Lord Judeal Juhel de Totenais, of Barnstable

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Lord Judeal Juhel de Totenais, of Barnstable

Latin: Judhellus filius Aluredi, of Barnstable
Also Known As: "de Totnes", "Juhael", "Juthael", "Johel", "Judhael"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Barnstable, Devon, England
Death: January 1123 (69-78)
Barnstable, Barnstaple, Devon, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Alured the Giant
Husband of Bertha de Picquigny
Father of Aenor Eva de Totenais; Alfred de Totenais and N.N. de Totenais
Brother of Robert fitz Alfred

Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Lord Judeal Juhel de Totenais, of Barnstable

See J. B. Williams, "Judhael de Totnes: the life and times of a post-Conquest baron," Anglo-Norman Studies 16 (1994), 271-279.

In Domesday People (p. 41-42), KSB Keats-Rohan writes that by 1069, at least, Juhel was established in the English borough of Totnes, in Devon. He founded a priory there (in the foundation documents naming his father as Alfred). However, he was exiled shortly after 1087 when William II acceeded to the throne, resulting in the forfeiture of his fiefs. Then, before 1113, he was granted a new fief at Barnstaple in Devon by Henry I. This fief had been previously forfeited in 1095 by Robert de Mowbray, nephew of Geoffrey bishop of Coutances, who had held it in 1086.

At the time of the conflict between Alain III of Bretagne and Robert Duc of Normandy in 1029, his father Afred "the Giant" of Lievres, Cavados (canton of Surrain) was fighting the Bretons alongside Niel I de Saint-Saveur (viscount of the Cotentin). Orderic Vitalis alleged that Juhel son of Alfred was a companion of Robert Curthose in his rebellion against William the Conqueror in 1079. After this defeat at Gerberoy, Robert Curthose and his companions travelled north toward Flanders, and in Picquigny Juhel married the sister of Germond de Picquigny.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juhel_of_Totnes, after having been lord of Totnes, was awarded the Barony of Barnstaple, in Devonshire.

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"One of the most interesting, as well as original, portions of the book before us, is the contribution from Richard John King, esq. of Bigadon, of a memoir of Johel de Totenais, the Domesday lord of the castles of Totnes and Barnstaple, and of no less than one hundred and seven manors in Devonshire. Mr. King has successfully traced his Norman parentage. He was the son of one "Alured the giant," whose name occurs in the chronicle of William of Jumieges, and is more fully celebrated by master Wace in his Roman de Rou. Alured, after all his exploits, died a pious monk in the abbey of Cerisy, near Bayeux. His son, Judhael or Joel (a Breton name, now, it is said, represented by Gicquel), who was so largely rewarded for his part in the conquest of England, subsequently espoused the cause of Robert Courthose; whereupon his barony of Totnes was seized by William Rufus, and bestowed upon Roger de Nonant.*[fn. omitted] Johel had previously founded the priory of Barnstaple; in which, following the example of his father, he is said to have closed his days. He had also founded a priory at Totnes, which was a cell dependent on the abbey of saints Sergius and Bacchus at Angiers. The priory at Barnstaple was dedicated to saint Mary Magdalene: that at Totnes to the Virgin Mother." Sylvanus Urban, ed. The Gentleman's Magazine, Vol. XXXV, new ser.(Jan.-June, 1851), p. 380. See also The Genealogist, Vol. IV, p. 138.

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http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3T-Z.htm#_To...

TOTNES

1. ALURED . m ---. The name of Alured’s wife is not known. Alured & his wife had one child:

a) JUHEL de Totnes (-[1099/1129]). [“…Whali [Rahel?] filii Aluredi…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[158]. It appears likely that "Whali" is a transcription error for "Juheli".] His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Joelis filii Aluredi” founded Barnstaple Priory[159]. His name suggests Breton origin. Domesday Book records “Iudichael of Totnes” holding numerous properties in Devonshire, and Froxton in Cornwall[160]. “Juhellus filius Aluredi” founded Totness Priory by undated charter, dated to the reign of William II King of England[161]. An undated charter records that King William II expelled “Juhello de Totenesio" from "hæreditatem eius" and granted it to "Rogerio de Novant” founded Totness Priory by undated charter, dated to the reign of William II King of England[162]. m --- de Picquigny, daughter of ---. A "sœur de Guermond de Picquigny, mariée en Angleterre avec un riche seigneur nommé Joelle de Totenes" is referred to in the De Miraculis sanctæ Mariæ Laudunensis[163]. Juhel & his wife had [three] children:

i) ALURED (-after 1136). The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Alur fil Johel" accounting for "terre patris sui" in Devonshire[164]. The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Aluredo filio Joelis" held out against the king, after helping his friend Baldwin de Reviers at the siege of Exeter, following the surrender of most of his followers, dated to [1136][165].

