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Mary Foulke (Richardson)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: North Wingfield, Derbyshire, England (United Kingdom)
Death: February 16, 1718 (84-93)
Burlington County, New Jersey
Place of Burial: Crosswicks, Burlington, NJ
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Henry Richardson and Spouse of Henry Richardson
Wife of Thomas Foulke, of Burlington
Mother of Mary Bunting; Sarah Bunting; Hannah Woodward; Thomas Foulke, Jr. and Joana Watson

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Mary Foulke

1677 "Thomas Foulke arrived with his family on the ship Kent in Nov. 1677. A member Wingfield, Meeting England to Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, New Caesara. 'Very wealthy, intelligent and religious' from the records found he was most active in the founding of the Meeting."

Family

Extracted From http://www-personal.umich.edu/~bobwolfe/gen/mn/m3629x3630.htm

Thomas Fauke, son of Thomas and Dorothy Fouke, and Mary Richardson, daughter of Henry Richardson of Bolsover, were married on November 14, 1654 at Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England.

Their children

  1. Mary Foulke Born: 4 October 1655, North Wingfield parish, Derbyshire, England married Samuel Bunting
  2. Sarah Foulke Born: 6 January 1658, North Wingfield parish, Derbyshire, England married John Bunting
  3. Hannah Foulke Born: 16 April 1660, North Wingfield parish, Derbyshire, England
  4. Hannah Foulke Born: 27 April 1662, North Wingfield parish, Derbyshire, England married Anthony Woodward
  5. Thomas Foulke Born: 7 September 1665, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England married Elizabeth Curtis
  6. Hannah Foulke Born: 13 May 1668, North Wingfield parish, Derbyshire, England
  7. Joanna Foulke married Isaac Watson

Notes

1655-1668 The births of Mary, Sarah, Hannah (there were three daughters named Hannah, two died young), and Thomas to Thomas Fouke were registered at the Chesterfield [Quaker] Meeting in Derbyshire, England.

Notes for Thomas Foulke and Mary Richardson A biosketch, published in 1905, gives an overview of the life of Thomas Foulke, written by Hilda Justice (an 8th generation descendant) [1]

Thomas Foulke Thomas Foulke (Ffoulke, old style), the first of that name who came to America, was born about 1624. He died in 1714 when 90 years of age. In January, 1677, he resided in "Holmegate in ye parish of Northwingfield, County of Derby, England." (Deed Book, Part I, folio 187, Office of Secretary of State, Trenton, New Jersey), and is described as "Yeoman." He purchased from Mahlon Stacy, of Handsworth, York Co., England (tanner), 1-5 part of one of the 7-90 of West New Jersey.

He was one of "the nine commissioners sent by the Proprietors of West New Jersey, in 1677, with power to buy lands of the natives; to inspect the rights of those who claimed property; to order lands laid out; and in general, administer the government pursuant to the Concessions."

"In 1675 William Penn had been chosen umpire to settle a dispute between Edward Byllinge and John Fenwick (both Quakers), respecting their claims to a tract of land known as West Jersey. William Penn decided in favor of Byllinge, but the latter, having become much embarrassed in his affairs, and in order to satisfy his creditors, gave up to them his interest in this West Jersey territory.

"At the earnest solicitation of Byllinge, William Penn was associated with the creditors as a joint trustee. Within the next two or three years, several vessels came to West Jersey with about 800 emigrants, of whom the greater number were Quakers." Among them was Thomas Foulke, who, with the other commissioners, "sailed in the Kent, Gregory Marlow, Master, and after a tedious voyage landed at New Castle 6-16-1677 old style." The Commissioners proceeded to a place called Chygo's Island (afterward Burlington) to treat with the Indians for the land there.

He located in Chesterfield, at Crosswicks, and was a member of Chesterfield Monthly Meeting (see records for details of births, marriages and deaths, &c, of Thomas Foulke's descendants).

1624 Thomas Foulke was born about this time (he was age 90 at his death in 1714). [2]

1629 Mary was born about this time (she was age 89 at her death in 1718). [3]

1654 Thomas Fauke, son of Thomas and Dorothy Fouke, and Mary Richardson, daughter of Henry Richardson of Bolsover, were married on November 14, 1654 at Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England. [4][5]

1654 Upon a certificate of Publicacon of mariage from Mr Thomas Curtis Parish Register of Northwingfeild - Thomas Fauke of Holmegate in the Parish of Northwingfeild husbandman son of Thomas & Dorothy Fouke of the said Town and parish and Mary Richardson of Williamthorpe in ye aforesaid Parish of Northwingfeild ye Daughter of Henry Richardson of Boulsover were married at Chesterfield ye xiiijth" of November. Witnesses then present vizt Mathew Hopkinson Richard Ashemoore & P. N. Reg. [Note that Matthew Hopkinson was named in a deed with Thomas Foulke in 1660.]

1658? Thomas Fauke, and others, "doe make choyce of William Wing to be register for our pish of Northwingfield he having been our pish Clearke for many yeares we hould him a fit man for this place—(signed) [6][7]:

Henrie Mortton, Francis Clay, Samuel Weatcroft, James Brough, Thomas Steavenson, John Cowpe, John Morsley, Hercules Brealsford, Ffrancis Hopkinson, John Fletcher, George Dakin, William Dukes, Thomas Hopkinson, Richard Banks, John Steavenson, James Fletcher, Henrie Cowlishaw, William May, John Ellis, Francis Webster, William Hill, Edward Turner, Richard Goodwin, Richard Watson, William Blieth, Edward Bradshaw, William Milnes, Richard Houle, Thomas Fauke, Robert Hall, Authonie Fox, Matthew Phillips, Roberte Wood, Henrie Cowlishaw, John Lee, Thomas Cowlishaw, Robert Cowlishaw, George Millward, James Hawksley, William Webster, George Hawksley, Thomas Millward, Richard Millward, Richard Hawksley, Richard Brealsford, John Bower, John Simson, Robert Watkinson, Edward Willson, Thomas Willson. John Ashmore, Matthew Hopkinson, Churchwardens, Anno Dmi 1658.

