Enoch Place, Sr.

Is your surname Place?

Research the Place family

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Enoch Place, Sr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dorchester Center, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States
Death: May 31, 1695 (63)
Kingston, South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Place, I and Dionis "Dinah" Place
Husband of Sarah Place
Father of Enoch Place; Sarah MacCoone; Peter Place; Thomas Place, Jr.; Joseph Place and 2 others
Brother of Peter Place, Sr. and John Place
Half brother of Susanna Place; Elsabeth Place and Frances Place

Occupation: Farmer
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Enoch Place, Sr.

Biography

Enoch Place, Sr. was born on November 5, 1631 in Devon, England. His parents were Thomas Place, I and Dionis "Dinah" (Lyllewhite) Place. He was a Farmer.

Enoch married Sarah (...) Place on November 5, 1657 in Dorchester, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Together they had the following children: Enoch Place; Sarah (Place) MacCoone; Peter Place; Thomas Place, Jr.; Joseph Place; Mary Place; Dinah (Place) Cooke.

He died on September 11, 1695 in Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island.


1657, November 5- Married Sarah in Dorchester, MA.

1660- Moved to Rhode Island and settled in Kingstown probably at present day Wickford.

1663, July 3- First record of Enoch in Rhode Island (Kingstown).

He and others wished to be under the protection of Connecticut.

1664, May 5- He was ordered released from prison upon giving bonds for 100 pounds and ordered to appear before the Court and "speak further to the matter of Timothy Mather, whom he accused of speaking words of a very dishonorable nature against his majesty (King Charles II of England).

1671, May 19- Swore oath of allegiance his Majesty (King Charles II) and fidelity to Rhode Island.

1687, September 6- Taxed 10 shillings and four pence.

1687/88, March 6 and

1688, December 11- Served on grand juries.

1693, October 1- Daniel Gould recorded in his journal: "I went over the water in a canoe, with old Place (Enoch, Sr.) to Cononicut (Jamestown, RI)."

1695, May 31- He made his will and stated he was 64 years of age.

1695, September 11- His will was proved.


From the "History of the John H. Place Family Homestead and Adjoining Farms with other interesting facts", by John W. Place, May, 1944: "Enoch Place came from England to Boston, Massachusetts in 1642, when a boy of 11 years old. It is stated in an old book at the Boston Public Library that "he came in the company of Major Atherton". In those days a number of young boys were sent over from England to America under the guardianship of some responsible person until they became 21 years of age and evidently Enoch's guardian was Major Atherton. There is no record of where Enoch spent his first 15 years in America, but it was probably in the vicinity of Boston, as he was married in Dorchester Mass on November 5, 1657, to Sarah Mumford. About 1660 they moved to North Kingston, R.I. and settled on land in the Pettaquamscutt Purchase, of which Major Atherton was one of the purchasers. It is difficult to determine just where the farm was located, but it was evidently a short distance west of the Wickford-to-Narragansett Pier Road near the village of Hamilton, described in Enoch's will as "a dwelling house and 100 acres about half a mile west of Sugar House Hill." It is said that Sugar House Hill, a name no longer used, is a small hill near the main road, a little north of Hamilton and about one mile south of Wickford. Enoch and Sarah both died in the same year, 1695, leaving the farm to their youngest son, Joseph, It is said that "Enoch had red hair, a commanding personality and showed considerable temper when angry."


The first record we have of Enoch (1) Place is that of his marriage. According to the New England Historical & Genealogical Society Register (11/332), Enoch was married by Major Atherton to Sarah [____] on 5-9-1657 (Dorchester Marriages). Their first son, Enoch (2) was born in Dorchester on 18-7-1658 and their second, Peter (2) in Dorchester on 16-12-1660. These dates should be read (for instance) "on the 5th day of the 9th month. At that time, March 1 was considered as New Year's Day, so Enoch's marriage date would have been 5 November 1657 and the other dates should be advanced two months, as well.

Whether or not our assumptions about Thomas are correct, it is clear that Enoch was close to both the Mather and Atherton families.

About 1660, Enoch and his family moved to Rhode Island and settled on land in the Pettaquamscutt Purchase, of which Major Atherton was one of the purchasers. The Pettaquamscutt Purchase, signed in 1657 at Treaty Rock by the Narragansett sachems Quassaquanch, Kachanaquant and Quequaquenuet, opened for settlement some of the richest farmland in New England (cleared by the Indians). For decades, the Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth and Connecticut colonies tried to poach it from Rhode Island. And in King Philip's War (1675-76), its original inhabitants fought in vain to keep their land. The group purchased from Narragansett sachems a tract of land about twelve square miles in size for the sum of 16 Pounds [1]. The Pettaquamscutt Purchasers allotted the land among themselves and a few other men. This area became known as Kings Town and later as Kingstown. It is difficult to determine just where Enoch's farm was located but it was evidently near what is now known as Wickford, RI, a short distance west of the Wickford to Narragansett Pier Road near the village of Hamilton, described in Enoch's will as "a dwelling house and 100 acres about one half mile west of Sugar House Hill." It is said that Sugar House Hill, a name no longer used, is a small hill near the main road, a little north of Hamilton and about one mile south of Wickford.

