John Wingfield, III

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John Wingfield, III

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wingfield, Suffolk, England (United Kingdom)
Death: Wingfield, Suffolk, England (United Kingdom)
Place of Burial: Wingfield Church, Wingfield, Suffolk, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir John de Wingfield, Knight and Elizabeth E. Honypot
Husband of Eleanor Wingfield (Braose)
Father of Catherine de la Pole, Countess of Suffolk
Brother of Sir Thomas Wingfield, Knight of Letheringham; Richard de Wingfield and William de Wingfield

Managed by: Elizabeth Ellen Prince
Last Updated:

About John Wingfield, III

WINGFIELD CHURCH

Wingfield Church is located in the beautiful little village of Wingfield in northern Suffolk. It was originally built as the Collegiate Church for Wingfield College established by Sir John de Wingfield. The church was built in 1362 on the site of an earlier church. It was dedicated to St. Andrew. It is of gray stone, but the stone glitters in the sunlight from crystals that are part of the stone.

The first part of the church, the Chancel, was built by the executors of Sir John's estate. Since he died in 1361, it was necessary to erect the area for his tomb as soon as possible. The nave, with its aisles and south porch are said to have been built by Michael de la Pole, who married Sir John de Wingfield's only daughter and heiress, Katherine. In about 1430, the Chancel and the Lady Chapel were lengthened and the beautiful arches of Lincolnshire stone on the south side of the Chancel were erected. The font stands in the middle of the west end of the nave, facing the Communion Table. It was placed in the church by Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, about 1405. It is octagonal and, on the east side bears the de la Pole arms quartered with Wingfield. The west also has these arms but differenced by a label of three points. The south side bears the Stafford arms and the north, those of Wingfield. The East Window was added by William de la Pole, 1st Duke of Suffolk, in memory of his father, Michael de la Pole, who had died at Harfleur in 1415.

Besides the tomb of Sir John de Wingfield, there are two other near the altar. On the same side as Sir John is the tomb of John de la Pole of Suffolk and his wife Elizabeth Plantagenet, who was the sister of King Edward IV and King Richard III. On the other side of the altar, in the arch that separates the sanctuary from the Lady Chapel, is the tomb of Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, and his wife Katherine Wingfield, daughter of Sir John de Wingfield.

As the years passed, the de la Pole family were very generous to the church and it grew rich with silks and jewels to the glory of God. Then in 1547, the Reformation came and the Crown plundered the rich churches of the country. Wingfield was no exception. The Church was reduced to a ruinous estate. There was probably no minister to care for it since there was a great shortage of clergy and one man had to serve several parishes and had no time to spare for any one individual church. For nearly 300 years, the church was neglected.

In the early part of the 18th century, various improvements were accomplished. In 1837, the Tower of the church was repaired and five years later the South Aisle was repaired and the roof releaded. Major restoration was begun in 1866 and was completed twelve to fourteen years later. These included the repair of the entire roof, new communion rails, restoration of the clerestory windows and other windows throughout the church.

Further work was begun in 1911 to beautify the Sanctuary with appointments to match its age and grace. This work continues to the present day. Just two years ago, the bells were brought down from the tower so that the equipment for supporting and ringing them could be renewed.

As with all very old buildings, there are always repairs to be made. If you are interested in contributing to this beautiful old church, you may write to the Church Warden,Air Commodore J.B. Wellingham.

Sir John was the son of Robert de Wingfield, a wealthy man of a family of Norman origin. Sir Robert left his title and lands to his eldest son John who was in the army fighting in France. John was a confidante and financial adviser to the Black Prince, son of Edward III and heir to the throne.

While at Wingfield Castle, Sir John proposed to found a College for secular Chaplins and a Collegiate Church. In 1361 Sir John died of the Black Death leaving a widow Alianore and only child Katherine.

In 1362, in memory of her husband, Alianore arranged for the building of Wingfield College together with a large Collegiate Church. It was stated that the church in order to make it suitable for the College must be constructed "with a belfry, bells, chapels, at a very great expense". The Chancel was built first and then the chapel to the side with the tomb of the founder.

Sir Johns daughter, Katherine, married Michaael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk. www.findagrave.com

John de Wingfield BIRTH 1320 Wingfield, Mid Suffolk District, Suffolk, England DEATH 1361 (aged 40–41) Wingfield, Mid Suffolk District, Suffolk, England BURIAL St. Andrew's Churchyard Wingfield, Mid Suffolk District, Suffolk, England MEMORIAL ID 86109187

John de Wingfield was chief administrator to Edward the Black Prince. He and both his brothers fought at Crecy in 1346. He fought in the Normandy campaign from 1347-48. He was appointed 'governor of the prince's business' (in effect business-manager) to Edward the Black Prince round about 1351. In 1356 Wingfield fought at Poitiers capturing the head of the French King John II's bodyguard, Sire D'Aubigny. Edward III purchased this captive from Wingfield for £833 . Wingfield died round about 1361, possibly of the second outbreak of the Black Death. His will provided for the founding of Wingfield College in 1362. The college was endowed by the Black Prince. Sir John Wingfield's only child, Catherine, married Michael de la Pole, later 1st Earl of Suffolk and lived at Wingfield Castle in Suffolk. He was the son of John de Wingfield and Elizabeth Honypot. He married Eleanor de Glanville about 1348 in Wingfield.

Family Members ChildrenFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sir John de Wingfield (d. circa 1361) of Wingfield Castle in Suffolk was chief administrator to Edward the Black Prince (1330-1376). He and both his brothers fought at Crecy in 1346. He fought in the Normandy campaign from 1347-48. He was appointed 'governor of the prince's business' (in effect business-manager) to Edward the Black Prince round about 1351. In 1356 Wingfield fought at Poitiers capturing the head of the French King John II's bodyguard, Sire D'Aubigny. Edward III purchased this captive from Wingfield for £833 . Wingfield died in about 1361, possibly of the second outbreak of the Black Death.

His will provided for the founding of Wingfield College in 1362. The college was endowed by the Black Prince. Sir John Wingfield's only child, his daughter and heiress Catherine Wingfield, married Michael de la Pole, later 1st Earl of Suffolk and lived at Wingfield Castle in Suffolk.

Sources Register of Edward, the Black Prince, preserved in the Public Record Office, prepared under the superintendence of the Deputy Keeper of the Records. Vols 1 to 4 Wrottesley, Staffs, II, 33,38. P. H. W. Booth, The Financial Administration of the Lordship and County of Chester, 1272-1377, Chetham Society, third series, 38 (1981), pp. 73-9, 133, 136. External links Wingfield Family Society | Wingfield Family Society St. Andrews Church Wingfield :: Welcome Categories: People from Mid Suffolk District

Catherine de Wingfield de la Pole 1349–1386

http://www.wingfield-suffolk.org.uk/index.htm

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John Wingfield, III's Timeline

1330
1330
Wingfield, Suffolk, England (United Kingdom)
1349
1349
Wingfield, Suffolk, England (United Kingdom)
1361
1361
Age 31
Wingfield Church, Wingfield, Suffolk, England
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Wingfield, Suffolk, England (United Kingdom)