ii) ELEANOR . "Philippus de Brausia" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze, by "pater eius Guillemus de Brausia", by charter dated 5 Jan [1096], with the consent of "uxor eius Aanor et Guillelmus filius suus"[166]. Her parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Willielmus de Braosa” confirmed donations to Barnstaple Priory by "Johelis avi sui" by undated charter[167]. m PHILIP [I] de Briouse, son of GUILLAUME [I] de Briouse & his wife --- ([1060/70]-[1131/39]).

iii) [daughter . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. It is probably speculative, designed to explain how the Tracy family held part of the honour of Barnstaple (the other part of which was in the hands of the Briouse family, inherited through Juhel de Totnes’s recorded daughter Eleanor): the 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Oliverus de Traci…pro parte sua de honore de Berdestapl" in Devonshire[168]. Domesday Descendants comments that the honour of Barnstaple "probably came to [Henry de Tracy] by grant of King Stephen, against whom Alfred [fitz Juhel] had fought in the previous year, though the possibility that his wife was a sister of Alfred cannot be excluded"[169]. Stapleton is more specific, stating that Oliver de Tracy held "a moiety of the Honour of Barnstaple…through the grant of King Stephen to his father Henry de Tracy, but which grant had been made to the prejudice of the heir of the former possessor Joel son of Alured, who was the grandfather of William de Briouze"[170]. m --- de Tracy, son of ---.]

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From Curt Hofeman as reposted on https://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=flockb&i...

The flwg is from Sanders, I.J., _ ENGLISH BARONIES A STUDY OF THEIR ORIGIN AND DESCENT 1086-1132_, (Oxford University Press, London, first published 1960, Reprinted lithographically, from corrected sheets of the first edition 1963):

Part I Baronies, p. 89.

TOTNES DEVON

The estates which Juhel de Totnes held in Domesday Book later formed part of the barony of Totnes. It is stated that when William the Conqueror died, in 1087, Juhel was expelled from Totnes, which was granted by William II to Roger I de Nonant. This finds support from the fact that in 1091 Roger's gift of the church of St. Mary, Totnes, to the abbey of SS. Sergius and Bacchus, Angers, was confirmed by the king; this was confirmed by King Henry I in 1102-5. He is also called Juhel fitz Alfred or Juhel de Mayenne.

Part II Probable Baronies, p. 104

BARNSTAPLE DEVON

The estates which Geoffrey de Mowbray, bishop of Countances, held when Domesday Book was compiled formed the basis of the barony of Barnstaple. Geoffrey d. 1093, his lands passed to his nephew Robert de Mowbray, Earl of Northumberland, who lost his estates when he rebelled in 1095. The great majority of the lands in Devon passed to Juhel, Domesday lord of Totnes, some time before 1100. Juhel was living in 1123 but he d. ante 1130 when he was followed by his son Alfred who d.s.p. ante 1139 possibly leaving an unnamed SISTER and a sister called Aenor. The major part of the town of Barnstaple was in the king's hands, but the bishop and Baldwin de Brionne, lord of Okehampton, also had interests there.

Sander's above note 5.89 ref. to _Feudal England_, p. 486, no. 4 as flws:

Round, J.H., M.A., _Feudal England - Historical Studies on the XIth and XIIth Centuries_, (Swan Sonnenschein & Co., London, 1895), p. 486, note 4:

The _Guido de Totteneyes_ of this charter seems to be identical with the _Wido de Nunant_ of the charter granted by Henry II. to this priory. This conjecture is confirmed by the entry in the Pipe Roll of 31 Hen. I.: "Wido de Nunant reddit comp. de x. marcis pro concessione ferie de Totneis" (p. 154). There is a story quoted by Dugdale, under Totnes priory, from the records of the abbey of Angers, that Juhel "of Totnes," the Domesday baron, was expelled by William Rufus, and his lands given to Rogert de Nunant. I certainly find Roger de Nonant attesting in 1091 the foundation charter of Salisbury Cathedral in conjunction with William fitz Baldwin (see pp. 330, 472); and Manors belonging to Juhel in 1086 are found afterwards belonging to Valletort, Nonant's successor, as part of his honour of Totnes. But it would seem that Juhel retained part as the honour of Barnstaple, while the Nonants held the rest as the honour of Totnes. Indeed, he must have held both _capita_ so late as 1113, when, say the monks of Laon, "venimus ad castrum, quod dicitur Bannistaplum, ubi manebat quidam princeps nomine Joellus de Totenes," etc. (_Hermannus_, ii. 17), adding that they afterwards visited Totnes "pr�fati principis castrum: (_ibid._ 18).