1659 Conveyance by Thomas Gladwin and John Newton to Thomas Fowke the younger of Holmgate, North Wingfield, yeoman, of 1/3 part of several parcels of land comprising "Lane Crofte, the Highfeild, the Water Meadowe, The Carr and Neather Close", and 1/3 part of that cottage and croft of Robert Wood at Woodhend 10 Oct 1659. [note the similar properties in the 1682 conveyance] [8][9]

1660 Thomas Fowke, of Holmgate, was named in a deed on May 10. The South Fields at Handley and other property: Deed of covenant made between Thomas Gladwin of Boythorpe gent. and Raphe Clarke of Cutthorpe in the parish of Brampton esq., James Webster of the Hill in the parish of North Wingfield gent., John Clay of Ford yeoman, Robert Hall of Holmgate yeoman, James Hauxley junior of Handley yeoman, Matthew Hopkinson of Holmgate yeoman, Richard Milward of Handley yeoman, George Milward of Handley yeoman, John Beighton of Holmgate yeoman, Thomas Fowke of Holmgate yeoman, Samuel Wheatcroft of Stretton yeoman, George Brunt of Clay Cross yeoman, Richard Glew of Handley yeoman, Thomas Cowlishaw of Woodhead in the parish of North Wingfield yeoman, George Smith of Holmgate yeoman, Robert Milward of Alton in the parish of Ashover yeoman, Robert Allwood of Sutton yeoman, John Osland of Chesterfield shoemaker, John Revell of Woolley yeoman, Laurence Bunting of Woolley yeoman, and Peter Elliot of Woolley yeoman, reciting conveyance of 8 Feb. 1658/1659 by Hon. Henry Howard to Thomas Gladwin and John Newton of one third-part of the manor of Stretton, part in trust for Gladwin and part in trust for the parties named above, whereby Gladwin acknowledges that he stands seised of a moiety of one third-part in trust. Schedule giving details of individual purchase monies. Dated 10 May. [10][11]

1661 Thomas Foulke was among 31 Quakers who were subjected to violence by government officials at Eyam in the Highpeak, Derbyshire, England, on June 20, because they were having a Quaker meeting. They were sent to Derby jail, kept in a barn, sent to Crich, and then back to Derby, where they were jailed until 18 next month. [12][13][14]

1661 Hannah, daughter of Thomas Fouke was buried at the Quaker burying ground in North Wingfield parish, Derbyshire, England. [15]

c 1662 Thomas Fawkes of Derbyshire and Quaker George Fox were at a meeting in Swanington in Leicestershire when Lord Beaumont and a company of soldiers came in and confused their names. "they came slappinge there swords one ye doores & rusht into ye house with there swords & pistolls: cryinge 'putt out candles & make fast ye doores: & they seised upon' ffreindes in ye house: & they askt if there were noe more about ye house & they sayde there was another man in ye hall: & there was some freindes come out of Darby sheere & one of ym was caled Tho: Fawkes & this Lord Beamont after hee had taken all there names bid ym sett doune ye freindes name [aforesaid] Thomas fox & hee said nea his name was faux & in ye meane time ye souldyers brought mee in & they askt mee my name & I tolde ym my name was G: ffox: I was ye man soe caled & knowne: Ay saide hee you are knowne all ye worlde over: yes saide I for noe hurte but good." [16]

1663 Hannah, daughter of Thomas Fouke was buried at the Quaker burying ground in North Wingfield parish, Derbyshire, England. [17]

1655-1668 The births of Mary, Sarah, Hannah (there were three daughters named Hannah, two died young), and Thomas to Thomas Fouke were registered at the Chesterfield [Quaker] Meeting in Derbyshire, England. [18][19]

1666 Thomas Fouke, and others, witnessed the marriage of John Kirke and Sarah Brandrith at the forrist meeting, west side. [20]

1668 Thomas Fouke, and others, witnessed the marriage of Robert Moore and Elizabeth Bingham at the forrist meeting, west side. [21] The marriage took place at the house of Richard Bingham, of Mansfield, Woodhouse. [22]

1668 Several Quakers in Derbyshire, England were excommunicated, in August, for their absence from public worship, including Thomas Fowkes and his wife and Godfrey Fowkes and his wife, relationship unknown. [23]

1669 Thomas ffolle, and others, witnessed the marriage of Christopher Brandrith and Mary Clay at the forrist meeting, west side. [24]

1669 Thomas Fouke, and others, witnessed the marriage of Thomas Lambert and Elizabeth Hooton at the forrist meeting, west side. [25] The marriage took place at the house of Elizabeth Hooton. [26]

1670 Fines were levied on several people, including £12 for Thomas Fowke, for holding a Quaker meeting at the house of Anthony Bunting, in Derbyshire, England. [27]

1670 Fines were levied on several people, including £8 for Thomas Fowke and 5 shillings for Godfrey Fowkes and £10.5.0 for Matthew Hopkinson, for Quaker meetings held at the house of Thomas Fowkes, in July and August, in Derbyshire, England. [28]

1676 Conveyance by Thomas Fowke of Holmgate, North Wingfield, yeoman, to Mathew Hopkinson of Coldwell, North Wingfield, yeoman, of all of his 1/3 prt of Nether Close March 16, 1676-77. [note the Neather Close property in the 1659 conveyance] [29]

1676 Thomas Fowkes was at a Quaker meeting at Tipton, on September 29, and the greater part of his goods were seized and exposed to sale at two markets, but nobody would buy them, which when the constables reported to the justices, they threatened to fine them. Thus constrained, they sold them for £3, far beneath their value. [30]

1664-76 Land in New Jersey was made available for purchase. James the Duke of York, George Carteret, William Penn, Edward Byllynge, and John Fenwick were all involved. [31]:

It was at this time, in the year 1664, that the Duke of York, afterwards James II, eager to mend his fortunes, persuaded King Charles XI [sic, recte] II, to give him a large share of the newly acquired territory in America. … Hardly had the ink come dry upon this parchment when James himself, in consideration of "a competent sum of money" sold what is now known as New Jersey to two of his friends, Sir George Carteret and Lord Berkeley. … After ten years of thankless efforts and unprofitable ownership, and too old to hope for a realization of his plans, Lord Berkeley became anxious to be rid of his province and offered it for sale. … The wealthier men among the Friends saw the opportunity, and Edward Byllynge and John Fenwick became its purchasers. … But times were hard, and when the conveyance came to be made the name of John Fenwick, as trustee, was substituted for that of Byllynge, and after a little while all the interest of the latter was given up for the benefit of creditors to three trustees, Gawen Lowrie, Nicholas Lucas, and William Penn. … First the province had to be divided by agreement with the owner of the other half, and this was not accomplished until 1676. … The eastern part was taken by Sir George Carteret, the other by the trustees, who gave it the name of West New Jersey. Penn and his agents, next divided their share into one hundred parts, of which they assigned ten to Fenwick and ninety to the creditors of Byllynge.

