Peder Henrichsen Kofoed

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Peder Henrichsen Kofoed

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Death: 1535 (59-61)
Rønne, Vester, Bornholm, Denmark
Place of Burial: Rønne, Vester, Bornholm, Denmark
Immediate Family:

Son of Heinrich Covot and Mette Kovot
Husband of Boel Pedersdatter Kofoed
Father of Hans Pedersen Kofoed; Karen Jensdatter Kofoed; Poul Pedersen Kofoed; Mads Kofoed; Margrethe Kofoed and 2 others
Brother of Cathrine Madsdatter Kofoed; Anne Madsdatter Kofoed and Oluf Jensen Kofoed

Occupation: Købmand, Borgmester i Rønne 1522, Borgmester, Kom i 1499 i tjeneste hos Erkebiskop Byrje i Lund, hvor han ble adlet 14.6.1514, mayor of Rønne in 1522
Managed by: Flemming Allan Funch
Last Updated:

About Peder Henrichsen Kofoed

Se denne siden for Koefoed slekten og deres slektsvåpen: http://www3.sympatico.ca/colin.swift/vaaben.htm

AKA "Peter Kovoth". Formentlig den første Kofoed på Bornholm og stamfaderen til alle Kofoederne der.


This guy is a bit controversial. Was said to have been invented around 100 years ago, around the same time that information emerged about the Kofods probably starting off as Kovoths from Lübeck.



Tjente hos erkebiskopen, ble for sin innsats mot plyndring fra Hanseatene adlet 14 Juli 1524.


Se denne siden for Koefoed slekten og deres slektsvåpen: http://www3.sympatico.ca/colin.swift/vaaben.htm

AKA "Peter Kovoth". Formentlig den første Kofoed på Bornholm og stamfaderen til alle Kofoederne der.


This guy is a bit controversial. Was said to have been invented around 100 years ago, around the same time that information emerged about the Kofods probably starting off as Kovoths from Lübeck.



Tjente hos erkebiskopen, ble for sin innsats mot plyndring fra Hanseatene adlet 14 Juli 1524.

______________________

http://www.123hjemmeside.dk/mahlerdam/12801970



Peder Kofoed emigrated from Lübeck to Rønne circa 1500, he was mayor of Rønne in 1522

In 1510, Denmark was at war with Lübeck, whose fleet landed on Bornholm, and Nexø and Åkirkeby were burnt off. The Bornholmers prayed for mercy, and an agreement was signed on July 12 by three priests, Peder Kofoed and the country judge Oluf Ottesen, paying 4000 guilders to the occupiers. The entire sum could not be raised, missing 1400 guilders, which Peder Kofoed and 2 others promised to pay in Lübeck within 6 weeks. The three fulfilled the payment, after which the council of Lübeck writes on 20/11 to the council in Rostock that the Bornholm "sergeants" - as they are now called - have requested that Bornholm skippers can again be allowed to call the ports of cities.


"Peter Kovoth" appears to have been the first recorded Kofoed on Bornholm. On July 12th 1510 a treaty was signed with humiliating conditions: 4,000 gold coins - a huge sum of money, and 8,000 measures of pure silver. Also, three hostages were given over until the debt was fully paid, they were: Pastor Peder Laurentsen of Ibsker parish, Peter Kovoth and Jens Skaaning. The island's noble Chief Justice, Oluf Ottesen, acted as the representative for Bornholm, since the Commander of Hammershus was still hiding in the fortress! On July 16th 1510, Peder Kofoed can be found as an under signer with power of attorney on the subsequent "Løftebrev" (promise-letter) to the Lübeck'ers; his signature comes after three clergymen and the chief justice. In documents from 1522 and 1532 he can be found acting as the mayor of Rønne.

It is likely that Peter Kovoth (Peder Kofoed) is the father of the next generation of Kofoeds on Bornholm: Hans Kofoed (-1525-1543-) of Rønne, Poul Kofoed (-1543-1553-1572-) of Kofoedgård in Østermarie parish, and Mads Kofoed (-1547-1552) of Rønne.

Possibly Peder Kofoed's wife's given might have been Boel? Possibly her patronymic was Esbernsdatter? For it is with the third generation of Kofoeds that the name Esbern first appears among the Kofoeds: Poul Kofoed's son Esbern Kofoed (-1590-1623-) of Rønne and [Hans Kofoed's son?] Esbern Kofoed (-1569-) of Frigård, 15 Vdg. Vestermarie. An Esbern Kofoed [possibly the son of "Frimand" Hans (Madsen) Kofoed (c.1550-1623) of Blykobbegård in Nyker?] from the fourth generation is known to have been married to Elline Jørgensdatter [the daughter of "Frimand" Jørgen Pedersen of Vellensgård in Nyker and Eskesgård in Pedersker] in 1608. Or her patronymic might be found by looking at the names Peder Kofoed's three sons: Hansdatter, Poulsdatter or Madsdatter.

