Opechancanough "Mangopeesomon", paramount chief of the Powhatan

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Opechancanough "Mangopeesomon", paramount chief of the Powhatan

Also Known As: ""He whose Soul is White"", "Powhatan", "Wyanoak", "Mangopeesomon", "Chief of the Pamunkey"
Birthdate: (100)
Birthplace: Cinquoateck, Virginia
Death: October 5, 1645 (96-104)
James River, Buckingham County, Virginia (Shot by an English soldier while in captivity)
Immediate Family:

Son of Running Stream "Don Luis" Winanuske, Weroance of the Powhatan and PauPauwiske "Morning Scent Flower", of the Powhatan
Husband of Daughter of Chief of Accohannock and N.N.
Ex-husband of wife of Pipsico
Father of Necotowance, Successor of Opitchapum beginning 1646 as Powhatan Confederate Chief and daughter of Opechaconough
Brother of Morning Flower, Powhatan; Chief Wahunsonacock Powhatan, paramount chief of the Powhatan; Poechananough Winanuske; Opussunaquonuske (Opachisco), of the Powhatan; Apachamo Kekataugh (Catataugh) Powhatan and 2 others
Half brother of Japasaw "Iopassus", weroance of Patawomeck and Paupauwiske and Weroance Opitchapum

Occupation: Weroance (war leader)
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Opechancanough "Mangopeesomon", paramount chief of the Powhatan

Brother of Chief Powatan (real name Wahunsonacock) When Powatan died in1618, Opechancanough took over. he was much more violent than his brother. in 1622 he invaded Jamestown. Brother Wahunsonacock was the father of Pocahontas. Therefore Princess Nicketti was her cousin. Brother's parents were : Emperior Wahunsonacock Powhatan. Many names are very similar. Note: On Powhatan's death in 1618, Opechancanough, brother of Powhatan and chief of the Pamunkey, became the central power in the Powhatan Confederacy.

For many years he was the scourge of the early colonists, and the fierce and implacable enemy of the whites. Constant encroachment and attempts to force European culture upon the Indians led to tensions that erupted in a general war. Opechancanough organized the March 22, 1622 attack, in which some 347 settlers were killed and came close to destroying the entire colony. English reprisals were equally violent, but there was no further fighting on a large scale until 1644, when Opechancanough led the last uprising, in which he was captured and taken to Jamestown. He was kindly treated by the governor, but in a few days shot in the back by one of his guards for some private revenge and died of the wound. He was nearly a hundred years old and very infirm. His successor was Necotowance. The British soon conquered the empire, and, after a few ill fated attempts at rebellion, the Powhatan's were soon destroyed. Survivors fled northward, to Pennsylvania and New Jersey.


A Powhatan chief, born about 1545, died in 1644.

He captured Capt. John Smith shortly after the arrival of the latter in Virginia, and took him to his brother, the head-chief Powhatan (q. v.). Some time after his release, Smith, in order to change the temper of the Indians, who jeered at the starving Englishmen and refused to sell them food, went with a band of his men to Opechancanough's camp under pretense of buying corn, seized the chief by the hair, and at the point of a pistol marched him off a prisoner. The Pamunkey brought boat-loads of provisions to ransom their chief, who thereafter entertained more respect and deeper hatred for the English. While Powhatan lived Opechancanough was held in restraint, but after his brother's death in 1618 he became the dominant leader of the nation, although his other brother, Opitchapan, was the nominal head-chief.

He plotted the destruction of the colony so secretly that only one Indian, the Christian Chanco, revealed the conspiracy, but too late to save the people of Jamestown, who at a sudden signal were massacred, Mar. 22, 1622, by the natives deemed to be entirely friendly.

In the period of intermittent hostilities that followed, duplicity and treachery marked the actions of both whites and Indians. In the last year of his life, Opechancanough, taking advantage of the dissensions of the English, planned their extermination. The aged chief was borne into battle on a litter when the Powhatan, on Apr. 18, 1644, fell upon the settlements and massacred 300 persons, then as suddenly desisted and fled far from the colony, frightened perhaps by some omen. Opechancanough was taken prisoner to Jamestown, where one of his guards treacherously shot him, inflicting a wound of which he subsequently died.


Pronunciation: (O-pech"un-kä'nO)

Information from Wm. Dey Herbert gedcom, Sara Pollastrini : Chief Opechanacanough led the native american indian attack on Jamestown colony, resulting in the death of 347 settlers. This massacre lead to the collapse of Virginia Company and the return of the colony to the control of the King of England. Chief Opechanacanough died by a brutal murder while in captivity in 1644.