1677 Two companies were established in England, one for Yorkshire and one for London, mostly for Quakers who purchased and settled on land in New Jersey. [32]

They come from two different parts of England. Amongst the creditors of Byllynge were five Friends who dwelt in Yorkshire. Persecutions had been very severe in that county, and York Castle at one time contained a large number of prominent Friends. Amongst these latter were five heads of families who were glad to join the creditors of Byllynge in their new plan for settling West Jersey, and a company was speedily formed amongst them, which was known as the Yorkshire Company. It was thus that the names of Clayton, Ellis, Hancock, Helmesley, Stacey and Wetherill first came to be transported into Jersey. Meantime another company was forming in the vicinity of London. Men came from different parts of England to join its ranks. William Peachey, fresh from his trial at Bristol, and under sentence of banishment as a convict for attending meetings; John Kinsey, of Hadham in Hertfordshire, himself a prisoner a few years before, and marked among these settlers of Burlington as the first to die; John Cripps, twelve days in a cell in Newgate for "keeping his hat on in a bold, irreverent manner" when the Lord Mayor passed by into Guildhall; Thomas Ollive, familiar with the inside of Northampton Gaol; John Woolston, his companion in that prison, and Dr. Daniel Wills, tried for banishment for a third offence, and thrice in prison for holding meetings in his house. The last three were all men of note, and their joining the London Company had great influence on its history.

1677 Thomas Foulke was one of four commissioners of the Yorkshire Company who went to America on the ship Kent to purchase land from the Indians for a settlement in West Jersey. Apparently King Charles II made notice of their ship as it left London. There are several accounts of these events. [33] [34] [35] [36] [37]

The preparations are now made, and the time for departure is at hand. The two companies have appointed commissioners to govern them: Joseph Helmesley, Robert Stacey, William Emley and Thomas Foulke for the Yorkshire people; Thomas Ollive, Daniel Wills, John Penford and Benjamin Scott for the London purchasers. They have secured a staunch ship under the command of an experienced seaman, and she is now lying ready in the Thames. … the happy citizen of a free commonwealth in a distant land shall speak with affectionate remembrance, of the good ship " Kent" and "Master Godfrey Marlow!" Obscure and unnoticed, and perhaps on that account undisturbed, all are at last on board. They have taken leave of their country; it remains only to say farewell to their King. … The bright sun and the pleasant air tempt His Majesty [Charles II] upon the water, and he passes the afternoon floating in his barge. The Thames is full of shipping, for at this time London has no rival in commerce but Amsterdam, and the king amuses himself watching the vessels as they come to and fro. Suddenly the barge approaches a ship evidently about to sail. Something attracts the king, and draws him near. A group of men and women are on the deck, plain in appearance, sombre in dress, quiet in demeanor. They are of the yeoman class chiefly, and the gay courtiers wonder what attracts the attention of the king. The two strangely different vessels come together, and for a moment those two widely separated companies are face to face. Charles, with that pleasant voice that could heal with a friendly phrase the wounds inflicted by a lifetime of ingratitude, inquires who they are. "Quakers, bound to America!" is the reply. There is a pause for an instant, and then the king, with a royal gesture, flings them his blessing, and Charles II and his Quaker subjects have parted forever.

1677 The ship Kent reached New York harbor on about the 6th of August, 1677. [38][39]

The object the emigrants have in view in coming here is to wait upon Sir Edmund Andros, the Duke of York's lately appointed Governor of his territory. Accordingly the commissioners go on shore. Andros receives them coldly. They inform him of their purpose to settle on the Delaware. He feigns an ignorance of their authority. They remind him of the law and repeat how the land in West Jersey was granted by the king to his brother, by the Duke of Carteret and Berkeley, and by him to their grantors. It is of no use. "Show me a line from the duke himself," says Andros. They have neglected this precaution. Upon which the governor forbids them to proceed, and when remonstrated with touches his sword significantly. Here is a new and unexpected trouble, and it is no comfort to learn that John Fenwick is at the moment a prisoner in New York for attempting his settlement at Salem without the duke's authority. Suddenly their perplexity is unexpectedly relieved. If they will take commissions from him, Sir Edmund will allow them to set sail, but they must promise to write to England and abide by the result. Anxious to escape from the dilemma, they accept the proposal; Fenwick is released at the same time, and they set sail for the Delaware [River].

