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Edward Raynor

Also Known As: "Rainor", "Reynier"
Birthdate: (61)
Birthplace: Stmary Elms Church, Ipswich, Suffolk, England
Death: 1685 (61)
Hempstede, Nassau, NY, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Samuel Raynor and Mary Surname?
Husband of Deborah Raynor
Father of Samuel Raynor; Edward Jr Raynor; Daniel Raynor and Joseph Raynor
Brother of Marie Raynor

Managed by: Gwyneth McNeil
Last Updated:

About Edward Raynor

Edward Rayner (Raynere, Raynor) of Raynertown (Freeport), LI, NY

Edward Raynor came to America with his Uncle Thurston Raynor in the year 1634. The ship, Elizabeth of Ipswich, departed Ispwich, England on April 30, 1634 with 108 passengers. They arrived in Boston Harbor in July 1634. Edward was ten years old and a orphan. At the age of 21, Edward elected to stay in Hempstead, NY, and eventually establish his home in "South Woods." It was later named Raynor South, then Raynortown. Until the mid-nineteen century it was named Freeport.

notes

The first Raynors to come to America were Thurston Raynor, his wife, Elizabeth, their five children, and Thurston’s ten year old nephew, Edward Raynor. Residents of Elmsett, in the County of Suffolk, they left Ipswich, England in April 1634 aboard the ship, Elizabeth, and arrived in Boston three months later. They settled first in Watertown, Massachusetts, and in 1636, along with some other Watertown families, they went to Wethersfield, Connecticut, where Thurston Raynor was listed among the first settlers. In 1641, Thurston Raynor and his family and several other families from Wethersfield moved on to settle Rippowams, the area now known as Stamford, Connecticut. Three years later, in 1644, Thurston Raynor once again uprooted his family and joined with twenty-two other Rippowams families in following their religious leader, Rev. Denton, to Long Island where they settled Hempstead, in the western part of the Island.

The Edward Raynor family, the largest of the Raynor families, have generally lived in Nassau County and the western part of Suffolk County. Before the middle of the past century Freeport, in Nassau County, was known as Raynortown, due to the large number of Raynor descendants living there. Edward Raynor is said to have founded the settlement area in 1659.


The Raynor family often intermarried with the Carman and "Rock" Smith families whom they consequently share a great deal of history. This genealogy relates to the descendants of Edward and Thurston Raynor who settled early at Southampton (his descendants stiuck mainly to the east end of LI).


Information pertaining to the Raynor Family is from the book "Josiah Raynor of Manorville, LI, NY" by Stuart Payne Howell.

http://longislandgenealogy.com/Surname_Pages/raynor.htm The Raynor/Rayner family of Long Island by Clinton E. Metz - Freeport Village Historian (undated abt 1970)

origins

From The Will of Edward Reyner of Elmesett in the County of Suffolk, yeoman, 22 March, 18 James [1620/1].NEHGR 66:164-165

To Anna, Marie, John, Edward, and Robert, sons and daughters of my late son Edward Reyner deceased, 20s. each, to be paid to the said Henry Pinson to their uses until their several ages of eighteen. To Elizabeth, Anna, Marie, Martha, Robert, and Sara, children of the aforesaid Robert Lewes, my son-in-law, 20s. each to be paid to the said Robert Lewes to their uses until their several ages of eighteen. To Samuel, John, Edward, and Marie, children of my son Richard Reyner, 20s. each, to be paid to the said Richard to their use until their several ages of eighteen.

