George Washington Parke Custis

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George Washington Parke Custis

别名字号 "Wash"
生日 (76)
出生地 Mount Airy, Carroll, Maryland, United States
逝世 1857年10月10日 (72-80)
Arlington, his estate, Virginia, USA
直接亲属

John Parke CustisEleanor Calvert Stuart / Custis之子
Mary Lee Custis的丈夫
Mary Ann Randolph Lee (Custis); 3 died young CustisEdward Hill Carter Custis之父
(Child) Custis; Elizabeth Parke Law; Martha Parke 'Patsy' Peter; Eleanor "Nelly" Parke CustisTwins Custis的兄弟
William Custis Costin, freed slave of Custis family; Ann Calvert Robinson Robinson; Sarah Waite Waite; Eleanor Custis Stuart; Charles Calvert Stuart另外3个的异母(或异父)兄弟

Occupation: orator, playwright, writer, step-grandson and adpton son Of Prs. George Washington
管理员 Private User
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About George Washington Parke Custis

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Birthdate : 4/20/1781

Birth Location: Mount Airy, Maryland, United States

George Washington Parke Custis (April 30, 1781 – October 10, 1857), the step-grandson (and adopted son) of United States President George Washington, was a nineteenth-century American writer, orator, and agricultural reformer.

Through his mother Eleanor Calvert Custis Stuart, he was a great-grandson of Charles Calvert, 5th Baron Baltimore and of Henry Lee of Ditchley. He was the grandson of Martha Washington through her first marriage to Daniel Parke Custis. His father, John Parke Custis, died in November 1781, when "Wash" was an infant. He and his sister "Nelly" (Eleanor Parke Custis) were raised at Mount Vernon by George and Martha Washington.

Wash and Nelly were 8 and 10, respectively, when brought to New York City in 1789 to live with their grandparents in the first presidential mansion. Following the transfer of the national capital, the First Family occupied the President's House in Philadelphia from 1790 to 1797. Wash Custis attended but did not graduate from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) and St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland.

Upon reaching his majority in 1802, he inherited vast sums of money, land and slaves from the estates of his father and grandfather, as a well as bequests from his grandmother and step-grandfather. Almost immediately, he began the construction of Arlington House on a high hill directly across the Potomac River from the National Mall, Washington, DC. It took 16 years to complete the mansion, which he intended to serve as a living memorial to George Washington.

On July 7, 1804, Custis married Mary Lee Fitzhugh. Of their four children, only one daughter, Mary Anna Randolph Custis, survived. She married Robert E. Lee at Arlington House on June 30, 1831.

In 1799, Custis was commissioned as a cornet in the United States Army and aide-de-camp to General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. During the War of 1812, Custis volunteered in the defense of Washington, D.C., at the Battle of Bladensburg.

In 1853, the writer Benson John Lossing visited Custis at Arlington House. See the Cornell University Library transcription of Harper's New Monthly Magazine article: [1] (starting on page 433). Four of the Custis paintings mentioned in the Harper's article can be seen in color (Battle of Germantown/Battle of Trenton/Battle of Princeton/Washington at Yorktown) in the February 1966 issue of American Heritage magazine.

Custis was notable as an orator and playwright. Two addresses delivered during the War of 1812 had national circulation, Oration by Mr. Custis, of Arlington; with an Account of the Funeral Solemnities in Honor of the Lamented Gen. James M. Lingan (1812) and The Celebration of the Russian Victories, in Georgetown, District of Columbia; on the 5th of June, 1813 (1813). Two of Custis's plays, The Indian Prophecy; or Visions of Glory (1827) and Pocahontas; or, The Settlers of Virginia (1830), were published. Other plays include The Rail Road (1828), The Eighth of January, or, Hurra for the Boys of the West! (ca. 1830), North Point, or, Baltimore Defended (1833), and Montgomerie, or, The Orphan of a Wreck (1836). Custis wrote a series of biographical essays about his adoptive father, collectively entitled Recollections and Private Memoirs of Washington, which was posthumously edited and published by his daughter.