The flwg is from Sanders, I.J., _ ENGLISH BARONIES A STUDY OF THEIR ORIGIN AND DESCENT 1086-1132_, (Oxford University Press, London, first published 1960, Reprinted lithographically, from corrected sheets of the first edition 1963), Part II Probable Baronies, p. 104-5.

BARNSTAPLE DEVON The estates which Geoffrey de Mowbray, bishop of Countances, held when Domesday Book was compiled formed the basis of the barony of Barnstaple. Geoffrey d. 1093, his lands passed to his nephew Robert de Mowbray, Earl of Northumberland, who lost his estates when he rebelled in 1095. The great majority of the lands in Devon passed to Juhel, Domesday lord of Totnes, some time before 1100. Juhel was living in 1123 but he d. ante 1130 when he was followed by his son Alfred who d.s.p. ante 1139 possibly leaving an unnamed SISTER and a sister called Aenor.

One SISTER, who inherited half the barony, seems to have m. Henry de Tracy, who was named with Barnstaple in 1139. Henry was living in 1147 but some time before 1165 he was succeeded by his son Oliver. Oliver d. circa 1184, his son Oliver II d. 1210 leaving Henry who in 1213 was granted the Braose half of Barnstaple in addition to the half which he had inherited. Henry d. 1274, his heir was his granddaughter MAUD.

MAUD, who inherited the whole barony, d. ante Mich. 1279. She m. firstly, Nicholas fitz Martin d. 1260 of Blagdon, q.v., and secondly, Geoffrey de Camville d. 1308. On Geoffrey's death Maud's lands passed to her son William I fitz Martin d. 1324. William II fitz Martin, s. and h., d.s.p. 1326. His heirs were his sister ELEANOR and the son of his sister JOAN. [NOTE from JW: I am following CP and many others in stating that it was Maud de Briene, daughter of Guy de Briene by Eve de Tracy daughter of Henry de Tracy (of whom Maud was a granddaughter), who is mentioned above.]

ELEANOR, who inherited half the barony, d.s.p. 1342. She m. firstly, William de Hastings d.v.p.s.p. 1311, son of John de Hastings d. 1313 of Abergavenny. She m., secondly, Philip de Columbars d.s.p. 1342 of Nether Stowey, q.v. JOAN, who inherited half the barony, d. 1322. She m. firstly, Henry, Earl of Lincoln, d. 1311. She m., secondly, Nicholas Audley d. 1316. James, s. and h., was given seizin of his lands in 1329. In 1343 he inherited the lands of his aunt Eleanor. He d. 1386.

AENOR [the other SISTER of Alfred above], who inherited half the barony, m. Philip de Braose d. 1134-55 of Bramber. William II, s. and h., owed 1,000 silver marks in 1158 to obtain his share of Barnstaple. William d. circa 1192-3; the lands of his son William III were confiscated by King John in 1208 and in 1213 his half of the honour of Barnstaple was granted to Henry de Tracy, holder of the other half.

Henry's name is not mentioned in the pipe rolls and the first mention of Oliver is in 1165 when he owed 500 m. for his share of Barnstaple. This suggests that Henry had died in the reign of Stephen and that the lands had been seized into the hands of the king, who released them only after the payment of a heavy fine. In 1165 Oliver was charged scutage on 25 knights' fees. In 1166 he recorded 21 _de veteri_ and 2 � _de novo_ but in 1168 he was charged for 28 knights' fees _de veteri_ and for 2 � _de novo_. Scutage was later charged on 28-29 knights' fees.

Henry de Tracy held the barony by service of 2 knights or 4 sergeants for 40 days. Geoffrey de Camville held Maud's lands 'by service of a barony and a fifth part of a barony'. See Great Torrington for the 'fifth part of a barony'. Henry de Tracy answered for 56 knights' fees in 1235-6. In 1246 he was charged for 28 knights' fees of the honour of Barnstaple (the Braose half) and for 28 knights' fees of the honour of Oliver de Tracy. The same charge was made on Geoffrey de Camville in 1279. Maud was da. and h. of Eve da. and h. of Henry de Tracy, by Guy de Brian of Laugharne, co. Carmarthen. William I m. Eleanor, da. of Reginald fitz Peter d. 1286 of Blaen Llynfi and widow of John de Mohun d. 1279. See Dunster. William II m. Margaret, da. of John de Hastings d. 1313 of Abergavenny.