Links

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register

By Henry Fitz-Gilbert Waters, New England Historic Genealogical Society

Published by New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1912

This Edward Raynor is probably the Edward Raynor of Hempstead, Long Island, whose will, dated 27 Mar. 1881 but not recorded, mentions wife (not named), eldest son Samuel, " her [wife's] five children" (not named), and "my brother Thomas Patrigh." Simon Searing, Thomas Patrigh, Jonathan Seaman, and Nathaniel Pearsall are to be "overseers over my wife and children . . . and thev may dispose of the estate for their benefit, till they come to age." (New York Historical Society's Abstracts of Wills, vol. 1, p. 469.) This Edward, both from the position of his name in the shipping list and from the fact that he is not mentioned in Thurston Rayner's will, could hardly have been Thurston's son. Savage (Genealogical Diet., vol. 3, p. 514) suggests that he may have been a nephew of Thurston. He was too young to be the Edward, son of Thurston's brother Edward (SEE BELOW), or the Edward, son of Thurston's brother Richard, both of whom were mentioned in the will of Thurston's father in 1620/21 ; but he may have been a son of Thurston's brother Samuel, his own eldest son being named Samuel. The original will of " Thirstan Rainer" is in the Surrogate's Office, Hall of Records, New York City, where also the recorded copy may be found (lib. 1-2, pp. 22- 23). The statements given above have been taken from the original will. There is an abstract of this will in the New York Historical Society's Abstracts of Wills, vol. 1, pp. 6-7.

Edward Rayner

(1624-1682)

Information taken from a series of unidentified articles in "Raynor Family History,"

by Clinton E. Metz - Freeport Village Historian (undated abt 1970)

Freeport's founder was an orphan when he crossed the Atlantic with his uncle Thurston Raynor. That fact has always been suspected but has been a source of contention until research finally bore fruit at the Suffolk County Historical Society Museum in Riverhead, on Long Island.

Thompson, in his famous Long island History called Edward and Thurston brothers - Pelletreau's "American Families of Historical Lineage" contended that Edward probably was Thurston's son when they sailed together from Ipswich, England in 1634.

Now, like a breeze dispelling fog, comes a pair of letters found at the Riverhead Museum. The letters from George W. Matthews of Cutchogue (formerly a Rockville Centre resident) said that he had a copy of the will of Edward Raynor - the Freeport founder's grandfather - which was probated in Elmset, England on July 7, 1621.

After mentioning his "son Thurston" three times in the will, Mr. Raynor bequested sums of money to others, including "Ann, Marie, John, Edward and Robert, sons and daughters of my late son Edward Raynor, deceased."

CAN'T BE EDWARD, SON OF EDWARD SINCE THIS EDWARD IS MENTIONED IN A WILL BEFORE EDWARD IMMIGRANT WAS BORN.

Mr. Matthews kindly shared a copy of the will. He also shared a copy of a will written by an earlier ancestor, Robert Reynere of Wickham Market, County of Suffolk, England, on October 4, 1571.

Robert Reynere's great-grandson Edward sailed to massachusetts with his uncle Thurston. The boy's mother had died in England before his father. Orphaned, Edward joined the children of his uncle Thurston and aunt Elizabeth on their voyage to the "new world." Thurston ultimately settled in Southampton.

Mr. Matthews quotes Donald Linus Jacobus, editor-in-chief for many years of the American Genealogist, on the origin of the Raynor family in England. Jacobus' statement, summarized briefly follows: The Raynors derived from Robert Reynere of Wickham Market, Suffolk, who died testate between October 4 and December 5, 1571. His son Edward Raynor of Elmsett in the same county, made a will on March 22, 1620, proved July 7, 1621, which names his sons Edward, Richard, John, Samuel, Thurston and Robert, and daughter Anne, wife of Robert Lewes of Great Bricet, Suffolk, as well as a son-in-law Henryn Pinson until the grand-children's 18th birthday.

Clifford Roe Raynor of Manorville gave copies of both wills to Mr. Matthews.

The other discovery sheds light - or at least presents an ingeniopus theory on the name of Edward raynor's wife. A quest in the Genealogy Room of the New York Public Library uncovered a 1946 survey, entitled "Edward Raynor of Hempstead, Long Island and some of his descendants," by Henry Alanson Tredwell. Edward's wife was probably named Deborah Partridge before her marriage.

From her husband's will, plus the wills of Elizabeth Partridge of Flushing dated 1696, and Thomas Partridge of the same place, dated 1696, Mr. Treadwell believes that Mrs. Raynor may have been the Deborah Raynor listed as a Hempstead Town resident in 1698.