Information from Arnold gedcom, JD Watson: Opechancanough, uncle to Pocahontas, was considered a master tactician. He led the Pamunkey tribe for twenty-five years following the death of his brother, Powhatan. For the first six months following Powhatan's death, Opechancanough reassured the settlers of Jamestown, Virginia of their safety. Opechancanough became Werownsi or Werowance (Good Person) of Pamunkey. However, Opechancanough saw that the settlers were beginning to encroach on his tribe's hunting grounds by clearing the trees to make tobacco fields and driving away the game. He saw a pattern building which he wanted to stop. In 1622, on Good Friday, the Indians struck, killing nearly 350 settlers and destroying the town's iron works. Opechancanough was captured during a peace council with the colonists, but managed to escape soon afterward. The attack had so effectively curtailed the community's growth that Opechancanough did not attack again until 1644. Soon after this assault, the chief was taken prisoner for the last time.

When the English first met him, Opechancanough was in his compound five miles north of Apamatuk on land belonging to the Werowans of Winau (Weanoc). This neck of land lies between the Mattaponi (Mattapanlent) River and the Pamunkey River. Opechancanough's major village was at Menapacuts (Menapacunt) on the Pamunkey River, near the sacred center of Uttamussak.

Some of what was written of Opechancanough and the tribe's homeland by early settlers:

"Wyroans Panaunche a Rychland of Copper and pearle. His country lyes into the land to another [Pamunkey] Ryver. The Copper They weare it in eares, about neckes in long lynckes, and in broade plates on heades. The Kyng had a 'Chaine of pearle about his neck thrice Double, the third part of them as bygg as pease. One hundred acres were planted with beans, corn, peas, tobacco, gourds, pumpkins, and other crops."

Near to Opechancanough's village of Menapacunt was the sacred center of Uttamussak, located on "top of certaine red sandy hils." In the woods there were "three great houses filled with images of their kings, and Devils, and Tombes of their Predecessors. Those houses are neare sixtie foot in length built arbour-wise, after their building [style]. This place they count so holy as that but the Priests and Kings dare come into them." People going up the adjacent Pamunkey River "solemly cast some piece of copper, white beads, or Pocones [red paint powder] into the river" to honor Oke, or Okee (probably Auki) ["Earth-Spirit"]. Opechancanough had similar places in the territory of his brothers.


Brother of Chief Powatan (real name Wahunsonacock) When Powatan died in1618, Opechancanough took over. he was much more violent than his brother. in 1622 he invaded Jamestown.

Brother Wahunsonacock was the father of Pocahontas. Therefore Princess Nicketti was her cousin.

Brother's parents were : Emperior Wahunsonacock Powhatan. Many names are very similar.

Note: On Powhatan's death in 1618, Opechancanough, brother of Powhatan and chief of the Pamunkey, became the central power in the Powhatan Confederacy. For many years he was the scourge of the early colonists, and the fierce and implacable enemy of the whites. Constant encroachment and attempts to force European culture upon the Indians led to tensions that erupted in a general war. Opechancanough organized the March 22, 1622 attack, in which some 347 settlers were killed and came close to destroying the entire colony. English reprisals were equally violent, but there was no further fighting on a large scale until 1644, when Opechancanough led the last uprising, in which he was captured and taken to Jamestown. He was kindly treated by the governor, but in a few days shot in the back by one of his guards for some private revenge and died of the wound. He was nearly a hundred years old and very infirm. His successor was Necotowance. The British soon conquered the empire, and, after a few ill fated attempts at rebellion, the Powhatan's were soon destroyed. Survivors fled northward, to Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

http://www.gurganus.org/ourfamily/browse.cfm?pid=90804


Notes

  1. "Library of the Maryland Historical Society, an item of three lines covering eleven years. During the period covered by the fragment, matters became so bad between the Whites and the Indians that Opechancanough , Chief of the Powhatans, was induced to agree upon a line being established which neither White nor Indian, excepting truce bearers, should cross under penalty of being shot on sight. To insure strict obedience to the compact, a law was passed at Jamestown imposing a heavy penalty on any people crossing the line without a special permit from the Commissioners Council and the General Court. This accounts for the item alluded to, which is given verbatim. It reads: "Note:

  1. Dec. 17th, 1641 -- Thomas Rolfe petitions the governor to let him see Opechankeno to whom he is allied, and Cleopatra, his mother's sister."
  2. The record of the General Court was evidently intended to be a verbatim copy though they differ in phraseology and spelling: Note: "Dec. 17th, 1641 -- Thomas Rolph petitions Gov. to let him go see Opechanko, to whom he is allied, and Cleopatre, his mother's sister."
  3. Thomas Rolfe was the son of John Rolfe and Pocahontas. Source: http://www.kentuckykinfolkorganization.com/descendantofSamuelBurks.html

His name reportedly means either "He Whose Soul Is White" or "At the Waterfall" in the Algonquian language.