References

  • John Bryan Williams, Judhael of Totnes: The Life and Times of a Post-Conquest Baron, Anglo-Norman Studies 16 (1993) pp. 271-289

Notes

1. ^ Judel, Judhel, Judael, Judhael, Joel of Totnes, Judhel de Totenais, Judhellus filius Aluredi, Juhel fitz Alfred, Juhel de Mayenne.

2. ^ E. M. R. Ditmas, Reappraisal of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Allusions to Cornwall, Speculum, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Jul., 1973), pp. 510-524.

3. ^ For example Clawton[1], Broadwood Kelly[2], Bridford[3], Cornworthy[4].

4. ^ William Rufus (1983), p. 171.

5. ^ [5], [6]

______________________ Independent research by David Bigelow

Judhel "Juhel fitz Alfred, Juhel de Mayenne, Lord Barnstable" de Totnes (Totenais), 1st feudal Baron of Barnstable and Totnes, his siblings and children

Contrary to many of the community trees Juhel de Totnes was “most likely” not born in Barnstable, Devon, England. It was made clear in Domesday People in which it was pointed out J.H Round observed that the names of his father and son clearly indicate a Breton origin for the family. But what does origin mean in this context? Juhel's ancestors were obviously Breton, but does this have to mean that he himself came to England from Brittany? Breton names were not uncommon in Normandy during the eleventh century, reflecting in part the earlier occupation of much of western Normandy by the Bretons… Despite certain difficulties, it is possible, even likely, therefore, that Juhel of Totnes was Orderics Juhel son of Alfred the Giant of Lievres, Calvados, cant. Surrain.[1]

gs. Mr. Watkins in his work “The History of Totnes Priory & Medieval Town, Devonshire” makes a strong argument that the name Alfred is uniquely English, implying therefore that not only Juhel but his father Alfred the Giant were born in England.[7]

The conquest of Cornwall had been carried out as a secondary operation in 1067-1068 after the conquest of other parts of England. William the Conqueror himself seems to have headed the initial foray after the submission of Exeter in December 1067. He was back in Winchester by March 1068 and the consolidation of the conquest and the repulse of Harold's supporters in 1069 seems to have been entrusted to a Breton contingent under Breton leaders. One of these leaders was Judhellus filius Aluredi, afterward lord of Totnes and of a hundred and seven manors in Devonshire and of one in Cornwall.”[2] From this effort in 1969 Juhel (Juhel de Totnes, probably a close member of the families of Mayenne and Fougeres,[3]) received as a gift from William I the borough of Totnes.

That Judhael was a retainer of considerable importance is proved by the large extent of territory assigned to him in Devonshire, consisting of no less than one hundred and seven manors, together with the important castles of Totnes and Barnstable.[4]

However, Mr. R. J. King, (antiquarian and poet) in 1850, wrote the result of his research concerning the parentage of Iuhellus de Totnais in the form of a letter to Mr. William Cotton, who reproduced it in the appendix of his book on the Antiquities of Totnes. Mr. King bases his belief, that Alured the Giant was the father of Iuhellus, on his discovery of the name " Iohel, Aluredi Gigantis filins " among the names of those Normans who adhered to the fortunes of Robert Courthose when he departed from Normandy in 1080. This name was admittedly "inserted in the margin," in a subsequent correction of the Chronicle of Ordericus (Antiquities of Taints, fo. 78, note); but it is less likely to have been added by Ordericus himself than subsequently by some student, who has confused the two insurrections of 1080 and 1088, and considered that the name of Iuhellus, known to have supported Robert on the second occasion, was inadvertently omitted by the chronicler in his list.