Emigrant to America (Watertown, Massachusetts) July 1634 on the "Elizabeth" Age 10, with (possibly father but probably brother) Thurston Raynor (Biblio ref. Werner, "Geneology of Long Island Families"

Peter Wilson Coldham. 1987-c1993. The Complete Book of Emigrants. 4 vols. Genealogical Publ. Co., Baltimore, MD (Broderbund CD-350):

Vol. I,

p. 31 30 April 1634. Passengers from Ipswich embarked in the Elizabeth of Ipswich, Mr. William Andrews, for New England: John Sherman 20; Joseph Mosse 24; Richard Woodward 45 and Rose his wife 50, George Woodward 13, John Woodward 13; Edmond Lewis 33 and Mary his wife 32, John Lewis 3, Thomas Lewis 9 months; John Spring 45 and Elinor his wife 46, Henry Spring 6, John Spring 4, William Spring 9 months;

Thurston Raynor 40 and Elizabeth his wife 36, Thurston Rayner 13, Joseph Raynor 11, Elizabeth Raynor 9, Sarah Raynor 7, Lidia Raynor 1, Edward Raynor 10,

Elizabeth Kemball 13; Thomas Skott/Scott 40 and Elizabeth his wife 40, Elizabeth Scott 9, Abigail Scott 7, Thomas Scott 6; Henery Kemball 44 and Susan his wife 35; Richard Kemball 39 and Ursula his wife, Henry Kemball 15, Richard Kemball 11, Mary Kemball 9, Martha Kemball 5, John Kemball 3, Thomas Kemball 1; John Lavericke 15; Isaacke Mixer 31 and Sarah his wife 33, Isaack Mixer 4; Martha Scott 60; George Munnings 37 and Elizabeth his wife 41, Elizabeth Munnings 12, Abigail Munnings 7; John Bernard 30 and Phebe his wife 27, John Bernard 2, Samuell Bernard 1, Thomas King 15; Thomas Kilborne 24 and Elizabeth his wife 20; John Crosse 50 and Anne his wife 38; Robert Sherin 32; Humphry Bradstreet 40 and Bridgett his wife 30, Anna Bradstreet 9, John Bradstreet 3, Martha Bradstreet 2, Mary Bradstreet 1; Henery Glover 24; William Blomfield 30 and Sarah his wife 25, Sarah Blomfield 1; Robert Day 30 and Mary his wife 28; Sarah Reynolds 20; Robert Goodall 30 and Katherin his wife 28, Mary Goodale 4, Abraham Goodale 2, Isaacke Goodale 1/2; Samuell Smithe 32 and Elizabeth his wife 32, Samuell Smith 9, Mary Smith 4, Elizabeth Smith 7, Phillip Smith 1; Thomas Hastings 29 and Susan his wife 34; Susan Munson 25; Martin Underwood 38 and Martha his wife 31; Henery Gouldson 43 and Anne his wife 45, Anne Gouldston 18, Mary Gouldston 15; William Cutting 26; John Palmer 24; Danyell Pierce 23; John Clearke 22; John Firmin 46; Rebecca Isaacke 36; Anne Dorifall 24. (PRO:CO1/8/pp.102-103).

Edward Rayner

(1624-1682)

Information taken from a series of unidentified articles in "Raynor Family History,"

by Clinton E. Metz - Freeport Village Historian (undated abt 1970)