The book "På spor af de første Kofod'er" by Jørn Klindt (published 1979) is a scholarly examination, which tries to clear up the many errors surrounding this family's genealogy.

In his book "På spor af de første Kofod'er" Jørn Klindt writes: "The first time we find the Kofod surname on Bornholm is at the beginning of the 1500s, carried by one of the island's leading men. Although the "Jens Kofod" of 1514 was declared to be a fraud around 100 years ago, at the same time "Peter Kovoth" (Peder Kofoed) of 1510 was discovered! But where did these Bornholmer Kofods hail from? Was the first Kofod a Bornholm peasant having merited knighthood after fighting valiantly in Denmark's wars against the Hanseatic League? This was the conclusion of early researchers from around 1700. Maybe he came from an old Bornholm freeman-family who had adopted the name Kofod on account of their emblem depicting a cow's foot? This was the supposition of the great Bornholm historian Dr. M.K. Zahrtmann. Or maybe he came from across the sea: a skillful adventurer bringing his Kofod surname with him? This is the presumtion of my book."

It is thought that the immediately preceading ancestors to the Kofoed'er of Bornholm originated from the area around Hamburg, in the Duchy of Holstein. In 1286 there is mention of a knight, Albertus Kofod; the Holstein'er family attained the right to be armigerous and held various titles of knighthood. Every couple of generations the family rose in status to near nobility, only to then descend the social ladder; they never broke into, and then maintained, noble status.

According to Jørn Klindt it was the so-called "Østermarie branch" (aka Julius Bidstrup's "Familien B") of the Kofoed-family that adopted the image of the cow-foot around the year 1590 - it is displayed on a tombstone in Østermarie Church, as well as in the seal of Mayor Esbern Kofoed (-1590-), and later used by Mayor Poul Madsen Kofoed (c.1630-1685) of Svaneke. But the cow-foot was not the preferred emblem for the Kofoeds, but rather a very old armorial image - the chevron (sparre) was the most widely used. Notably by the so-called "Rønne branch" (aka Julius Bidstrup's "Familien A"). First used by Chief Justice Jens Kofoed (c.1541-1625) of Rønne. Followed by his half-brother Hans Kofoed (c.1550-1623) of Blykobbegård, who used the chevron in his seal from 1595. Hans Kofoed's oldest son Mads Hansen Kofoed (c.1588-1646) used the chevron from 1608, and thus on down through the family.

Jørn Klindt states that in Holstein in the late-1200s and early-1300s there can be found record of a number of "Kofod" men: Albertus (-1286-), Henrik, Didrik, and Bertold. In the mid-1300s: Hasse, Johannes and his son Markvard (-1370-1378-), Frederik, Conrad, Michael Kovot of Lübeck, and two other Johannes. In the mid-1400s there were a number of Hanseatic traders: Henrik Kovodt (-1466-1515) and Hans Kovoet (-1481), both of Lübeck (and possibly brothers?), Hans Kovoth (-1484-) of Wismar, and Jasper Kovot (-1523-1526-). The Hans Kovoth who died in 1481 is known to have had five children: Jochim, Grete, Engel, Anna, and Hans (born circa 1481). In the early-1500s one of the Kofoed-family Hansa traders is known to settled on Bornholm: Peter Kovoth (-1510-1532-), as a merchant in Rønne in 1510 and from 1522 as the mayor. The next generation of Kofoeds on Bornholm were: Hans Kofoed (-1525-1543-) of Rønne, Mads Kofoed (-1547-1552) of Rønne, and Poul Kofoed (-1543-1553-) of Kofoedgård in Østermarie parish.

In 1931 Dr. M.K. Zahrtmann wrote down his theories on the Kofoed-family roots. Jørn Klindt states that the factual findings of Dr. Zahrtmann are always correct - however one can differ with his interpretations of the facts! His interpretation presumes that the given names Peder and Hans in the 1600s often change from father to son, and that you therefore can extend this custom down into the dark 1500s - a period in which there is no documentation to speak of. Using this method Dr. Zahrtmann concluded that Hans Kofoed (died 1623) of Blykobbegård, was the son of a Peder Kofoed, who was the son of a Hans Kofoed, the son of the Hansa trader Peder Kofoed of 1510. Jørn Klindt states that this idea is too perfect, for at least 2 out of 3 children died before reaching adulthood in those days; so it was impossible to guarantee that a Hans or a Peder would carry on the family name?

