Sir John Ragland

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John Lewis Ragland, Kt.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Llys-y-Fronydd, Glamorgan, Wales
Death: Died in St. Decumans, Somerset, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir Thomas Raglan, Kt. and Mary Ragland
Husband of Alice Ragland
Father of Thomas Ragland, Sr.; John 'the Elder' Ragland; William Ragland and Joan Ragland

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sir John Ragland

Ragland Ancestry in England The following outline of the RAGLAND family in England is from the website of Robert C. Dodd (Jan. 1999). The report includes additional ancestry extending through Welsh lines and connecting to Henry I, King of England, and beyond. Also included is a brief outline of the family in America.

History: William, Earl of Huntingdon left no male heirs. That is why his daughter Elizabeth passed Raglan Castle to the Somersets. However, Robert ap Jevan's line continued, and his great-grandson "Sir John Ragland, Knight," "(Ragland John,1570, son of Sir Thomas Ragland, Knight," mentioned in the Cardiff records, vol. II, ch.IV)) is again mentioned 1596 in the Cardiff records <http://www.btinternet.com/~pat.sewell/cr/cr-miscellanea.html> vol.IV, ch.III when his daughter Joan married "Thomas, son of William Bawdrippe <http://www.btinternet.com/~pat.sewell/cr/cr-miscellanea.html>, Esq., Knight." John Ragland was born in 1545 at Llys-y-Fronydd, Wales. His father "Raglan Thomas <http://www.btinternet.com/~pat.sewell/cr/cr-gleanings.html> 1558 gent of Lyswurney aged 45 years", according to the Cardiff records, had moved from the old family home at Llys-y-Fronydd across the Bristol Channel to Somerset, England, to escape danger from pirates. Sir John married Alice Kingsonn at St. Decuman's Parish, Somerset, in about 1564, and died there about 1605. (When moving from Wales to England, the Raglans definitively adopted the English spelling by adding the letter -d- to their name, whereas the name of the castle retained the Welsh spelling) Sir John's great-grandson was the famous Evan Ragland who was kidnapped. Had the boy remained in England there is little doubt that he would have carried the title of Sir Evan Ragland, Knight, had he been the eldest son -- which he wasn't, being the fourth son of Thomas Ragland and Jane Morgan. There were also other Raglans living in Glamorgan, for instance at Llantwit-Major <http://www.llantwit-major.net/history.shtml> where they built several houses. "About 1440, a new family came to Llantwit Major, the Raglans or Raglands. Robert Raglan built a house which is now the Old White Hart public house, making it the oldest continually inhabited house in the town. Then about 1465, Raglan built a new house, which in time was used by the church as a presbytery, and which in 1874 was extended and became the village school, now the "Old School" used by community groups. The Old Swan Inn on the other side of the square is another Raglan house. There is a tradition that this pub was at one time a mint. This dates from the Civil War when the owner, Edward Maddocks, struck brass tokens for his workers. The Old Swan was was also a popular inn for American visitors before the 1939-45 war when St. Donats Castle was owned by William Randolph Hearst."(http://www.theoasthouse.net/llantwithistory.htm) At Llancarvan <http://www.llancarfan.f9.co.uk/Llancarfan/history.htm> a John Raglan acquired by marriage Carniiwyd Manor in the 12th century. The local Raglans, considered rich and influential, also built the Raglan Chapel in early Norman style, as part of St. Cadoc's church. Some time before Evan Ragland was taken to Virginia, his distant relative William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, had become Lord Chamberlain of the Royal Household and, as such, "furthered the exploration and colonization of America" so vigorously "that the Rappahannock river in Virginia was renamed Pembroke <http://www.fae.plym.ac.uk/neworld/1619.htm> in his honour" (1619). Unfortunately, his family ties to William Herbert (whom Shakespeare dedicated his first folio) did not help Evan Ragland at all. He never returned to Britain, perhaps because of the traumatic experience of his first and only voyage. But his son John, born about 1690 in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent Co., Virginia, visited Britain and married in about 1715/16 Anne Beaufort. They returned to Virginia and had 8 children. It is an interesting fact that Raglands/Herberts and Beauforts married twice two centuries apart: if Anne Beaufort was a Somerset -- which is very likely -- John and Anne had been distant relatives. John Ragland was a planter and land speculator in Hanover Co., Virginia. He owned 1600 acres, recorded in the Registrar's Office in Richmond, VA. His plantation home was Ripping Hall <http://www.rootsweb.com/~vahanove/central.htm> in Hanover County on the Mechumps Creek, sometimes also called 'Rippon Hall' which burnt in the 1820s but was rebuilt. Incidentally, the 19th century Lord Raglan to whom the eponymous sleeve is ascribed, was Fitzroy James Henry Somerset, the youngest of the Duke of Beaufort's 11 children. He was the Duke of Wellington's military secretary during the Napoleonic wars, lost his right arm during the battle of Waterloo, and was Field Marshal and British Commander in chief during the Crimean war. For his merits Queen Victoria revived the title of the old manor by creating him Baron Raglan of Raglan in 1852. (His tailor invented the raglan sleeve to cover the baronet's missing right shoulder; it was quickly copied by other tailors and remained in fashion for many decades)