1677 "Two hundred and thirty of their passengers landed near Raccoon Creek, where the Swedes had a few houses, and in these and in tents and caves the newcomers took temporary lodgings [40]. The commissioners proceeded at once to Chygoes (Burlington) Island, to settle the terms of purchase with the Indians [41]. They were accompanied by Israel Holmes, Peter Rambo, and Lacy Cock, Swedish interpreters, and by their help they bought three tracts from the Assunpink to the Rancocas, from Rancocas to Timber Creek, and from Timber Creek to Oldman's Creek." ... "The Yorkshire purchasers chose from the Assunpink to the Rancocas, which was called the first tenth" [42] [43] [44]

On the 16th day of August—about the 26th according to our style—they reach the site of Newcastle, and presently—230 in number-land at the mouth of Raccoon creek. The few settlements of the Dutch and Swedes have hardly changed the original Appearance of the country, and they find themselves on the borders of a wilderness. The Swedes have a few houses at the landing-place, and in these and in tents and caves our new comers take temporary lodging. It is a change from the snug homes to which they have been accustomed, and the fare they find is rough, but there is no murmuring among them. "I have never heard them say," wrote one of their number, who had herself exchanged a pleasant home in England for a cave, " I never heard them say,'I would I had never come' which it is worth observing, considering how plentifully they had lived in England." But they were not given to complaining, and moreover the autumn is at hand. Without delay the commissioners set out to examine the country and settle the terms of purchase with the Indians. Accompanied with Swedish interpreters they buy three tracts—from the Assanpink to the Rancocas, from Rancocas to Timber creek, and from Timber creek to Old Man's creek. The Yorkshire purchasers choose the former as their share; the London decide to settle at Arwaumus, near the present Gloucester,… [45]

1677 Thomas Folke was a signer, with other commissioners, of an Indian deed, on September 10. Katamas, Sekappie, Peanto alias Enequete, Rennowighwan, and Jackickon; Indian Sackamackers; sold to Thomas Ollive, Daniel Wills, John Pennford, Benjamin Scott, Joseph Helmsley, Robert Stacy, William Emley and Thomas Folke, the land along the Dellaware River between Rankokus Creek on the North and Timber Creek on the South, East a line between the heads of the two creeks named. [46][47]

1677 Memorandum of Indian Deed, dated September 27. Mohocksey, Tatameckho, Apperingues, Indians, to John Kinsey, Thomas Ollive, Daniel Wills, John Pennford, Benjamin Scott, Joseph Hemsley, Robert Stacy, William Emlay and Thomas Folke, for the tract between Old Man's Brook and Timber Creek. [48]

1678 Mahlon Stacy, of Handsworth, County of York, tanner, deeded a tract of land in West Jersey to Thomas Fowke, of Holmegate, Parish of Northwingfield, County of Derby, yeoman, for 1-15 of one of the seven ninetieths of New Jersey. Dated nyne and twenthieth day of January in ye nyne & twentieth yeare of ye Reigne of … Charles the second … Anno Domini 1677. The land had been granted to Mahlon Stacy by James, dearest brother of King Charles II. [49] [Photocopy, 1677 deed to Thomas Foulke (first part).][50]

1679 Daughter Sarah Foulke married John Bunting on April 28, in England. Witnessed by Thomas and Mary Foulke and others. [51]

1679 Thomas Fouk and Mary Fouk witnessed the marriage of Samuel Sikes, of Medford in the water, Derbyshire, and Jone Jolly, of the town of Derby, on October 11, at Monash, England. [52]

1680 Mary Fouke Junior and Mary Fouke Senior witnessed the marriage of Anthony Woodward and Dorothy Taylor, on February 19, in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England. [53]

1680 Mary Foulke witnessed the marriage of Edward Stones and Mary Chapman on May 11, in Derbyshire, England. [54]

1680 Return of survey, dated October 11, in New Jersey for Seth Smith and Thomas Foulke [ffolke], of 80 acres on the S. W. side of the creek around the Island, along the swamp. [55]

1682 Mary Foulke witnessed the marriage of Joseph Low and Priscilla Cundy on May 17, in ye parish of Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England. [56]

1682 In August, "there was a great presentment of recusants by the grand jury, at the assizes held in August, 1682. The presentment, with convictions annexed, is on a long skin of parchment, closely written on both sides. ... The great majority of recusants of names on the list are undoubtedly Roman recusants, but there are some Quaker recusants" marked with [Q]. Thomas Fowke, yeo., of Sutton. John Curtisse, yeo. of Sutton. [57]

1682 Thomas Fowke the elder, of Holmgate, North Wingfield, [Derbyshire, England], yeoman, conveyed to Thomas Hopkinson, of Holmgate, yeoman, of 1/3 part of his messuage house and of several parcels of land comprising "the Lane Crofte, the Highfeild, the Water Meadow, the Carr and the Nether Close", and the 1/3 part of a barn [note the similar properties in the 1659 conveyance], on August 21. [58]

1682 Return of survey, dated September 21, for Percifall Towle, of 500 acres (bounded on the) S. Michael Newbold, including 25 acres of meadow at Mount Pleasant [New Jersey], W. John Woolston, N. and E. Thomas Foulke [ffolke], S. Mount Pleasant. [59]

A report about the Quaker Meeting houses of Crosswicks gives a sense of a different life in New Jersey and mentions Thomas Foulke [60]:

Friends and their Meeting-Houses at Crosswicks, New Jersey

By Joseph Middleton

On the 16th of Sixth month, 1677, the ship "Kent" arrived at New Castle, Delaware, with 230 passengers. Among them was Thomas Foulke and other Friends. In the Eleventh month of the same year came the ship " Willing Mind," with 70 passengers, who landed near Salem, New Jersey. This was followed soon after by the " Martha," from Hull, with about 114 passengers, who landed near Philadelphia. The next that arrived was the "Shield," from Hull, which came up the river and landed at Burlington in Tenth month, 1678. A large portion of these passengers were Friends from England, who settled in Pennsylvania and adjacent parts of West New Jersey.

Thomas Foulke, Samuel and John Bunting, Francis Davenport, Thomas Gilberthorpe, Thomas Lambert, William Satterthwaite, William Black, Samuel Taylor, and others, migrated eastward from the different landings and formed a settlement among the Indians on the Cross-weeks-ung, or divided creek (Crosswicks).

In order more clearly to comprehend the original settlement, our minds must revert to the primitive condition of the Indian settlement, neither roads nor bridges, but paths or trails through the woods and canoes to cross the creek.

The Friends established a crossing on the farm of Francis Davenport, now occupied by Walter Bird, known as the David Union or Job Sutterly farm. This was called "Davenport's crossing," or the upper ford, the lower ford being near where the Camden and Amboy Railroad crosses the creek below Yardville, near the junction of Doctor's Creek with Crosswicks Creek.