The evidence of this single notice of " Iohel Aluredi Gigantis filius" by an unknown scribe must be accepted with reserve because the only known children of Aluredus Gigant were a son named William, and a daughter named Athselinoc (Freeman, Norman Conquest, Appendix, fo. 770). The daughter's name, as we learn from the records of the Abbey of the Holy Trinity of Caen already mentioned, was Ascelina. Iuhellus, in his foundation charter of Tonics Priory, only records " his father and mother and his brother Rodbertus." There is no mention of William or Ascelina, in this or subsequent deeds. The only possible explanation could be that Iuhellus and Robertus were children by a second wife; but we must incline to the opinion that if Iuhellus was really the son of the well-known giant, we should certainly find—somewhere in the authentic records we possess—his name associated with the patronymic " Aluredi Gigantis sive Vicecomitis," just as the daughter Ascelina was known as " filia Aluredi Gigantis."[10]

Alured is the only male descendant of Judhael de Totnais of whom we can obtain anything like a clear trace. A daughter of Judhael, however, appears to have married into the great family of Braose ; and it was through her that the Honors both of Barnstable and Totnes were claimed by, and passed into the hands of, the powerful house I have just mentioned, and subsequently into those of the Zouches.[5] And Wikipedia says that “Juhel's son and heir was Alfred de Totnes, who died sine prole (without issues) sometime before 1139, leaving two sisters as his co-heiresses each to a moiety of the barony: Aenor and a sister whose name is unknown. However, the Geni master profile shows one child, a daughter named Aenor Eva, and shows her to have been married twice, to Philip de Braose and Turgisus II de Tracy. Let’s break this down.

Medieval Lands at the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy shows this: TOTNES (I’ve edited this for clarity) 1. ALURED . m ---. The name of Alured’s wife is not known. Alured & his wife had one child: a) JUHEL de Totnes (-[1099/1129]). . Juhel & his wife had [three] children: i) ALURED (-after 1136). ii) ELEANOR . "Philippus de Brausia" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze, by "pater eius Guillemus de Brausia", by charter dated 5 Jan [1096], with the consent of "uxor eius Aanor et Guillelmus filius suus". Her parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Willielmus de Braosa” confirmed donations to Barnstaple Priory by "Johelis avi sui" by undated charter. m PHILIP [I] de Briouse, son of GUILLAUME [I] de Briouse & his wife --- ([1060/70]-[1131/39]). iii) [daughter. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. It is probably speculative, designed to explain how the Tracy family held part of the honour of Barnstaple (my emphasis) (the other part of which was in the hands of the Briouse family, inherited through Juhel de Totnes’s recorded daughter Eleanor): the 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Oliverus de Traci…pro parte sua de honore de Berdestapl" in Devonshire. Domesday Descendants comments that the honour of Barnstaple "probably came to [Henry de Tracy] by grant of King Stephen, against whom Alfred [fitz Juhel] had fought in the previous year, though the possibility that his wife was a sister of Alfred cannot be excluded". Stapleton is more specific, stating that Oliver de Tracy held "a moiety of the Honour of Barnstaple…through the grant of King Stephen to his father Henry de Tracy, but which grant had been made to the prejudice of the heir of the former possessor Joel son of Alured, who was the grandfather of William de Briouze". m --- de Tracy, son of ---.] [6] (Note: an unnamed brother of Alured is mentioned in the Gesta Stephani[4])

This shows that Juhel had a son and daughter, and a possible third daughter who may be spurious. The son Alured is accounted for. But we seem to be forced into a choice between Aenor and Eleanor, but is this really a choice? If we look at the onomastics of these names…;

Eleanor The name derives from the Provençal name Aliénor which became Eléanor or Eleonore in the northern Langue d'oïl and from there also to English. The name probably originates as that of Eleanor of Aquitaine (1120s–1204). She was the daughter of Aénor de Châtellerault, and it has been suggested that having been baptized Aenor after her mother, she was called alia Aenor, i.e. "the other Aenor" in childhood and would have kept that name in adult life; the name Aénor itself appears to be a Latinization of a Germanic name of uncertain form. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Eleanor

Aénor (also Aenora, Ainora; the spelling Aénor suggests an original trisyllabic pronunciation) was a feminine given name in medieval France. It is likely the origin of, and by the later Middle Ages was replaced by, the name Eleanor (Alienor). It arose as a Latinization of an earlier Germanic name, via the form Adenordis (Aanordis, Anordis, Anor). Use of the name seems to be mostly confined to the 12th century; before that, it would have retained its original form (Anordis or similar), and after 1200 it had been mostly ousted by its replacement Eleanor. The form Adenordis is recorded in the 1090s. It may itself be a corruption of Adamardis, apparently a feminine form of Ademar. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Aenor

… looking at “alia Aenor”, it is not difficult to see how Eleanor became a derivation of Aenor. I submit that these two different names are in fact the same person. One could write it in Geni as Eleanor (Aenor).

