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Descendants William Coxe(The Ancient Planter) 1598-1656) and Elizabeth Hutchins Cox (1612-1665)

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https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cox-509:

William Cox (1598 - bef. 1656)
William Cox aka Coxe
Born 1598 in Steeple Ashton, Wiltshire, Englandmap
ANCESTORS ancestors
Son of John Cox [uncertain] and Alice (Walsheer) Cox [uncertain]
Brother of John Richmond Coxe, Michael Cox [half], Margaret Cox, John Cox, Grace Cox, Anstice (Cox) Pardee and Alice (Coxe) Edloe
[spouse%28s%29 unknown]
DESCENDANTS descendants
Father of Catherine (Cocke) Burton, John Cox and Thomas Cox
Died before 14 Dec 1656 at about age 58 in Henrico, Virginiamap
Profile managers: Mary Richardson private message [send private message] and Mary Elizabeth Stewart private message [send private message]
Profile last modified 18 Apr 2022 | Created 30 Dec 2010
This page has been accessed 14,875 times.
Contents
[hide]
1 Biography
2 Sources
2.1 Ancestry Family Trees
3 Acknowledgements
Biography
flag of the Jamestowne Society
William Cox is a Qualifying Ancestor of the Jamestowne Society
Jamestown Church Tower
William Cox was a Jamestown colonist.
William Coxe[1] was born approximately (1584-1598, in England, according to Genealogy.com and two other sources). [2] [3] William Cox is mentioned as being about twelve years of age in one source. [4] This source [5] shows William on the Jamestown arrival list. [6][7] [8]

Immigration

Three ships, the Discovery, Susan Constant, and the Godspeed left the England port for America. [5][9]William was listed as immigrating at the age of 12 on June 10, 1607 from England to Jamestown, Colony on the ship, Godspeed or Goodspeed. [5][10][11] [12][13] [14][15]He had traveled in the party of Thomas West, Third Lord de la Warre. [16]

Feb 1624, the Muster of Elizabeth City and Jamestown was taken, showing William Coxe living with friend, Thomas Bouldinge, age 40. [17] . Thomas Bouldinge had immigrated on the ship SWAN, 1610) to Jamestown and was living in Elizabeth City. "Immigrant: William Coxe, 1624, (age 26 Est. DOB: 1584-1598), Virginia was listed on the Godspeed ship. The Muster of Jamestown, of 1624 recorded that William was 26 years of age at that time. [18][19][13]with friend, William Bouldin who arrived 1610. [20][16]

"ANCIENT PLANTER"

By 20 Sep 1628, following the 1624 Jamestown Muster, William Coxe of Jamestown, James, Virginia, qualified as Category:Ancient Planters of Virginia. This was defined as a person who had been in Jamestowne colony before the (Apr 1616 departure of Sir Thomas DALE) was defined as Category:Ancient Planters of Virginia. He was granted a 10 YR LEASE for 100 Acres land., which was "within the precincts of Elizabeth City," bounded on the south by the maine (James) river, on the east by Dictoris Christmas, planter, and Christopher Calthropp, Gent.[21][18][22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27][28]

Marriage:
Husband: William Coxe
Wife: Elizabeth Hutchins
Child: John Cox
William Coxe, Ancient Planter:
William Coxe
Born 1598 in Steeple Ashton, Wiltshire, England
Died before 14 Dec 1656 in Henrico, Colony of Virginia
seen as son of John Richmond Cox [uncertain] and Alice (Walsbeer) Cox [uncertain]
Husband of Elizabeth (Hutchins) Cox — married [date unknown] in Waricke, Henrcio, Colony of Virginia
The children of William and Elizabeth Coxe:

1. Thomas - inherited as "son and heir" a right to 250 acres sold on Sept. 1, 1642, by Matt hew Gough to William Cox and Isaac Hutchins, and assigned this interest to John Knowles on Au g. 1, 1668.
2. John [I] - married twice and had six children. He died in 1696.
3. Elizabeth - married Robert Porter.
4. Mary - married John Burton
William Cox (Coxe) was the husband of Elizabeth Hutchins and they married about 1633 in Henrico County, Virginia.

William Cox (Coxe) immigrated at the age of 12, on June 10, 1610 from England to Jamestowne, Virginia Colony, Virginia in the party of Thomas West (Third Lord de la Warre) on the ship the Godspeed or Goodspeed.

William Cox (Coxe) is a qualifying Ancestor to membership in the Jamestowne Society. He is also listed among the Ancient Planters of Virginia.

References
“ For a comprehensive and scholarly account of the William Cox family, please refer to Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5: Families A-F by John Frederick Dorman, pages 727 - 765.“
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cox-509
http://www.jamestowne.org/qualifying-ancestors.html
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/117594487
content to clean up
William Coxe was born in 1598 in England, and was 12 years old when he came to Virginia in 1610. He arrived in the Godspeed on June 10, 1610, in the party of Thomas West, Third Lord De La Warr. He may have been a brother of Elizabeth Coxe, daughter of Sir Henry Coxe of Broxburn, Herfordshire, who was married to Robert West, brother of Lord De La Warr. When the muster was taken in February 1624/25, he was listed as William Coxe, age 26, at Elizabeth City, with Thomas Bouldinge. On Sept. 20, 1628, because he qualified as an "ancient planter" - that is, one who had been in the colony before April 1616, the time of departure of Sir Thomas Dale - he was granted a ten-year lease for 100 acres. This land granted to William Coxe, Planter, was located "within the precincts of Elizabeth City...bounded on the south by the maine [James] river."

"Ship Passenger Lists The South 1538-1825" by Carl Boyer Names of inhabitants in Virginia, 1624-1625

William Coxe ship Godspeed date 1610 (William immigrated on 10 Jun 1610 to On the Godspeed in the party of Thomas West)
From ("Early Virginia Ancestors of our Cox Family and Their Colonial Cousins," compiled by Mrs. David O. Reichlein, submitted by Mrs. Opal Cox Avant):

"The first Cox in our family appears to have been William Cox, Planter, who came to Virginia before 1628, and could have been the same William Cox, age 26, who came over in the Godspeed. A land grant of 150 to William Cox, Oct. 29, 1637 in Henrico County, about 2 miles above Harrow Attocks, was granted for transportation of three persons, one of which was Richard Byrd. William Cox appears to have purchased additional land adjoining this patent and owned land on both sides of the James River: Coxendale on one side, and Dutch Gap on the other side. William Cox acquired by lease 100 acres of land in Elizabeth City on Sept. 20, 1624.

William Coxe and Elizabeth were probably married about 1633 and had at least four children, two daughters and two sons:

Thomas and
John [I].
Thomas was mentioned in records of May 6, 1665, when it is noted that he had previously sold land at "Warrick" to Mr. John Knowles. This was part of the land on "Fallen Creek" belonging to the orphans of William Coxe. The son John [I] probably married Robert Craddock's daughter and was the only one of William's children known to have left issue.

