Ansigisel de Metz, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia

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Ansigisel de Metz, maire du palais d'Austrasie

Also Known As: "Ansigisel", "Ansigue", "Anchises", "Ansegus", "Ansegisel", "Anseguis", "Anségisel", "Ansgise", "Ansigise", "Ansigisen", "Ansegise", "Ansegisel Arnulfien", "Anségisel de Metz", "Arnulfing", "Aldegisel de Neustrie / Ansigisel de Metz", "maire du palais d'Austrasie", "Hausmeier von Aust..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France
Death: Died in Siegburg, Cologne, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Place of Burial: Saint Begga's Collegiate Church (Andenne Monastery), Andenne, Walloon Region, Belgium
Immediate Family:

Son of Saint Arnoul, bishop of Metz; Arnoud de METZ; Saint Dode of Metz and <private> de Schelde
Husband of <private> Begga and Saint Beggue of Austrasia
Father of Pepin II d'Héristal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia; Saint Clotilda; Valtrude d'Orléans and Unknown Mother of Théodéric III's Children
Brother of Saint Chlodulf (Cloud), Bishop of Metz; Basine Sainte de Thurgovie; Walechise, comte de Verdun and Martin de Metz

Occupation: Vir inlustris, Dux under King Sigbert III of Austrasia, Domesticus to King Siegbert III of Austrasia, Mayor of the Palace of Austasia 602-685, Duke of Brabant, Comte de Metz, Herttua, Frankische Hofmeijer, Autorité sous Sigebert 3 et Childeric 2
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Ansigisel de Metz, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia

Ansegisel. He was a Vir inlustris, and domesticus (632-638) for Siegebert III of Austrasia. There is no contemporary evidence that he was Mayor of the Palace.

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From the English Wikipedia page on Ansegisel:

Ansegisel (also Ansgise) (ca 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

He married sometime after 639 to Saint Begga, the daughter of Pepin of Landen. They had the following children:

1. Pippin II (635 or 640-December 16, 714), mayor of the palace of Austrasia

2. Possibly Clotilda of Heristal (650-699), married King Theodoric III of Neustria

Sources

Les ancêtres de Charlemagne, 1989, Christian Settipani

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From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Merovingian Nobility:

ANSEGISEL ([612]-killed [662]).

The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names (in order) "duos filios Anschisum et Chlodolfum" as sons of Arnulf "iuventutis suæ tempore ex legitimi matrimonii copula" but does not name their mother[65]. The Vita Chrodegangi Episcopi Mettensis; names "Anchisæ" as second son of "Arnulfum sanctum"[66].

“…necnon et domesticorum Flodulfi, Ansigisili, Bettelini, Gariberti” consented to a donation to the monastery of Stabulo and Malmédy by King Sigebert III in a charter dated to [648][67]. "Childericus rex Francorum, Emnehildis et Bilihildis…reginæ…Gundoino duce et Hodone domestico" confirmed the property of the monastery of Stablo and Malmedy on the advice of "Grimoaldo, Fulcoaldo, Adregisilo, Bobone ducibus, Chlodulfo, Ansegisilo, Gariberto domesticis" by charter dated 6 Sep 667[68], although the presence of "Grimoaldo" in the document ten years after the attested death of the only known Duke Grimoald suggests that the document may have been subject to some alteration.

He was killed by a nobleman Gundoen[69].

m ([643/44]) BEGGA, daughter of PEPIN [I] "l'Ancien" or "de Landen", maior domus of King Clotaire II & his wife Itta --- (-693).

The Cronica Hohenburgensis names "huius soror [beata Gerdrudis] Begga" as wife of "Angiso sancti Arnulfi filio"[70]. Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis names "Pippinus…principes Francorum…sanctæ Beggæ matris eius"[71]. She founded the Abbey of Andenne, near Namur, 691 with nuns from the Abbey of Nivelle. The Annales Xantenses record the death in 698 of "Sancta Begga mater Pippini ducis"[72]. Ansegisel & his wife had [two] children:

a) PEPIN [II] "le Gros" or "d'Herstal" ([645]-Jupille, near Liège 16 Dec 714, bur Metz, basilique de Saint-Arnoul). The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names "Anschisus" as father of "Pippinum"[73].

"Pippinus filius Ansegisili quondam necnon…matrone mea Plectrudis" donated property to the church of St Arnulf at Metz by charter dated 20 Feb 691[74].  He defeated his adversaries at Tertry, Somme in Jun 687 before becoming maior domus of Austrasia in [688/90]. 

b) [CHROTHECHILDIS [Rotilde] [Doda] (-692 or after).

Settipani approves the theory of Maurice Chaume according to which the wife of King Theoderic III was the daughter of Ansegisel[75]. However, this does not appear to be directly supported by primary source evidence.

"Theudericus rex Francorum" donated property at the request of "regine nostre Chrodochilde…et…Berchario maiorem domos nostre" to the abbey of St Denis by charter dated 30 Oct 688[76]. "Chrotechildis regina" is named mother of King Clovis III in the Cartulaire of Saint-Bertin[77]. She was regent for her son King Chlodovech III until 692. The epitaph of King Theoderic III and his wife bore the inscription "rex Theodericus…cum coniuge Doda", assumed to be another name by which Rotilde was known[78].

m THEODERIC III King of the Franks in Neustria, son of CLOVIS II King of the Franks in Neustria & his wife Bathildis --- ([651]-[2 Sep 690/12 Apr 691], bur Arras, basilique Saint-Vaast).]

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Austrasisk prins. Död 685. Dödsorsak: Mördad?. Ansegisel, austrasisk prins, mördad/död 685. Son till den mäktige biskop Arnulf av Metz. Far till Pippin av Heristal. Ansegisel var gift med Begga, dotter till Pippin av Landen, maior domus i Austrasien, ett frankiskt kungadöme.

För mer fakta se länk http://www.suku.fi/genos/34/34_9.htm

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Link no longer functions:

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I14803

Ansigisen was born in year 0602 in Austrasia, France.1

Ansigisen's father was Arnoul Metz and his mother was Dode Clothilde de Heristal. His paternal grandparents were Duke of Acquitaine Bodegeisel II Aquitaine and Oda Suevia; his maternal grandparents were Arnoldus Metz and Berthe (Aldeberge Bilthildis) Kent.

He was the oldest of two children. He had a brother named St. Clodulf.

He died, at the age of 83 years, in year 0685 in Murdered at Andene Monastery, Stieburg, France.1

General Notes

+ Ansegis=Ansegisus, Duke d'Austrasie (Andre Roux: Scrolls, 191.)

(Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 129, Line 171-45).

Born: in 602 in Austrasia, son of Arnoul=Arnulf, Bishop de Metz and Dode=Doda=Clothilde de Saxe.

Occupation: in 632 Ansegis was Mayor of the Palace of Austrasie to Sigebert in 632. Married circa 635: Sainte Begge=Begga de Landen, daughter of Pepin de Landen and Iduberge=Sainte Ida N?. Died: in 685 Ansegis was murdered.

Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on

Page: Arnulf of Metz, Pepin II

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999

Page: 190-9

Ansigisen's family with Beggue (St. Beggue) Landen

Ansigisen and Beggue (St. Beggue) were married in a religious ceremony in year 0635.

Family Notes

Ansegis=Ansegisus, Duke d'Austrasie (Andre Roux: Scrolls, 191.)

(Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 129, Line 171-45).

Born: in 602 in Austrasia, son of Arnoul=Arnulf, Bishop de Metz and Dode=Doda=Clothilde de Saxe.

