Necotowance, King of the Wyanoak

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Necotowance, King of the Wyanoak's Geni Profile

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Necotowance, King of the Wyanoak

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Tsenacomoca, now, New Kent County, Virginia
Death: after 1649
Virginia
Immediate Family:

Son of N.N. and mother of Nectowance
Husband of wife of Necotowance
Father of Cockacoeske, Leader of the Pamunkey and Patawomek Sis of Cockacoeske, Mother of "Queen Anne" niece of Cockcoeske

Occupation: "King of the Indians"
Managed by: Erica Howton
Last Updated:

About Necotowance, King of the Wyanoak

Necotowance was a Wyanoak; called the King of the Wyanoak. October, 1646, a treaty of peace {lb., 323) was confirmed with Necotowance, King of the Indians,"he successor of Opitchapum,( the successor of Opechancanough), Werowance over 20+ Algonquian tribes on the south as well as the north side of the river. "From this period, for a number of years, the policy of the Virginia government towards the Indians was not illiberal. Acts for their benefit and protection were passed at the session of July, 1653 (O., 380), March, 1655-6 {lb., 393), March, 1657-8 {lb., 457, 467), and March, 1661-2 (W., II, 138). In March, 1659-60 (D., I, 547), it was enacted that, as the King of Wyanoak.

From page 338 of The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 7

"by reason of many disadvantageous bargains with the English," had gotten into debt and been arrested by his creditors, "whereby much detriment hath accrued to the publique," he should, in accordance with his petition, be exempt from arrest for debt until the first of March succeeding."

"If you study the Pamunkey matrilineal succession that determined the rulers of the Federation, it would be highly unlikely that Totopotomoi could have been a son of Necotowance. Since Cockacoeske was later the ruler of the Federation in her own right, not because she was Totopotomoi's widow, and is known to have been Opechancanough's granddaughter, it follows that "she" was Necotowance's daughter, by his traditional wife of the matrilineal succession." ~ ~ ~ ~Bill Devo, PATAWOMECK TRIBAL HISTORIAN, emailed statement July 27, 20117 to manager of this profile.

Terms of Powhatan Confederate Werowances/Weroransqua

Necotowance descended from the Wearowance whom Raleigh's first colony had dealings with via Ralph Lane as governor (who had settled on Roanoke Island in 1585), the Werowance being King Wingina /Pemisapan; because, the line of succession went next to "Rappahannock/Topohannok" (said" Some Powhatan Words" and the Rappahannock Historian. [http://www.ncpedia.org/biography/pemisapan] Then, the succession went to Opecanconough and then for one year to Opitchapum and then to === NECOTOWANCE - and mentioned in timeline at [https://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Opechancanough_d_1646#start_entry] He did not die the same year as Opecanconough

'

Opechancanough Werorance til 1618 ; followed by

Opichapum - Werowance 1618 til 1630.Weroance Opitchapum; followed by

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Necotowance - King of Wyanoak and Werowance King of Indians 1630-44=; followed by


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Totopotomoi - King of Pamunkey 1630-1656; sibling ofollowed by

'

Cockacoeske - Queen of Pamunkey and Weroansqua 1656-1686; who followed the line of succession in her own right by matrilineal succession and not through the line of her husband; Patawomeck tradition has her as the daughter of Opecanconough; followed by

Queen Anne Isom GoSi One/ -1686-1715

A note on the successor of Necotowance: 1644–1649 - Totopotomoi - probable father of Cockacoeske's only documented child was her son, John West, born probably around 1656-57 and "reputed the son of an English colonel."[6] On the basis of his name, and birth after her husband's death, he has often been considered an illegitimate son of John West, who established a plantation (now the town of West Point at the confluence of the Mattaponi and Pamunkey Rivers, where they form the York River), or his son John West. The Virginia-Indian Treaty of 1677/1680, which this youth signed, identified him as "Cap't John West, sonne to the Queen of Pamunkey."[11] (Disproven with ydna testing - FTDNA).