A forcible reminder of the Indian village or settlement is the crooked street through the village of Crosswicks, being the original trail or pathway through the forest. A lone survivor of the original forest remains standing in the yard in front of the meeting-house, a noble oak, with arms uplifted, as though saying, " I am monarch of all I survey," and appealing for protection. Could it but reveal to us what has passed beneath and around it, what history would be unfolded!

The first record of a meeting for Divine worship by the Society of Friends at Crosswicks was at the house of Thomas Lambert in 1677. In 1684 the meeting was held at the house of Francis Davenport. Prior to the erection of a meeting-house it was the custom to hold meetings for worship in the house of some Friend in the neighborhood.

On the "2nd of ye 8th mo., 1684," the monthly meeting was established and held at the house of Francis Davenport. The record is signed by John Wilford, Francis Davenport, and William Watson, and recorded as "Chesterfield Monthly Meeting of Friends," by which name it is known at the present time.

The first marriages recorded in the meeting were: Samuel Bunting to Mary Foulke, daughter of Thomas, 1684. In 1686, Samuel Taylor and Susanna Horsman. In 1686, Anthony Woodward and Hannah Foulke. In 1687, Richard Harrison and Ruth Buckman.

"At a monthly meeting held at the house of Francis Davenport, ye 7th of ye llth mo. 1685 it was directed that deeds of Trust for the burying ground at Chesterfield be made from Thomas Foulke, Grantor, to Francis Davenport, Samuel Bunting, John Bunting, Thomas Gilberthorpe, Roger Parke and Robert Wilson."

1684 Thomas Fouke was on the assessment list for Burlington County, New Jersey as owning 350 acres. [61][62]. This land was related to 320 acres surveyed to Thomas Foulke senior in Chesterfield Township and part of this land, 6 acres of meadow at the S. E. corner of John Thake, was sold on December 9, 1695, by Thomas Folke junior, to John Bunting, both of Chesterfield, Burlington County. [63]

1684 Samuel Bunting and Mary Foulke, daughter of Thomas Foulke, both of Chesterfield, New Jersey, were married at the house of Francis Davenport on 18 of month 9 (November). Witnessed by Thomas Foulkes, father, Thomas Foulkes, brother, and others [64]

1684 Thomas Fowke, of Crosswicks Creek alias Chesterfield, [Burlington County] West New Jersey, yeoman, made a deed to Samuel Bunting of Burlington [son-in-law], mason of Burlington, on October 1, for 5 pounds. The tract was a town lot wharfe lott or water lot on Burlington Island, belonging to his [Thomas Foulke] fifteenthe part a share. Witnessed by Thomas Faulk Jr, Job Bunting, and Roger Parks. [65][66] [Photocopy] 1834 map of Chesterfield Twp. 1684 survey: Thos Folk owned 304 acres. [67]

1685 The Chesterfield Quaker meeting in New Jersey made plans for cemeteries, on 7 of month 11 [1684/5]. "Agreed at this meeting that [deeds?] shall be made for the burying place both at the Falls and Chesterfield. At the Falls John Lambert grantor, grantees William Emley, Thomas Lambert, John Wright, and Mahlon Stacy, John Wilson & ?, At Chesterfield Thomas Foulke grantor, grantees Francis Davenport, Samuel Buntain, John Buntain, Thomas Gilberthorpe, Roger Parke, and Robert Wilson." [68]

1685 Samuel Bunting, of Burlington, mason, made a deed to George Hutcheson of the same place, distiller, for a townlot there, on May 1. The tract was 1-15 of a share in New Jersey, adjoining Anthony Morris and formerly the back part of Thomas Folk and John Curtise's land. [69]

1685 Daniel Leeds returned a survey of land in New Jersey for Thomas Folke, in the 5th month (July), of 320 acres along Crosswicks alias Leeds R[iver]. near the bridge, adjoining John Bunting, incl. 16 acres of meadow in two places, i. e. 10 acres between Francis Davenport and John Thake, and 6 acres S. E. of John Thake. [70]

1687 Anthony Woodward, late of Long Island, now of West New Jersey, and Hannah Folkes, dau. of Thomas, were married on 14 of month 12 (February). Witnessed by Thomas Foulks Senr and others. [71]

1687 Thomas Foulks, perhaps this one or his son, served as constable and in different township offices for five years in Bordentown Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. [72]

1687 Thomas Foulkes, husbandman of West Chesterfield, West Jersey, sold land to John Smith on March 20. The tract was 26 acres and 106 perches on the south side of Burlington Creek, east Joseph Pope, West Francis Davenport. Signed with the mark (T) of Thomas Foulke. Marginal note: Sold to Christ Wetherill by Daniel Smith sd John's brother. [73]

1688 Thomas Faulk of Chesterfield, Burlington County, yeoman, made a deed, on October 23, for love and affection, to his daughter Sarah, wife of John Bunting of the same place, carpenter, and her children, for 12 acres on the West side of her husband's house. Witnessed by Thomas Faulk Jr, Job Bunting, and, Roger Parks. [74][75]

1688-9 Thomas Folke senior deed land to Anthony Woodward, both of Chesterfield, yeomen, on January 22, for 2.5 pounds. The tract was 200 acres near there, bo't of Mahlon Stacy, then of Handsworth, Yorkshire, England, Jan. 28-29, 1677-8. In view of the marriage between Hannah Foulke, daughter of Thomas Foulke, and Anthony Woodward. [76][77]

1689 Thomas Foulke, son of Thomas Foulke, of Chesterfield, married Elizabeth Curtis, daughter of John Curtis, of Ogston, on February 21, 1688/89, at Chesterfield with witnesses Thomas Foulke, his father, and others. [78]

1689 Return of survey by Symon Charles, for Thomas Folke, of 120 acres on North side of Crosswicks Creek at the old Indian line, adjoining Thomas Wright. [79]

1691 1st m. (March). Return of survey by Symon Charles for Francis Davenport, of 77 acres adjoining his former settlement, along the Southside of Crosswicks Creek, between Samuel Wright, John Bunting, George Nicholson and Thomas Folk. [80]