Occupation: in 632 Ansegis was Mayor of the Palace of Austrasie to Sigebert in 632. Married circa 635: Sainte Begge=Begga de Landen, daughter of Pepin de Landen and Iduberge=Sainte Ida N?. Died: in 685 Ansegis was murdered.

Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on

Page: Arnulf of Metz, Pepin II

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999

Page: 190-9

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From a genealogy report (someone's online family tree) of Austrasia families, or surname index of Austrasia pedigrees or report summary of Austrasia heritage from "The Skaggs-Files".

They had two sons and a daughter, named Paepin II, Martin and Clotilde.

Male Paepin II d'Heristal

Paepin II was born in year 0635 in Heristal, Austrasia, Landen Belgium.2

Birth Notes

B: Abt. 635

He died, at the age of 79 years, on December 16th, 0714 in Junille, Meuse, France.2

Male Martin of Laon

Martin was born in year 0647.3

He died, at the age of 43 years, in year 0690.3

Death Notes

D: Aft. 690

Female Clotilde of Heristal of Metz

Clotilde was born in year 0650.3

She died, at the age of 42 years, on June 3rd, 0692.3

1 Orp-le-Grand, Brabant

2 http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=tamer&id=I14786&style=TABLE

3 http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=jdp-fam&id=I4382&style=TABLE

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Ansguise (Ansegiesel), Mayor Of The Palace Of Austrasia to Siegbert, murdered.

Source: 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 129, 192. 'Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants', Langston & Buck, 1986, p cvi.

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Son of Oda de Savoie (source?)

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No source listed:

Duke Ansigise:

Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia in 632

Birth: cir. 602

Died: 685 (murdered)

Spouse: St. Bégue or Begga,

Duke Ansigise is also known as Anchises, Ansegisel and Ansegilius.

Begga was the daughter of Pépin the Old of Landen who was Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia in 623 and a counsellor of Dagobert (I), King of Austrasia. St. Bégue's mother was St. Itta. On the death of her husband in the year 691, St. Bégue built a church and convent at Andenne on the Meuse River and died there. Her feast day is December 17th. Duke Ansigise and St. Bégue had a son: Pépin

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http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/of-the-west-franks.htm#name3194

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Died 629, while hunting

Notes: Some sources say 640. The Calendar of Saints says 692.

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Ansegisèle d'Arnoul ou Ansegisel ou Ansegise (né vers 614- mort av. 679 à Andenne), est le fils de Arnoul de Metz, (saint Arnoul), évêque de Metz et maire du palais d'Austrasie de 629 à 639.

Vers 630, il épouse Begga de Landen (vers 613-693), fille de Pépin de Landen (580-640, dit Pépin le Vieux) et d'Itta de Nivelles (597-652), par ce mariage, ils scellent l'alliance entre les deux familles.

Vers 633 ou 634, sous la pression de la noblesse Austrasienne, Dagobert 1er nomme son fils Sigebert III alors agé d'environ 2ans, roi d'Austrasie. Ansegisèle devint un de ses tuteurs.

Il est le père de Pépin d'Héristal (vers 635-714, dit Pépin le Jeune).

Il jouit d'une grande autorité au VIIe siècle, sous Sigebert III et Childéric II. On lui a donné quelquefois le titre de duc d'Austrasie.

Il est assasiné vers 679, son épouse Begga fonde un monastere à Andenne.

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From the German Wikipedia page on Ansegisel:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ansegisel

Ansegisel (auch Ansegisal, Ansegise, Anchise, Ansguise) (* um 610; † nach 657 aber vor 679, er wird um 662 erwähnt, führt den Titel eines domesticus, ist aber 679 bereits tot, von seinen Feinden erschlagen) war ein Sohn des Bischofs Arnulf von Metz.

Ansegisel heiratete Begga, die Tochter des austrischen Hausmeiers Pippin der Ältere, und führte damit Macht und Reichtum seiner Familie, der Arnulfinger, und der Familie seiner Frau, der Pippiniden, zusammen, nachdem die Bündnisse der beiden Gruppen in der Vergangenheit den merowingischen Königen bereits erhebliche Probleme und Nachteile eingebracht hatten.

Ansegisel und Begga hatten einen Sohn, Pippin den Mittleren, der die Machtübernahme faktisch zu Ende führt, bevor sie von dessen Enkel Pippin der Jüngere mit dem Königstitel auch nach außen dokumentiert wird. Nach Karl Martell, dem Enkel von Ansegisel und Begga, wird die Familie dann Karolinger genannt.

Wo Ansegisel begraben ist, ist nicht bekannt.

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Robert Sewell's Genealogy Site.

Online: http://www3.sympatico.ca/robert.sewell/sitemapweb.html

Duke Ansgise Mayor of the Palace

Male, (602 - 685)

Duke Ansgise Mayor of the Palace|b. 602\nd. 685|p30521.htm|Saint Arnulf Mayor of the Palace and Bishop of Metz|b. 13 Aug 582\nd. 16 Aug 641|p30535.htm|Clothilde|b. a 586|p30536.htm|Bodegisel I. Governor of Aquitaine|d. 588|p30538.htm|Oda||p30539.htm|Arnoldus Bishop of Metz||p30525.htm||||

Duke Ansgise Mayor of the Palace was born in 602 in Austrasia.1,2,3,5

He was the son of Saint Arnulf Mayor of the Palace and Bishop of Metz and Clothilde.1,2,3,4,5

Duke Ansgise Mayor of the Palace became Mayor of the Palace to King Siegbert, son of King Dagobert in 632.1,2,3,5

Before 639 Ansgise married Saint Begga of Landen, daughter of Pépin "the Old" Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia and Saint Itta.1,2,3,5

Duke Ansgise Mayor of the Palace was murdered in 685 at age 83 years.1,2,3,5

Charts

Ancestry of Edward III

Children of Duke Ansgise Mayor of the Palace and Saint Begga of Landen

Martin of Laon+ 2

Pépin II of Heristal Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia+ (a 635 - 16 Dec 714)1,2,3,4

Citations

1. Weis, Frederick Lewis. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650. Fifth Edition. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1982.

2. Stuart, Roderick W. Royalty for Commoners, The Complete Known Lineage of John of Gaunt, Son of Edward III, King of England, and Queen Philippa. Fourth Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002.

3. Moriarty, G. Andrews. "The Origin of the Carolingians", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register volume XCVIII (October 1944).

4. Kelley, David H.. "Genealogical Research in England: A New Consideration of the Carolingians", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register volume CI (April 1947).

http://www.genealogy.theroyfamily.com/p30521.htm

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http://parsonsfamily.blogware.com/indiI2911.html

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From the French Wikipedia page on Ansegisel:

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ansegisel

Ansegisel ou Ansegise (né avant 613[1], assassiné entre 648 et 669 et probablement en 662 au château de Chèvremont), est un fils de saint Arnulf, évêque de Metz et de sainte Dode. Il est le père de Pépin d'Héristal, maire du palais d'Austrasie, de Neustrie et de Bourgogne.

Biographie

Ses fonctions

Il est connu par les diplômes de son fils Pépin le Jeune qui se contente de le nommer, sans préciser ses rôles ni ses titres. En 727, le Liber Historiae Francorum confirme cette information. Il est cité dans plusieurs actes des abbayes de Stavelot et Malmédy vers 648 parmi les fidèles du maire du palais Grimoald avec son frère Clodulf et avec le qualificatif de domestique[2]. C'est tout ce que mentionnent les documents contemporains[3].