The Kofoed'er spread east from the Hamburg area to Lübeck, Wismar, etc. along the north Baltic coast-line of present day Germany and Poland. They also spread up the Jylland peninsula into Schleswig and Denmark. Kofod/Kofoed/Koefoed is a family-name that has spread all over Denmark. There are numerous Kofoeds listed in the book of Danish Knights.

The Kofoed'er who settled in Bornholm had attained the status of "Frimænd", this meant that they were "free men" and had no over-lord except the King of Denmark, and thus were of the minor nobility. It should be noted here that such "frimænd" would have were not of the social class of the true titled nobility, and in fact would have been snubbed by that rarified class of people. As free-men the Kofoeds were one of the leading families of Bornholm, with the right to own property, to engage in business and trade, to hunt the forests and make use of the beaches, and were among the island's brew-masters. They had the right to exact labour and duties from the "bonde" (peasant farmers) who lived and worked on their farms. Of course, over the succeeding years not all Kofoed descendants stayed amongst the social elite, and they gradually fell to lower social classes. To this day on Bornholm the surname "Kofoed" remains a prestigious family-name.

From the "Dansk adelsvåbner, en heraldisk nøgle", page 92, by Sven Tito Achen, Politikens Forlag, 1973, København: Kofod. Et koben. Farver og eventuel hjelmfigur kendes ikke. Markvard Kofod, væbner, 1378; afkom ukendt. NDA side 151.

(The above translated to English:) Kofod. On the shield a cow foot. Colours and eventual helmet unknown. Markvard Kofod, arms carrier in 1378; no known descendants. NDA page 151.

According to Julius Bidstrup (published 1886-87) from 1496 through 1514 a Jens Kofoed went into the service of Archbishop Byrge in Lund, Skåne provinve, who bestowed on him the priviledges of noble title for "mandighed, forstand og udviste meriter" (faithful service, manliness, intelligence and displays of merit). (See "Familien Koefoed A og B" by Julius Bidstrup.)

Jens Kofoed and his wife Johanne Thygesdatter (presumably a variant spelling of Thue or Tue) are said to have had three daughters: Karen, Margrethe and Johanne, who all died young. Also an Oluf Kofoed, who was mayor (Borgmester) of Rønne circa 1545, is said to be their son. That Jens Kofoed is the father of Mads Kofoed is disputed, the assertion that they are father and son seems to have been based on inconclusive and sketchy evidence -- see under Mads Kofoed's "Notes" field for more information.

In the 19th century it was suggested that the letter written by the Archbishop entitling knighthood was a forgery; however further research has found this probably not to be the case. (Note: Jørn Klindt wrote in his 1979 book that he believed the letter to be a forgery.)

The June 14, 1514 document supposedly issued by Archbishop Byrge of Lund reads as follows: Wii Byrge med Guds Naade Erke-Biskop i Lund, Sverrigs første og Pavens Legat, Giøre witterligt, at vi af wor synderlige Gunst og Naade have taget annammet og undfanget, og nu med dette Wort Vabne-Brev tage annamme og undfange Os Elskelige, Jens Koefod, hans Hustru, Børn, Hion, Tienere og Godts, rørendes og urørendes, udinden vor Biskopelige Hegn, Vern, Fred og Beskiermelse, besynderligen at ville handthæve, forsvare og Dagtinge til ald Rette; Og saasom bemelte Jens Koefod, der hidtil har været ufri, og en Almues-Mand, haver ladet sig finde udi denne Tog og Feide, som en Brav og Tapper Helt, til at slaa paa Vores og Riigens Fiender, og forsvaret Vores Land; Saa have Vi hannem for saadant hans tro Tieneste og Tapperhed bevilget og samtykt, saasom Vi og hannem med dette Vort Vabne-Brev, bevilge og samtykke, at hand derefter skal være en fri Adelsmand, og haver derfor givet hannem dette paateignede Adels-Vaaben som er: Et blaat Spende udi et rødt Feldt, og to Horn oven i Hielmen; Hvilket Adelige Vaaben, hand, hans Børn og Afkom, skulde nyde og beholde, og skal hand, hans Børn og Efterkommere, saafremt de sig saaledes forholde, som han før dennem giort haver, naar noget Rov og Bytte efter Krigen deeles, tage lige Lod af det bedste, som andre Rigens Adelsmænd. Thi forbyde Vi Vore Biskopper, Ridder, og andre Adelsmænd, udi Vore Lande, fornefnte Os Elskelige Jens Koefod, paa saadan hans Adels Frihed at hindre, eller udi nogen Maade Forfang at giøre. Til ydermere Stadfæstelse, have Vi ladet hænge Vores Secret her neden under dette Ao. Dni. MDXIIII den XIIII Dag Junii.

