Brutus "The Trojan", King of Britian

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Brutus the Dardanian "The Trojan" 1st King of Briton

Also Known As: "Brwt", "Brutus of /Troy/", "The Trojan"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Alba Longa, Italy
Death: Died in Britain, England
Place of Burial: buried at a temple at Tower Hill, Britain (UK)
Immediate Family:

Son of Legendary father of Brutus, 1st king of Britain and Unknown Mother
Husband of Ignoge
Father of Loegres ap Brutus, King of Britain; Albanactus Founding king of Albany (Silvius); Camber (Cymryw) Ap Brutus (ap Brwt), Duke of Cambria and Cornwall and Gwendolin "The Trojan" Of Britian

Occupation: b.ca960bc d.ca1077bc -of Great Britain
Managed by: Joseph Kinner Harmon
Last Updated:

About Brutus "The Trojan", King of Britian

A legendary "founder of Britain", referenced in the Historia Brittonum (ca 828) and Historia Regum Britanniae (ca 1136). There is no contemporary or classical source for the existence of this person.

In the legends, his father is variously given as Silvius king of Alba Longa or Ascanius, his father.

Because of the lack of compelling evidence, the link is left as "unknown father".

B: -1150 -1120 -1050 -1091 -1103

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brutus_of_Troy -------------------- Brutus of Troy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Brutus (Brut, Brute, Welsh Bryttys), a legendary descendant of the Trojan hero Aeneas, was known in medieval British legend as the eponymous founder and first king of Britain. This legend first appears in the Historia Britonum, a 9th century historical compilation attributed to Nennius, but is best known from the account given by the 12th century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Historia Regum Britanniae. However, he is not mentioned in any classical text and is not considered to be historical. eferences


[edit] Historia Britonum The Historia Britonum states that "The island of Britain derives its name from Brutus, a Roman consul" who conquered both Spain and Britain. A more detailed story, set before the foundation of Rome, follows, in which Brutus is the grandson or great grandson of Aeneas.

Following Roman sources such as Livy and Virgil, the Historia tells how Aeneas settled in Italy after the Trojan War, and how his son Ascanius founded Alba Longa, one of the precursors of Rome. Ascanius married, and his wife became pregnant. In a variant version, the father is Silvius, who is identified as either the second son of Brutus, previously mentioned in the Historia, or as the son of Ascanius. A magician, asked to predict the child's future, said it would be a boy and that he would be the bravest and most beloved in Italy. Enraged, Ascanius had the magician put to death. The mother died in childbirth.

The boy, named Brutus, later accidentally killed his father with an arrow and was banished from Italy. After wandering among the islands of the Tyrrhenian Sea and through Gaul, where he founded the city of Tours, Brutus eventually came to Britain, named it after himself, and filled it with his descendants. His reign is synchronised to the time the High Priest Eli was judge in Israel, and the Ark of the Covenant was taken by the Philistines.[1]

A variant version of the Historia Britonum makes Brutus the son of Ascanius's son Silvius, and traces his genealogy back to Ham, son of Noah.[2] Another chapter traces Brutus's genealogy differently, making him the great-grandson of the legendary Roman king Numa Pompilius, who was himself a son of Ascanius, and tracing his descent from Noah's son Japheth.[3] These Christianising traditions conflict with the classical Trojan genealogies, relating the Trojan royal family to Greek gods.

Yet another Brutus, son of Hisicion, son of Alanus the first European, also traced back across many generations to Japheth, is referred to in the Historia Britonum. This Brutus's brothers were Francus, Alamanus and Romanus, also ancestors of significant European nations.[4]

[edit] Historia Regum Britanniae Geoffrey of Monmouth's account tells much the same story, but in greater detail.[5] In this version, Brutus is explicitly the grandson, rather than son, of Ascanius; his father is Ascanius' son Silvius. The magician who predicts great things for the unborn Brutus also foretells he will kill both his parents. He does so, in the same manner described in the Historia Britonum, and is banished. Travelling to Greece, he discovers a group of Trojans enslaved there. He becomes their leader, and after a series of battles and some judicious hostage-taking, forces the Greek king Pandrasus to let his people go. He is given Pandrasus's daughter Ignoge in marriage, and ships and provisions for the voyage, and sets sail.

The Trojans land on a deserted island and discover an abandoned temple to Diana. After performing the appropriate ritual, Brutus falls asleep in front of the goddess's statue and is given a vision of the land where he is destined to settle, an island in the western ocean inhabited only by a few giants.

After some adventures in north Africa and a close encounter with the Sirens, Brutus discovers another group of exiled Trojans living on the shores of the Tyrrhenian Sea, led by the prodigious warrior Corineus. In Gaul, Corineus provokes a war with Goffarius Pictus, king of Aquitaine, after hunting in the kings forests without permission. Brutus's nephew Turonus dies in the fighting, and the city of Tours is founded where he is buried. The Trojans win most of their battles but are conscious that the Gauls have the advantage of numbers, so go back to their ships and sail for Britain, then called Albion. They meet the giant descendants of Albion and defeat them.