À la fin du VIIIe siècle, Paul Diacre, dans son Histoire des Lombards le mentionne mais le nomme Anchises et le qualifie de major domus. Vers 805, les Annales Mettensespriores le qualifient de princeps. On constate déjà la tendance des Carolingiens à glorifier leurs ancêtres et à les rattacher aux Troyens (Anchise est le père d'Énée) et, à travers ce lien, à la Rome Impériale. Le silence des sources contemporaines permet d'affirmer qu'Ansegisel n'a jamais été ni maire de palais ni prince, et les récits l'affirmant résultent soit d'une volonté de surévaluer l'importance des ancêtres de Charlemagne, soit d'une confusion avec Adalgisel, effectivement maire du palais à l'époque considérée[3].

Mariage et enfants

Il épouse vers 643 ou 644[4] Begga, fille de Pépin l'Ancien, maire du palais d'Austrasie, et de Itte Idoberge.

Les jeunes époux ont donné naissance :

1. de manière certaine à Pépin le Jeune (v. 645 † 714) , maire des palais d'Austrasie, de Neustrie et de Bourgogne,

2. hypothétiquement à Grimo, abbé de Corbie et archevêque de Rouen de 690 à 748, selon J Laporte[5].

Cette hypothèse part du principe que les évêques qui se succèdent dans un même diocèse durant le Haut Moyen Âge sont souvent apparenté. Or Griffo est précédé d'un Ansbert, parent probable de Dode, son second successeur est Saint Hugues petit fils de Pépin le jeune. Cela place Grimo comme un parent des Arnulfinges. En rapprochant le nom de Grimo à celui de Grimoald, on le place comme parent des Pépinides. Chronologiquement, il ne peut alors qu'être fils d'Ansegisel et de Begga. Mais ses conclusions ne sont pas toujours acceptées, et J Laporte semble confondre Griffo (ou Grippho, archevêque de 695 à 713) avec Grimo, archevêque de 744 à 748[6].

hypothétiquement à Clotilde Dode, épouse du roi Thierry III, selon Maurice Chaume[7]. Cette hypothèse s'appuie sur la présence de prénoms mérovingiens au sein de la famille de Caribert de Laon et considère Bertrade de Prüm comme une fille de Thierry III et de Clotilde Dode. Puis il constate que Pépin le Bref et son épouse Bertrade, fille de Caribert, possédaient en commun deux propriétés à Rommersheim et à Rheinbach et tenaient chacun leur moitié de leur père, ce qui suppose un ancêtre commun proche. Une chronique tardive, celle d'Adémar de Chabannes, au XIe siècle, donne le roi Clotaire IV, fils probable de Thierry III et de Dode, comme cousin de Charles Martel. Enfin, le nom de Clotilde Dode est rapprochée de celui de sainte Dode, l'épouse de saint Arnulf et la mère d'Anségisel[8].

Deux autres enfants ont été attribués à Ansegisel et à Begga, mais ces propositions sont depuis abandonnées :

Martin († 690), comte qui se bat en 690 contre Ébroïn au côtés de Pépin le jeune[9]. Cette hypothèse se fonde sur l’Hagiolum Viennense, datant de 1040, qui mentionne Pipinus, Ansegelli filius, et Martinus frater eius (=« Pépin, fils d'Ansegisel, et Martin, son frère »). Mais cette mention est maintenant considéré comme une mauvaise interprétation d'un passage du Liber Historiae Francorum, qui ne permet pas de préciser le lien de parenté entre Pépin et Martin, ni même s'il y en a un lien de parenté[10].

Sainte Landrada, fondatrice de l'abbaye de Munsterbilzen, dont une biographie tardive indique qu'elle descendait de Pépin et d'Arnulf († 690). Chronologiquement, elle ne pourrait être que fille d'Ansegisel et de Begga, mais la biographie insiste sur sa qualité de fille unique[10].

Assassinat

La Vita Beggae, rédigée au XIe siècle raconte qu'Ansegisel est assassiné à Chèvremont (près de Liège) par un noble austrasien du nom de Godin ou Gundoen qu'il aurait auparavant élevé comme son fils. La date de cet évènement n'est pas mentionnée, mais elle est postérieure à 648 (un acte des abbayes de Stavelot et Malmédy le mentionne comme vivant) et antérieure à 691 (quand Begga, veuve, se retire à Andenne), 680 (Pépin le Jeune est déjà l'un des principaux chefs austrasiens) ou 669 (si l'on identifie le meurtrier à un Gundoen qui devient alors duc en Austrasie). Ce Gundoen pourrait être apparenté Otton, maire du palais d'Austrasie, prédécesseur et ennemi de Grimoald. Christian Settipani voit ce meurtre comme un vengeance de la famille d'Otton en réponse au meurtre d'Otton en 643, vengeance rendue possible par la mort de Childebert l'Adopté en 662[11]. Devenue veuve, Begga fonde un monastère à Andenne en 691 et meurt deux ans plus tard.

Bibliographie

Pierre Riché, Les Carolingiens, une famille qui fit l'Europe, Hachette, coll. « Pluriel », Paris, 1983 (réimpr. 1997), 490 p. (ISBN 2-01-278851-3), p. 26, 35 et tableau généalogique II .

Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne, Paris, 1989, 170 p. (ISBN 2-906483-28-1), p. 29-33

Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens (Nouvelle histoire généalogique de l'auguste maison de France, vol. 1), éd. Patrick van Kerrebrouck, 1993 (ISBN 2-9501509-3-4), p. 151-3

Jean-Charles Volkmann, Bien connaître les généalogies des rois de France, Éditions Gisserot, 1999 (ISBN 2-877472086)

Michel Mourre, Le Petit Mourre. Dictionnaire d'Histoire universelle, Éditions Bordas, avril 2007 (ISBN 978-2-04-732194-2)

Notes et références

1.↑ À cette date, son père devient évêque de Metz et sa mère se retire au couvent.

2.↑ Ce terme se disait anciennement pour des individus attachés à une grande maison, même quand ils étaient nobles et que leur emploi était important (Emile Littré, Dictionnaire de la langue Française, Paris, 1883 ).

3.↑ a et b .Settipani 1993, p. 151.

4.↑ La Chronique de Sigebert mentionne le mariage à la date de 649, mais cette chronique mentionne durant la même année d'autres évènements qui sont en fait datée de 643 ou 644 (Settipani 1993, p. 152).

5.↑ J. Laporte, « Les monastère francs et l'avênement des Pippinides », dans Revue Mabillon, 1940, p. 1-30 .

6.↑ Settipani 1993, p. 153.

7.↑ Maurice Chaume, « La famille de saint Guillaume de Gellone », dans Annales de Bourgogne, 1948, p. 47-9 .

8.↑ Settipani 1989, p. 29-31.

9.↑ Karl August Eckhardt, Merowinger Blut - I, Die Karolinger und ihre Frauen, Witzenhausen, 1965, p. 21 .

10.↑ a et b Settipani 1993, p. 152, note 68.

11.↑ Settipani 1993, p. 151

In English:

Ansegisel or Ansegise (born before 613 - when his father became Bishop of Metz and his mother retired to a convent, murdered between 648 and 669, probably 662, at the Chateau de Chevremont) is a son of St. Arnulf, Bishop of Metz, and St. Dode.

He is the father of Pepin de Herstal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia, Neustria, and Burgundy.

Biography:

It is known from documentation on his son, Pepin The Middle, only his name without specifying his roles or titles. In 727, the Liber Historiae Francorum confirms this information. He is quoted in several acts of the abbeys of Stavelot and Malmedy around 648 among the faithful Mayor of the Palace Grimoald, and his brother Clodulf, to have the title of Domesticus (the term is said of individuals formerly attached to a large house, even when they are nobility, and that their use was signfiicant, according to the French Language Dictionary of Emile Littre, published in Paris in 1883). That is all that contemporary documents mention (according to Settipani - 1993).