The above "Vabne-Brev" putatively of 1514, tells us that Archbishop Byrge was granting the "ufri, og en Almues-Mand" (unfree, and Common-Man) "Jens Koefod" noble status for "haver ladet sig finde udi denne Tog og Feide, som en Brav og Tapper Helt, til at slaa paa Vores og Riigens Fiender, og forsvaret Vores Land" (having taken upon himself in this Campaign and Fued, like a Worthy and Courageous Hero, to strike upon Our and the Kingdom's Enemies, and defend Our Country). It describes his new coat of arms as: "Et blaat Spende udi et rødt Feldt, og to Horn oven i Hielme" (A blue Chevron upon a red Field, and two Horns upon a Helmet). It also charges Jens Kofoed, his children, and descendants to defend against those who would attempt to "Rov og Bytte" (Rob and Pillage) the crown's property.

According to Christopher Giessing's pedigree (dated 1786) of the Kofoed-family "Mads Jensen Kofoed" of Hasle is the earliest recorded Kofoed on Bornholm. Giessing states that he lived at Lille Haslegård, and was a "Borger" (Burgher, or middleclass citizen) of Hasle township. As a burgher he was licensed to engage in business and commerce, what the Danes call a "Handelsmand". Giessing relates that the danish Noblemen with the "Koefoed'er" emblem were of mingled blood with the Normans, those people who had occupied Normandy.

He relates further back: to when William the Conqueror, in 1063, went from Normandy to England, there was among the Norman nobility who followed him, one man with the name of Arnfred Kofod. Also, on an English monastery list are several Danish names: Erik, Oluf, Svend of Essex, Ospern and Arnfred Kofod. It is related that the Scottish king, Macbeth, agreed to hide Ospern in Scotland, and that Svend became part of his royal staff. Arnfred Kofod became a faithul servant of King Edward. However, it would be impossible to establish any link between this man and the Bornholmer family of the same name.

The surname Kofoed stems from "KoFod" which means "Cow's Foot". The origin of the name is not known, however the hypothosis has been put forward that the original Kofod had some sort of physical deformity, such as a club-foot. It seems that one branch of the old Bornholm Kofoed families used the cow-foot as their emblem; from obvious association with their name, rather than through their connection to the Duchy of Holstein.

Christopher Giessing's pedigree tells that Mads Jensen Kofoed of Hasle is the father of Jens Kofoed (1481-1519). And that Jens Kofoed is the father of Mads Kofoed, mayor of Rønne, and Oluf Kofoed, also mayor of Rønne. Further, that Mayor Mads Kofoed is the father of Hans Kofoed of Kyndegård; and that Mayor Oluf Kofoed is the father of Jens Kofoed (died 1625) of Kyndegård. Giessing's pedigree of the Kofoed-family was later picked up by Julius Bidstrup in his book "Familien Koefoed" published 1886-87.

The following is a look at events taking place between Denmark and Lübeck in Peder Kofoed's time: In 1509 Denmark and Lübeck were engaged in one of their numerous skirmishes. The Danes had a famous battleship called the "Svane" (english: Swan) - which was reputed to be the largest and most powerful in the world; but the Lübeck'ers in several small vessels surprised, attacked and destroyed it. After this victory a fleet of 14 Lübeck ships ravaged the Danish islands and did much damage to Danish shipping. Nine Swedish ships joined them, and the combined fleet almost ruined Lolland and Bornholm.

Later, in the summer of 1509, a great naval battle took place between 16 Lübeck men-of-war and 17 Danish ships of about equal size and strength. One of the latter was a new vessel, the "Engel" (english: Angel), larger than the unlucky Svane had been. The Lübeck'ers had landed some of their guns and men to attack the fortress of Hammershus, on the northern tip of Bornholm, when the Danish fleet appeared, quite unexpectedly, and attacked at once. The battle lasted all day, and at night both sides claimed the victory. Some days later the fight was resumed, when, after several hours of fierce contest, the Engel had her rudder shot away and was taken in tow by her consorts, and the whole Danish fleet fled.

http://www.ikjensen.dk/jensen/48668.html

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Peder Henrichsen Kofoed's Timeline

1475
1475
Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
1501
1501
Rønne, Vester, Bornholm, Denmark
1505
1505
Lund, Skane, Sweden
1510
1510
Rønne, Vester, Bornholm, Denmark
1513
1513
1535
1535
Age 60
Rønne, Vester, Bornholm, Denmark
????
????
Bornholm, Denmark
????