John Cox [I] was born about 1635 and died in Henrico in 1676; he had a son Richard Coxe who died about 1735 in Virginia. Richard married Mary Trent, the daughter of Henry Trent and Elizabeth Sherman, and the granddaughter of Henry Sherman and his wife Cisley, who was the widow of Isaac Hutchins. Mary Trent and Richard Coxe had a daughter Elizabeth Cox, born February 25, 1713. About 1731 their daughter Elizabeth married Strangeman Hutchins, son of Nicholas Hutchins and Mary Watkins Hopkins of Virginia and Related Families, by Walter Lee Hopkins, J.W. Fergusson & Sons Printers, Richmond, Virginia, 1931, pages 114-117:

from Cox Family of Virginia: In the list of "Adventurers," as they were styled in the Charters of the Virginia Companies, 1609 and 1620, the name is spelled Cock, Cocks, Cox, Coxe (Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 3, page 282).:

William Coxe, aged 26, came over in the Godspeed in 1610. It is most likely that this is the same William Cox whom Governor West granted 100 acres of land in Elizabeth County [City?], Virginia, Sept. 28, 1628 (Land Book I, page 89, Richmond, Virginia); also to whom Gov. John West, under date of Nov. 29, 1636, granted "one hundred and fifty acres of land, situate and being in the County of Henrico, about three miles and a half above Harrowattocks, west and by north upon main river, westerly upon the great Swamp, easterly into the woods, southerly towards Harrowattocks," for the transportation of three heads into the Colony, viz: Thomas Braxton, Richard Bird, and Richard Hewes (Land Book I, page 403). Also to whom Gov. John Harvey, under date Oct. 29, 1637, granted "one hundred fifty acres of land situate, lying and being in the County of Henrico, about three miles and a half above Harrowattocks," for the transportation of three persons into the Colony at his own expense; names of persons not found (Land Book I, page 492). (See Cox notes by Mrs. E.F. O'Gorman, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 38, pages 157-159.)

Posted to the Henrico County, Virginia Deed Forum by Regena Cogar, rlcogar@bellsouth.net, 22 September 2000: VA Patents 1, p. 403 Library of Virginia Digital Collection: Land Office Patents and Grants

William Cox 150 Exmd __________ To all to whome these presents shall come I Capt John West Esqr Governor &c. send &c. Now Know yee that I the said Capt John West Esqr doe with the consent of the Councell of State accordingly give and grant unto William Cox one hundred and fiftie acres of Land scituate lying and being in the County of Henrico about twoe miles & a halfe above Harroe Attocks West and by North upon the maine river Westerly upon the great swamp Easterly into the woods and Southerly towards [Harrow?] Attocks The said one hundred and fiftie acres of Land being due unto him the said William Cox by and for the transportacon of three persons into this Colony whose names are in the Records menconed under this pattent To have and to hold &c. dated the 29th November 1636 ut in aliis __________ Thomas [Bra_ston?] Richard Bird Richard [He__es?]

Note: Transcriber's comments are in brackets [ ]. For clarity, some contractions have been spelled out. Image format copyrighted by the Library of Virginia.

William, who died about 1656, also had 250 acres of land across the river at the mouth of Falling Creek obtained in partnership with Isaac Hutchins on the 1st of September 1642. These lands belonged on December 14, 1656, to "the orphans" (then meaning heirs, not minor children) of William Coxe. On that date Peter Lee acquired 126 acres called "Worricke" bounded on the southwest by a small run, at a place called London Bridge, which divided his land from land belonging to the orphans of William Coxe, bounded on the southeast by the main river and on the northeast by Isaac Hutchins. Isaac Hutchins also obtained his 378-acre grant of land in "Worricks" on the 14th of December 1656. It was lying next to land of Peter Lee, southeast on the main river and northeast to a place called "Porringers Spring." Isaac was probably the son of Robert Hutchins, the mariner, and brother to Elizabeth Coxe, wife of William Coxe. Isaac had other lands on the south side of the river near "Worricks," for on the 1st of September 1642, he bought 250 acres in partnership with William Coxe at the mouth of Falling Creek.

Isaac Hutchins probably came to Virginia about 1633 prior to the 16th of June 1637 when Captain Thomas Osborne was given credit for Isaac's headrights. Isaac married Cicely "Sisly" and had one child, a son Robert, who was mentioned in Isaac's will of February 23, 1656. In April 1714 the Henrico court concluded that Robert, son of Isaac, died under age and without issue, and thus the lands of Isaac reverted to his wife Cicely. She had married Henry Sherman after the death of Isaac. Her granddaughter, Mary Trent, married Richard Coxe, the grandson of William Coxe. Mary Trent and Richard Cox had a daughter Elizabeth Cox, born February 25, 1713, who about 1731 married Strangeman Hutchins, son of Nicholas Hutchins and Mary Watkins of Henrico County.

From Margaret L. Smith, 3209 Reba Drive, Houston, Texas, 77019, May 1998:

First Generation

William Coxe was born in 1598 in England, and was 12 years old when he came to Virginia in 1610. He arrived in the Godspeed on June 10, 1610, in the party of Thomas West, Third Lord D e La Warr. He may have been a brother of Elizabeth Coxe, daughter of Sir Henry Coxe of Broxb urn, Herfordshire, who was married to Robert West, brother of Lord De La Warr. When the must er was taken in February 1624/25, he was listed as William Coxe, age 26, at Elizabeth City, w ith Thomas Bouldinge. On Sept. 20, 1628, because he qualified as an "ancient planter" - tha t is, one who had been in the colony before April 1616, the time of departure of Sir Thomas D ale - he was granted a ten-year lease for 100 acres. This land granted to William Coxe, Plan ter, was located "within the precincts of Elizabeth City...bounded on the south by the main e [James] river."

On Nov. 29, 1636, William Coxe received a patent for 150 acres in Henrico County, for the tra nsportation of three persons into the colony. This tract was also located on the James River , further west, and was about 2 miles northwest of "Harroe Attocks" (Arrowhattocks). On Oct . 29, 1637, he received a patent for 150 more acres in the same location, for three more head rights.

William Coxe and his wife, Elizabeth, made at least one return trip to England, and in 1637 w ere claimed by Mathew Edloe as headrights. Mathew Edloe, his mother Alice Edloe, and siste r Hannah Boyes were all neighbors of William Coxe, owning property adjoining his in Henrico C ounty. Sometime before Dec. 14, 1656, William Coxe and his wife had both died, for on that d ate, Peter Lee patented 126 acres in Henrico County adjoining the land belonging to the "orph ans of William Coxe," and lying on the main (James) river and northeast of the land of Isaa c Hutchins. (There is an unreferenced family chart which shows that William Coxe's wife wa s Elizabeth Hutchins, and it also names their four children.)

The children of William and Elizabeth Coxe:

1. Thomas - inherited as "son and heir" a right to 250 acres sold on Sept. 1, 1642, by Matt hew Gough to William Cox and Isaac Hutchins, and assigned this interest to John Knowles on Au g. 1, 1668.
2. John [I] - married twice and had six children. He died in 1696.
3. Elizabeth - married Robert Porter.
4. Mary - married John Burton.
After the first generation, the name was spelled "Cox."

In 1611, four years after Newport's early explorations, Sir Thomas Dale left Jamestown to establish a settlement upriver. Relations with the Indians had steadily deteriorated since 1607, and Dale's company suffered constant attacks. The party finally came to a peninsula on the north side of the river, now Farrar's Island, where Dale established the colony's second settlement, "Henricus," known also as the "city" or "town" of "Henrico." In just four months the town grew to a fortified settlement. Frame houses lined three streets, and the men had built a wooden church, a brick foundation for a permanent church, storehouses, watchtowers, and huts.

Life in the New World was hard, but the English had high hopes that their settlements would add valuable minerals and raw materials to their economy, in addition to providing strategic military outposts. They also saw this land as a new frontier for spreading Christianity.