At the end of the 8th century, Paul Deacon, in his History of the Lombards, mentions the name Anchises and calls him Major domus (Mayor of the Palace). In 805, the Annals Mettensespriores describes him as a Princeps (Prince). There is the tendency to glorify Carolingian ancestors, such as one attempt to link Anchises to the ancient Trojans (Anchises being called the father of Aeneas) and through this link, connect their house to Imperial Rome.

The silence of more contemporary sources suggest that Ansegisel was never a Mayor of the Palace or a Prince, and stories saying this are merely a willingness to overstate the importance of the ancestors of Charlemagne.

Marriage and children:

He married around 643 or 644 to Begga, a daughter of Pepin the Elder, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia, and Itte Idoberge. (The Chronicle Sigebert mentions the date of this marriage as 649, but also refers to other events in that same year that are actually dated from 643 or 644.) The young couple gave birth to:

1. most definitely to Pepin the Middle (c. 645-714), Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia, Neustria, and Burgundy.

2. hypothetically to Grimo, Abbot of Corbie and Archbishop of Rouen (690-748), according to J. Laporte ("The monasteries of France and the future of Pippinids" from the Revue Mabillon of 1940). This hypothesis assumes that the bishops who succeeded in a diocese during the High Middle Ages are often related. But Griffo is preceded by an Ansbert, parent likely of Dode, his second successor to St. Hugh, grandson of Pepin the young. This places Grimo as a parent of the Amulfinges. By matching the name of Grimo to Grimoald, this places him as a founder of the Pippinids. Chronologically, it can then only be that he is the son of Ansegisel and Begga. But his conclusions are not always accepted, and J. Laporte seems to confuse Griffo (or Grippho, Archbishop 695-713) with Grimo (Archbishop 744-748, according to Settipani - 1993).

3. Hypothetically to Clotilde Dode, wife of King Thierry III according to Maurice Chaume ("The family of St. William of Gellone" in the Annals of Burgundy from 1948). This assumption is based on the presence of names in the Merovingian family of Caribert of Laon, and considers Bertha de Prum as a daughter of Thierry III and Clotilde Dode. Then he finds that Pepin and his wife Bertha, Daughter of Caribert, possessed two common properties of Rommersheim and Rheinbach, each a half of their inheritance from the same father, implying a close common ancestor. A chronical of the late 11th century of Ademar of Chabannes gives King Clotaire IV, probably the son of Thierry III and Dode, as a cousin of Charles Martel. Finally the name of Clotilde Dode is closer to that of St. Dode, wife of St. Arnulf and mother of Ansegisel (according to Settipani - 1989).

Two other children were assigned to Ansegisel and Begga, but these suggestions are now discredited:

Martin (d. 690), a count who fought in 690 against Ebroin as an ally of Pepin The Middle (suggested by Karl August Eckhardt in Merowinger Blut - I die Frauen und ihre Karolinger, published in Witzenhausen in 1965). This hypothesis is based on the Hagiolum viennensis, dating from 1040, which mentions Pipinus, Ansegelli filius, frater eius and Martinus (translates to Pepin, son of Ansegisel, and Martin, his brother). But this statement is now considered a misinterpretation of a passage from the Liber Historiae Francorum, which does not specify the relationship between Pepin and Martin, or even if there was a relationship.

St. Landrade, founder of the Abbey of Munsterbilzen, included ina late biography that says he descended from Pepin and Arnulf (d. 690). Chronologically, it could be the daughter of Ansegisel and Begga, but the biography emphasizes that she is an only child (according to Settipani - 1993).

Murder:

The Vita Beggae, written in the 11th century, tells that Ansegisel was murdered at Chevremont (near Liege) by an Austrasian nobleman named Gundoen or Godin, that he previoiusly raised as his son. The date of the event is not mentioned, but it is later than 648 (an act of the abbeys of Stavelot and Malmedy say that he is living) and before 691 (when Begga, widowed, retirs to Andenne). possibly 680 (Pepin the Middle becomes one of the principal leaders of Austrasia), and possibly 669 (if one identifies the murder as the Gundeon who became a Duke of Austrasia).

This could be related to Gundeon Otto, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia, predecessor and enemy of Grimoald. Christian Settipani (1993) regards this murder to be the revenge of the family of Otto in response to the murder of Otto in 643, possibly avenged with the death of Childebert the Adopted in 662.

Widowed, Begga founded a monastery in Andenne in 691, and died two years later.

--------------------

Married to his first cousin.

--------------------

Murdered

Ansegis=Ansegisus, Duke d'Austrasie (Andre Roux: Scrolls, 191.)

(Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 129, Line 171-45).

  1. Note: Born: in 602 in Austrasia, son of Arnoul=Arnulf, Bishop de Metz and Dode=Doda=Clothilde de Saxe.

Occupation: in 632 Ansegis was Mayor of the Palace of Austrasie to Sigebert in 632. Married circa 635: Sainte Begge=Begga de Landen, daughter of Pepin de Landen and Iduberge=Sainte Ida N?. Died: in 685 Ansegis was murdered.

Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on

Page: Arnulf of Metz, Pepin II

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999

Page: 190-9

--------------------

From Wikipedia:

Ansegisel (also Ansgise, Ansegus, or Anchises) (c. 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

He married sometime after 639 to Saint Begga, the daughter of Pepin of Landen. They had the following children:

   * Pippin II (635 or 640-December 16, 714), mayor of the palace of Austrasia
   * Possibly Clotilda of Heristal (650-699), married King Theodoric III of Neustria

--------------------

Ansegisel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ansegisel (also Ansgise) (ca 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

Marriage and issue

He married sometime after 639 to Saint Begga, the daughter of Pepin of Landen.

They had the following children:

Pippin II (635 or 640-December 16, 714), mayor of the palace of Austrasia

Martin, count of Laon

Clotilda of Heristal (650-699), married King Theodoric III of Neustria

Sources

Les ancêtres de Charlemagne, 1989, Christian Settipani

--------------------

B: 602 607 or 610

D: 685 679 or 662

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ansegisel

Ansegisel

aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie

Wechseln zu: Navigation, Suche

Ansegisel (auch Ansegisal, Ansegise, Anchise, Ansguise) (* um 610; † nach 657 aber vor 679, er wird um 662 erwähnt, führt den Titel eines domesticus, ist aber 679 bereits tot, von seinen Feinden erschlagen) war ein Sohn des Bischofs Arnulf von Metz.

Ansegisel heiratete Begga, die Tochter des austrischen Hausmeiers Pippin der Ältere, und führte damit Macht und Reichtum seiner Familie, der Arnulfinger, und der Familie seiner Frau, der Pippiniden, zusammen, nachdem die Bündnisse der beiden Gruppen in der Vergangenheit den merowingischen Königen bereits erhebliche Probleme und Nachteile eingebracht hatten.

Ansegisel und Begga hatten einen Sohn, Pippin den Mittleren, der die Machtübernahme faktisch zu Ende führt, bevor sie von dessen Enkel Pippin der Jüngere mit dem Königstitel auch nach außen dokumentiert wird. Nach Karl Martell, dem Enkel von Ansegisel und Begga, wird die Familie dann Karolinger genannt.

Wo Ansegisel begraben ist, ist nicht bekannt.

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   * genealogie-mittelalter.de
   * weyer-neustadt.de

Normdaten: PND: 137805616 (PICA) | VIAF: 85986817 | WP-Personeninfo

Diese Seite wurde zuletzt am 17. Februar 2010 um 20:17 Uhr geändert.

