm


http://www.thepeerage.com/p10812.htm#i108113

David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford1 M, #108113, b. circa 1360, d. circa February 1406/7

    David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford was born circa 1360.1 He was the son of Sir Alexander de Lindsay and Catherine Stirling.2 He married Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland and Eupheme de Ross, between 1380 and 1384.1 He and Elizabeth Stewart were engaged on 22 February 1374/75.1 He died circa February 1406/7 at Finhaven Castle, Angus, ScotlandG.3 He was buried at Grey Friars Church, Dundee, Angus, ScotlandG.3
    He held the office of Justiciary [Scotland] in 1389.4 He held the office of Sheriff of Banff.4 He held the position of Chief of the Name and Arms of Lindsay from in 1397.4 He was created 1st Earl of Crawford [Scotland] between 21 April 1398 and 2 May 1398.4 He held the office of Admiral of Scotland before October 1403.3 He held the office of Scottish Ambassador to England in 1404.3 He held the office of Deputy Chamberlain, North of the Forth in 1406.3 He held the office of Scottish Ambassador to England in 1406.3

Children of David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford and Elizabeth Stewart

   David Lindsay, Lord of Newdosk1
   Gerard Lindsay1 d. b 1421
   Ingelram Lindsay1 d. 1458
   Marjorie Lindsay+1
   Lady Elizabeth Lindsay+1
   Isabella Lindsay1
   Alexander Lindsay, 2nd Earl of Crawford+1 b. c 1387, d. a 31 Mar 1438

Citations

   [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 225. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
   [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 507. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
   [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 509.
   [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 508.
view all 14

David Lindsay, 9th Lord of Crawford, 1st Earl of Crawford's Timeline

1359
1359
Glenesk, Angusshire, Scotland
1385
1385
Angusshire, Kincardineshire, Scotland
1386
1386
Scotland
1389
1389
Angus, Scotland
1393
1393
Crawford, Lanarkshire, Scotland
1407
August 12, 1407
Age 48
Castle of Finhaven, Angusshire, Scotland
August 12, 1407
Age 48
Grey Friars Church, Dundee, Angus, Scotland
1407
Crawford, Lanarkshire, Scotland
1408
1408
Crawford, Lanarkshire, Scotland