    Freeport's founder was an orphan when he crossed the Atlantic with his uncle Thurston Raynor.  That fact has always been suspected but has been a source of contention until research finally bore fruit at the Suffolk County Historical Society Museum in Riverhead, on Long Island. 
   Thompson, in his famous Long island History called Edward and Thurston brothers - Pelletreau's "American Families of Historical Lineage" contended that Edward probably was Thurston's son when they sailed together from Ipswich, England in 1634. 
   Now, like a breeze dispelling fog, comes a pair of letters found at the Riverhead Museum.  The letters from George W. Matthews of Cutchogue (formerly a Rockville Centre resident) said that he had a copy of the will of Edward Raynor - the Freeport founder's grandfather - which was probated in Elmset, England on July 7, 1621. 
   After mentioning his "son Thurston" three times in the will, Mr. Raynor bequested sums of money to others, including "Ann, Marie, John, Edward and Robert, sons and daughters of my late son Edward Raynor, deceased." 
   Mr. Matthews kindly shared a copy of the will.  He also shared a copy of a will written by an earlier ancestor, Robert Reynere of Wickham Market, County of Suffolk, England, on October 4, 1571. 
   Robert Reynere's great-grandson Edward sailed to massachusetts with his uncle Thurston.  The boy's mother had died in England before his father.  Orphaned, Edward joined the children of his uncle Thurston and aunt Elizabeth on their voyage to the "new world."  Thurston ultimately settled in Southampton. 
   Mr. Matthews quotes Donald Linus Jacobus, editor-in-chief for many years of the American Genealogist, on the origin of the Raynor family in England. Jacobus' statement, summarized briefly follows:  The Raynors derived from Robert Reynere of Wickham Market, Suffolk, who died testate between October 4 and December 5, 1571.  His son Edward Raynor of Elmsett in the same county, made a will on March 22, 1620, proved July 7, 1621, which names his sons Edward, Richard, John, Samuel, Thurston and Robert, and daughter Anne, wife of Robert Lewes of Great Bricet, Suffolk, as well as a son-in-law Henryn Pinson until the grand-children's 18th birthday. 
   Clifford Roe Raynor of Manorville gave copies of both wills to Mr. Matthews. 
   The other discovery sheds light - or at least presents an ingeniopus theory on the name of Edward raynor's wife.  A quest in the Genealogy Room of the New York Public Library uncovered a 1946 survey, entitled "Edward Raynor of Hempstead, Long Island and some of his descendants," by Henry Alanson Tredwell.  Edward's wife was probably named Deborah Partridge before her marriage. 
   From her husband's will, plus the wills of Elizabeth Partridge of Flushing dated 1696, and Thomas Partridge of the same place, dated 1696, Mr. Treadwell believes that Mrs. Raynor may have been the Deborah Raynor listed as a Hempstead Town resident in 1698.

Edward Rayner (Raynere, Raynor) of Raynertown (Freeport), LI, NY

   The first Raynors to come to America were Thurston Raynor, his wife, Elizabeth, their five children, and Thurston’s ten year old nephew, Edward Raynor. Residents of Elmsett, in the County of Suffolk, they left Ipswich, England in April 1634 aboard the ship, Elizabeth, and arrived in Boston three months later. They settled first in Watertown, Massachusetts, and in 1636, along with some other Watertown families, they went to Wethersfield, Connecticut, where Thurston Raynor was listed among the first settlers. In 1641, Thurston Raynor and his family and several other families from Wethersfield moved on to settle Rippowams, the area now known as Stamford, Connecticut. Three years later, in 1644, Thurston Raynor once again uprooted his family and joined with twenty-two other Rippowams families in following their religious leader, Rev. Denton, to Long Island where they settled Hempstead, in the western part of the Island. 
   The Edward Raynor family, the largest of the  Raynor families,  have generally lived in Nassau County and the  western part of Suffolk County. Before the middle of the past century Freeport, in Nassau County, was known as Raynortown, due to the  large number  of Raynor descendants living there. Edward Raynor is said to have founded the settlement area in 1659. 
   The Raynor family often intermarried with  the Carman and "Rock" Smith families whom they consequently share a great deal of history. This genealogy relates to the descendants of Edward and Thurston Raynor who settled early at Southampton (his descendants stiuck mainly to the east end of LI). 
   Edward Raynor came to America with his Uncle Thurston Raynor in the year 1634. The ship, Elizabeth of Ipswich, departed Ispwich, England on April 30, 1634 with 108 passengers. They arrived in Boston Harbor in July 1634. Edward was ten years old and a orphan. At the age of 21, Edward elected to stay in Hempstead, NY, and eventually establish his home in "South Woods." It was later named Raynor South, then Raynortown. Until the mid-nineteen century it was named Freeport.

http://groups.msn.com/TheRAYNORFamily/yourwebpage1.msnw

Notes for Edward (Rainor) Raynor: Edward Rainor (Raynor) came to America with his Uncle Thurston Raynor in the year 1634. The ship Elizabeth of Ipswich, departed Ipswich, England on April 30, 1634 with 108 passengers. They arrived in Boston harbor in July 1634. Edward was ten years old and a orphan. He was the son of Samuel Reyner and Mary.

