Bonnie Elizabeth Barrow

Is your surname Barrow?

Research the Barrow family

Bonnie Elizabeth Barrow's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Bonnie Elizabeth Barrow (Parker)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Rowena, Runnels County, Texas, United States
Death: Died in Bienville Parish, Louisiana, United States
Cause of death: Gun shots
Place of Burial: Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, United States
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Charles Parker and Emma Parker
Wife of Roy Glenn Thornton
Partner of Clyde Chestnut Barrow
Sister of Coley Parker; Hubert Nicholas Parker; Eddie Parker; Charles Parker; Fannie Parker and 4 others

Managed by: Ric Dickinson
Last Updated:

About Bonnie Elizabeth Barrow

Bonnie and Clyde, lovers and criminals who traveled the Central United States during the Great Depression were not considered as romantic back then as they are today. Their gang was responsible for at least nine police officer and several civilian deaths. It is unsure how the couple met but it is thought that it was love at a first sight. When Bonnie and Clyde met (probably in 1930), the latter already had a criminal record but that obviously did not bother Bonnie. She decided to join him in his criminal undertakings and stayed with him until the very end. They were ambushed by the police in Bienville Parish, Louisiana in 1934 and killed. The couple wanted to be buried together but Bonnie’s family did not allow it.

Bonnie Parker (October 1, 1910 – May 23, 1934) and Clyde Barrow (March 24, 1909 – May 23, 1934) were well-known outlaws, robbers and criminals who traveled the Central United States with their gang during the Great Depression. Their exploits captured the attention of the American public during the "public enemy era" between 1931 and 1934. Though known today for his dozen-or-so bank robberies, Barrow in fact preferred to rob small stores or rural gas stations. The gang is believed to have killed at least nine police officers and committed several civilian murders. The couple themselves were eventually ambushed and killed in Louisiana by law officers. Their reputation was cemented in American pop folklore by Arthur Penn's 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde.

Sources:

Legendary Outlaw. She was the middle child and oldest daughter of Henry and Emma Parker. After the death of her father in 1914, her mother moved the family to the West Dallas area called “Cement City.” In her youth, she was known for being kind, an Honor Student and a writer of poetry (and other creative writing endeavors). In 1926, She married high-school sweetheart Roy Thornton. Despite the rocky and sometimes abusive marriage and Roy’s imprisonment in 1929, she remained married to him until she died. To support herself, she worked as a waitress at Marco’s café and became friends with Ted Hinton (who would ironically take part in gunning her down). In 1930, she met Clyde Barrow when she was unemployed and helping out a mutual friend. When he was arrested shortly after, she smuggled a gun into the prison in order to help him escape. When he was rearrested, and released two years later, she decided to join him as an outlaw. After their notorious crime sprees, they were eventually stopped when Law Enforcement Officials ambushed their car and killed both of them in a hail of bullets not too far away from their Louisiana hideout. Before her death, she sent the reporters her infamous “Story (or Ballard) of Bonnie and Clyde.” (bio by: Jip)


Cause of death: Shot to death with Clyde Barrow by officers in an ambush near Sailes, Bienville Parish, Louisiana

Legendary Outlaw. She was the middle child and oldest daughter of Henry and Emma Parker. After the death of her father in 1914, her mother moved the family to the West Dallas area called “Cement City.” In her youth, she was known for being kind, an Honor Student and a writer of poetry (and other creative writing endeavors). In 1926, She married high-school sweetheart Roy Thornton. Despite the rocky and sometimes abusive marriage and Roy’s imprisonment in 1929, she remained married to him until she died. To support herself, she worked as a waitress at Marco’s café and became friends with Ted Hinton (who would ironically take part in gunning her down). In 1930, she met Clyde Barrow when she was unemployed and helping out a mutual friend. When he was arrested shortly after, she smuggled a gun into the prison in order to help him escape. When he was rearrested, and released two years later, she decided to join him as an outlaw. After their notorious crime sprees, they were eventually stopped when Law Enforcement Officials ambushed their car and killed both of them in a hail of bullets not too far away from their Louisiana hideout. Before her death, she sent the reporters her infamous “Story (or Ballard) of Bonnie and Clyde.” (bio by: [fg.cgi?page=mr&MRid=46559925" target="_blank Jip)] Cause of death: Shot to death with Clyde Barrow by officers in an ambush near Sailes, Bienville Parish, Louisiana Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Jan 01, 2001

Find A Grave Memorial# 791

view all

Bonnie Elizabeth Barrow's Timeline

1910
October 1, 1910
Rowena, Runnels County, Texas, United States
1934
May 23, 1934
Age 23
Bienville Parish, Louisiana, United States
May 23, 1934
Age 23
Gibsland, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, United States
May 23, 1934
Age 23
Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, United States

Crown Hill Memorial Park