Imaam Ma'ad bin Imaam 'Adnaan

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Records for Imaam Ma'ad Imaam 'Adnaan

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About Imaam Ma'ad bin Imaam 'Adnaan

Source 1: http://www.ruqaiyyah.karoo.net/articles/prophfamily2.htm

Source 2: http://www.maaref-foundation.com/english/library/pro_ahl/imam01_ali/biography_of_imam_ali/002.htm

Source 3: http://community.fortunecity.ws/tattooine/spock/67/gen/saadid.htm


From Wikipedia (English):

Ma'ad son of Adnan is in Classical Arabic literature an ancient ancestor of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad.

Origin

According to traditions, Ma'ad is the son of Adnan, the father of a group of the Ishmaelite Arabs who inhabited West and Northern Arabia. Adnan is believed by Arab genealogies to be the father of many Ishmaelite tribes along the Western coast of Arabia, Northern Arabia and Iraq.

As it was reported, Ma'ad was first born of Adnan.



Known by his Kunya "Abu Quda'a"

Ma'ad ibn Adnan is an ancient ancestor of Qusai ibn Kilab and his descendant the Islamic prophet Muhammad. He is featured in ancient Arabic literature.

According to traditions, Ma'ad is the son of Adnan, the father of a group of the Ishmaelite Arabs who inhabited West and Northern Arabia. Adnan is believed by Arab genealogies to be the father of many Ishmaelite tribes along the Western coast of Arabia, Northern Arabia and Iraq.

As it was reported, Ma'ad was first born of Adnan

Ma'ad was the father of four sons: Nizar, Quda'a, Qunus and Iyad. Quda'a was the first-born and so Ma'ad ibn Adnan was known by his Kunya "Abu Quda'a."

In Pre-Islamic Arabia[edit] From the poems composed by Pre-Islamic poets, and from their statements, it can be concluded that Ma'ad was more venerated and more important than his father Adnan, evidenced by the number of times when he was mentioned in Pre-Islamic poetries, and how he was described and honored by his descendants's tribes when boasting against other tribes, some other poets even considered it as "disgrace" not to be a descendant of Adnan and Ma'ad.

Some other poems also celebrated and honored the victory of the people of Ma'ad against the Ghassanids and the kingdom of "Mazhaj" in South Arabia.

When the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II attacked the Qedarite Arabs during the time of Adnan, Ma'ad was sent away by his father, and after the defeat of the Qedarite and the death of both Adnan and Nebuchadnezzar II, many of the people of Adnan who were not forced to live in Mesopotamia have fled away to Yemen, but Ma'ad, as the successor of his father, ordered them to come back to Hijaz and Northern Arabia.

The defeat and displacement of the people of Ma'ad seemed to be viewed by Pre-Islamic Arabs as a disastrous event, so that it was used as a proverbial measure in describing the horribleness of their later defeats

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