Neferibre Psamtek, Pharaoh of Egypt

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Neferibre Psamtek Psammetichus אחרון מלכי יהודה

English (default): Neferibre Psamtek Psammetichus, Hebrew: אחרון מלכי יהודה, Italian: Re di Giuda
Also Known As: "Pharaoh Psamtik II of /Egypt/", "Psammétique II"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Pharaoh of Egypt
Death: -589 (40-42)
589 BC, Egypt
Place of Burial: Egypt
Immediate Family:

Son of Necho II, Pharaoh of Egypt and Chedebnit Jerbone Queen Consort of Egypt
Husband of Takhuat, Princess of Athribis
Father of Apries "Wahibre / Ha'a'ibra" Pharaoh of Egypt; Ankhesneferibre Ankhenesneferibre of Egypt; Ast.khebt of Egypt, Princess and Neitmeretefs
Brother of Neitaqert (Nitokris) and Shapertap

Occupation: farao
Managed by: Private User
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About Neferibre Psamtek, Pharaoh of Egypt

From Wikipedia

Psamtik II (also spelled Psammetichus or Psammeticus) was a king of the Saite based Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (595 BC – 589 BC). His prenomen, Nefer-Ib-Re, means "Beautiful [is the] Heart [of] Re." He was the son of Necho II.

From Encyclopedia Britannica

Psamtik II, Psamtik also spelled Psammetichus (died 589 bce), king (reigned 595–589 bce) of the 26th dynasty (664–525 bce; see ancient Egypt: The Late period [664–332 bce]) of ancient Egypt, who conducted an important expedition against the kingdom of Kush, Egypt’s southern neighbour (see Nubia).

The Greek historian Herodotus, writing in the 5th century bce, refers briefly to an Ethiopian war of Psamtik, an expedition that contemporary records prove to have been of great importance. Perhaps suspecting a Kushite threat to Egypt, Psamtik sent a large force against it. The army consisted of native Egyptians led by Amasis, who later became pharaoh, and mercenaries (Greeks, Phoenicians, and Jews) led by another general. A contemporary stela from Thebes dates the venture to the third year of Psamtik’s reign and refers to a great defeat that was inflicted on a Kushite force. The expedition advanced at least as far south as the Third Cataract of the Nile River; Greek participants in the expedition left graffiti on the colossi at Abu Simbel, the temple of Ramses II, claiming to have advanced beyond Kerkis (perhaps modern Korkos) near the Fifth Cataract of the Nile, which stood well within the Kushite kingdom.

Psamtik initiated destruction of the memorials of the 25th (Kushite) dynasty in Egypt (see ancient Egypt: The 24th and 25th dynasties) by hacking out their names and the emblems of royalty from their statues and reliefs. Toward Palestine he apparently remained neutral. He paid a peaceful visit to Phoenicia in 591, after the Kushite campaign.



https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psamtik_II

Psamtik II (also spelled Psammetichus or Psammeticus) was a king of the Saite-based Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (595 BC – 589 BC). His prenomen, Nefer-Ib-Re, means "Beautiful [is the] Heart [of] Re."[1] He was the son of Necho II.

Psamtik II led a foray into Nubia in 592 BC, marching as far south as the Third or even the Fourth Cataract of the Nile, according to a contemporary stela from Thebes (Karnak), which dates to Year 3 of this king's name and refers to a heavy defeat that was inflicted upon the kingdom of Kush.[2] A well-known graffito inscribed in Greek on the left leg of the colossal seated statue of Ramesses II, on the south side of the entrance to the temple of Abu Simbel, records that:

"When King Psammetichus (ie. Psamtik II) came to Elephantine, this was written by those who sailed with Psammetichus the son of Theocles, and they came beyond Kerkis as far as the river permits. Those who spoke foreign tongues (Greek and Carians who also scratched their names on the monument) were led by Potasimto, the Egyptians by Amasis.[3]

Kerkis was located near the Fifth Cataract of the Nile "which stood well within the Cushite Kingdom."[4]

This was the first confrontation between Egypt and Nubia since the reign of Tantamani. A Kushite king named Anlamani had revived the power of the kingdom of Napata. Psamtik II's campaign was likely initiated to destroy any future aspirations the Kushites may have had to reconquer Egypt. The Egyptian army advanced to Pnubs (Kerma) and the capital city of Napata in a series of fierce battles, where they looted its temples and destroyed the royal Kushite statues.[5] The Kushite capital was sacked under the reign of the native Kushite king Aspelta who was the younger brother of Anlamani and the son of Senkamanisken. The Year 3 Karnak stela is dated to II Shemu day 10 of Psamtik II's reign and states that:

The army that your Majesty sent to Nubia has reached the land of Pnubs....Nubians from all parts [of Kush] had arisen against him, their hearts full of anger when he attacked those who had rebelled against him there; because he was furious at those who had arisen against him. His Majesty took part in the combat as soon as he reached the battle. The rebels capitulated before a single arrow was unleashed against them....Those who tried to flee did not succeed and were brought back as prisoners: four thousand two hundred men.[6]

As a result of Psamtik's devastating campaign, Kush's power was crushed, and its kings from Aspelta onwards lost any opportunity of ever regaining control of Egypt. Instead, the Nubian rulers decided to shift their capital further south from Napata to the relative safety of Meroë. Curiously, however, Psamtik II does not appear to have capitalized on his victory. His troops retreated back to the First Cataract, and Elephantine continued to be the southern border of Egypt.

An outcome of this campaign was the deliberate destruction of monuments belonging to the 25th Dynasty Kushite kings in Egypt "by hacking out their names and the emblems of royalty from their statues and reliefs."[7] Later, in 591 BC, during the fourth year of his reign, Psamtik II launched an expedition into Palestine "to foment a general Levantine revolt against the Babylonians" that involved, among other, Zedekiah of the Kingdom of Judah.[8]