	

"Lord Raglan (Fitzroy Sommerset) Commandant en chef de l'Armée Anglaise en Orient. Né le 30 septembre 1786. Lith. par Maurin. Lith. de Turgis à Paris. Paris V5 Turgis, éditeur rue Serpente, 10, et à New York, Broadway 300"


Ragland Ancestry in England The following outline of the RAGLAND family in England is from the website of Robert C. Dodd (Jan. 1999). The report includes additional ancestry extending through Welsh lines and connecting to Henry I, King of England, and beyond. Also included is a brief outline of the family in America.

History: William, Earl of Huntingdon left no male heirs. That is why his daughter Elizabeth passed Raglan Castle to the Somersets. However, Robert ap Jevan's line continued, and his great-grandson "Sir John Ragland, Knight," "(Ragland John,1570, son of Sir Thomas Ragland, Knight," mentioned in the Cardiff records, vol. II, ch.IV)) is again mentioned 1596 in the Cardiff records <http://www.btinternet.com/~pat.sewell/cr/cr-miscellanea.html> vol.IV, ch.III when his daughter Joan married "Thomas, son of William Bawdrippe <http://www.btinternet.com/~pat.sewell/cr/cr-miscellanea.html>, Esq., Knight." John Ragland was born in 1545 at Llys-y-Fronydd, Wales. His father "Raglan Thomas <http://www.btinternet.com/~pat.sewell/cr/cr-gleanings.html> 1558 gent of Lyswurney aged 45 years", according to the Cardiff records, had moved from the old family home at Llys-y-Fronydd across the Bristol Channel to Somerset, England, to escape danger from pirates. Sir John married Alice Kingsonn at St. Decuman's Parish, Somerset, in about 1564, and died there about 1605. (When moving from Wales to England, the Raglans definitively adopted the English spelling by adding the letter -d- to their name, whereas the name of the castle retained the Welsh spelling) Sir John's great-grandson was the famous Evan Ragland who was kidnapped. Had the boy remained in England there is little doubt that he would have carried the title of Sir Evan Ragland, Knight, had he been the eldest son -- which he wasn't, being the fourth son of Thomas Ragland and Jane Morgan. There were also other Raglans living in Glamorgan, for instance at Llantwit-Major <http://www.llantwit-major.net/history.shtml> where they built several houses. "About 1440, a new family came to Llantwit Major, the Raglans or Raglands. Robert Raglan built a house which is now the Old White Hart public house, making it the oldest continually inhabited house in the town. Then about 1465, Raglan built a new house, which in time was used by the church as a presbytery, and which in 1874 was extended and became the village school, now the "Old School" used by community groups. The Old Swan Inn on the other side of the square is another Raglan house. There is a tradition that this pub was at one time a mint. This dates from the Civil War when the owner, Edward Maddocks, struck brass tokens for his workers. The Old Swan was was also a popular inn for American visitors before the 1939-45 war when St. Donats Castle was owned by William Randolph Hearst."