Memorial Drive and the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery. Arlington House is visible on the hill above.When Custis died in 1857, his son-in-law Robert E. Lee came to control (as executor of the will) almost 200 slaves on Custis's three plantations, Arlington, White House in New Kent County, and Romancoke in King William County. Under Custis's will, the slaves were to be freed once the legacies from his estate were paid, and absolutely no later than five years after his death.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, the 1,100-acre Arlington Plantation was confiscated by Union forces for strategic reasons (protection of the river and national capital). But the burial, beginning in 1864, of 16,000 War dead surrounding Confederate General Robert E. Lee's home attests to the cold resentment against the commander of the Confederate Army. Arlington Plantation is now Arlington National Cemetery. Arlington House, built by Custis to honor Washington, is now the Robert E. Lee Memorial, and is open to the public under the auspices of the National Park Service.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Washington_Parke_Custis


Birthdate : 4/20/1781

Birth Location: Mount Airy, Maryland, United States

George Washington Parke Custis (April 30, 1781 – October 10, 1857), the step-grandson (and adopted son) of United States President George Washington, was a nineteenth-century American writer, orator, and agricultural reformer.

Through his mother Eleanor Calvert Custis Stuart, he was a great-grandson of Charles Calvert, 5th Baron Baltimore and of Henry Lee of Ditchley. He was the grandson of Martha Washington through her first marriage to Daniel Parke Custis. His father, John Parke Custis, died in November 1781, when "Wash" was an infant. He and his sister "Nelly" (Eleanor Parke Custis) were raised at Mount Vernon by George and Martha Washington.

Wash and Nelly were 8 and 10, respectively, when brought to New York City in 1789 to live with their grandparents in the first presidential mansion. Following the transfer of the national capital, the First Family occupied the President's House in Philadelphia from 1790 to 1797. Wash Custis attended but did not graduate from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) and St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland.

Upon reaching his majority in 1802, he inherited vast sums of money, land and slaves from the estates of his father and grandfather, as a well as bequests from his grandmother and step-grandfather. Almost immediately, he began the construction of Arlington House on a high hill directly across the Potomac River from the National Mall, Washington, DC. It took 16 years to complete the mansion, which he intended to serve as a living memorial to George Washington.

On July 7, 1804, Custis married Mary Lee Fitzhugh. Of their four children, only one daughter, Mary Anna Randolph Custis, survived. She married Robert E. Lee at Arlington House on June 30, 1831.

In 1799, Custis was commissioned as a cornet in the United States Army and aide-de-camp to General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. During the War of 1812, Custis volunteered in the defense of Washington, D.C., at the Battle of Bladensburg.

In 1853, the writer Benson John Lossing visited Custis at Arlington House. See the Cornell University Library transcription of Harper's New Monthly Magazine article: [1] (starting on page 433). Four of the Custis paintings mentioned in the Harper's article can be seen in color (Battle of Germantown/Battle of Trenton/Battle of Princeton/Washington at Yorktown) in the February 1966 issue of American Heritage magazine.

Custis was notable as an orator and playwright. Two addresses delivered during the War of 1812 had national circulation, Oration by Mr. Custis, of Arlington; with an Account of the Funeral Solemnities in Honor of the Lamented Gen. James M. Lingan (1812) and The Celebration of the Russian Victories, in Georgetown, District of Columbia; on the 5th of June, 1813 (1813). Two of Custis's plays, The Indian Prophecy; or Visions of Glory (1827) and Pocahontas; or, The Settlers of Virginia (1830), were published. Other plays include The Rail Road (1828), The Eighth of January, or, Hurra for the Boys of the West! (ca. 1830), North Point, or, Baltimore Defended (1833), and Montgomerie, or, The Orphan of a Wreck (1836). Custis wrote a series of biographical essays about his adoptive father, collectively entitled Recollections and Private Memoirs of Washington, which was posthumously edited and published by his daughter.

Memorial Drive and the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery. Arlington House is visible on the hill above.When Custis died in 1857, his son-in-law Robert E. Lee came to control (as executor of the will) almost 200 slaves on Custis's three plantations, Arlington, White House in New Kent County, and Romancoke in King William County. Under Custis's will, the slaves were to be freed once the legacies from his estate were paid, and absolutely no later than five years after his death.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, the 1,100-acre Arlington Plantation was confiscated by Union forces for strategic reasons (protection of the river and national capital). But the burial, beginning in 1864, of 16,000 War dead surrounding Confederate General Robert E. Lee's home attests to the cold resentment against the commander of the Confederate Army. Arlington Plantation is now Arlington National Cemetery. Arlington House, built by Custis to honor Washington, is now the Robert E. Lee Memorial, and is open to the public under the auspices of the National Park Service.

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George Washington Parke Custis的年谱

1781
1781年4月30日
Mount Airy, Carroll, Maryland, United States
1808
1808年10月1日
27岁
Arlington,Virginia
1857
1857年10月10日
76岁
Virginia, USA
1857年10月13日
76岁
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