In 1644 his uncle Thurston Raynor, who was a proprietor #3 was owner of several "Necks" on the South Shore which was called "Rainers Neck." He passed on to Edward the "extra" proprietor share.

At the age of 21, Edward elected to stay in Hempstead, Queens, New York. He eventually established his home in "South Woods." It was later named Raynor South, then Raynortown, and finally in the mid-nineteenth century Freeport, New York.

Edward Raynor is listed as one of the 65 members along with a William Raynor (no further information) as original Proprietors according to Hempstead Town records. According to town records Edward worked as a herdsman. He was one of a group authorized to build a fence around the southern end of the neck on the west side of Hempstead. The fence was a three rail built in sections known as "pannels."

From the book Gildersleeve Pioneers - Edward Raynor along with William Jecocks kept the east herd of 165 cows owned by thirty settlers. As a cowkeeper / herdsman was paid twelve shillings a week. Actually the sum was paid in produce such as butter, wheat, corn, and oats. Some other items used to barter were pork, beef, rye, tallow, beer, lodging, labor, and hog's fat. All cattle were herded one half hour after sunrise and one half hour before sunset. Anyone who opened the gate while cattle was herded drew a fine in accordance wiuith the law. Usually approximately "five shillings per defect, one halfe to be given ye informer, other halfe for ye Townes use."

1634 - Emmigrated from Ipswich, England to Boston Harbor, Mass.

1640 - Mentioned in the colony of New Haven (Rippowams), Connecticut along with Thurston and William Raynor.

1647 - Listed as Freeholder Town of Hempstead.

1657 - Responsible for six gates and owned seven animals.

1658 - Allotted twelve acres of meadowland, and ten acres on the east side of the harbor.

1665 - According to rate list Edward was worth 80 pounds.

May 25, 1682 - Assessed seven shillings tax for salary of Minister.

The marriage of Edward Raynor to Deborah Partridge has not been confirmed. Notes of Gerald V.S. Raynor - Family Genealogist (Edward's line)

Court Appearances

At a court held in Hempstead 6 March 1677/8. Edward Rainor (Raynor) entered the line of trespass against Mathew Bedel (Bedell - son of Robert Bedell and Blanche) alleging that the defendant had taken part of his "cart tacklin." Source - Annals of Hempstead 1667 -1679

Mar 6 - Edward Rainor (Raynor) declares Mathew Bedel (Bedell). hath taken away a part of his cart tackling, for use of which was to plow and sow a parcel of land with winter corn, which he did not do. Jeremy Woods, Jr. says Bedel was to have the use of Rainor's tacklin for a year, and for it was to plow and sow for him a piece of land in season, and they were to have then the use of the cart between them. The Court ordered the defendant Bedel to pay 30 shillings either in corn (wheat at 5 shillings a bushel or Indian Corn at 3 shillings), or else a neat young beast that comes near the money.

The Last Will and Testament of Edward Rainor Dated: March the 27th, 1681 Hempstead

I leave to my eldest son Samuel, all my land and meadow in the town of Hempstead. I leave to my wife one half of my movable estate, and to the other half to her five children (not named). I make choice of Simon Searing, and my brother Thomas Partridge and Jonathan Seaman, and Nathaniel Pearsall, to be overseers of my wife and children, and over the little estate I have left them, and they dispose of the estate for their benefit, till they come of age. Witnesses: ? Jacobus, Solomon Seaman (not recorded)

Source: Abstract of Wills on file Surrogates Office, City of New York Volume I 1665 - 1701 Appendix Page 409

According to the Names of Inhabitants of the town Hempstead, New York dated 1673 it shows no surname of Raynor listed although it mentions nine others whose names were lost.

Notes: According to the 1698 Census, Town of Hempstead it lists Elizabeth Rainer underneath Deborah Rainer (Page 6 - Column 2). This possibly could be their daughter. No further information on her has been uncovered. As Deborah brought into the relationship five children. Also there is also a possibility of Edward being previously married.

Also various names have been published as descendants of Edward from various sources - they are Edward, Josiah, Daniel, Jonathan, Unknown Raynor, Henry, Amy, Sarah, Elizabeth and Ezekiel. The Raynor Family Association has Ezekiel instead of Edward listed in their files.