(http://www.theoasthouse.net/llantwithistory.htm) At Llancarvan <http://www.llancarfan.f9.co.uk/Llancarfan/history.htm> a John Raglan acquired by marriage Carniiwyd Manor in the 12th century. The local Raglans, considered rich and influential, also built the Raglan Chapel in early Norman style, as part of St. Cadoc's church. Some time before Evan Ragland was taken to Virginia, his distant relative William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, had become Lord Chamberlain of the Royal Household and, as such, "furthered the exploration and colonization of America" so vigorously "that the Rappahannock river in Virginia was renamed Pembroke <http://www.fae.plym.ac.uk/neworld/1619.htm> in his honour" (1619). Unfortunately, his family ties to William Herbert (whom Shakespeare dedicated his first folio) did not help Evan Ragland at all. He never returned to Britain, perhaps because of the traumatic experience of his first and only voyage. But his son John, born about 1690 in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent Co., Virginia, visited Britain and married in about 1715/16 Anne Beaufort. They returned to Virginia and had 8 children. It is an interesting fact that Raglands/Herberts and Beauforts married twice two centuries apart: if Anne Beaufort was a Somerset -- which is very likely -- John and Anne had been distant relatives. John Ragland was a planter and land speculator in Hanover Co., Virginia. He owned 1600 acres, recorded in the Registrar's Office in Richmond, VA. His plantation home was Ripping Hall <http://www.rootsweb.com/~vahanove/central.htm> in Hanover County on the Mechumps Creek, sometimes also called 'Rippon Hall' which burnt in the 1820s but was rebuilt. Incidentally, the 19th century Lord Raglan to whom the eponymous sleeve is ascribed, was Fitzroy James Henry Somerset, the youngest of the Duke of Beaufort's 11 children. He was the Duke of Wellington's military secretary during the Napoleonic wars, lost his right arm during the battle of Waterloo, and was Field Marshal and British Commander in chief during the Crimean war. For his merits Queen Victoria revived the title of the old manor by creating him Baron Raglan of Raglan in 1852. (His tailor invented the raglan sleeve to cover the baronet's missing right shoulder; it was quickly copied by other tailors and remained in fashion for many decades)

	

"Lord Raglan (Fitzroy Sommerset) Commandant en chef de l'Armée Anglaise en Orient. Né le 30 septembre 1786. Lith. par Maurin. Lith. de Turgis à Paris. Paris V5 Turgis, éditeur rue Serpente, 10, et à New York, Broadway 300"


Ragland Ancestry in England The following outline of the RAGLAND family in England is from the website of Robert C. Dodd (Jan. 1999). The report includes additional ancestry extending through Welsh lines and connecting to Henry I, King of England, and beyond. Also included is a brief outline of the family in America.