--------------------

Note: Mayor of the Palace to Siegbert, 632, son of Dagebert; m. bef. 639,St. Begga, d. 694, dau. of Pepin of Landen, Mayor of the Palace inAustrasia, d. 694, and his wife Itta, dau. of Arnoldus, Bsp. of Metz,and niece of St. Modoald, Bsp. of Treves, sons, it is said, ofANSBERTUS, the Senator (180-15). (Weis, 190-9).

--------------------

Ansegisel (also Ansgise) (ca 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

[edit] Marriage and issue

He married sometime after 639 to Saint Begga, the daughter of Pepin of Landen.

They had the following children:

Pippin II (635 or 640-December 16, 714), mayor of the palace of Austrasia

Martin, count of Laon

Clotilda of Heristal (650-699), married King Theodoric III of Neustria

--------------------

was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus.

He married sometime after 639 to Saint Begga, the daughter of Pepin of Landen. They had the following children:

Pippin II (635 or 640-December 16, 714), mayor of the palace of Austrasia

Martin, count of Laon

Clotilda of Heristal (650-699), married King Theodoric III of Neustria

He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

--------------------

Was a duke and military leader. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ansegisel

--------------------

Ansegisel (also Ansgise, Ansegus, or Anchises) (c. 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

Marriage and issue

He married sometime after 639 to Saint Begga, the daughter of Pepin of Landen. They had the following children:

Pippin II (635 or 640-December 16, 714), mayor of the palace of Austrasia

Possibly Clotilda of Heristal (650-699), married King Theodoric III of Neustria

--------------------

Ansegisel (also Ansgise, Ansegus, or Anchises) was born circa 602 or 610 was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a Duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He married sometime after 639 to Saint Begga, the daughter of Pepin of Landen. She bore him three children, all of them independently our ancestors: Pepin and Martin and Clotilda.

Ansegisel was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

--------------------

Laurel Logan

Sept 8, 2008

from http://armidalesoftware.com/issue/full/Thaler_105_main.html

DUKE ANSGISE9 (Arnulf8, Bodegisel II7, Gondolfus6, Munderic5, Cloderic the Parricide of COLOGNE4, Siegbert the Lame3, Childebert2, Clovis the Riparian1), son of Saint Arnulf and Dode (Clothilde), was born in 602, and died in 685. He married before 639. BEGGA, daughter of Pepin and Itta _____, who died in 694.

Mayor of the Palace to Siegbert, 632, son of Dagobert.

Child:

i. PEPIN OF HERISTAL of Heristal, France, d. in 714; m. (1) AUPAIS; m. (2) PLECTRUDE.

--------------------

Ansegisel (also Ansgise, Ansegus, or Anchises) (c. 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

--------------------

Död: 629 1) Dog under en jakt

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Familj med Begga av Heristal (- 693)

Barn:

Pippin II av Austrasien (- 714)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Källor

1)  Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Hull, England 
 
 

--------------------

Ansegisel (also Ansgise, Ansegus, or Anchises) (c. 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

--------------------

Död: 629 1) Dog under en jakt

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Familj med Begga av Heristal (- 693)

Barn:

Pippin II av Austrasien (- 714)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Källor

1)  Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Hull, England 
 
 

--------------------

Maire du Palais d'Austrasie

--------------------

Ansegisel (also Ansgise, Ansegus, or Anchises) (c. 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ansegisel

--------------------

632

Resigned bishopric

b. c. 580,, near Nancy [France]

d. July 18, 640?, Remiremont; feast day August 16 or 19

French SAINT ARNOUL DE METZ, bishop of Metz and, with Pepin I, theearliest known ancestor of Charlemagne.

A Frankish noble, Arnulf gave distinguished service at the Austrasiancourt under Theudebert II (595-612). In 613, however, with Pepin, he ledthe aristocratic opposition to Brunhild that led to her downfall and tothe reunification of Frankish lands under Chlotar II. About the sameyear, he became bishop.

From 623, again with Pepin, now mayor of the Austrasian palace, Arnulfwas adviser to Dagobert I, before retiring (629?) to become a hermit.Arnulf's son Ansegisel married Pepin's daughter Begga; the son of thismarriage, Pepin II, was Charlemagne's great-grandfather.

Copyright c 1994-2001 Encyclopædia

History: Pepin the Elder (circa 580-639), founder of the Carolingian dynasty. A noble of the Frankish kingdom of Austrasia, Pepin, also known as Pepin of Landen, joined with Arnulf, bishop of Metz, in the struggle to overthrow Brunhild, queen of Austrasia, in 613, and subsequently governed the kingdom as mayor of the palace for Brunhild's successor, Clotaire II. Pepin's descendants remained dominant in Austrasia, and in the following century displaced the Merovingians as the royal house of the Franks.

History: Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. -------------------- Prefix: Duke

Titel: Borgmästaren i den Palace -------------------- CHARLEMAGNE THE PIOUS AND PROLIFIC PROGENITOR By: Xenia Stanford Biography & Archived Articles Article Published December 23, 1999

Although a Christian should take only one wife even then, Charlemagne had four. He may have been married to only one at a time. However, he also kept five known mistresses throughout his marriages. Charles the Great sired at least eighteen children, only eight of whom were legitimate. He refused to let his daughters marry so he would not lose them but he allowed them numerous affairs out of which came several illegitimate children. In spite of this, he was a deeply devout man.

He was well versed in the scriptures and quoted chapter and verse to those who erred in their ways. He supported the Church through organization and funding but he was also very demanding of its behaviour. Many of his capitularies deal with how the clergy should act and how they should improve their morals. He expected much more of them than of himself. He expected celibacy at a time when even Popes were known for their debauchery. Nuns particularly were victims of his scathing attacks on their whoring.

He also demanded that the Church not tolerate image worship and superstition even though most of the religious hierarchy disagreed with him. He also blasted the clergy in one of his capitularies in 811 for the earthly possessiveness and cheating of their parishioners. He introduced tithing (one tenth of income) to counteract the Church's need against the Church's greed. Charlemagne himself left one-third of his estates to the Church.

Known to be ruthless in his evangelical efforts to bring Christianity to all (even to the beheading of those who refused to be baptized), he was honest and caring in his dealings with his earthly empire and strove to improve the preparation of himself and his subjects for the world beyond life. Years after his death, the Church ignored his worldly indiscretions and beatified him for his contributions.

CHARLEMAGNE - GREAT BOON TO GENEALOGISTS To this great man we also owe much in terms of genealogical records for he required the church to document baptisms, marriages and wills. Always one for standardization, he insisted the priests record these events diligently and consistently. This was at least the beginning of parish records. Though none have been found dating from this period, Charlemagne reinforced the importance of maintaining documentary evidence, which no doubt contributed to the earliest registers to be uncovered.

The oldest register found so far, which covers the cities of Givry in Saône and Loire (Saône-et-Loire) for the years1334 to 1357, was after the influence of the next great reformer King Louis IX, canonized as Saint Louis. However, Saint Louis definitely drew upon the practices established by his predecessor.

Charlemagne's own secretary Einhard kept a diary or record of the great man's life. Though often it seems exaggerated, it remains a way to understand history as it unfolded. Charlemagne was also the subject of much literature during his time and later, such as the poems of Theobold. In 814 he died at Aachen from pleurisy in the forty-seventh year of his reign with his son Louis already crowned as his successor. He was seventy-two years old but his legacy to history still lives on.