While we do not know how much land Enoch purchased or what he paid for it, one has to wonder where a 31-year-old young man would have accumulated the kind of funds involved. One obvious source would have been through an inheritance. Thomas was obviously a man of substance - one of the requirements for acceptance as a Freeman. Another was membership in "the church" - and again, only men of substance were considered for this. Furthermore, only men of substance were able to afford the costs involved in bringing a family to America. So Thomas would have had a substantial estate when he died. While a will has not been found, it is assumed that he willed his entire estate to his wife (and we assume that this was the Dinah Place who died in Dorchester in 1657) and that this passed to Peter and Enoch and, possibly, a sister or sisters, following Dinah's death.

The first record of Enoch in Rhode Island is dated July 3, 1663, at Kings Town, when he and others of Narragansett indicated their preference to be under the protection of Connecticut. Major Atherton and others (including Thomas Mumford) had obtained land at Pettaquamscutt from the Narragansett Indians (Jan 20, 1658). At a meeting held on July 2, 1663, (moderated by Major Atherton) it was decided that it would be up to the people to decide which colony they wanted to align with--Massachusetts, Rhode Island, or Connecticut. Enoch and others apparently preferred to cast their lots with Connecticut. (Rhode Island, at that time, was literally an island--originally, Aquidneck Island--on the other side of Narragansett Bay). One of the concerns was certainly a question of which political entity could best provide security from Indian raids.

The next record of him is dated May 5, 1664, when he and Thomas Mumford were released from prison. The Records of the Colony of Rhode Island, and Providence Plantations, read as follows: "Vpon consideration which of the prisonors shall be called first: ordered, That Thomas Mumford shall be first heard. Vpon consideration and debate about Thomas Mumford and Enock Playce concearning ther release or continuance in bonds: it is ordered, That they shall be bound in the sume of one hundred pounds apiece, to be lyable to come forth vpon all occationes when duely called for, to speake farther to the matter concearning Timothy Mather, whome they accuse for speaking words of a very dishonerable natuer against his Majestye; and the court see cause to enlarge them from prison in consideration of the voluntary, though somewhat late information consearning the sayd Timothy Mather's expressiones, concieving that want of knowledge what to doe (as they aleadge), was the true cause of ther neglect in the premises." (Timothy Mather was a son of the Rev. Richard Mather and was Major Atherton's son-in-law. Thomas Mumford would later be an overseer of Enoch's will.)

For reasons unknown, Enoch tried to return to Dorchester in 1668. The Dorchester Town Records, Volume 4, Page 156, state:.."At a meeting of the selectmen on 8 (12)1668. The same day a letter was presented to the selectmen from Enoch Place for his reseption into the Towne as an inhabitant again but the selectmen saw no reason to grant it". The events described in the previous paragraph may have had a lot to do with the selectmen's decision. The next record of Enoch is found in the same Records Of The Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, on May 18th, 1671, when the General Court met at Pettaquomscott.: "The inhabitants being present, the court was called; after which the commission from the Generall Assembly for holding this Court, his Majesties most gracious Charter and letters; as also the Commissioners orders were publickly read, after which the inhabitants, viz: Mr. Jireh Bull, Mr. Samuell Wilson, Mr. John Porter, Tho. Mumford, John Tift, William Hefernan, Rouse Holmes, James Eldridge, Samuell Albro, Ben. Gardiner, Henry Gardiner, George Gardiner, Nicholas Gardiner, George Palmer, Stephen Northup, Wm. Aires, George Crofts, Enoch Plaice, and Christopher Holmes, did give their engagements for their allegiance to his Majestie, and fidelity to this Colony."

Enoch's date of death is not recorded. His will, dated May 31, 1695, was proved on September 11, 1695: Exx. wife Sarah. Overseers, Thomas Mumford and Josiah Arnold. He calls himself aged sixty-four years. "To wife Sarah, whole estate, real and personal, for life, for support in old age. To youngest son Joseph, at decease of wife, my dwelling house and 100 acres, about half a mile west of Sugar House Hill, and he then to be executor. If Joseph die without issue, the said house and land to go to the eldest of the male heirs of the Places of my issue. All movables in wife's possession at her death to go equally to sons and daughters, viz: Enoch, Peter, Thomas and Joseph Place and Sarah Cook. Inventory, £17, 19s, viz: cow, heifer, 2 yearlings, calf, 4 sheep, 2 or 3 lambs, pewter, iron, etc."