Virginia's economy was sharply transformed by the introduction in 1612 of new strains of mild tobacco by colonist John Rolfe. Rolfe's tobacco was shipped to England, and Virginia's economy soon began to prosper.

In 1614, peace with the Indians was temporarily established, following Rolfe's marriage to Powhatan's daughter, Pocahontas, who had converted to Christianity and been baptized "Rebecca."

William Coxe was born in 1598 in England, and was 12 years old when he came to Virginia in 1610. He arrived in the Godspeed on June 10, 1610, in the party of Thomas West, Third Lord De La Warr. He may have been a brother of Elizabeth Coxe, daughter of Sir Henry Coxe of Broxburn, Herfordshire, who was married to Robert West, brother of Lord De La Warr. When the muster was taken in February 1624/25, he was listed as William Coxe, age 26, at Elizabeth City, with Thomas Bouldinge. On Sept. 20, 1628, because he qualified as an "ancient planter" - that is, one who had been in the colony before April 1616, the time of departure of Sir Thomas Dale - he was granted a ten-year lease for 100 acres. This land granted to William Coxe, Planter, was located "within the precincts of Elizabeth City...bounded on the south by the maine [James] river."

"Ship Passenger Lists The South 1538-1825" by Carl Boyer Names of inhabitants in Virginia, 1624-1625 •William Coxe ship Godspeed date 1610 (William immigrated on 10 Jun 1610 to On the Godspeed in the party of Thomas West)

From ("Early Virginia Ancestors of our Cox Family and Their Colonial Cousins," compiled by Mrs. David O. Reichlein, submitted by Mrs. Opal Cox Avant):

"The first Cox in our family appears to have been William Cox, Planter, who came to Virginia before 1628, and could have been the same William Cox, age 26, who came over in the Godspeed. A land grant of 150 to William Cox, Oct. 29, 1637 in Henrico County, about 2 miles above Harrow Attocks, was granted for transportation of three persons, one of which was Richard Byrd. William Cox appears to have purchased additional land adjoining this patent and owned land on both sides of the James River: Coxendale on one side, and Dutch Gap on the other side. William Cox acquired by lease 100 acres of land in Elizabeth City on Sept. 20, 1624.

William Coxe and Elizabeth were probably married about 1633 and had at least four children, two daughters and two sons: •Thomas and •John [I].

Thomas was mentioned in records of May 6, 1665, when it is noted that he had previously sold land at "Warrick" to Mr. John Knowles. This was part of the land on "Fallen Creek" belonging to the orphans of William Coxe. The son John [I] probably married Robert Craddock's daughter and was the only one of William's children known to have left issue.

John Cox [I] was born about 1635 and died in Henrico in 1676; he had a son Richard Coxe who died about 1735 in Virginia. Richard married Mary Trent, the daughter of Henry Trent and Elizabeth Sherman, and the granddaughter of Henry Sherman and his wife Cisley, who was the widow of Isaac Hutchins. Mary Trent and Richard Coxe had a daughter Elizabeth Cox, born February 25, 1713. About 1731 their daughter Elizabeth married Strangeman Hutchins, son of Nicholas Hutchins and Mary Watkins Hopkins of Virginia and Related Families, by Walter Lee Hopkins, J.W. Fergusson & Sons Printers, Richmond, Virginia, 1931, pages 114-117:

from Cox Family of Virginia: In the list of "Adventurers," as they were styled in the Charters of the Virginia Companies, 1609 and 1620, the name is spelled Cock, Cocks, Cox, Coxe (Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 3, page 282).:

William Coxe, aged 26, came over in the Godspeed in 1610. It is most likely that this is the same William Cox whom Governor West granted 100 acres of land in Elizabeth County [City?], Virginia, Sept. 28, 1628 (Land Book I, page 89, Richmond, Virginia); also to whom Gov. John West, under date of Nov. 29, 1636, granted "one hundred and fifty acres of land, situate and being in the County of Henrico, about three miles and a half above Harrowattocks, west and by north upon main river, westerly upon the great Swamp, easterly into the woods, southerly towards Harrowattocks," for the transportation of three heads into the Colony, viz: Thomas Braxton, Richard Bird, and Richard Hewes (Land Book I, page 403). Also to whom Gov. John Harvey, under date Oct. 29, 1637, granted "one hundred fifty acres of land situate, lying and being in the County of Henrico, about three miles and a half above Harrowattocks," for the transportation of three persons into the Colony at his own expense; names of persons not found (Land Book I, page 492). (See Cox notes by Mrs. E.F. O'Gorman, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 38, pages 157-159.)

Posted to the Henrico County, Virginia Deed Forum by Regena Cogar, rlcogar@bellsouth.net, 22 September 2000: VA Patents 1, p. 403 Library of Virginia Digital Collection: Land Office Patents and Grants

William Cox 150 Exmd __________ To all to whome these presents shall come I Capt John West Esqr Governor &c. send &c. Now Know yee that I the said Capt John West Esqr doe with the consent of the Councell of State accordingly give and grant unto William Cox one hundred and fiftie acres of Land scituate lying and being in the County of Henrico about twoe miles & a halfe above Harroe Attocks West and by North upon the maine river Westerly upon the great swamp Easterly into the woods and Southerly towards [Harrow?] Attocks The said one hundred and fiftie acres of Land being due unto him the said William Cox by and for the transportacon of three persons into this Colony whose names are in the Records menconed under this pattent To have and to hold &c. dated the 29th November 1636 ut in aliis __________ Thomas [Bra_ston?] Richard Bird Richard [He__es?]

Note: Transcriber's comments are in brackets [ ]. For clarity, some contractions have been spelled out. Image format copyrighted by the Library of Virginia.

William, who died about 1656, also had 250 acres of land across the river at the mouth of Falling Creek obtained in partnership with Isaac Hutchins on the 1st of September 1642. These lands belonged on December 14, 1656, to "the orphans" (then meaning heirs, not minor children) of William Coxe. On that date Peter Lee acquired 126 acres called "Worricke" bounded on the southwest by a small run, at a place called London Bridge, which divided his land from land belonging to the orphans of William Coxe, bounded on the southeast by the main river and on the northeast by Isaac Hutchins. Isaac Hutchins also obtained his 378-acre grant of land in "Worricks" on the 14th of December 1656. It was lying next to land of Peter Lee, southeast on the main river and northeast to a place called "Porringers Spring." Isaac was probably the son of Robert Hutchins, the mariner, and brother to Elizabeth Coxe, wife of William Coxe. Isaac had other lands on the south side of the river near "Worricks," for on the 1st of September 1642, he bought 250 acres in partnership with William Coxe at the mouth of Falling Creek.

Isaac Hutchins probably came to Virginia about 1633 prior to the 16th of June 1637 when Captain Thomas Osborne was given credit for Isaac's headrights. Isaac married Cicely "Sisly" and had one child, a son Robert, who was mentioned in Isaac's will of February 23, 1656. In April 1714 the Henrico court concluded that Robert, son of Isaac, died under age and without issue, and thus the lands of Isaac reverted to his wife Cicely. She had married Henry Sherman after the death of Isaac. Her granddaughter, Mary Trent, married Richard Coxe, the grandson of William Coxe. Mary Trent and Richard Cox had a daughter Elizabeth Cox, born February 25, 1713, who about 1731 married Strangeman Hutchins, son of Nicholas Hutchins and Mary Watkins of Henrico County.