CHARLEMAGNE - ANCESTRY According to some the greatest of all rulers of Francia may not have been French at all. Charlemagne was believed to be mainly German as he was reputed to be blond and spoke German as his primary tongue. The difficulty is, even knowing as much as we know about Charlemagne, we know little about his ancestry and truly what mix of blood ran through his ancestors' veins.

Were the Merovingians French just because they arose from the Frankish people and the Carolingian rulers German? The Franks themselves were Germanic in origin and replaced the Celts who were the first known inhabitants of what is now France. Although the nations of France and Germany became dreaded enemies, I don't think we can separate them so categorically during or before the time of Charlemagne.

As explained in the past issues, Charlemagne arose from the line of chief administrators known as Mayors of the Palace who served under and later over the Merovingian kings. However, despite the hard efforts of genealogists the Carolingian lineage named for Charlemagne can only be truly documented as far back as his 3rd great grandfather. We know his grandfather Pepin d'Herstal or Pepin I (Pippin I to some historians) was the grandson of Pepin the Elder but the generation before and the generation between are unnamed in the histories found to date.

As we can see people, such as the rulers above, were distinguished by "nicknames". No one had surnames at the time and later historians named the dynastic lines after a significant ruler but naming people after some physical attribute, profession or characteristic was certainly prominent then. What is also significant is that many women's names were recorded as well. Thus we know that Pepin d'Herstal was married to a woman named Itta.

Pepin and Itta had three known children. One, a girl named Gertrude, became an abbess and was not known to have any offspring but the other two had descendants. Although the other daughter, Begga, was to produce the most significant heirs, initially the couple's only known son, Grimoald, gained his father's position and title of Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia after Pepin I's death about 639 or 640 AD.

Thus so far we have the following lineage: (See website for diagram)

Grimoald had a daughter Wulfetrude who became a well-known abbess. Although the actual paternity of another child called Childebert has been questioned, Grimoald claimed him as son and named him in 656 AD as the successor to King Sigebert of Neustria over Sigebert's son and heir Dagobert. Dagobert was exiled to Ireland but his supporters were so angered by the coup they captured and killed Grimoald soon after.

Childebert died in 662 but already the kingdom had been thrown into turmoil with the wars between Neustria and Austrasia and between the Merovingian heirs and the descendants of the powerful mayors. Although Grimoald had a grandson Childebrand whose parents' names are unknown, it was his nephew, son of sister Begga who regained the mayoral supremacy and the rule.

Begga married Ansegisel and produced a son, Pepin or Pippin named for her father. This Pepin (now called Pepin II) had children by at least two women. One of these women was his wife Plectrude and the other his mistress Alpaida.

He married Plectrude around 670 for her inheritance of substantial estates in the Moselle region. They produced at least two children and through them at least two significant grandchildren. These legitimate children and grandchildren claimed themselves to be Pepin's true successors and with the help of his widow Plectrude tried to maintain the position of Mayor of the Palace after their progenitor's death on December 16, 714.

The position of Mayor of the Palace had over the years become one of great significance and with the work of Pepin the Elder and his grandson Pepin d'Herstal it had become as important if not greater than the role of the king. Under Grimoald the land holdings and influence of the Mayor had increased. Pepin II was not satisfied with ruling only Austrasia, thus in 690 he also took over as Mayor of the Palace for Neustrian King Theuderic. Although the king still sat on the throne, the role and title of Mayor as well as Pepin's fortunes in land were inheritances to be coveted.

However, the son of Pepin II and his mistress Alpaida gained favour among the Austrasians and despite the efforts of Plectrude to silence her rival's child by imprisoning him, he became the one Mayor of the Palace and true ruler of Francia. This illegitimate son of Pepin II was Charles Martellus (the Hammer) or Charles Martel whose deeds have been explained in previous issues.

His descent from Begga is as follows: (see website for diagram)

Like his father, Charles had rival children from two unions, that of his wives: Rotrude and Swanachild. Charles had deposed both kings by 739 and began rule under the title of Princeps or Prince. In 740 he placed his two sons from his first marriage, Pepin III (aka Pepin Le Bref or the Short) and Carloman as the Mayors of the Palaces of Neustria and Austrasia respectively.

Grifo, the son of Charles and second wife Swanachild, was appointed ruler of Thuringia about the same time. However, after Charles death in 741, Grifo's half-brothers banished Swanachild to a convent and imprisoned Grifo.

In 746 Carloman, apparently the more militarily successful of the brothers, resigned as Mayor of Austrasia and went to Rome for monastic training. He placed the Mayoralty into the hands of his young son, Drogo, and asked the boy's uncle Pepin Le Bref to watch over him and the administration of Austrasia. Instead Pepin took over complete control about a year later and in 751 convinced the Pope to make him King of all Franks and his wife Bertrada the Queen. Drogo who continued to protest was thrown into prison by his uncle in 753.

Pepin Le Bref or Pepin the Short had two sons by Bertrada. Charles, the eldest, was born in 748 prior to his parent's marriage. In order to legitimize his son and ensure his succession rather than Drogo's, Pepin married Bertrada in 749. In 751 their second son Carloman (II to distinguish him from his uncle) was born.

After Pepin's death in 768 AD, his two sons split the kingdom once again. The older son Charles was given Austrasia and other lands. Carloman was given various regions but Neustria was not listed by name since it appears to have been divided between the two rather than given in totality to Carloman. This division did not last long as Carloman died on December 4, 771.

Thus the descent from Charles Martel is as follows: (see website for diagram)

It may be amazing to learn the deaths of these rulers were recorded accurately giving date and place of death and age at death. Fredegar, the historian, used church records from Saint-Denis to find the exact death dates of Pepin II and III as well as Carloman II.

No longer did historians have to live during the time for accurate information nor did they need to rely solely on word of mouth, legends or the writings of others. However, as stated under Charlemagne - Great Boon to Genealogists, we have seen that the records of the Church and of administration were soon to increase even more in frequency and accuracy due to the work of Carloman II's brother Charles, whom we know better as Charlemagne.

CHARLEMAGNE - DESCENDANCY Although Charlemagne's son and successor Louis I succeeded in keeping the kingdom together during his lifetime, after he died the empire was divided into three among his sons. The youngest, Charles "the Bald" became Emperor of France, another son, Louis "the German", was crowned King of Germany and Austria and the third, Lothaire, ruled Belgium. From these three Kings came the nations above that continue to exist today though the borders changed over the years.

From their descendants and those of the other many children of Charlemagne come countless numbers who are the progeny of this great man. These may be patriots of any of those three original nations but many can be found elsewhere in the world.

One of the lines for many North Americans descends through Catherine Baillon, a "fille de roi" who came to New France and married Pierre Miville. Baillon's descent from King Philippe II Auguste of France (a descendant of Charlemagne and wife Hildegard) has been carefully researched. The work has primarily been conducted by four genealogists who are all well-known for their past accurate and well-documented works. They are René Jetté, John P. DuLong, Roland-Yves Gagné, and Gail F. Moreau who have a website dedicated to the Baillon genealogy at http://www.habitant.org/baillon.

This foursome has obtained extensive and expensive documentation from original sources. So far they have written two articles, one in French and one in English, and are currently working on a book to share their findings with us. Although I have not read either article, I know all four through their prior works, contributions to lists and email correspondence. Therefore, I have no hesitation in recommending you read either of the two articles cited below:

René Jetté, John P. DuLong, Roland-Yves Gagné, and Gail F. Moreau. "De Catherine Baillon à Charlemagne." Mémoires de la Société généalogique canadienne-française 48 (Autumn), 1997: 190-216 (in French).