1692 "The inhabitants of this townshep of Chesterfield Being met togeather About Chuseing A Constable & other Busnes Belonging to ye town" nominated Thomas folkes and others, who had already served, to be constables, on the 15th of ye 12 mo 1692. Thomas Folke was chosen overseer ot the highways. [81]

1693 Samuel and John Bunting of Chesterfield, Burlington County, yeomen, sold land to Robert Murfin, John Abbott, Edward Rockhill and John Wilsford junior, all of said county, yeomen, on 3d d. 3d m. (May). The tract was 6 acres between Thomas Folke and the burying ground, for a Meeting house. [82]

c 1693 (date not specified) Return of survey by Daniel Leeds for the Meeting House, of 6 acres out of the land of John and Samuel Bunting, and of 1 acre for a burying ground out of the land of Thomas Folk [in New Jersey]. [83]

1693 Thomas Folke was among those agreeing to attend town meetings, in Chesterfield township, Burlington County, or face a fine, on 12th day, 12th month 1693 (February, 1694). [84]

1694 Thomas Folke, perhaps this Thomas or his son, was named as one of the assessors for Chesterfield Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey on the 2d day of ye first month 1693/4. [85]

1694 (Date not specified). Return of survey for Walter Humphries, of 70 acres on the Northbranch of Rancokus Creek, near Mount Holly, adjoining his own, Nathaniel Cripps and Henry Grubb; also of 130 acres on the Southside of Crosswicks Cr., along the same, a brook bounding Joshua Wright's land and a small run, adjoining Thomas Folk. "All five parcells Surveyed by Daniel Leeds." [86]

1694 Son Thomas Foulke [Folks] Jr, yeoman of Chesterfield Twp, Burlington County, West New Jersey, deeded 6 acres to son-in-law John Bunting. [87]

c 1695 (Date not specified), Return of survey by Symon Charles, for John and Samuel Bunting, of 133 acres on Crosswicks Cr., next to Samuel Bunting on the N. W., S. W. George Nicholson, S. E. Thomas Foulke [ffolk]; also of 17 acres remote, next to Francis Davenport. [88]

1695 Symon Charles and Daniel Leeds returned a survey, on 3d m. (May), for John Bunting, of 56 acres with the bounds of other 80 acres formerly surveyed, between Thomas Folk, George Nicholson and Francis Davenport, 14 acres; also a lot between Francis Davenport and his own settlement, which is bounded E. by said Davenport, W. by Thomas Folk, 40 perches on Crosswicks Cr., in all 136 acres [89]

1702 Richard French and Mary King were married on January 13, at the house of Harmenus King, Nottingham Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. Witnessed by Thomas Folkes Senior and others. [90]

1702 Indian Deed, dated November 4. Hoaham and Quenalowmon, Sachems to Thomas Folkes, of Chesterfield West Jersey, likely this Thomas or his son, signed deed for Alexander Hamilton for the tract from and along Rockie Brook to and along Milston River as far as David Lyell's and Senpink. [91]

1703 The proprieters met on November 2 and ordered a party to meet with the Indians above the Falls, especially Caponodockous, and meet in Nimhammoe's wig-wam to finalize a deed. Thomas Foulke, Andrew Heath, or some other proper person was to go to be an interpreter between them and the Indians. [92]

1704 William Murfin and grand-daughter Sarah Bunting were married on August 8, at Chesterfield, New Jersey. Witnesses: Thomas and Mary Foulks and others. [93]

1704 John Sykes and Joanna Murfin were married on October 19, at Chesterfield, New Jersey. Witnessed by Mary and Thomas Foulk and others [94]

1706 John Black and [grand-daughter] Sarah Rockhill were married on December 4, at Chesterfield, Burlington County, New Jersey. Witnessed by Thomas (Senr) and Mary Foulks and others. [95]

1706 John King and Elizabeth Woodward were married at Chesterfield on November 13. Witnessed by Thomas (Senr) and Mary Foulks and others. [96]

1709 Thomas Foulke Sen'r, and others, witnessed the wedding of Isaac Horner of Mansfield, and Elizabeth Sikes of Chesterfield, on 19 of month 3, at Chesterfield, Burlington County, New Jersey. [97][98]

1712 Thomas Folkes and Anthony Woodward purchased land from Indians Sheeroppy, Kerhpotark and Oquarhsoon on December 9. [99]

1714 As recorded in the family bible, Thomas Foulkes Senior died June the 10th: 1714. Aged 90 years. [100] He died at Chesterfield Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. [101]

1716 William Bunting married Abigail Horseman, daughter of Marmaduke on October 11. Witnesses: Mary Folkes and others. [102]

1718 As recorded in the family bible, Mary Foulkes died February the 16th: 1718. Aged 89 years. [103]

Research Notes:

1628 Marie Richardson, daughter of Thomas Richardson, was born on January 25, 1628 in Dronfield, Holmesfield, Dore, Derbyshire, England. [104]

Mary Wright witnessed the marriages of daughters Hannah Foulke to Anthony Woodward and of Mary Foulke to Samuel Bunting. How was she related to this family and to the Burlington Wrights?

A biosketch reports [105][106]:

Thomas Foulke, father of ThomasFoulke, Jr., ... was born 1624, and 1677 was living at "Holmegate, in ye Parish of Northwingfield, County of Derby, England," when he purchased of Mahlon Stacy, of Hansworth, York, one-fifth part of a share in West Jersey. In the same year he was sent out by William Penn and the other purchasers from Byllinge, of the lands of West Jersey, as one of the nine commissioners of the Proprietors, to sell lands, etc. He sailed with the other commissioners in the "Kent," and after a tedious voyage landed at New Castle, August 16, 1677, from whence they proceeded to Burlington, to treat with the Indians for the land. He located at Crosswicks, in what became Chesterfield township, where he died 1714, aged ninety years. His wife Mary died April 16, 1718, aged eighty-nine years. His daughter Mary married Samuel Bunting, ancestor of Esther Syng (Bunting) Justice; her sister Sarah married John Bunting, brother to Samuel; another daughter, Hannah, married Anthony Woodward, and the son ThomasFoulke, Jr., married Elizabeth Curtis, as above stated, in 1688. Thomas Foulke was an early convert to the principles and faith of Friends. and a friend of William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania. It was in a letter from Penn to Thomas Foulke that the founder states his Welsh origin, and explains the adoption of the name for his new Province. He had selected the name of New Wales, but King Charles was not satis?ed with the name, whereupon Penn suggested "Sylvania," meaning woodlands, by reason of the virgin forest that was supposed to cover the country. The King taking the pen wrote into the grant the name Pennsylvania, and when Penn protested that the title savored too much of personal vanity, the King said, "My good fellow, do not deceive yourself, this is in honor of your noble father, the Admiral," with which explanation the founder was compelled to be content.

