Margaret de Clare, Baroness of Badlesmere

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Margaret de Clare, Lady Badlesmere

Also Known As: "Margaret de clare baroness Badlesmere"
Birthdate: (45)
Birthplace: Bunratty Castle, Connaught, County Clare, Thurmond, Ireland
Death: January 3, 1333 (41-49)
Convent House of Minorite Sisters, London, Aldgate, England
Place of Burial: Badlesmere Church Badlesmere Swale Borough Kent, England
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliane FitzMaurice
Wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron of Badlesmere and Gilbert de Umfreville
Mother of Margery de Badlesmere, Baroness De Ros; Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford; Elizabeth de Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton; Baron Giles de Badlesmere; Ralph Badlesmere and 1 other
Sister of Matilda (Maud) de Clare; Richard de Clare, 1st Lord Clare, Lord of Thomond and Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond

Occupation: Baroness of Badlesmere, a Norman-Irish noblewoman and the wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere
Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Margaret de Clare, Baroness of Badlesmere

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_de_Clare,_Lady_Badlesmere]

Margaret de Clare (c.1 April 1287- 22 October 1333/ 3 January 1334) was a Norman-Irish noblewoman and the wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere.[1]

In 1321, she was arrested and imprisoned in the Tower of London for refusing Isabella of France, Queen consort of King Edward II, admittance to Leeds Castle of which her husband, Lord Badlesmere, was castellan.

Contents

1 Family 2 Marriages 3 Leeds Castle 4 Issue 5 Ancestry 6 References 7 Sources


Family

Margaret was born at Bunratty Castle in Thomond, Ireland on or about 1 April 1287, the youngest child of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly. Her paternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy. Her maternal grandparents were Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly and Maud de Prendergast (born 17 March 1242), daughter of Gerald de Prendergast and a de Burgh daughter whose first name is not known. Margaret's maternal ancestors included Brian Boru, Dermot McMurrough, and Maud de Braose.

Margaret had an elder sister, Maud and two brothers, Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond, and Richard de Clare, 1st Lord Clare, Lord of Thomond, who was killed at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea in 1318.[2]

On 29 August 1287, when she was almost five months of age, her father was killed in battle. Her mother married her second husband, Nicholas Avenel, sometime afterwards.

Margaret was co-heiress to her nephew Thomas de Clare, son of her brother Richard, by which she inherited the manors of Plashes in Standon, Hertfordshire and lands in Thomond, Limerick and Cork in 1321 upon the death of Thomas.[3]

Marriages

Before 1303, she married firstly, Gilbert de Umfraville, son of Gilbert de Umphraville, Earl of Angus, and Elizabeth Comyn. Upon their marriage, the Earl of Angus granted Gilbert and Margaret the manors of Hambleton and Market Overton. When Gilbert died childless, sometime before 1307, the manors passed to Margaret.

Sometime before 30 June 1308, she married secondly, Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere, (1275-14 April 1322), an English baron and Governor of Bristol Castle, by whom she had five children.[4] She was styled as Lady Badlesmere on 26 October 1309, and henceforth known by that title.[5]


Lord Badlesmere was appointed castellan of the Royal Castle of Leeds in Kent, by Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, Regent of King Edward II. In October 1321, the queen consort Isabella of France went on a pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas at Canterbury. She decided to break her journey by stopping at Leeds Castle, which was given to her as part of her dowry[6] Bartholomew was away at the time leaving Margaret in charge of the castle. Due to her dislike of Isabella as well as her own belligerent character, she refused the Queen admittance, and subsequently ordered her archers to fire upon Queen Isabella when she approached the outer barbican. When King Edward heard of the treatment meted out to his consort by Margaret, he sent an expeditionary force to the castle. After a successful assault of the castle, with the King's troops using ballistas, the defenders surrendered, and Margaret was seized and sent to the Tower of London.[7]

As a result of Margaret's arrest, Lord Badlesmere joined Lancaster's rebellion and fought in the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322. He was arrested and afterward hanged for treason on 14 April 1322. Margaret remained imprisoned in the Tower until 3 November 1322.[2] She was released from the Tower, due to the successful mediation, on her behalf, of her son-in-law William de Ros. She retired to the convent house of the Minorite Sisters, outside Aldgate.[8]

In 1328, her son Giles obtained a reversal of his father's attainder and succeeded to the barony as the 2nd Baron Badlesmere.

Margaret died between 22 October 1333 and 3 January 1334.[9]

Issue

1.Margery de Badlesmere (1308/1309- 18 October 1363), married before 25 November 1316, William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake. (c.1290- 3 February 1343[10]), by whom she had six children.

2.Maud de Badlesmere (1310- 24 May 1366), married firstly Robert FitzPayn, and secondly, John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford. By her second marriage, Maud had seven children.

3.Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313- 8 June 1356), married firstly Sir Edmund Mortimer, and secondly, William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton. Both marriages produced children.