Necotowance was the father of Totopotomoi citing [https://books.google.com/booksid=555CzPsGLDMC&pg=PA158&] According to Rountree, the Powhatans practiced matrilineal descent-- Opitchapan to Opechancanough, to Catataugh to 2 living sister (unnamed) having the same mother; but, not necessarily the same father (Leaving aside adoption practices) would be the line of succession. No documentation. It is a matter of succession.

Who descended from Necotowance? Necotowance was the father of Totopotomoi citing [https://books.google.com/booksid=555CzPsGLDMC&pg=PA158&]. Based on succession, it is thought to be Totopotomoi. "Fab pedigree has Totopotomoy as Opecanconough's, which is missing a generation; needing Necotowance as father of Totopotomoi. http://fabpedigree.com/s065/f792124.htm

Best Book of Who's who: page 54 of The Historie of Travaile Into Virginia Britinia By William Strachey


From page 338 of The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 7

The massacre of 1644 was again followed by invasions of the Indian country, with such success that the power of the neighboring tribes was broken. At the session of the Assembly, 1644-5, l'ie inhabitants of the country on the south side of James river were ordered to make constant marches upon the Indians {lb., 292). In March, 1645-6, war was again declared upon the "Nansimum" and adjoining tribes {lb., 315), but within a few months the natives had been so thoroughly subdued that in October, 1646, the Assembly repealed the acts of 1643 prohibiting trade with the Indians, for cutting down their corn, for making war upon the Nansemonds, and also the 14th, 15th and 16th acts of said Assembly (1643), which were no doubt aimed against the Indians. It is worth noting that no acts of 1643, as described, appear in Hening. This was probably an Assembly which was in session at the time of the massacre, 1643-4. (Since this was written, examination of memoranda among the Robinson MS., in the collection of this Society, shows that a session was called for the spring of 1643-44, but no record of its proceedings is preserved.) At the same session, of October, 1646, a treaty of peace {lb., 323) was confirmed with "Necotowance, king of the Indians," the successor of Opechancanough, who appears to have been the chief of all the neighboring tribes on the south as well as the north side of the river. From this period, for a number of years, the policy of the Virginia government towards the Indians was not illiberal. Acts for their benefit and protection were passed at the session of July, 1653 (O., 380), March, 1655-6 {lb., 393), March, 1657-8 {lb., 457, 467), and March, 1661-2 (W., II, 138). In March, 1659-60 (D., I, 547), it was enacted that, as the

King of Wyanoak,"by reason of many disadvantageous bargains with the English," had gotten into debt and been arrested by his creditors, "whereby much detriment hath accrued to the publique," he should, in accordance with his petition, be exempt from arrest for debt until the first of March succeeding.

1655 - Totopotomoi marked x on agreement on the left with the Natives with Toby West signing his signature on the right hand side of the document, with the de la Warrs. Necotowance did not sign.

In October, 1665, the Assembly fixed the Indian boundary, which they were not to pass without permission, as a line extending from the southern branch of Blackwater to Appomattox Indian town, and thence to the Manakin town on James river.

War with the Indians broke out again in 1676, but a general peace was made on May 29, 1677; and after that date there is little legislative action in regard to the dwindling remnants of the tribes south of James river, except for the prevention of encroachment on their lands and the sale of liquor to them. These, like more modern laws for the same purpose, were probably not very effective.

Comments

"John C.E. Christensen says Necotowance is "assumed to be son of Opecancanough. Signed Treaty with the Commonwealth of Virginia in 1645, at which time he was called by the English "King of the Indians.""

From documents, we do not know the names of any of Opechancanough’s children.

Citations



            
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Necotowance, King of the Wyanoak's Timeline

1600
1600
New Kent County, Virginia
1622
1622
Age 22
1634
1634
Age 34
King William County , Virginia Colony
1649
1649
Age 49
Virginia