He was Weroance of the Pamunkey and a tribal chief of the Powhatan Confederacy of what is now Virginia in the United States, and its leader from 1618 until his death in 1644.


[LINKS]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opechancanough

http://www.southern-style.com/powhatan_vann.htm


The following information comes from Dan Bryan (dmbryanfamily@msn.com).

"I recently found a Record that might lend some credence to the existence of our Chief Eagle Plume, and it might be right. I will give what I have and let you judge it from there."

Chief Eagle Plume = Chief Opencancanough

Spouse: Princess Cleopatra "Scent Flower"

Iroquois Tribal Leader - Brother of Chief Powhatan

Cause of Death: Gunshot Wound

(Note: I, Charles D Brown, will leave out about two (2) pages if geneology and jump to the notes at the end of this paper.)

"Opechancanough. A Powhatan chief, born about 1545, died in 1644. He captured Capt. John Smith shortly after the arrival of the latter in Virginia, and took him to his brother, the head-chief Powhatan (q.v.). Some time after his release, Smith, in order to change the temper of the Indians, who jeered at the starving Englishmen and refused to sell them food, went with a band of his men to Opchancanough's camp under pretense of buying corn, seized the chief by the hair, and at the point of a pistol marched him off a prisoner. The Pamunkey brought boat-loads of provisions to ransom their chief, who thereafter entertained more respect and deeper hatred for the English. While Powhatan lived Opechancanough was held in restraint, but after his brother's death in 1618 he became the dominant leader of the nation, although his other brother, Opitchapan, was the nominal head-chief. He plotted the destruction of the colony so secretly that only one Indian, the Christian Chanco, revealed the conspiracy, but too late to save the people of Jamestown, who at a sudden signal were massacred, March 22, 1622, by the natives deemed to be entirely friendly.

In the period of intermittent hostilities that followed, duplicity and treachery marked the actions of both whites and Indians. In the last year of his life, Opechancanough, taking advantage of the dissensions of the English, planned their extermination. The aged chief was borne into battle on a litter when the Powhatan, on April 18, 1644, fell upon the settlements and massacred 300 persons, then as suddenly desisted and fled far from the colony, frightened perhaps by some omen. Opechancanough was taken prisoner to Jamestown, where one of his guards treacherously shot him, inflicting a wound of which he subsequently died.

This is none other than My 16th Great Grandfather - Chief Eagle Plume! The dates are as Follows:

Chief Opechancanough Chief Eagle Plume

1545 Birth: 1543 or 1545

Jamestown Birth Place: Jamestown

1644 Death: 1643 or 1644

Powhatan/Pamunke Tribal Affilation: Powhatan/Pamunke

Dominant Leader of Iroquois - Dominant Leader of Iroquois

Coincidence? I doubt it!

YEEHAW!

A Note from Tim and Dianne Erwin (erwin@cox.net)

A very good genealogist once said to me when I was trying to stop a myth in one of my lines. . . "Trying to correct something incorrect/undocumented that has been printed is like trying to nail Jell-o to a tree."

This tale has evidently been "out there" for years and researchers have been attempting to find anyone who might be able to document it. So far, I haven't seen anyone come forward with anything to prove it. If you have proof, please share it with us. We would love to know for sure!

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opchanacanough
  • Opechancanough or Opchanacanough (1554-1646)[1] was a tribal chief of the Powhatan Confederacy of what is now Virginia in the United States, and its leader from sometime after 1618 until his death in 1646. His name meant "He whose Soul is White" in the Algonquian Powhatan language.[2] He was the famous Chief Powhatan's younger brother (or possibly half-brother)

Wind Clan, Cornstalk, AKA Young Cornstalk Wind Clan Powhatan - Young Shewanee Cornstalk (1598-1650)

Son of Cornstalk Wind Clan - Powhatan Sheewanee Powhatan (1577-1635) & the daughter of the Chalakatha Tree Clan Chief. Married, in 1617, to the daughter of the Chalakatha Turkey Clan Chief; their children included daughters Pride (married Thomas "Pashmere" Carpenter) & Nomura (married her uncle Hokolewska "Stream" Cornstalk).

In 1635 he inherited the position of chief upon the death of his father, and ruled as paramount Chalakatha chief for 25 years.

From Wikipedia

According to one European legend, some Shawnee were descended from a party sent by Chief Opechancanough, ruler of the Powhatan Confederacy 1618–1644, to settle in the Shenandoah Valley. The party was led by his son, Sheewa-a-nee.[12] Edward Bland, an explorer who accompanied Abraham Wood's expedition in 1650, wrote that in Opechancanough's day, there had been a falling-out between the Chawan chief and the weroance of the Powhatan (also a relative of Opechancanough's family). He said the latter had murdered the former.[13]

Links

Opechancanough or Opchanacanough was a tribal chief within the Powhatan Confederacy of what is now Virginia in the United States, and its paramount chief from sometime after 1618 until his death in 1646. His name meant "He whose Soul is White" in the Algonquian Powhatan language.[3] He was the younger brother (or possibly half-brother) of Chief Powhatan, who had organized and dominated the Powhatan Confederacy.