From Margaret L. Smith, 3209 Reba Drive, Houston, Texas, 77019, May 1998:

First Generation

William Coxe was born in 1598 in England, and was 12 years old when he came to Virginia in 1610. He arrived in the Godspeed on June 10, 1610, in the party of Thomas West, Third Lord D e La Warr. He may have been a brother of Elizabeth Coxe, daughter of Sir Henry Coxe of Broxb urn, Herfordshire, who was married to Robert West, brother of Lord De La Warr. When the must er was taken in February 1624/25, he was listed as William Coxe, age 26, at Elizabeth City, w ith Thomas Bouldinge. On Sept. 20, 1628, because he qualified as an "ancient planter" - tha t is, one who had been in the colony before April 1616, the time of departure of Sir Thomas D ale - he was granted a ten-year lease for 100 acres. This land granted to William Coxe, Plan ter, was located "within the precincts of Elizabeth City...bounded on the south by the main e [James] river."

On Nov. 29, 1636, William Coxe received a patent for 150 acres in Henrico County, for the tra nsportation of three persons into the colony. This tract was also located on the James River , further west, and was about 2 miles northwest of "Harroe Attocks" (Arrowhattocks). On Oct . 29, 1637, he received a patent for 150 more acres in the same location, for three more head rights.

William Coxe and his wife, Elizabeth, made at least one return trip to England, and in 1637 w ere claimed by Mathew Edloe as headrights. Mathew Edloe, his mother Alice Edloe, and siste r Hannah Boyes were all neighbors of William Coxe, owning property adjoining his in Henrico C ounty. Sometime before Dec. 14, 1656, William Coxe and his wife had both died, for on that d ate, Peter Lee patented 126 acres in Henrico County adjoining the land belonging to the "orph ans of William Coxe," and lying on the main (James) river and northeast of the land of Isaa c Hutchins. (There is an unreferenced family chart which shows that William Coxe's wife wa s Elizabeth Hutchins, and it also names their four children.)

The children of William and Elizabeth Coxe: •1. Thomas - inherited as "son and heir" a right to 250 acres sold on Sept. 1, 1642, by Matt hew Gough to William Cox and Isaac Hutchins, and assigned this interest to John Knowles on Au g. 1, 1668. •2. John [I] - married twice and had six children. He died in 1696. •3. Elizabeth - married Robert Porter. •4. Mary - married John Burton.

After the first generation, the name was spelled "Cox."

In 1611, four years after Newport's early explorations, Sir Thomas Dale left Jamestown to establish a settlement upriver. Relations with the Indians had steadily deteriorated since 1607, and Dale's company suffered constant attacks. The party finally came to a peninsula on the north side of the river, now Farrar's Island, where Dale established the colony's second settlement, "Henricus," known also as the "city" or "town" of "Henrico." In just four months the town grew to a fortified settlement. Frame houses lined three streets, and the men had built a wooden church, a brick foundation for a permanent church, storehouses, watchtowers, and huts.

Life in the New World was hard, but the English had high hopes that their settlements would add valuable minerals and raw materials to their economy, in addition to providing strategic military outposts. They also saw this land as a new frontier for spreading Christianity.

Virginia's economy was sharply transformed by the introduction in 1612 of new strains of mild tobacco by colonist John Rolfe. Rolfe's tobacco was shipped to England, and Virginia's economy soon began to prosper.

In 1614, peace with the Indians was temporarily established, following Rolfe's marriage to Powhatan's daughter, Pocahontas, who had converted to Christianity and been baptized "Rebecca."

GEDCOM Note
Added Note: from http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cox-509
William arrived in Virginia on June 10, 1610 on the ship 'Godspeed'. William was in the party of Thomas WEST, Third Lord De La WARR. he may have been a brother of Elizabeth COXE, daughter of Sir Henry COXE, of Broxburn, Herfordshire, who was married to Robert WEST, brother of Lord De La WARR.

When the muster was taken in Feb. 1624/25, he was listed as William COXE, age 26, at Elizabeth City, with Thomas BOULDINGE. On Sept 20, 1628, because he qualified as an "ancient planter," ie, one who had been in the colony before April 1616, the time of departure of Sir Thomas DALE, he was granted a ten year lease for 100 acres. This land was granted to William COXE, Planter, and was located "with in the precincts of Elizabeth City,..bounded on the south by the maine (James) river." (Order of First Families of Virginia, Adventures of Purse and Person, pp 211-212; Nell Marion Nugent, Cavaliers and Pioneer, P.12: Virginia Patent Book 1, P.89; John Frederick Dorman ed., The Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 15, p. 163; West-Central Kentucky family Research Association, Kentucky Family Records, Vol. II, p. 61-64. 69-71. According to Walter Lee Hopkins, HOPKINS OF VIRGINIA and RELATED FAMILIES. p. 114, Nell Marion Nugent, CAVALIERS AND PIONEERS, P. 52, 74: Virginia Patent Book 1, P. 403, 492. "On Nov 29 , 1636, William COXE received a patent for 150 acres in Henrico Co., VA, for the transportation of three persons into the Colony. This tract was also located on the James River, further west, and was about 2 1/2 miles northwest of "Harroe Attocks" (Arrowhattocks). On Oct. 29 , 1637, he received a patent for 150 more acres in the same location for three more headrights." Coxe and his wife Elizabeth returned to England at least once. In 1637 they were claimed by Mathew EDLOE as headrights. Mathew EDLOE, his mother, Alice EDLOE, and sister, Hannah BOYES were all neighbors of William COXE, owning property adjoining his in Henrico Co VA. Sometime before Dec 14, 1665, both COXE and his wife died, for on that date Peter LEE patented 126 acres in Henrico Co VA adjoining the land belonging to the "orphans of William COXE, " and lying on the main (James)river and northeast of the land of Isaac HUTCHINS. According to information sent by Margaret Smith, "There is an unreferenced family chart which shows that William's wife was Elizabeth HUTCHINS and it also names their four children. (Order of First Families of Virginia, Adventures of Purse and Person, p 212. John Frederick Dorman, ed., The Virginia Genealogist, Vol 15. P. 164.) William COXE was known as King "of Arrowhattoncks" in Henrico Co., VA he was dead by Dec 14 , 1656. His wife Elizabeth HUTCHINS who may have married (2) William ELAM. This information supplied by Beth Sloan: esS934310487@ Shows the early arrival of William Coxe in North America.

WILLIAM CAME OVER TO AMERICA ON THE GODSPEED WHEN HE WAS TWELVE YEARS OLD AT THE AGE OF 12, JUNE 10, 1610. HE WAS LISTED AS LIVING WITH THOMAS BOULDINGE IN ELIZABETH CITY, VA. SOME YEARS LATER HE WAS GRANTED A LEASE ON 100 ACRES, LATER RECEIVED A PATENT OF 150 ACRES, AND STILL LATER RECEIVED ANOTHER 150 ACRES.

GEDCOM Note
Perhaps we will never fully appreciate or understand the fear, excitement, and wonder that young William Coxe must have felt as he saw for the first time the wild coast of North America. He had survived a spring crossing of the Atlantic to land in the New World, and the unexplored forests surrounding the tiny colony of Virginia stretched inland beyond his sight. He stepped ashore on the only English outpost of an unknown continent where he would spend the rest of his life carving a place in a new society that would reward his abilities and initiative, if he survived. At the time, he was simply an indentured child servant with little control over his life and none of the established society he must have know in England.