Brutus renames the island after himself and becomes its first king. Corineus becomes ruler of Cornwall, which is named after him.[6] They are harassed by the giants, but kill all of them but their leader, Gogmagog, who is saved for a wrestling match against Corineus. Corineus throws him over a cliff to his death. Brutus then founds a city on the banks of the River Thames, which he calls Troia Nova, or New Troy, siting his palace where is now Guildhall and a temple to Diana on what is now St Paul's (with the London Stone being a part of the altar at the latter). The name is in time corrupted to Trinovantum, and is later called London.[7] He creates laws for his people and rules for twenty-four years. He is buried at a temple at Tower Hill. After his death the island is divided between his three sons, Locrinus (England), Albanactus (Scotland) and Kamber (Wales).

[edit] Legacy


the Brutus Stone in TotnesEarly translations and adaptations of Geoffrey's Historia, such as Wace's Norman French Roman de Brut, Layamon's Old English Brut, were named after Brutus, and the word "Brut" came to mean a chronicle of British history. A Middle Welsh adaptation was called the Brut y Brenhinedd ("Brut of the Kings"), and a sequel recounting the Welsh rulers from the 7th century on, in which Brutus makes no appearance, was known as the Brut y Tywysogion ("Brut of the Princes").

Geoffrey's Historia says that Brutus and his followers landed at Totnes in Devon. A stone on Fore Street in Totnes, known as the "Brutus Stone", commemorates this.

Preceded by Trojans Legendary Kings of Britain Succeeded by Locrinus

THE KINGS OF THE ANCIENT BRITONS: A CHRONOLOGY by Bill Cooper

THORPE'S LAMENT

Thorpe complains that Geoffrey of Monmouth provides too few clues for dating purposes, and that even those that he does provide only serve to confuse us. Upon examination of Geoffrey's Historia, however, we find that Thorpe was quite mistaken. The Historia is rich in clues compared to many other of these early accounts, and far from confusing us, they actually help us to build a most erudite picture.

Let us begin with Brutus, the very first king of the Britons and from whom the Britons derived their name. Geoffrey tells us in Book 1, chapter 18 of his Historia, that Brutus was born two or three generations after the Trojan Wars. The Trojan Wars having occurred around 1240 BC, that would place his birth in about the middle of the XII century, say around 1150 BC. Moreover, Geoffrey goes on to tell us that Brutus reigned as king for 23 years, and further, that he ruled Britain at the time that Eli was judge in Israel. We know that Eli judged Israel between the years 1115 - 1075 BC. Thus, we are given two synchronisms, not one, and both of these confirm each other, thus allowing us to date the reign of Brutus with much confidence. No cause for complaint there!

Following Brutus's reign, we are told that his son Locrinus ruled for 10 years, and that his, Locrinus's, widow, Queen Gwendolen, ruled after him for 15 years at the time when Samuel judged Israel (Book 2, chapter 6.) We know that Samuel judged Israel for the forty year period between 1075 - 1035 BC, and thus Geoffrey's synchronisms begin to take on an unexpected, and hitherto uncredited, aura of respectability.

BRUTUS (1160 - 1137 BC) the son of Silvius, was the first to colonise these islands after the flood and from whom Britain derives it's name. His wife was Ignore who married him against her will. He had three sons, to Locrinus he left Logria (England); to Kamber he left Cambria (Wales) and to Albanactus he left Albany (Scotland stretching down as far as the River Humber). There was a king called Humber who sought to settle in southern Albany. He brought his followers from Scythia. He killed Albanactus in the fighting that followed. Locrinus then did battle with Humber and captured him. He drowned him in a river to avenge his brother. His people fled but settled in various parts of Albany and they were the early Picts. Brutus came from what is now Italy. The genealogy of Brutus is traced back to Noah

--------------------

  1. Event: was the "father" of Britons
  2. Event: was expelled from Italy for having killed his father
  3. Event: 1st King Title Britain

-------------------- Brutus (Welsh: Brutus) or Brute of Troy is a legendary descendant of the Trojan hero Aeneas, was known in medieval British legend as the eponymous founder and first king of Britain. This legend first appears in the Historia Britonum, a 9th century historical compilation attributed to Nennius, but is best known from the account given by the 12th century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Historia Regum Britanniae. However, he is not mentioned in any classical text and is not considered to be historical.

   *

[edit] Historia Britonum

The Historia Britonum states that "The island of Britain derives its name from Brutus, a Roman consul" who conquered both Spain and Britain. A more detailed story, set before the foundation of Rome, follows, in which Brutus is the grandson or great grandson of Aeneas.

Following Roman sources such as Livy and Virgil, the Historia tells how Aeneas settled in Italy after the Trojan War, and how his son Ascanius founded Alba Longa, one of the precursors of Rome. Ascanius married, and his wife became pregnant. In a variant version, the father is Silvius, who is identified as either the second son of Brutus, previously mentioned in the Historia, or as the son of Ascanius. A magician, asked to predict the child's future, said it would be a boy and that he would be the bravest and most beloved in Italy. Enraged, Ascanius had the magician put to death. The mother died in childbirth.