All this above taken together yields the conclusion that Juhel had two children, Aulred and Eleanor (Aenor). The second unnamed daughter is spurious because her reason for being is solely to provide means for the Tracy family to gain a moiety in Barnstable, something which FMG shows they acquired on their own. Note that FMG shows that the name of turgisus II is unknown.

However, there is other information that indicates that FMG is also lacking. Watkins in his work “The History of Totnes Priory & Medieval Town, Devonshire…” indicates that Alured “the Giant” had two children, William and Athselinoc (Ascelina?).[7] And Freeman in his work “Norman Conquest” says that Alfred had a son William and a daughter Athselinoc (Ascelina).[8] And, in the foundation charter of his Totnes Priory by Iuhellus (Juhel) he refers to a brother Rodburtus. Mr. Watkins also makes an argument that it is questionable whether Juhel was a son of Alfred the Giant, but if so it was by a second unknown wife. All of this taken together would look like this, but still far from assured:

Alfred = unknown wife #1 = unknown wife #2

                 _________|__________                               ___________|__________    
                 |                                |                               |                                    |
           William                Athselinoc (Ascelina)	 Iuhellus (Juhel)	       Rodburtus    
                                                      ________________|_________
                                                      |                                           |
                                                   Alured                  Eleanor (Aenor) m. Philip de Braose (ONLY)  

Note: Once saved this table does not display correctly, please refer to the .pdf posted to the Siources tab

Finally, the coat of arms used for Aenor is incorrect. The arms used are the arms of the feudal barony of Barnstable. While the de Braose were barons of Barnstable, a wife does not normally use the titled arms of a baron, she uses the family arms of her father unless she herself is titled such as Baroness of Barnstable. These arms were also attributed to William de Braose (died 1211) by Matthew Paris in Historia Anglorum, Chronica Majora, Part III (1250-59) British Library MS Royal 14 C VII f. 29v[3] (shown there inverted to denote his death). He apparently adopted them at the start of the Age of Heraldry c. 1200-1215, but Matthew Paris's attribution may be dubious as his descendants in the Braose family bore different arms [9], and those before back to at least Phillippe de Braose, husband of Eleanor.

Based on the book by William Cotton, I’ve drawn arms for de Totnes. I’ve used the current civic arms of Totnes as a basis since the book does not have a heraldic description which would include tinctures. It is not uncommon for current civic arms to be derivations of ancient arms of early barons, but prior to about 1250, armorial bearings effectively did not exist. I have taken a small bit of artistic license. Based on the current civic arms, the keys are shown opposing, but the small sketch in Mr. Cottons book shows them in parallel. I have chosen to show them opposed.

The see the arms please refer to the .pdf posted under the Sources tab.

Totnes arms by Mr. Cotton Arms of Totnes (drawn by me) Civic arms of Totnes [1] Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. Domesday People: a Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166 I: Domesday Book. Vol. 2, Boydell & Amp, 1999, 41-42 [2] Ditmas, E.M.R. “A Reappraisal of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Allusions to Cornwall.” Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies, vol. 48, no. 3, July 1973, 510. [3] Jones, Michael. The Creation of Brittany: a Late Medieval State. A&C Black, 1988. 77 [4] Cotton, William. A Graphic and Historical Sketch of the Antiquities of Totnes. Longman, 1850, 78 [5] ibid, 87 [6] Cawley, Charles. “Untitled English Nobility.” Medieval Lands, The Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG), 2 May 2018, fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3T-Z.htm#_Toc433462056. (Totnes and Tracy) [7] Watkin, Hugh R. “The History of Totnes Priory & Medieval Town, Devonshire, Together with the Sister Priory of Tywardreath, Cornwall; Comp. from Original Records, by Hugh ... V.3.” HathiTrust, Torquay, 1914, babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo1.ark:/13960/t4vh64d7h. 654-680 [8] Freeman, Edward A. The History of the Norman Conquest of England. Its Causes and Its Results. Clarendon Press, 1871. Appendix 770 [9] Lewis, Susanne, The Art of Matthew Paris in the Chronica Majora; and see The Matthew Paris Shields, published 1958 in series "Aspilogia II", MP IV No7, Boydell Press [10] Cotton, ibid 77

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Lord Judeal Juhel de Totenais, of Barnstable's Timeline

1049
1049
Barnstable, Devon, England
1084
1084
Barnstaple, Devonshire, England
1123
January 1123
Age 74
Barnstable, Barnstaple, Devon, England
1123
Age 74
1936
May 7, 1936
Age 74
May 7, 1936
Age 74
May 7, 1936
Age 74
May 7, 1936
Age 74
May 7, 1936
Age 74