When he and the rest of the relief convoy arrived at Jamestown that June day in 1610, the colony's survivors had already abandoned the place and boarded ship to leave it, perhaps forever. The site of the first "successful" English settlement in North America, was only in its third year of life, and survival was very uncertain. Eventually thousands of other Virginia colonists would succumb to massacre, disease, and homesickness that led to despair, but William survived and thrived, finished his indenture, acquired land, became a planter, married, and raised a family. Four hundred years later he is looked upon as the progenitor of more than a dozen generations of descendants that must number in the thousands.

William Coxe was born in 1598 in southeast England at Broxburn, Hertfordshire. This was described by John Marius Wilson in 1872 as "a village, a township, and a parish in the Ware district on the the New River" and to the south was London. Later as a colonist in Virginia William married Elizabeth Hutchins and raised a family of at least four children before he died by 14 Dec. 1656.

Children of William and Elizabeth (Thomas and John are affirmed by documents, but the two daughters are less secure): - Thomas Cox (the oldest son, b. in Henrico Co., Va.; d. New Kent Co., Va.; married Elizabeth). - John Cox (b. ca. 1640 in Henrico Co., Va.; d. before 1 Feb. 1696/97 in Henrico Co., Va. - see link below); - Mary Cox (married John Burton); - Elizabeth Cox (married Robert Porter);

Young William's arrival and possible family connections are reported in "Adventurers of Purse and Person" (pgs. 211-216) which based some of its information on the "muster" list from Jamestown taken in 1625:

"William Coxe came to Virginia at the age of 12 in the Godspeede, which arrived 10 June, 1610 with the party of Thomas West, Third Lord De La Warr. The fact that Lord De La Warr's brother, Robert West, married Elizabeth Coxe, daughter of Sir Henry Coxe of Broxburn, Hertfordshire, suggests that William Coxe may have been of that family. When the muster was taken in Feb. 1624/25, he was listed with Thomas Bouldinge at Elizabeth City. He was granted a lease for ten years, 20 Sept. 1628, for 100 acres "within the precincts of Elizabeth City," bounded on the south by the maine (James) river, on the east by Dictoris Christmas, planter, and Christopher Calthropp, Gent."

There has been some question of whether William arrived on the Godspeed in 1610. Other than William's record, there is no other source unearthed that records this voyage. The Godspeed was one of the three ships that made the Atlantic crossing in 1606-7 to found the colony, and author Catherine C. Swormstedt notes there is record of it returning to England in June 1607 along with the smaller ship Susan Constant under the command Christopher Newport who gave a report to the company about the colony's progress. The Susan Constant later went into service as a merchantman along the English coast, but no other record of the Godspeed has been found ("Four Lives of the Godspeed," "Elks Magazine" March 2009). However, shipping records of the time are very spotty, and the complete history of most ships is not know from this period. So another voyage to Jamestown with the relief squadron in 1610 is not contradicted by any source, and it is quite possible the ship was used again by the company in 1610.

In those early decades on the coast, the danger from attack by local tribes was very real. William's arrival in 1610 came right at the end of the "starving time" siege of Jamestown which stretched through the winter and spring of 1609-10. The population was shut up in the fort with dwindling food, and many died. "Jamestown Rediscovery" reports there were only 60 of the original 214 settlers at Jamestown who survived, and some 30 others were in the countryside around it. When June began with no help on the horizon, the survivors decided to bury the cannon and armor and abandon the town. They boarded the ships they had and began sailing down the James River heading back to England when news reached them that help was on the way. It was only the timely arrival of the new governor, Lord De La Ware, and his supply ships (including the Godspeede with William aboard) that restored the colonists to the fort and the colony was resurrected. "Although the suffering did not totally end at Jamestown for decades, some years of peace and prosperity followed the wedding of Pocahontas, the favored daughter of the Algonquian chief Powhatan, to tobacco entrepreneur John Rolfe."

The conflict between the English and the tribes was much the fault of the colonial authorities who had sent troops into the countryside to demand food from the indiginous population. The rough treatment had led to the tribal assault on the town some dozen tears later.

An uneasy period followed after the siege, but the relative calm was punctuated with spasms of violence and reprisal. In fact, on a trading expedition to the Potomac River in 1613, Captain Samuel Argall kidnapped Pocahontas and brought her to Jamestown, hoping her father, Chief Powhatan, would return stolen English settlers, tools and weapons. When her father did not fully comply, Pocahontas was sent to the nearby Henrico settlement under the care of the Reverend Alexander Whitaker.

While she was held captive she converted to Christianity and took the name Rebecca. She chose to remain with the English after she was freed, and thus met Rolfe who she married and bore a son, Thomas Rolfe. William would have been on hand to hear about their wedding in April 1614, and perhaps he attended the festivities held for the couple. But even this famed woman suffered like so many others of a life cut short by sudden illness, and she died at the age of 22 in 1617.

The "Great Migration" period from 1618 to 1623 saw the population of Jamestown rise from 400 to several thousand. One wonders if these were the desperate poor or foolhardy adventurers who took such risks with their lives. Perhaps they had no choice or were duped into making the voyage without know the tru situation in the colony. It is believed more than 4,000 colonists, nearly all men, arrived in this period, but most died of the ubiquitous dangers of disease, starvation, and attack (Crandell Shiftlett, "Virtual Jamestown").

Preceded by a period of relative calm, the secuirty of the colony was shattered the morning 22 March 1622 when the Powhatan Confederacy launched a coordinated attack on various settlements around Jamestown (which was saved by an Indian youth who warned the town in time to close their gates). The Algonquins had arrived in the streets of several settlements around Jamestown, and they carried the usual goods for trade, but at a given signal they struck with whatever weapons were at hand. Some 347 colonial men, women, and children are recorded as killed in the attack, a number equal to about a quarter of the population of Jamestown itself. The assault against the English was not enough to dislodge the colony, and of course, reprisals from the settlers soon followed. A low level of warfare persisted for the next decade.

By December 1622 the population was in dire need of food due to the conflicts that had disrupted farming. However, the Abigail arrived with no food but rather an infectious load of passengers; plague and starvation eventually reduced the colony to 500 people. The colonists held out hope for the arrival of the Seaflower which could have brought them relief, but the vessel blew up in an accident.

Perhaps it was the desperate situation that led to a horrific act by the colonists to eliminate their enemies on March 18, 1623. This was the mass poisoning of some 200 Algonquins who were given tainted liquor at a toast during a mass meeting in celebration of peace negotiations by Captain William Tucker. The poison in their drink was supplied by Dr. John Potts, and the result was nearly instant death, followed by the slaughter of another 50 who had not imbibed.

Prospects improved in 1624 when the Virginia Company went bankrupt and lost its charter for the colony which became a royal colony with a governor and council appointed by the King to oversea development. Since the governor was on site, shipments of supplies and support would become much more regular. From 1625 onward something like 1,000 indentured servants arrived each year through 1640. Some were orphans, others were criminals, and still others were the poor, but all shared bleak prospects in the rigid society of England. In contrast, the offer of land and advancement in the colonies as well training in a trade made the constraints of becoming an indentured servant an acceptable option.