"Holmgate is an estate situated in the town of Clay Cross which is located in the district of North East Derbyshire, England." [107]

1677 "Thomas arrived with his family on the ship Kent in Nov. 1677. A member Wingfield, Meeting England to Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, New Caesara. 'Very wealthy, intelligent and religious' from the records found he was most active in the founding of the Meeting." [108]

Footnotes: [1] Hilda Justice, Life and ancestry of Warner Mifflin, Friend--philanthropist--patriot (1905), [HathiTrust].

[2] "Old records of the Foulke, Skirm, Taylor, Coalman, Wooley, and Gaskill families," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 11 (1887), 207-212, at 207, citing a family bible, [InternetArchive].

[3] "Old records of the Foulke, Skirm, Taylor, Coalman, Wooley, and Gaskill families," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 11 (1887), 207-212, at 207, citing a family bible, [InternetArchive].

[4] Derbyshire Record Office, Derbyshire Church of England Parish Registers, Diocese of Derby, Chesterfield, St. Mary and All Saints, 1635-1672, D643 A/P1 1/2 FHL film 1752142, Item 4, Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812, [Ancestry_Image], [AncestryRecord], [FHLCatalog].

[5] England Marriages, 1538–1973, incorrectly reports date as Nov. 9. In the image of the record, the date is clearly xiiij, [FamilySearchRecord].

[6] J Charles Cox, "The Parish Registers of North Wingfield," The Reliquary 13 (1873), 35-39, at 37, [HathiTrust].

[7] Derbyshire Record Office, Derbyshire Church of England Parish Registers, Diocese of Derby, North Wingfield Parish Registers, 1657-1681, D1434 A/PI, item 2, FHL film 1041093, Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812, [Ancestry_Image], [FHLCatalog].

[8] Derbyshire Record Office, Ref. No.: D3955/1/1, [Derbyshire_Record_Office].

[9] Derbyshire Record Office, Ref. No.: D3955/1/2, [Derbyshire_Record_Office].

[10] The National Archives of the United Kingdom Catalog, D37 M/T769, [UKNationalArchives].

[11] Derbyshire Record Office, Ref. No.: D37/MT/769, [Derbyshire_Record_Office].

[12] Joseph Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers, Vol. 1 (1753), 138, of 138-39, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[13] An Abstract of the Sufferings of the People called Quakers, Volume II. From the Year 1660 to the Year 1666 (London: J. Sowle, 1738), 117.

[14] William Wood, The history and antiquities of Eyam; with a full and particular account of the great plague, which desolated that village, A.D. 1666, Fifth Edition (Derby: Richard Keene, 1865), 227-228, [HathiTrust].

[15] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece 1034, RG 6, Monthly Meeting of Chesterfield, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, England (1641-1775), [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[16] Norman Penney, ed., T. Edmund Harvey, The Journal of George Fox, Vol. 2 (Cambridge: The University Press, 1911), 13, 383, [HathiTrust].

[17] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece 1034, RG 6, Monthly Meeting of Chesterfield, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, England (1641-1775), [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[18] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece 1034, RG 6, Monthly Meeting of Chesterfield, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, England (1641-1775), [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[19] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece 1446, RG 6, Monthly Meeting of Chesterfield, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, England (1641-1728), [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[20] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece RG 6/1368, 365, Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire: Marriages (1664-1754), Births ( 1650-1778), Burials (1657-1758), 210, [AncestryImage].

[21] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece RG 6/1368, 365, Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire: Marriages (1664-1754), Births ( 1650-1778), Burials (1657-1758), 211/53, [AncestryImage].

[22] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece 1606, 361, Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire: Nottingham (1637-1750), [AncestryImage].

[23] Joseph Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers, Vol. 1 (1753), 140, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[24] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece RG 6/1368, 365, Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire: Marriages (1664-1754), Births ( 1650-1778), Burials (1657-1758), 211/53, [AncestryImage].

[25] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece RG 6/1368, 365, Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire: Marriages (1664-1754), Births ( 1650-1778), Burials (1657-1758), 211/53, [AncestryImage].

[26] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece 1606, 361, Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire: Nottingham (1637-1750), [AncestryImage].

[27] Joseph Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers, Vol. 1 (1753), 140, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[28] Joseph Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers, Vol. 1 (1753), 141, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[29] Derbyshire Record Office, Ref. No.: D3955/2/1, [Derbyshire_Record_Office].

[30] Joseph Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers, Vol. 1 (1753), 142, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[31] Henry Armitt Brown, "The Founding of the City of Burlington, N.J.," Friends' Intelligencer 34 (Philadelphia: 1877-78), 691-693, 708-710, 724-727, 739-742, at 708, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[32] Henry Armitt Brown, "The Founding of the City of Burlington, N.J.," Friends' Intelligencer 34 (Philadelphia: 1877-78), 691-693, 708-710, 724-727, 739-742, at 724, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[33] Henry Armitt Brown, "The Founding of the City of Burlington, N.J.," Friends' Intelligencer 34 (Philadelphia: 1877-78), 691-693, 708-710, 724-727, 739-742, at 724, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[34] John Edwin Pomfret, The Province of West New Jersey, 1609-1702 (1956), 103, [GoogleBooks].

[35] Samuel Smith, The History of the Colony of Nova-Caesaria, or New Jersey (1890), 92-93, [InternetArchive], [Google].