According to the research of Emma Machacek in her compiled information of Raynor and Burnham Families, Library of Congress catalog card # 66- 30542. She lists as sons of Edward as Samuel (eldest), Josiah (who had children : Henry, Amy, and Sarah) and possibly a Daniel , and several daughters. (No sources quoted)

Also she states the following: The first English settlement made in Queens County was at Hempstead in 1643 by a group of English settlers who had previously settled in Westherfield and Stanford in Connecticut. There was a patent granted November 1644, by Governor Keift to several English families of Hempstead. This patent was confirmed by Govenor Nicoll, March 6, 1666, and by Governor Dongan, April 17, 1685. In the group which made the first English settlement in Hempstead in 1643 we find the names of William, Thurston, and Robert Raynor (?). Edward Raynor, with most of the first settlers and 55 others were freeholders and shared in the division of land in 1647.

There is a William Rainor (Raynor) listed as one of the original Proprietors of Hempstead. According to information uncovered this possibly is the William Rainor who accompanied Thurston down from Boston. It also relates to him being a preacher. William Raynor is listed in the Colony of New Haven, called Stamford (Rippowams), Connecticut in the years of November 1641 along with Edward Raynor. He was also listed as a Freeholder in 1647 in the first division of land for Hempstead town area along with Edward Raynor. According to Hempstead Town Records Volume #1 page 28 it lists cattle owned by inhabitants of Hempstead on June 11, 1657, together with the number of acres of land taken by each of them in 1658. William Raynor name does not appear in either. So possibly he moved on; or possibly passed away. He his not listed in the 1698 Town Census of Hempstead. So quite possibly some of the names mention above could be children of him. No further confirmation has been uncovered on him or his descendants.

There is a Henry Rainor / Rainer as part of a land transaction for the town of Marlborough, Ulster County, New York for 3600 acres on the 10th of February 1714. Listed in Volume 45, November 19th 1787. Letters for patent from Queen Anne on June 12, 1712 were granted to Capt. William Boyd (assumed first settler of Marlborough {aka Milton}, Ulster County, New York along with Henry Rainor. This possibly could be Edward's son, but hasn't been confirmed. At least it identifies a Henry Rainor at that time period.

More About Edward (Rainor) Raynor: Baptism: St. Mary's Elm Street Church, Ipswich, England

Notes for Deborah Partridge: Information regarding Thomas Partridge and his wife Elizabeth

From Abstracts of Wills on file Surrogates Office, City of New York Liber 5 - 6 page 112

Whereas Thomas Partridge lately died interstate. Letters of Administration are granted to Charles Morgan of flushing in Queens County, who has married the niece of Thomas Partridge.

Liber 5 - 6 page 147 Dated February 6, 1695 / 6

Quietus granted to Charles Morgan, as administrator of estate of Thomas Partridge. "Attested to after the manner of Quakers," before Stephan Van Cortlandt.

Liber 5 - 6 page 124 Flushing July 22, 1698

According to a warrant from Justice Whitehead to us directed, to take true inventory of all movable estate of Thomas Partridge, of Flushing, late deceased. We have taken a true inventory to the best of our judgement, according to the best account we have from Charles Morgan, administrator. John Jarrison, John Tallman - total amount, L64.

Liber 1 - 2 page 38 Dated: May 23, 1669

Elizabeth Partridge, of Flushing, Leaves one fourth of the estate "to all my grandchildren equally" The rest "to all my children equally" Makes Mr. Elias Doughty. of Flushing, executor. Written at the order of Elizabeth Partridge by me, Anthony Water, Clerk. Proved: June 9, 1669 Debts mentioned as owning her from Robert Fecks, Francis ye Carpenter Nicolas Davies, John Gonin.

Liber 1 - 2 page 47 Dated: October 18, 1669

Inventory of the estate of Elizabeth Partridge, taken by William Laurence and Eyrke Jacobs, overseers chosen by the Constable, House and lot L45. Appraised made by John Bowne, W, Noble, and John Hinchman. James Clement. Clerk.

More About Deborah Partridge Census: 1698, Listed in the Town of Hempstead

Children of Edward Raynor and Deborah Partridge are:

<DIR> <DIR> <DIR> <DIR>

+ 2 i. Samuel (Rainor)2 Raynor, born 1660 in Hempstead, Queens, New York; died 1712.