4.Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere (18 October 1314- 7 June 1338, married Elizabeth Montagu, by whom he had four daughters.

5.Margaret de Badlesmere (born 1315), married John Tiptoft, 2nd Lord Tiptoft, by whom she had one son, Robert Tiptoft.

References

1.^ Thomas B. Costain "The Three Edwards" 2.^ a b The Complete Peerage. 3.^ Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, p. 35 4.^ The Complete Peerage 5.^ The Complete Peerage, volume 1, page 372. 6.^ Thonas B.Costain "The Three Edwards" pages 193-95 7.^ Costain,pages 193-95 8.^ Richardson and Everingham, p.35 9.^ Richardson and Everingham,p.35 10.^ thePeerage.com.pp.10696

Sources

1.G.E. Cokayne The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant. 2.Thomas B. Costain The Three Edwards. Published by Doubleday, 1958 3.Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_de_Clare,_Lady_Badlesmere" Categories: 1287 births | 1333 deaths | Anglo-Normans in Ireland | Women of medieval England | Prisoners in the Tower of London

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Margaret de Clare1 F, #3559, b. circa 1287, d. 1333

Last Edited=1 Jan 2004

    Margaret de Clare was born circa 1287.2 She was the daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzMaurice.1 She married, firstly, Gilbert de Umfreville, son of Gilbert de Umfreville, 8th Earl of Angus and Elizabeth Comyn, before 1303.1 She married, secondly, Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere, son of Guncelin de Badlesmere and Joan FitzBernard, before 30 June 1308.1 She died in 1333.1
    From before 1303, her married name became de Umfreville.1 From before 30 June 1308, her married name became de Badlesmere.1 As a result of her marriage, Margaret de Clare was styled as Lady Badlesmere on 26 October 1309. In 1321 she refused the Queen admission to the Royal Castle of Leeds, leading to the siege and capture of the Castle.2 Between 11 November 1321 and 3 November 1322 at Tower of London, The City, London, England, she was imprisoned.2

Children of Margaret de Clare and Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere Margery de Badlesmere+ b. c 13063 Maud de Badlesmere+ b. c 1310, d. 13663 Elizabeth de Badlesmere+ b. c 1313, d. 8 Jun 13563 Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Lord Badlesmere b. 18 Oct 1314, d. 7 Jun 13382 Margaret de Badlesmere+ b. c 13153

Citations

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 149. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 372. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 373.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_de_Clare,_Baroness_Badlesmere


http://knight-france.com/geneal/names/1686.htm

Margaret DE CLARE [1686]

   Born: 1 Apr 1287, Bunratty Castle, Thomond, Ireland
   Marriage: Bartholomew DE BADLESMERE, 1st Baron Badlesmere [2025]
   Died: 22 Oct 1333-3 Jan 1334, , , England at age 46

<Wikipedia>: " Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere (c.1 April 1287 \endash 22 October 1333 / 3 January 1334) was a Norman-Irish noblewoman, suo jure heiress, and the wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere.

She was arrested and subsequently imprisoned in the Tower of London for the duration of a year from November 1321 to November 1322, making her the first female prisoner in the Tower's history. She was jailed on account of having ordered an armed assault on Isabella of France, Queen consort of King Edward II of England. Before Margaret had instructed her archers to fire upon Isabella and her escort, she had refused the Queen admittance to Leeds Castle where her husband, Baron Badlesmere held the post of governor, but which was legally the property of Queen Isabella as part of the latter's dowry. Margaret surrendered the castle on 31 October 1321 after it was besieged by the King's forces using ballistas. Edward's capture of Leeds Castle was the catalyst which led to the Despenser War in the Welsh Marches and the north of England.

Upon her release from the Tower, Margaret entered a religious life at the convent house of the Minorite Sisters outside Aldgate. King Edward granted her a stipend to pay for her maintenance.

Family Margaret was born at Bunratty Castle in Thomond, Ireland on or about 1 April 1287, the youngest child of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly, and granddaughter of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester.

She had two brothers, Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond, and Richard de Clare, 1st Lord Clare, Lord of Thomond, who was killed at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea in 1318; and an elder sister, Maud, whose first husband was Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford. Margaret also had an illegitimate half-brother, Richard the Clerk.

Her father was killed in battle on 29 August 1287, when she was almost five months of age. Her mother married her second husband, Nicholas Avenel sometime afterwards, but the exact date of this marriage is not known. Between 11 December 1291 and 16 February 1292, Margaret acquired another stepfather when her mother married her third husband, Adam de Cretynges.

Margaret became co-heiress to her nephew Thomas de Clare, son of her brother Richard, by which she inherited the manors of Plashes in Standon, Hertfordshire and lands in Thomond, Limerick and Cork in 1321 upon the death of Thomas at the age of three.