[36] William E. Schermerhorn, History of Burlington, New Jersey (Burlington, New Jersey: 1927), 14.

[37] Chesterfield Township Tercentenary Committee, Chesterfield Township Heritage: Burlington County, New Jersey (1964), 19-20, [GoogleBooks].

[38] Henry Armitt Brown, "The Founding of the City of Burlington, N.J.," Friends' Intelligencer 34 (Philadelphia: 1877-78), 691-693, 708-710, 724-727, 739-742, at 725, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[39] John Edwin Pomfret, The Province of West New Jersey, 1609-1702 (1956), 111, [GoogleBooks].

[40] John Edwin Pomfret, The Province of West New Jersey, 1609-1702 (1956), 106, [GoogleBooks].

[41] John Edwin Pomfret, The Province of West New Jersey, 1609-1702 (1956), 104, [GoogleBooks].

[42] Major E. M. Woodward and John Hageman, History of Burlington and Mercer Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1883), 9, [HathiTrust].

[43] John Edwin Pomfret, The Province of West New Jersey, 1609-1702 (1956), 104, [GoogleBooks].

[44] John Edwin Pomfret, The Province of West New Jersey, 1609-1702 (1956), 1125, [GoogleBooks].

[45] Henry Armitt Brown, "The Founding of the City of Burlington, N.J.," Friends' Intelligencer 34 (Philadelphia: 1877-78), 691-693, 708-710, 724-727, 739-742, at 725, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[46] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 395, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[47] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 2, [FHLBook].

[48] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 395, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[49] New Jersey State Archives Colonial Deed I, folio 187.

[50] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 423, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[51] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece RG6/1415: Monthly Meeting of Chesterfield: Births, Marriages, Burials (1669-1724), [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[52] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece RG6/1415: Monthly Meeting of Chesterfield: Births, Marriages, Burials (1669-1724), [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[53] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece RG6/1415: Monthly Meeting of Chesterfield: Births, Marriages, Burials (1669-1724), 94, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[54] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece 1446, RG 6, Monthly Meeting of Chesterfield, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, England (1641-1728), [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[55] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 347, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[56] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece 1446, RG 6, Monthly Meeting of Chesterfield, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, England (1641-1728), [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[57] John Charles Cox, Three centuries of Derbyshire annals: as illustrated by the Records of the Quarter Sessions of the County of Derby, Volume 1 (London: 1890), 303, left column, [HathiTrust].

[58] Derbyshire Record Office, Ref. No.: D3955/3/1, [Derbyshire_Record_Office].

[59] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 356, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[60] Joseph S Middleton, "Friends and their Meeting-Houses at Crosswicks, New Jersey," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 27 (1903), 340-45, at 340, [HathiTrust].

[61] H. Clay Reed and George J. Miller, The Burlington Court Book. A Record of Quaker Jurisprudence in West New Jersey 1680-1709, Vol. 5 (1944), 31.

[62] John J. Thompson, "A Burlington County, New Jersey Assessment List, 1684," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 15 (1891), 346-349, at 347, [HathiTrust].

[63] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 469, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[64] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[65] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 431, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[66] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 44, [FHLBook].

[67] Chesterfield Township Tercentenary Committee, Chesterfield Township Heritage: Burlington County, New Jersey (1964), 18, [GoogleBooks].

[68] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, 3, [AncestryImage].

[69] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 509, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[70] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 363, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[71] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 40, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[72] Major E. M. Woodward and John Hageman, History of Burlington and Mercer Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1883), 459, [HathiTrust].

[73] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 532, citing West Jersey Records, Liber B, part 2, p 704, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[74] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 445, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[75] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 57, [FHLBook].

[76] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 42, [FHLBook].

[77] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 429, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[78] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 41, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[79] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 369, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[80] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 366, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[81] Carlos E. Godfrey, "Town Dockets of Chesterfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 35 (1911), 211-222, at 211, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[82] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 447, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[83] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 367, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

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[85] Carlos E. Godfrey, "Town Dockets of Chesterfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 35 (1911), 211-222, at 212, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

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[87] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 83, [FHLBook].

[88] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 374, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[89] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 374, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[90] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 56, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

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[93] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 62, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[94] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 62, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[95] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 67, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[96] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 66, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

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[98] Pennsylvania Vital Records From the Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine and the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 1 (1983), 22.

[99] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 83, [FHLBook].

[100] "Old records of the Foulke, Skirm, Taylor, Coalman, Wooley, and Gaskill families," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 11 (1887), 207-212, at 207, [InternetArchive].

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[102] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 85, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[103] "Old records of the Foulke, Skirm, Taylor, Coalman, Wooley, and Gaskill families," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 11 (1887), 207-212, at 207, [InternetArchive].

[104] England, Derbyshire, Church of England Parish Registers, 1537-1918, [FamilySearchImage], [FamilySearchRecord].

[105] John W. Jordan, Colonial Families of Philadelphia, Vol. 1 (New York: Lewis Publishing Company, 1911), 841, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[106] Wilfred Jordan, ed. Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, Vol. 2 (1911), 861, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[107] Wikipedia article about Holmgate, content subject to change, [Wikipedia].

[108] Chesterfield Township Tercentenary Committee, Chesterfield Township Heritage: Burlington County, New Jersey (1964), 19-20, [GoogleBooks].

Citation: Robert and Janet Chevalley Wolfe, Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy, "Notes for Thomas Foulke and Mary Richardson" Webpage: www.umich.edu/~bobwolfe/gen/mn/m3629x3630.htm Email address: JanetRobertWolfeGenealogy@gmail.com

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Mary Foulke's Timeline

1629
1629
North Wingfield, Derbyshire, England
1655
August 14, 1655
North Wingfield, Derbyshire, England
1657
November 6, 1657
Burlington,NJ
1662
February 27, 1662
Crosswicks, Burlington, NJ
1665
September 7, 1665
Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
1670
1670
Of,Burlington,NJ
1718
February 16, 1718
Age 89
Burlington County, New Jersey
1718
Age 89
Crosswicks, Burlington, NJ