3 ii. Daniel Raynor14,15.

Notes for Daniel Raynor: Listed in the research of Emma Marcheck who compiled family lines of Josiah Raynor.

If this is true possibly this is the Will of Daniel Raynor - died between September 18, 1728 and October 1, 1728 New York

Nuncupative Will of Daniel Reynier, of New York, Gentleman. My body to be buried at discretion of my executors. All debts to be paid, and I leave all my estate to my kinswoman, Mary Sly, and I make her executor. Dated September 18, 1728 Not Signed, No Witnesses Proved - October 1, 1728, upon the oath of John Blake, Antie Cregier, and Jacob DeKay, that the said writing was distinctly read to the said Dainel Reynier, and that he declareds the same to be his will. Not proven as a son of Edward Raynor.

4 iii. Edward Raynor16. Notes for Edward Raynor Letter from Gerald V.S. Raynor to William Fogarty Dated: February 5, 2000 Josiah and Joseph Raynor

There is no know evidence for the placement of Joseph and Josiah under Samuel (2nd Generation). There were just there and since no one came up with an Edward brother there was no other place to put them. However in working with hundreds of names on 7 to 8 large charts you sometimes get little clues here and there. There were three main sources of information. These were authors who published "genealogies" on many people in one book, so it is obvious they didn't go very deep into research. There were "Werner." "Treadwell" and Pellatrea (sp?). The latter was all mixed up, even had Edward as Thurston Raynor's son and the "American Family historic Lineage" follows him. Treadwell ignores the first two generations and only Wehner that there may have been a Samuel (2) brothers such as Henry and a couple of girls, Sarah and Amy, but it is more likely that he was thinking of the 3rd generation because Josiah (3) had children, Amy and Sarah. So since there is no firm reason otherwise. I have chosen to change that 2nd generation.

Here is why - Edward lists Samuel (2) as his eldest son, so there must of been others. Family tradition at the time would have Edward name a son after himself after he used his father's name, Samuel for the first son. There was a Edward Raynor up in Albany in 1701. A third son would be named after an uncle. There was a Joseph. Also, Edward spent age 10 - 21 as Thurston's nephew working with Thurston son Joseph, Edward's age. Also in 1790 census there is a Joseph (4) and I would need a Joseph (3) to get that. Also Josiah (3) in his will calls Joseph his brother, but Benjamin his cousin. Witness to will, Ezekiel (3) would have been a cousin instead of a brother & Ezekiel son, Elijah, was co-witness. Usually witnesses were close relatives not brothers. Also the name "Samuel" never appears in Joseph (3) line as it would if he was Samuel's son. So my guess is as good as anyone's until someone can prove otherwise.

More About Edward Raynor: Fact: 1701, Signer of Petition to King William III Residence: 1701, Albany, New York

5 iv. Elizabeth Raynor17. listed in 1698 Hempstead Census under Deborah Rainor. Not proven as a daughter of Edward.

+ 6 v. Joseph Raynor, born Abt. 1670 in Hempstead, Queens, New York.



http://longislandgenealogy.com/Surname_Pages/raynor.htm Edward Rayner (1624-1682) of Raynertown (Freeport), LI, NY