The 1625 "muster" described above which included William Coxe was not just a census but also meant to count the weapons each household possessed since the local situation could become violent at any moment. Thus it was that Thomas Bouldinge, another immigrant of 1610 to whom William had been indentured at some point, gave a list of the arms which included 6 pounds of gunpowder, 200 pounds of lead, 3 firearms listed as "pieces," a suit of mail, and three swords. The food count listed 600 dry fish which could have been consumed if there were another siege. There was also a "pallizado" which was the term for a palisade, a wall around part of the property (likely the farmhouse and barn) as a defensive measure during an attack.

William's period of servitude had ended by the date of the muster, but he still lived in the household of his former master Thomas Bouldinge for whom he must have been employed. Other males in the household were William Bouldinge, a son "borne in Virginia," and Richard Dale, aged 20, and transported aboard the Jacob in 1624. He too must have been indentured.

To establish an English colony in the New World after two failed attempts in the reign of Elizabeth, King James authorized the charter of the London Company to establish a colony that would bring goods and prestige to England in competition with the Spanish, French, and Dutch. To encourage colonists, the company offered free passage and 50 acres of land (called a headright). For each indentured servant whose cost of transport was covered, the master would be given 50 acres, and after the years of indenture were completed, the freed servant was to be given a new suit of clothes and tools from the former master, and 50 acres from the colony government. Thus the colony's population was expanded, and those who could bring over others could build their estates.

An example of this can be seen in a neighbor of William, Matthew Edlow who brought over 24 servants and gained 1,200 acres for the effort. These people were needed to keep the colony populated since by 1624, only 3,400 of the 6,000 early settlers had survived. With such uncertainty in their lives, the colonists had demanded more control of the colony in 1619 and established an elected legislature, the House of Burgesses. That same year African workers were first brought in to provided manpower as indentured servants, and it was not until 1654 that slavery was codified in a lawsuit (John Casor was ruled a slave rather than an indentured servant and returned to his master, Anthony Johnson, a free black man who had been one of the original 20 black indentured servants and had finished his indenture by 1623).

It was in the period after the crown assumed control that William's prospects improved enough for him to acquire land as a free man. His transactions in the colony's Patent Books provide some of the few details we know of his later life. The details can be found in "Cavaliers and Pioneers, Volume 1, 1623-1666," complied by Nell Marion Nugent.

William's land was originally located in the Elizabeth City area along the James River. In 1634 it became Elizabeth River Shire, one of the eight shires created in the Virginia Colony by order of the King. In 1636, the area was further subdivided, and only the portion north of the harbor of Hampton Roads became known as Elizabeth City Shire. It was renamed Elizabeth City County a short time later. However, it appears that the boundary change placed William's property in Henrico County where he is later listed. These records show, among other things, that William brought over three men to the colony which in turn granted him 150 acres.

From Patent Book 1, Part 1:

"William Cox, of Eliz. Citty, Planter, 100 acres within said precincts, abutting east on land of Dictoris Christmas, Planter, extending towards ground now graunted to Christopher Calthropp, Gent., south on the maine rivr, &c. Lease as above. 20 Sept, 1628 page 89" (page 12).

"William Cox, 150 acres, Henrico Co., 29 Nov. 1636, page 503. Aboute 2 1/2 miles above Harroe Attocks, west by north upon the maine river (James River), westerly upon the great swamp, easterly into the woods and southerly towards Harrow Attocks. Due for transportation of 3 person: Thomas Braxston, Richard Bird, Richard Hewes. Same patent listed Patent Book, Part 2, Page 74, but persons transported were not named" (page 5). This same transaction is repeated in Patent Book 1, Part 2 but without the named of the three men.

"Alice Edloe, 100 acres, Henrico Co., 14 July 1637, page 441. Lying 2 1/2 miles above Harroe Attocks towards the falls on the same side of the River in a Swamp betwixt land belonging to William Coxe & 350 acres graunted to said Alice, bounded west by south upon the maine river, east by north into the maine woods through said Swamp, beginning 12 feet on that side of a Creek towards land of said Coxe, running up the river & abutting her own land. Transportation of 2 persons: John Williams, William Attaway" (page 61).

From Patent Book 1, part 2:

"Robert Cradock (Craddock), 300 acres, Henrico Co., 29 May, 1638, page 537. Northerly on a little creek towards Lilley Valley upon land of William Cox & Isaac Hutchins & south upon land of John Davis. Transportation of 6 persons (not named)" (page 84).

"Thomas Ransha, 300 acres, Warwick Co., Aug. 25, 1642, page 813. Being a neck of land called Harwoods Neck, butting upon the Deepe Creek, near land of William Coxe, to Stokes Creek, dividing this from land of Christopher Boyce. 150 acres due by purchase of patent from John Garrett & the other for transportation of 3 persons: Richard Puse, Georg Sutton, Michaell Slowly" (page 133).

"Cronelius de Hull, Oct. 31, 1642, page 8442. 501 acres known as Lilley Valley, beginning next to Mrs. Edlows Swamp, near his own land & southeast upon John Davis, southwest to the river, ending neare a place called the Seaven - , 250 acres of this land was granted to William Cox in 1637. Transportation of 10 persons: Thomas Blackston, Richard Bird, Richard Hewes, James Dupen, Mary Howtree, Jon. Dodd, Robert Hayes, Samll. Waterhowse, Waltr. Jones, Wm. Thomas" (page 148).

The date of Wiliam's death is not recorded, but the land record that below shows that he had died by Dec. 1656 since it refers to his "orphan" children. As his oldest son was an adult by this time, the term seems to mean "heirs." Isack Hutchings, whom researchers believe was William's brother-in-law, is also involved in the record suggesting how they met or perhaps an indication that the families stayed close after the marriage and bought land in the same area for mutual support and shared labor.

"Peeter Lee, 126 acres, Henrico Co., known by the name of Worricke, 14 Dec. 1656, page 44 (67). Beginning at a small run & a place called London Bridge which divides it from land belonging to the Orphans of William Cox, southeast on the main river & northeast on Isack Hutchings. Transportation of 3 persons (not named)" (page 335).

The last record for William actually occurs in Aug. 1, 1668 when his oldest son Thomas Cox sold some land he inherited at Falling Creek to John Knowles. In fact, the sale refers back to when the property was purchased in a partnership of William with his brother-in-law Isack on Sept. 1, 1642 from Matthew Gough.

Concerning Isaac Hutchins, researcher Janet Ariciu reports that "Isaac Hutchins also obtained his 378-acre grant of land in 'Worricks' on the 14th of December 1656. It was lying next to land of Peter Lee, southeast on the main river and northeast to a place called 'Porringers Spring.' Isaac was probably the son of Robert Hutchins, the mariner, and brother to Elizabeth Coxe, wife of William Coxe. Isaac had other lands on the south side of the river near 'Worricks,' for on the 1st of September 1642, he bought 250 acres in partnership with William Coxe at the mouth of Falling Creek.

"Isaac Hutchins probably came to Virginia about 1633 prior to the 16th of June 1637 when Captain Thomas Osborne was given credit for Isaac's headrights. Isaac married Cicely "Sisly" and had one child, a son Robert, who was mentioned in Isaac's will of February 23, 1656. In April 1714 the Henrico court concluded that Robert, son of Isaac, died under age and without issue, and thus the lands of Isaac reverted to his wife Cicely. She had married Henry Sherman after the death of Isaac. Her granddaughter, Mary Trent, married Richard Coxe, the grandson of William Coxe. Mary Trent and Richard Cox had a daughter Elizabeth Cox, born February 25, 1713, who about 1731 married Strangeman Hutchins, son of Nicholas Hutchins and Mary Watkins of Henrico County."