René Jetté, John P. DuLong, Roland-Yves Gagné, and Gail F. Moreau. "From Catherine Baillon to Charlemagne." _American-Canadian Genealogist_ 25:4 (Fall 1999): 170-200 (in English).

The latter may be obtained at $3.00 US plus $1.50 US for postage and handling (shipping on additional copies ordered at the same time is $.90 each) from the following address:

American-Canadian Genealogical Society Treasurer P. O. Box 6478 Manchester, NH 03108-6478

http://globalgenealogy.com/globalgazette/gazxs/gazxs46.htm ------------------

-------------------- CHARLEMAGNE THE PIOUS AND PROLIFIC PROGENITOR By: Xenia Stanford Biography & Archived Articles Article Published December 23, 1999

Although a Christian should take only one wife even then, Charlemagne had four. He may have been married to only one at a time. However, he also kept five known mistresses throughout his marriages. Charles the Great sired at least eighteen children, only eight of whom were legitimate. He refused to let his daughters marry so he would not lose them but he allowed them numerous affairs out of which came several illegitimate children. In spite of this, he was a deeply devout man.

He was well versed in the scriptures and quoted chapter and verse to those who erred in their ways. He supported the Church through organization and funding but he was also very demanding of its behaviour. Many of his capitularies deal with how the clergy should act and how they should improve their morals. He expected much more of them than of himself. He expected celibacy at a time when even Popes were known for their debauchery. Nuns particularly were victims of his scathing attacks on their whoring.

He also demanded that the Church not tolerate image worship and superstition even though most of the religious hierarchy disagreed with him. He also blasted the clergy in one of his capitularies in 811 for the earthly possessiveness and cheating of their parishioners. He introduced tithing (one tenth of income) to counteract the Church's need against the Church's greed. Charlemagne himself left one-third of his estates to the Church.

Known to be ruthless in his evangelical efforts to bring Christianity to all (even to the beheading of those who refused to be baptized), he was honest and caring in his dealings with his earthly empire and strove to improve the preparation of himself and his subjects for the world beyond life. Years after his death, the Church ignored his worldly indiscretions and beatified him for his contributions.

CHARLEMAGNE - GREAT BOON TO GENEALOGISTS To this great man we also owe much in terms of genealogical records for he required the church to document baptisms, marriages and wills. Always one for standardization, he insisted the priests record these events diligently and consistently. This was at least the beginning of parish records. Though none have been found dating from this period, Charlemagne reinforced the importance of maintaining documentary evidence, which no doubt contributed to the earliest registers to be uncovered.

The oldest register found so far, which covers the cities of Givry in Saône and Loire (Saône-et-Loire) for the years1334 to 1357, was after the influence of the next great reformer King Louis IX, canonized as Saint Louis. However, Saint Louis definitely drew upon the practices established by his predecessor.

Charlemagne's own secretary Einhard kept a diary or record of the great man's life. Though often it seems exaggerated, it remains a way to understand history as it unfolded. Charlemagne was also the subject of much literature during his time and later, such as the poems of Theobold. In 814 he died at Aachen from pleurisy in the forty-seventh year of his reign with his son Louis already crowned as his successor. He was seventy-two years old but his legacy to history still lives on.

CHARLEMAGNE - ANCESTRY According to some the greatest of all rulers of Francia may not have been French at all. Charlemagne was believed to be mainly German as he was reputed to be blond and spoke German as his primary tongue. The difficulty is, even knowing as much as we know about Charlemagne, we know little about his ancestry and truly what mix of blood ran through his ancestors' veins.

Were the Merovingians French just because they arose from the Frankish people and the Carolingian rulers German? The Franks themselves were Germanic in origin and replaced the Celts who were the first known inhabitants of what is now France. Although the nations of France and Germany became dreaded enemies, I don't think we can separate them so categorically during or before the time of Charlemagne.

As explained in the past issues, Charlemagne arose from the line of chief administrators known as Mayors of the Palace who served under and later over the Merovingian kings. However, despite the hard efforts of genealogists the Carolingian lineage named for Charlemagne can only be truly documented as far back as his 3rd great grandfather. We know his grandfather Pepin d'Herstal or Pepin I (Pippin I to some historians) was the grandson of Pepin the Elder but the generation before and the generation between are unnamed in the histories found to date.

As we can see people, such as the rulers above, were distinguished by "nicknames". No one had surnames at the time and later historians named the dynastic lines after a significant ruler but naming people after some physical attribute, profession or characteristic was certainly prominent then. What is also significant is that many women's names were recorded as well. Thus we know that Pepin d'Herstal was married to a woman named Itta.

Pepin and Itta had three known children. One, a girl named Gertrude, became an abbess and was not known to have any offspring but the other two had descendants. Although the other daughter, Begga, was to produce the most significant heirs, initially the couple's only known son, Grimoald, gained his father's position and title of Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia after Pepin I's death about 639 or 640 AD.

Thus so far we have the following lineage: (See website for diagram)

Grimoald had a daughter Wulfetrude who became a well-known abbess. Although the actual paternity of another child called Childebert has been questioned, Grimoald claimed him as son and named him in 656 AD as the successor to King Sigebert of Neustria over Sigebert's son and heir Dagobert. Dagobert was exiled to Ireland but his supporters were so angered by the coup they captured and killed Grimoald soon after.

Childebert died in 662 but already the kingdom had been thrown into turmoil with the wars between Neustria and Austrasia and between the Merovingian heirs and the descendants of the powerful mayors. Although Grimoald had a grandson Childebrand whose parents' names are unknown, it was his nephew, son of sister Begga who regained the mayoral supremacy and the rule.

Begga married Ansegisel and produced a son, Pepin or Pippin named for her father. This Pepin (now called Pepin II) had children by at least two women. One of these women was his wife Plectrude and the other his mistress Alpaida.

He married Plectrude around 670 for her inheritance of substantial estates in the Moselle region. They produced at least two children and through them at least two significant grandchildren. These legitimate children and grandchildren claimed themselves to be Pepin's true successors and with the help of his widow Plectrude tried to maintain the position of Mayor of the Palace after their progenitor's death on December 16, 714.

The position of Mayor of the Palace had over the years become one of great significance and with the work of Pepin the Elder and his grandson Pepin d'Herstal it had become as important if not greater than the role of the king. Under Grimoald the land holdings and influence of the Mayor had increased. Pepin II was not satisfied with ruling only Austrasia, thus in 690 he also took over as Mayor of the Palace for Neustrian King Theuderic. Although the king still sat on the throne, the role and title of Mayor as well as Pepin's fortunes in land were inheritances to be coveted.

However, the son of Pepin II and his mistress Alpaida gained favour among the Austrasians and despite the efforts of Plectrude to silence her rival's child by imprisoning him, he became the one Mayor of the Palace and true ruler of Francia. This illegitimate son of Pepin II was Charles Martellus (the Hammer) or Charles Martel whose deeds have been explained in previous issues.

His descent from Begga is as follows: (see website for diagram)

Like his father, Charles had rival children from two unions, that of his wives: Rotrude and Swanachild. Charles had deposed both kings by 739 and began rule under the title of Princeps or Prince. In 740 he placed his two sons from his first marriage, Pepin III (aka Pepin Le Bref or the Short) and Carloman as the Mayors of the Palaces of Neustria and Austrasia respectively.

Grifo, the son of Charles and second wife Swanachild, was appointed ruler of Thuringia about the same time. However, after Charles death in 741, Grifo's half-brothers banished Swanachild to a convent and imprisoned Grifo.