  Freeport's founder was an orphan when he crossed the Atlantic with his uncle Thurston Raynor.  That fact has always been suspected but has been a source of contention until research finally bore fruit at the Suffolk County Historical Society Museum in Riverhead, on Long Island.
   Thompson, in his famous Long island History called Edward and Thurston brothers - Pelletreau's "American Families of Historical Lineage" contended that Edward probably was Thurston's son when they sailed together from Ipswich, England in 1634.
   Now, like a breeze dispelling fog, comes a pair of letters found at the Riverhead Museum.  The letters from George W. Matthews of Cutchogue (formerly a Rockville Centre resident) said that he had a copy of the will of Edward Raynor - the Freeport founder's grandfather - which was probated in Elmset, England on July 7, 1621.
  ''' After mentioning his "son Thurston" three times in the will, Mr. Raynor bequested sums of money to others, including "Ann, Marie, John, Edward and Robert, sons and daughters of my late son Edward Raynor, deceased."'''
   Mr. Matthews kindly shared a copy of the will.  He also shared a copy of a will written by an earlier ancestor, Robert Reynere of Wickham Market, County of Suffolk, England, on October 4, 1571.
   Robert Reynere's great-grandson Edward sailed to massachusetts with his uncle Thurston.  The boy's mother had died in England before his father.  Orphaned, Edward joined the children of his uncle Thurston and aunt Elizabeth on their voyage to the "new world."  Thurston ultimately settled in Southampton.
   Mr. Matthews quotes Donald Linus Jacobus, editor-in-chief for many years of the American Genealogist, on the origin of the Raynor family in England. Jacobus' statement, summarized briefly follows:  The Raynors derived from Robert Reynere of Wickham Market, Suffolk, who died testate between October 4 and December 5, 1571.  His son Edward Raynor of Elmsett in the same county, made a will on March 22, 1620, proved July 7, 1621, which names his sons Edward, Richard, John, Samuel, Thurston and Robert, and daughter Anne, wife of Robert Lewes of Great Bricet, Suffolk, as well as a son-in-law Henryn Pinson until the grand-children's 18th birthday.
   Clifford Roe Raynor of Manorville gave copies of both wills to Mr. Matthews.
   The other discovery sheds light - or at least presents an ingeniopus theory on the name of Edward raynor's wife.  A quest in the Genealogy Room of the New York Public Library uncovered a 1946 survey, entitled "Edward Raynor of Hempstead, Long Island and some of his descendants," by Henry Alanson Tredwell.  Edward's wife was probably named Deborah Partridge before her marriage.
   From her husband's will, plus the wills of Elizabeth Partridge of Flushing dated 1696, and Thomas Partridge of the same place, dated 1696, Mr. Treadwell believes that Mrs. Raynor may have been the Deborah Raynor listed as a Hempstead Town resident in 1698.

Edward Rayner (Raynere, Raynor) of Raynertown (Freeport), LI, NY

   The first Raynors to come to America were Thurston Raynor, his wife, Elizabeth, their five children, and Thurston’s ten year old nephew, Edward Raynor. Residents of Elmsett, in the County of Suffolk, they left Ipswich, England in April 1634 aboard the ship, Elizabeth, and arrived in Boston three months later. They settled first in Watertown, Massachusetts, and in 1636, along with some other Watertown families, they went to Wethersfield, Connecticut, where Thurston Raynor was listed among the first settlers. In 1641, Thurston Raynor and his family and several other families from Wethersfield moved on to settle Rippowams, the area now known as Stamford, Connecticut. Three years later, in 1644, Thurston Raynor once again uprooted his family and joined with twenty-two other Rippowams families in following their religious leader, Rev. Denton, to Long Island where they settled Hempstead, in the western part of the Island.
   The Edward Raynor family, the largest of the  Raynor families,  have generally lived in Nassau County and the  western part of Suffolk County. Before the middle of the past century Freeport, in Nassau County, was known as Raynortown, due to the  large number  of Raynor descendants living there. Edward Raynor is said to have founded the settlement area in 1659.
   The Raynor family often intermarried with  the Carman and "Rock" Smith families whom they consequently share a great deal of history. This genealogy relates to the descendants of Edward and Thurston Raynor who settled early at Southampton (his descendants stiuck mainly to the east end of LI).
   Edward Raynor came to America with his Uncle Thurston Raynor in the year 1634. The ship, Elizabeth of Ipswich, departed Ispwich, England on April 30, 1634 with 108 passengers. They arrived in Boston Harbor in July 1634. Edward was ten years old and a orphan. At the age of 21, Edward elected to stay in Hempstead, NY, and eventually establish his home in "South Woods." It was later named Raynor South, then Raynortown. Until the mid-nineteen century it was named Freeport.
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Edward Raynor's Timeline

1624
1624
Stmary Elms Church, Ipswich, Suffolk, England
1660
1660
Age 36
Hempstead, Nassau, New York, United States
1670
1670
Age 46
Hempstead, Queens, New York, United States
1685
1685
Age 61
Hempstede, Nassau, NY, USA
????
Queens, New York
????
Queens, New York