Thus seems to end what we know of the story of William Coxe. However, there are some other instances of the name Wiiliam Cox appearing in Jamestown records as having been brought over in the 1630s and thus earning 50 acres for the man who paid for his passage. Rather than identifying the man as a different person, some researchers suggest that William returned to England and then allowed one of his neighbors to bring him back so it earned the man more land. This is possible but seems unlikely to risk one's life on the Atlantic for a neighbor's gain (unless there money that exchanged hands). It could have been that William returned to England to find a wife since European females were scarce in the colony, and thus he could have worked a deal with one of his neighbors. In fact, colonial administrators had shipped over 90 women in 1619 to become wives of colonists. The men had to pay for their passage which was set at "one hundredth and fiftie [pounds] of the best leafe Tobacco." Whatever the case, those records of this William appear below, and further research might reveal the details of who this William was.

Patent Book 1, Part 1:

"Mathew Edloe (Edlowe), son & heir to Matthew Edloe, late of Virginia, decs., 1,200 acres upon the north side of James River over against the Upper Chippokes Creek, southwest upon the maine river & northeast into the woods towards Danceing point, 12 July 1637, page 435. Due in right of 24 servants transported at the costs of his father: Math Edlow, Hugh Tyder, Wm. Deame, Edwd Tompson, Wm. Cox, Eliz. Jax (Jux - This may be intended for "ux" - wife), Griff. Roberts, Fr. Roberts, John Licheston, Peter Homes, Evans Kemp, Jon Buston, Tho. Crosby, Rand. Heyward, Hen. Croft, Tho. Morris, Tho. Rogers, Step. Pettis, Chri. Jomes, Wm. Marsten, Jon Bethone, Tho Martin, Jon. Seaton, Geo. Pricklove" (pg. 59-60).

Book 1, Part 2;

"Nathaniell Floyd, 850 acres, Isle of Wight Co., 20 Nov. 1637, page 498. 600 acres being a neck about 4 miles up the maine creek running up the baye of Warwicksquike, the said neck lying between 2 creeks, &c. 250 acres up towards the head of the maine creek over small creeks or brookes. Transportation of 17 persons: Christ. Denn, Robert Leaderd, Wm. Moyses, Ambrose Proctor, Tho. Weare, Robert Barton, Rober Joyce, Mathew Tomlin, Jon Cox, Rich Redock, David Hopkins, Flug. Floyd, Wm. Cox, Katherin Folder, Rich. Carter, Jon. Gillett, Christ. Thomas" (pg. 61).

"Thomas Hughes, 400 acres, Charles River Co., Sept. 28, 1643, page 907. Upon Tymber Neck creek on the north side of said river adjoining Mr. Richard Richards. Transportation of 8 persons: Georg Burford, Senr., Geo Burford, Junr., William Cox, Mary Cox, John Shell, Tho. Tapp, Wm. Thorpe" (pg 147).

Source: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=117594487

Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy: Nov 12 2017, 5:41:43 UTC
---

Elizabeth Hutchins Cox:

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/132347435/elizabeth-cox:
zabeth Hutchins was born on 3 Aug 1612 in Middlesex, Greater London, England. She was baptized on 8 Nov 1612 in the St Leonard, Shoreditch Parish in Middlesex County in Hackney Borough in England according to the parish records. Elizabeth was the daughter of Robert Hutchins (1574-1648) and Mary (Farley) Hutchins (1579-1640).

Elizabeth's family came to Virginia in 1633. Could have come before but no records found before 1633.

Elizabeth married William Cox (1598-1656) in Henrico County, Virginia in 1633. He was the son of John Cox (1567-1607) and Alice (Walsheer) Cox (1556-1608).

William and Elizabeth Cox were the parents of the following known children: Elizabeth Cox, Henry Cox, Mary Catherine Cox, John Cox and Thomas Cox. They owned hundreds of acres of land in Henrico County, Virginia colony.

William Cox came to Virginia from England at the age of
12 aboard the Godspeed on June 10, 1610. When the
muster was taken in February of 1624, he was listed as
living with Thomas Bouldinge in Elizabeth City. Some
four years later, William was granted a ten year lease on
100 acres "within the precincts of Elizabeth City,"
bounded on the south by the James River. On November
29, 1636, William received a patent of 150 acres in
Henrico County about two and one-half miles above
Arrowhattocks. Another 150 acres in the same location
was granted to him one month and one year later in the
vicinity of Falling Creek. William Coxe is listed among the
early records of Virginia as an "ancient planter" and in a
muster of the inhabitants of Elizabeth Cittie, taken in
January-February 1624/25 by Thomas Bouldinge.

There must have been at least one return trip to England
because Matthew Edloe, in a patent dated July 12, 1637,
claimed William Cox wife, Elizabeth, as two of his
headrights. He may have served as Burgess from Henrico
County in 1646. Per this website:
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/b/r/u/Albert-
M-Bruns/GENE5-0001.html
There are records on ancestry.com that he made a few
trips back to Virginia in 1624, 1637 and 1643.
A land grant of 150 to William Cox, Oct. 29, 1637 in
Henrico County, about 2 miles above Harrow Attocks,
was granted for transportation of three persons, one of
which was Richard Byrd. William Cox appears to have
purchased additional land adjoining this patent and
owned land on both sides of the James River: Coxendale
on one side, and Dutch Gap on the other side. William
Cox acquired by lease 100 acres of land in Elizabbeth City
on Sept. 20, 1624.

William Cox died before 1656, for on Dec. 14, 1656,
Peter Lee was granted 126 acres of land in Henrico
County which adjoined "the land belonging to the
orphans of William Cox." Orphans of William appear to
have been Thomas Cox and John Cox."

William Cox died in Henrico County, Virginia colony, USA
- not sure about the year or his burial. From land
records, he died before Dec. 14, 1656.

Elizabeth (Hutchins) Cox died on 14 Dec 1665 in Henrico County, Virginia, United States.

zabeth Hutchins was born on 3 Aug 1612 in Middlesex, Greater London, England. She was baptized on 8 Nov 1612 in the St Leonard, Shoreditch Parish in Middlesex County in Hackney Borough in England according to the parish records. Elizabeth was the daughter of Robert Hutchins (1574-1648) and Mary (Farley) Hutchins (1579-1640).

Elizabeth's family came to Virginia in 1633. Could have come before but no records found before 1633.

Elizabeth married William Cox (1598-1656) in Henrico County, Virginia in 1633. He was the son of John Cox (1567-1607) and Alice (Walsheer) Cox (1556-1608).

William and Elizabeth Cox were the parents of the following known children: Elizabeth Cox, Henry Cox, Mary Catherine Cox, John Cox and Thomas Cox. They owned hundreds of acres of land in Henrico County, Virginia colony.

William Cox came to Virginia from England at the age of
12 aboard the Godspeed on June 10, 1610. When the
muster was taken in February of 1624, he was listed as
living with Thomas Bouldinge in Elizabeth City. Some
four years later, William was granted a ten year lease on
100 acres "within the precincts of Elizabeth City,"
bounded on the south by the James River. On November
29, 1636, William received a patent of 150 acres in
Henrico County about two and one-half miles above
Arrowhattocks. Another 150 acres in the same location
was granted to him one month and one year later in the
vicinity of Falling Creek. William Coxe is listed among the
early records of Virginia as an "ancient planter" and in a
muster of the inhabitants of Elizabeth Cittie, taken in
January-February 1624/25 by Thomas Bouldinge.