History: William, Earl of Huntingdon left no male heirs. That is why his daughter Elizabeth passed Raglan Castle to the Somersets. However, Robert ap Jevan's line continued, and his great-grandson "Sir John Ragland, Knight," "(Ragland John,1570, son of Sir Thomas Ragland, Knight," mentioned in the Cardiff records, vol. II, ch.IV)) is again mentioned 1596 in the Cardiff records <http://www.btinternet.com/~pat.sewell/cr/cr-miscellanea.html> vol.IV, ch.III when his daughter Joan married "Thomas, son of William Bawdrippe <http://www.btinternet.com/~pat.sewell/cr/cr-miscellanea.html>, Esq., Knight." John Ragland was born in 1545 at Llys-y-Fronydd, Wales. His father "Raglan Thomas <http://www.btinternet.com/~pat.sewell/cr/cr-gleanings.html> 1558 gent of Lyswurney aged 45 years", according to the Cardiff records, had moved from the old family home at Llys-y-Fronydd across the Bristol Channel to Somerset, England, to escape danger from pirates. Sir John married Alice Kingsonn at St. Decuman's Parish, Somerset, in about 1564, and died there about 1605. (When moving from Wales to England, the Raglans definitively adopted the English spelling by adding the letter -d- to their name, whereas the name of the castle retained the Welsh spelling) Sir John's great-grandson was the famous Evan Ragland who was kidnapped. Had the boy remained in England there is little doubt that he would have carried the title of Sir Evan Ragland, Knight, had he been the eldest son -- which he wasn't, being the fourth son of Thomas Ragland and Jane Morgan. There were also other Raglans living in Glamorgan, for instance at Llantwit-Major <http://www.llantwit-major.net/history.shtml> where they built several houses. "About 1440, a new family came to Llantwit Major, the Raglans or Raglands. Robert Raglan built a house which is now the Old White Hart public house, making it the oldest continually inhabited house in the town. Then about 1465, Raglan built a new house, which in time was used by the church as a presbytery, and which in 1874 was extended and became the village school, now the "Old School" used by community groups. The Old Swan Inn on the other side of the square is another Raglan house. There is a tradition that this pub was at one time a mint. This dates from the Civil War when the owner, Edward Maddocks, struck brass tokens for his workers. The Old Swan was was also a popular inn for American visitors before the 1939-45 war when St. Donats Castle was owned by William Randolph Hearst."(http://www.theoasthouse.net/llantwithistory.htm) At Llancarvan <http://www.llancarfan.f9.co.uk/Llancarfan/history.htm> a John Raglan acquired by marriage Carniiwyd Manor in the 12th century. The local Raglans, considered rich and influential, also built the Raglan Chapel in early Norman style, as part of St. Cadoc's church. Some time before Evan Ragland was taken to Virginia, his distant relative William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, had become Lord Chamberlain of the Royal Household and, as such, "furthered the exploration and colonization of America" so vigorously "that the Rappahannock river in Virginia was renamed Pembroke <http://www.fae.plym.ac.uk/neworld/1619.htm> in his honour" (1619). Unfortunately, his family ties to William Herbert (whom Shakespeare dedicated his first folio) did not help Evan Ragland at all. He never returned to Britain, perhaps because of the traumatic experience of his first and only voyage. But his son John, born about 1690 in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent Co., Virginia, visited Britain and married in about 1715/16 Anne Beaufort. They returned to Virginia and had 8 children. It is an interesting fact that Raglands/Herberts and Beauforts married twice two centuries apart: if Anne Beaufort was a Somerset -- which is very likely -- John and Anne had been distant relatives. John Ragland was a planter and land speculator in Hanover Co., Virginia. He owned 1600 acres, recorded in the Registrar's Office in Richmond, VA. His plantation home was Ripping Hall <http://www.rootsweb.com/~vahanove/central.htm> in Hanover County on the Mechumps Creek, sometimes also called 'Rippon Hall' which burnt in the 1820s but was rebuilt. Incidentally, the 19th century Lord Raglan to whom the eponymous sleeve is ascribed, was Fitzroy James Henry Somerset, the youngest of the Duke of Beaufort's 11 children. He was the Duke of Wellington's military secretary during the Napoleonic wars, lost his right arm during the battle of Waterloo, and was Field Marshal and British Commander in chief during the Crimean war. For his merits Queen Victoria revived the title of the old manor by creating him Baron Raglan of Raglan in 1852. (His tailor invented the raglan sleeve to cover the baronet's missing right shoulder; it was quickly copied by other tailors and remained in fashion for many decades).

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Sir John Ragland's Timeline

1545
1545
Llys-y-Fronydd, Glamorgan, Wales
1569
1569
Age 24
1572
1572
Age 27
1575
1575
Age 30
St. Decuman's Parish, Somerset, Wales
1579
1579
Age 34
St. Decuman's Parish, Somerset, Wales
1605
1605
Age 60
St. Decumans, Somerset, England
????