The Powhatan Confederacy was established in the late 16th and early 17th centuries under the leadership of Chief Wahunsonacock (who was more commonly known as Chief Powhatan, named for the tribe he originally led which was based near present-day Richmond, Virginia). Over a period of years, through negotiation and/or coercion, Chief Powhatan united more than 30 of the Virginia Indian tribal groups in the Tidewater region of what is now the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States, essentially the southeastern portion of the state.

At the time of the English settlement at Jamestown which was established in May 1607, Opechancanough was a much-feared warrior and a charismatic leader of the Powhatans. As Chief Powhatan's younger brother (or possibly half-brother), he headed a tribe situated along the Pamunkey River near the present-day town of West Point. Known to be strongly opposed to the European settlers, he captured John Smith of Jamestown along the Chickahominy River and brought him before Chief Powhatan at Werowocomoco, one of the two capital villages of the Powhatans. Located along the northern shore of the present-day York River, Werowocomoco was the site where the famous incident with Powhatan's young daughter Pocahontas intervening on Smith's behalf during a ceremony is thought to have occurred, based upon Smith's account.

Written accounts by other colonists confirm that Pocahontas subsequently did serve as an intermediary between the natives and the colonists, and helped deliver crucial food during the winter of 1607-08, when the colonists' fort at Jamestown Island burned in an accidental fire in January 1608.

The marriage of Pocahontas and colonist John Rolfe in April 1614 brought a period of peace; this ended not long after her death while on a trip to England and the death of her father, Wahunsonacock, in 1618. A short time later, after a brief succession of the chiefdom by Opitchipam, Opechancanough became paramount chief of the Powhatan Confederacy.

The natives and the colonists came into increasingly irreconcilable conflicts as the land-hungry export crop, tobacco (which had been first developed by Rolfe), became the cash crop of the colony. The relationship became even more strained as ever-increasing numbers of Europeans arrived and began establishing "hundreds" and plantations along the navigable rivers.

Beginning with the Indian massacre of 1622, in which his forces killed many settlers, Chief Opechancanough abandoned diplomacy with the English colonists as a means of settling conflicts and tried to force them to abandon the region altogether. On March 22, 1622, approximately a third of the settlers in Virginia were killed by Powhatan forces during a series of coordinated attacks along both shores of the James River, extending from Newport News Point, near the mouth of the river, all the way to Falling Creek, near the fall line at the head of navigation. The colony eventually rebounded, however, and later they killed hundreds of natives in retaliation, including many warriors poisoned by Dr. John Potts at Jamestown.

Chief Opechancanough launched a last major effort to expel the colonists on April 18, 1644, the third Anglo-Powhatan War. In 1646, forces under Royal Governor William Berkeley captured Opechancanough, at the time believed to be between 90 and 100 years old. They paraded him as a prisoner through Jamestown before a jeering crowd; the chief was subsequently killed by a soldier, who shot him in the back while assigned to guard him. Before dying, the chief reportedly said, "If it had been my fortune to take Sir William Berkeley prisoner, I would not have meanly exposed him as a show to my people."

Rechristened as "Don Luis", the young man returned to his homeland in what is now the Virginia Peninsula subregion of the Hampton Roads region of Virginia, where Jesuit priests established their Ajacán Mission in September 1570. Shortly thereafter, Don Luis is believed to have returned to live with the Powhatan and turned against the Europeans. Don Luis and his allies killed the Jesuits at the mission in the winter of 1571, ending Spanish efforts to colonize the area.

From various contemporary reports, it is speculated that Opchanacanough may have suffered from myasthenia gravis. These reports include symptoms of weakness which improved with resting, and visible drooping of the eyelids.


Origins: Experts are saying there are West Indian origins of this paternal line.

Best Book of Who's Who: [https://books.google.com/books?id=fYYMAAAAIAAJ&vq=Nectowance&pg=PA54#v=onepage&q&f=false]

History: [https://www.nps.gov/cajo/learn/historyculture/powhatan.htm]

DNA Matching Fun: Please consider joining with kit matching fun at Nicketti Hughes

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Opechancanough "Mangopeesomon", paramount chief of the Powhatan's Timeline

1545
1545
Virginia
1595
1595
Age 50
Virginia
1600
1600
Age 55
New Kent County, Virginia
1622
March 22, 1622
Age 77
Jamestown, Virginia
1645
October 5, 1645
Age 100
Buckingham County, Virginia
1999
August 19, 1999
Age 100
October 8, 1999
Age 100
December 1, 1999
Age 100