There must have been at least one return trip to England
because Matthew Edloe, in a patent dated July 12, 1637,
claimed William Cox wife, Elizabeth, as two of his
headrights. He may have served as Burgess from Henrico
County in 1646. Per this website:
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/b/r/u/Albert-
M-Bruns/GENE5-0001.html
There are records on ancestry.com that he made a few
trips back to Virginia in 1624, 1637 and 1643.
A land grant of 150 to William Cox, Oct. 29, 1637 in
Henrico County, about 2 miles above Harrow Attocks,
was granted for transportation of three persons, one of
which was Richard Byrd. William Cox appears to have
purchased additional land adjoining this patent and
owned land on both sides of the James River: Coxendale
on one side, and Dutch Gap on the other side. William
Cox acquired by lease 100 acres of land in Elizabbeth City
on Sept. 20, 1624.

William Cox died before 1656, for on Dec. 14, 1656,
Peter Lee was granted 126 acres of land in Henrico
County which adjoined "the land belonging to the
orphans of William Cox." Orphans of William appear to
have been Thomas Cox and John Cox."

William Cox died in Henrico County, Virginia colony, USA
- not sure about the year or his burial. From land
records, he died before Dec. 14, 1656.

Elizabeth (Hutchins) Cox died on 14 Dec 1665 in Henrico County, Virginia, United States.

zabeth Hutchins was born on 3 Aug 1612 in Middlesex, Greater London, England. She was baptized on 8 Nov 1612 in the St Leonard, Shoreditch Parish in Middlesex County in Hackney Borough in England according to the parish records. Elizabeth was the daughter of Robert Hutchins (1574-1648) and Mary (Farley) Hutchins (1579-1640).

Elizabeth's family came to Virginia in 1633. Could have come before but no records found before 1633.

Elizabeth married William Cox (1598-1656) in Henrico County, Virginia in 1633. He was the son of John Cox (1567-1607) and Alice (Walsheer) Cox (1556-1608).

William and Elizabeth Cox were the parents of the following known children: Elizabeth Cox, Henry Cox, Mary Catherine Cox, John Cox and Thomas Cox. They owned hundreds of acres of land in Henrico County, Virginia colony.

William Cox came to Virginia from England at the age of
12 aboard the Godspeed on June 10, 1610. When the
muster was taken in February of 1624, he was listed as
living with Thomas Bouldinge in Elizabeth City. Some
four years later, William was granted a ten year lease on
100 acres "within the precincts of Elizabeth City,"
bounded on the south by the James River. On November
29, 1636, William received a patent of 150 acres in
Henrico County about two and one-half miles above
Arrowhattocks. Another 150 acres in the same location
was granted to him one month and one year later in the
vicinity of Falling Creek. William Coxe is listed among the
early records of Virginia as an "ancient planter" and in a
muster of the inhabitants of Elizabeth Cittie, taken in
January-February 1624/25 by Thomas Bouldinge.

There must have been at least one return trip to England
because Matthew Edloe, in a patent dated July 12, 1637,
claimed William Cox wife, Elizabeth, as two of his
headrights. He may have served as Burgess from Henrico
County in 1646. Per this website:
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/b/r/u/Albert-
M-Bruns/GENE5-0001.html
There are records on ancestry.com that he made a few
trips back to Virginia in 1624, 1637 and 1643.
A land grant of 150 to William Cox, Oct. 29, 1637 in
Henrico County, about 2 miles above Harrow Attocks,
was granted for transportation of three persons, one of
which was Richard Byrd. William Cox appears to have
purchased additional land adjoining this patent and
owned land on both sides of the James River: Coxendale
on one side, and Dutch Gap on the other side. William
Cox acquired by lease 100 acres of land in Elizabbeth City
on Sept. 20, 1624.

William Cox died before 1656, for on Dec. 14, 1656,
Peter Lee was granted 126 acres of land in Henrico
County which adjoined "the land belonging to the
orphans of William Cox." Orphans of William appear to
have been Thomas Cox and John Cox."

William Cox died in Henrico County, Virginia colony, USA
- not sure about the year or his burial. From land
records, he died before Dec. 14, 1656.

Elizabeth (Hutchins) Cox died on 14 Dec 1665 in Henrico County, Virginia, United States.

zabeth Hutchins was born on 3 Aug 1612 in Middlesex, Greater London, England. She was baptized on 8 Nov 1612 in the St Leonard, Shoreditch Parish in Middlesex County in Hackney Borough in England according to the parish records. Elizabeth was the daughter of Robert Hutchins (1574-1648) and Mary (Farley) Hutchins (1579-1640).

Elizabeth's family came to Virginia in 1633. Could have come before but no records found before 1633.

Elizabeth married William Cox (1598-1656) in Henrico County, Virginia in 1633. He was the son of John Cox (1567-1607) and Alice (Walsheer) Cox (1556-1608).

William and Elizabeth Cox were the parents of the following known children: Elizabeth Cox, Henry Cox, Mary Catherine Cox, John Cox and Thomas Cox. They owned hundreds of acres of land in Henrico County, Virginia colony.

William Cox came to Virginia from England at the age of
12 aboard the Godspeed on June 10, 1610. When the
muster was taken in February of 1624, he was listed as
living with Thomas Bouldinge in Elizabeth City. Some
four years later, William was granted a ten year lease on
100 acres "within the precincts of Elizabeth City,"
bounded on the south by the James River. On November
29, 1636, William received a patent of 150 acres in
Henrico County about two and one-half miles above
Arrowhattocks. Another 150 acres in the same location
was granted to him one month and one year later in the
vicinity of Falling Creek. William Coxe is listed among the
early records of Virginia as an "ancient planter" and in a
muster of the inhabitants of Elizabeth Cittie, taken in
January-February 1624/25 by Thomas Bouldinge.

There must have been at least one return trip to England
because Matthew Edloe, in a patent dated July 12, 1637,
claimed William Cox wife, Elizabeth, as two of his
headrights. He may have served as Burgess from Henrico
County in 1646. Per this website:
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/b/r/u/Albert-
M-Bruns/GENE5-0001.html
There are records on ancestry.com that he made a few
trips back to Virginia in 1624, 1637 and 1643.
A land grant of 150 to William Cox, Oct. 29, 1637 in
Henrico County, about 2 miles above Harrow Attocks,
was granted for transportation of three persons, one of
which was Richard Byrd. William Cox appears to have
purchased additional land adjoining this patent and
owned land on both sides of the James River: Coxendale
on one side, and Dutch Gap on the other side. William
Cox acquired by lease 100 acres of land in Elizabbeth City
on Sept. 20, 1624.

William Cox died before 1656, for on Dec. 14, 1656,
Peter Lee was granted 126 acres of land in Henrico
County which adjoined "the land belonging to the
orphans of William Cox." Orphans of William appear to
have been Thomas Cox and John Cox."

William Cox died in Henrico County, Virginia colony, USA
- not sure about the year or his burial. From land
records, he died before Dec. 14, 1656.

Elizabeth (Hutchins) Cox died on 14 Dec 1665 in Henrico County, Virginia, United States.