Marriages She married firstly before the year 1303, Gilbert de Umfraville, son of Gilbert de Umphraville, Earl of Angus, and Elizabeth Comyn. Upon their marriage, the Earl of Angus granted Gilbert and Margaret the manors of Hambleton and Market Overton; however, when Gilbert died childless prior to 1307, the manors passed to Margaret.

On an unrecorded date earlier than 30 June 1308, she married secondly, Bartholomew de Badlesmere, an English soldier and court official who was afterwards created 1st Baron Badlesmere by writ of summons. He had held the post of Governor of Bristol Castle since 1307, and from then onwards proceeded to accumulate many renumerative grants and offices. Margaret's marriage to Badlesmere had been arranged by her brother-in-law, Baron Clifford; Badlesmere having been one of Clifford's retainers during the Scottish Wars in the early 1300s. Clifford was later killed at the Battle of Bannockburn, where Badlesmere also fought.

Margaret was styled as Baroness Badlesmere on 26 October 1309 (the date her husband was by writ summoned to Parliament by the title of Baron Badlesmere) and henceforth known by that title.

The marriage produced four daughters, and a son and heir, Giles Badlesmere. The couple's principal residences were Castle Badlesmere and Chilham Castle, both in Kent.

Badlesmere was appointed steward of King Edward II's household in 1318; a position which brought him much power and influence in the royal council. He was one of the middle party, which resented the King's favourites, the Despensers, yet also equally opposed Edward's staunch enemies such as his immensely powerful cousin Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, who in addition to having been one of the wealthiest nobles in England, was the leader of the Lords Ordainers. These men, drawn from the peerage and clergy, were the 21 signatories of the Ordinances of 1311; a series of regulations forced upon the King with the aim of restricting his administrative prerogatives, and setting up a baronial oligarchy in the realm.

Margaret was visiting Cheshunt Manor in Hertfordshire in 1319, when she was taken hostage by a group of sixty people, both men and women. Her captors demanded a ransom of £100 for her release. She was held prisoner for one night before her prompt rescue the following day by the King's favourite, Hugh Despenser the Younger. Hugh was married to Margaret's first cousin, Eleanor de Clare, eldest daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester and Joan of Acre (This also made Eleanor a first cousin of Edward II). The King ordered the arrest and imprisonment of 20 of Margaret's kidnappers; they all, however, were eventually pardoned.

Issue The five children of Margaret and Baron Badlesmere:

Margery de Badlesmere (1308/1309- 18 October 1363), married before 25 November 1316 William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, by whom she had six children. Maud de Badlesmere (1310- 24 May 1366), married firstly, Robert FitzPayn; secondly, John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford, by whom she had seven children. Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313- 8 June 1356), married firstly in 1316 Sir Edmund Mortimer, eldest son of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville; she married secondly in 1335, William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton. Both marriages produced children. Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere (18 October 1314- 7 June 1338), married Elizabeth Montagu, but did not have any chldren by her. Margaret de Badlesmere (born 1315), married Sir John Tiptoft, 2nd Lord Tiptoft, by whom she had one son, Robert Tiptoft.

Assault on Queen Isabella ... Imprisonment in the Tower of London ... The Minorite Sisters Margaret retired to the convent house of the Minorite Sisters, outside Aldgate, where the abbess Alice de Sherstede was personally acquainted with Queen Isabella, who took an interest in the convent's business affairs. The King granted Margaret a stipend of two shillings a day for her maintenance, which was paid to her by the Sheriff of Essex. She also received a considerable proportion of her late husband's manors for her dowry.

Edward demonstrated his good will toward Margaret again on 1 July 1324, by giving her "permission to go to her friends within the realm whither she will, provided that she be always ready to come to the king when summoned".

Her son Giles obtained a reversal of his father's attainder in 1328, and succeeded by writ to the barony as the 2nd Baron Badlesmere. By this time Edward III had ascended the throne; however, the de facto rulers of England were Queen Isabella and her lover, Marcher Lord Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March (father-in-law of Margaret's daughter Elizabeth), who jointly held the Office of Regent for the new king. Edward II had been deposed in January 1327 and allegedly murdered in September by Mortimer's hired assassins.

Margaret died between 22 October 1333 and 3 January 1334."

Margaret married Bartholomew DE BADLESMERE, 1st Baron Badlesmere [2025] [MRIN: 1145], son of Guncelin DE BADLESMERE [632] and Joan FITZ BERNARD [639]. (Bartholomew DE BADLESMERE, 1st Baron Badlesmere [2025] was born in 1275 in , , England and died on 14 Apr 1322 in , , England.)

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Margaret de Clare, Baroness of Badlesmere's Timeline

1255
1255
Badlesmere, Kent, England
1287
April 1, 1287
Connaught, County Clare, Thurmond, Ireland
1304
December 3, 1304
Age 17
Kent, England
1310
1310
Age 22
Kent, England
1313
1313
Age 25
Chilham Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England
1314
October 1, 1314
Age 27
Hambleton, Rutlandshire, England
1315
December 3, 1315
Age 28
Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England