In 746 Carloman, apparently the more militarily successful of the brothers, resigned as Mayor of Austrasia and went to Rome for monastic training. He placed the Mayoralty into the hands of his young son, Drogo, and asked the boy's uncle Pepin Le Bref to watch over him and the administration of Austrasia. Instead Pepin took over complete control about a year later and in 751 convinced the Pope to make him King of all Franks and his wife Bertrada the Queen. Drogo who continued to protest was thrown into prison by his uncle in 753.

Pepin Le Bref or Pepin the Short had two sons by Bertrada. Charles, the eldest, was born in 748 prior to his parent's marriage. In order to legitimize his son and ensure his succession rather than Drogo's, Pepin married Bertrada in 749. In 751 their second son Carloman (II to distinguish him from his uncle) was born.

After Pepin's death in 768 AD, his two sons split the kingdom once again. The older son Charles was given Austrasia and other lands. Carloman was given various regions but Neustria was not listed by name since it appears to have been divided between the two rather than given in totality to Carloman. This division did not last long as Carloman died on December 4, 771.

Thus the descent from Charles Martel is as follows: (see website for diagram)

It may be amazing to learn the deaths of these rulers were recorded accurately giving date and place of death and age at death. Fredegar, the historian, used church records from Saint-Denis to find the exact death dates of Pepin II and III as well as Carloman II.

No longer did historians have to live during the time for accurate information nor did they need to rely solely on word of mouth, legends or the writings of others. However, as stated under Charlemagne - Great Boon to Genealogists, we have seen that the records of the Church and of administration were soon to increase even more in frequency and accuracy due to the work of Carloman II's brother Charles, whom we know better as Charlemagne.

CHARLEMAGNE - DESCENDANCY Although Charlemagne's son and successor Louis I succeeded in keeping the kingdom together during his lifetime, after he died the empire was divided into three among his sons. The youngest, Charles "the Bald" became Emperor of France, another son, Louis "the German", was crowned King of Germany and Austria and the third, Lothaire, ruled Belgium. From these three Kings came the nations above that continue to exist today though the borders changed over the years.

From their descendants and those of the other many children of Charlemagne come countless numbers who are the progeny of this great man. These may be patriots of any of those three original nations but many can be found elsewhere in the world.

One of the lines for many North Americans descends through Catherine Baillon, a "fille de roi" who came to New France and married Pierre Miville. Baillon's descent from King Philippe II Auguste of France (a descendant of Charlemagne and wife Hildegard) has been carefully researched. The work has primarily been conducted by four genealogists who are all well-known for their past accurate and well-documented works. They are René Jetté, John P. DuLong, Roland-Yves Gagné, and Gail F. Moreau who have a website dedicated to the Baillon genealogy at http://www.habitant.org/baillon.

This foursome has obtained extensive and expensive documentation from original sources. So far they have written two articles, one in French and one in English, and are currently working on a book to share their findings with us. Although I have not read either article, I know all four through their prior works, contributions to lists and email correspondence. Therefore, I have no hesitation in recommending you read either of the two articles cited below:

René Jetté, John P. DuLong, Roland-Yves Gagné, and Gail F. Moreau. "De Catherine Baillon à Charlemagne." Mémoires de la Société généalogique canadienne-française 48 (Autumn), 1997: 190-216 (in French).

René Jetté, John P. DuLong, Roland-Yves Gagné, and Gail F. Moreau. "From Catherine Baillon to Charlemagne." _American-Canadian Genealogist_ 25:4 (Fall 1999): 170-200 (in English).

The latter may be obtained at $3.00 US plus $1.50 US for postage and handling (shipping on additional copies ordered at the same time is $.90 each) from the following address:

American-Canadian Genealogical Society Treasurer P. O. Box 6478 Manchester, NH 03108-6478

http://globalgenealogy.com/globalgazette/gazxs/gazxs46.htm ------------------

-------------------- Ansegis=Ansegisus, Duke d'Austrasie (Andre Roux: Scrolls, 191.)

(Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 129, Line 171-45).

  1. Note: Born: in 602 in Austrasia, son of Arnoul=Arnulf, Bishop de Metz and Dode=Doda=Clothilde de Saxe.
  2. Note: Occupation: in 632 Ansegis was Mayor of the Palace of Austrasie to Sigebert in 632. Married circa 635: Sainte Begge=Begga de Landen, daughter of Pepin de Landen and Iduberge=Sainte Ida N?. Died: in 685 Ansegis was murdered.
  3. Note: Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
  4. Note: Page: Arnulf of Metz, Pepin II
  5. Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
  6. Note: Page: 190-9

--------------------

Wikipedia

*English Ansegisel

*Nederlands Ansegisus (hofmeier)

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ansegisel

Ansegisel

Ansegisel (also Ansgise, Ansegus, or Anchises) (c. 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin. Marriage and issue He married sometime after 639 to Saint Begga, the daughter of Pepin of Landen. They had the following children:

  1. Pippin II (635 or 640-December 16, 714), mayor of the palace of Austrasia
  2. Possibly Clotilda of Heristal (650-699), married King Theodoric III of Neustria

-----------------------

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~agrandchildsheritage/charlemagne1.html

The Charlemagne Line Generation No. 9

Siblings Ansegisel of Austrien & St. Clodulphe are both ancestors.

Ansegisel of Austrien Aka: Duke Angise; Ansigise, Mayor Of Austrasia [rt9;190-9][rt18;p368] Mayor of the Palace to Seigbert, 632 b 602 d 679/685

He married <639 Begga of Heristal Aka: St. Begga [rt18 p368] dau of Pippin I Of Austria Aka: Pepin of Landen, Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia, d 640 & Itta, d 652, dau of Arnoldus, Bishop of Metz, son of Ansbertus the Senator; b <620 d 694

-------------------- 2. Ansigise (Ansegisal) Duke of Brabant, [Mayor/Palace], b. 602, , , , Austrasia , d. 678/685 St. Beggue (Begga), b. Abt 613, of, Landen, Liege, Belgium, d. 694/698

Ansegiso (602 – prima del 679) , figlio del vescovo Arnolfo di Metz e dell'aristocratica Doda, fu consigliere di Sigeberto III d'Austrasia.

Si sposò dopo il 639 con Begga, figlia di Pipino di Landen con la quale ebbe i seguenti figli:

   * Pipino di Herstal (635 o 640 - 16 dicembre 714)
   * Martino conte di Laon
   * Clotilda di Heristal (650-699), moglie di Re Teodorico III

Venne ucciso prima del 679. -------------------- Ansegisel (also Ansgise, Ansegus, or Anchises) (c. 602 or 610 – murdered before 679 or 662) was the son of Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and his wife Saint Doda. He served King Sigbert III of Austrasia (634-656) as a duke (Latin dux, a military leader) and domesticus. He was killed sometime before 679, slain in a feud by his enemy Gundewin. -------------------- Mayor of the Palace to Siegbert 632 --------------------

Ansegisel var søn af den magtfulde Austrasian adelsmand, biskop Arnulf af Metz, og var gift med Saint Begga, datter af den mere kraftfulde Austrasian adelsmand borgmester Pepin I.

-------------------- Leo: Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried, Reference: 52.

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Ansigisel de Metz, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia's Timeline

602
602
Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France
635
635
Age 33
Herstal, Liège, Walloon Region, Belgium
639
639
Age 37
Austria
650
650
Age 48
Metz, Moselle, France
655
655
Age 53
662
662
Age 60
Siegburg, Cologne, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
679
679
Age 60
Andenne, Walloon Region, Belgium
693
December 17, 693
Age 60
France

Feast September 6 and December 17

1923
June 25, 1923
Age 60
June 25, 1923
Age 60