My wife Robyns` 8th greatgrandfather.

immigration to USA 1646 arrived in Boston, Massachusetts aboard the ship James from Bristol, England.

ID: I458 Name: Enoch Place 1 2 3 4 4 4 Sex: M Birth: 05 NOV 1631 in Devonshire, England 1 2 4 Immigration: 17 AUG 1635 Boston, Massachusetts Note: Enoch came to America "with his guardian, Major Humphrey Atherton." Major Atherton is generally believed to have come to America on the "James" with the Rev. Richard Mather. The "James"-- which arrived on 17 August 1635, according to James Savage — was one of 17 ships that sailed to Massachusetts that summer from Bristol, England. Sailing the Atlantic was a dangerous thing to do in those days. It was especially dangerous from June 1 through the end of October -- hurricane season -- and the sailing route from Old England to New England ran south to the Canaries, then west to the Bahamas, and then north with the Gulf Stream. While some families came in one boat, most seem to have split up. One family sent their four children on four different boats that year and the parents came on a fifth. Event: South Kingstown called by the proprietors Pettaquamscutt after the Pettaquamscutt Purchase of 1658. Moved 1660 Pettiquamscutt, Rhode Island Note: Enoch and his family moved to Rhode Island and settled on land in the Pettaquamscutt Purchase, of which Major Atherton was one of the purchasers. This area became known as Kings Town and later as Kingstown. It is difficult to determine just where Enoch's farm was located but it was evidently near what is now known as Wickford, RI, a short distance west of the Wickford to Narragansett Pier Road near the village of Hamilton, described in Enoch's will as "a dwelling house and 100 acres about one half mile west of Sugar House Hill." It is said that Sugar House Hill, a name no longer used, is a small hill near the main road, a little north of Hamilton and about one mile south of Wickford. Major Atherton and others (including Thomas Mumford) had obtained land at Pettaquamscutt from the Narragansett Indians (Jan 20, 1658). Will: Original name Aquidnessett. 30 MAY 1694 North Kingstown, Washington, RI Event: Arrival 1657 Massachusetts 4 4 4 Death: 31 MAY 1695 in Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States 4 4 4 Birth: 05 NOV 1631 in Kingston, Washington, Rhode Island, USA Birth: 11 MAY 1631 in Devon, England 4 Birth: 05 NOV 1631 in Drypool, Yorkshire, England 4 Event: Arrival 1640 Massachusetts 4 Note:

   Sarah's maiden surname will always be a mystery. However, the lack of a surname could be a sign that she was a servant, possibly of Major Atherton's. "Servant" was, of course, the short form of "indentured servant." We can imagine Enoch's buying her freedom with part of his inheritance and promptly marrying her. According to the New England Historical & Genealogical Society Register (11/332), Enoch was married by Major Atherton to Sarah [____] on 5-9-1657 (Dorchester Marriages). Their first son, Enoch (2) was born in Dorchester on 18-7-1658 and their second, Peter (2) in Dorchester on 16-12-1660. These dates should be read (for instance) "on the 5th day of the 9th month. At that time, March 1 was considered as New Year's Day, so Enoch's marriage date would have been 5 November 1657 and the other dates should be advanced two months, as well. Whether or not our assumptions about Thomas are correct, it is clear that Enoch was close to both the Mather and Atherton families.

Sources

  • Massachusetts Town Vital Collections 1620-1988, Boston, Transcript of County Records, 1643-1660; Vol. 1 Births, Marriages Deaths from 1630-1666. ("Enoch Place was married unto Sarah by Major Atharton the 5th of the 9th month 1657").
  • Reference: MyHeritage Family Trees - SmartCopy: Oct 24 2016, 2:00:39 UTC
  • Reference: MyHeritage Family Trees - SmartCopy: Oct 24 2016, 2:05:46 UTC

GEDCOM Source

@R1550995867@ Ancestry Family Trees Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.

GEDCOM Source

Ancestry Family Tree http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=40793367&pid...

view all 11

Enoch Place, Sr.'s Timeline

1631
November 5, 1631
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States
1658
September 18, 1658
Dorchester, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1659
1659
South Kingstown, Providence Plantations
1660
December 18, 1660
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States
1663
1663
North Kingstown, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
1665
January 7, 1665
South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, United States
1668
1668
South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, United States
1670
1670
South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, United States
1695
May 31, 1695
Age 63
South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, United States