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Profiles

  • Woody Herman (1913 - 1987)
    Woodrow Charles Herman (May 16, 1913 – October 29, 1987) was an American jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, singer, and big band leader. Leading various groups called "The Herd", Herman came to prominenc...
  • Steven Van Zandt
    Steven Van Zandt, also known as Little Steven or Miami Steve, is an American musician, songwriter, arranger, record producer, actor, and radio disc jockey. In 1999, Van Zandt took one of the core rol...
  • A.J. Nicks (1892 - 1974)
    A.J. Nicks was the grandfather of singer-songwriter Stevie Nicks. He was a local country singer and took Stevie on tour with him around the Phoenix valley.
  • Richard Lee Roberts
    Richard Lee Roberts (born November 12, 1948) is chairman and chief executive officer of the Oral Roberts Evangelistic Association and previously served as president of Oral Roberts University (ORU) f...
  • John Paul Densmore
    John Paul Densmore (born December 1, 1944) is an American musician and songwriter. He is best known as the drummer of the rock group The Doors. Born in Los Angeles, Densmore attended Santa Monica City ...

For musicians of all nationalities, please see Entertainment industry people.

American musicians are people from the United States who perform or compose music as a profession.

The music of the United States reflects the country's multi-ethnic population through a diverse array of styles. Among the country's most internationally-renowned genres are hip hop, blues, country, rhythm and blues, jazz, barbershop, pop, techno, and rock and roll. After Japan, the United States has the world's second largest music market with a total retail value of 3,635.2 million dollars in 2010 and its music is heard around the world. Since the beginning of the 20th century, some forms of American popular music have gained a near global audience.

Also see