The boy, named Brutus, later accidentally killed his father with an arrow and was banished from Italy. After wandering among the islands of the Tyrrhenian Sea and through Gaul, where he founded the city of Tours, Brutus eventually came to Britain, named it after himself, and filled it with his descendants. His reign is synchronised to the time the High Priest Eli was judge in Israel, and the Ark of the Covenant was taken by the Philistines.[1]

A variant version of the Historia Britonum makes Brutus the son of Ascanius's son Silvius, and traces his genealogy back to Ham, son of Noah.[2] Another chapter traces Brutus's genealogy differently, making him the great-grandson of the legendary Roman king Numa Pompilius, who was himself a son of Ascanius, and tracing his descent from Noah's son Japheth.[3] These Christianising traditions conflict with the classical Trojan genealogies, relating the Trojan royal family to Greek gods.

Yet another Brutus, son of Hisicion, son of Alanus the first European, also traced back across many generations to Japheth, is referred to in the Historia Britonum. This Brutus's brothers were Francus, Alamanus and Romanus, also ancestors of significant European nations.[4]

[edit] Historia Regum Britanniae

Geoffrey of Monmouth's account tells much the same story, but in greater detail.[5] In this version, Brutus is explicitly the grandson, rather than son, of Ascanius; his father is Ascanius' son Silvius. The magician who predicts great things for the unborn Brutus also foretells he will kill both his parents. He does so, in the same manner described in the Historia Britonum, and is banished. Travelling to Greece, he discovers a group of Trojans enslaved there. He becomes their leader, and after a series of battles and some judicious hostage-taking, forces the Greek king Pandrasus to let his people go. He is given Pandrasus's daughter Ignoge in marriage, and ships and provisions for the voyage, and sets sail.

The Trojans land on a deserted island and discover an abandoned temple to Diana. After performing the appropriate ritual, Brutus falls asleep in front of the goddess's statue and is given a vision of the land where he is destined to settle, an island in the western ocean inhabited only by a few giants.

After some adventures in north Africa and a close encounter with the Sirens, Brutus discovers another group of exiled Trojans living on the shores of the Tyrrhenian Sea, led by the prodigious warrior Corineus. In Gaul, Corineus provokes a war with Goffarius Pictus, king of Aquitaine, after hunting in the king's forests without permission. Brutus's nephew Turonus dies in the fighting, and the city of Tours is founded where he is buried. The Trojans win most of their battles but are conscious that the Gauls have the advantage of numbers, so go back to their ships and sail for Britain, then called Albion. They meet the giant descendants of Albion and defeat them.

Brutus renames the island after himself and becomes its first king. Corineus becomes ruler of Cornwall, which is named after him.[6] They are harassed by the giants, but kill all of them but their leader, Gogmagog, who is saved for a wrestling match against Corineus. Corineus throws him over a cliff to his death. Brutus then founds a city on the banks of the River Thames, which he calls Troia Nova, or New Troy, siting his palace where is now Guildhall and a temple to Diana on what is now St Paul's (with the London Stone being a part of the altar at the latter). The name is in time corrupted to Trinovantum, and is later called London.[7] He creates laws for his people and rules for twenty-four years. He is buried at a temple at Tower Hill. After his death the island is divided between his three sons, Locrinus (England), Albanactus (Scotland) and Kamber (Wales).

[edit] Legacy The Brutus Stone in Totnes

Early translations and adaptations of Geoffrey's Historia, such as Wace's Norman French Roman de Brut, Layamon's Old English Brut, were named after Brutus, and the word "Brut" came to mean a chronicle of British history. One of several Middle Welsh adaptations was called the Brut y Brenhinedd ("Chronicle of the Kings"). Brut y Tywysogion ("Chronicle of the Princes"), a major chronicle for the Welsh rulers from the 7th century to loss of independence, is a purely historical work containing no legendary material but the title reflects the influence of Geoffrey's work and in one sense can be seen as a "sequel" to it.

Geoffrey's Historia says that Brutus and his followers landed at Totnes in Devon. A stone on Fore Street in Totnes, known as the "Brutus Stone", commemorates this. -------------------- Brutus of Troy, also of Britain (Welsh: Bryttys), was the legendary founding king of Britain and great grandson of Aeneas, according to Geoffrey of Monmouth. Exiled from Italy for the accidental killing of his natural father Silvius, Brutus liberated a group of Trojans living in slavery in Greece and led them forth, received a vision during this wandering that he would found a kingdom in a land inhabited by giants, then after numerous battles in the region of the city of Tours in Gaul, he settled in Britain with the aid of his fellow Trojan Corineus, where they slew the giants living in that island. He is said to have founded the city Troia Nova, later named London. The Celtic tribe that dwelt in the area of London was called the Trinovantes, and one early name of the city named it after them. He created a code of laws for his people before his death. He reigned 23 years. By Ignoge he had three sons Locrinus, Kamber, and Albanactus whom on Brutus's death divided the island between them. Geoffrey fixes the time of his death with the statement that Eli was priest in Judea and the Ark of the Covenant was captured by the Philistines, the sons of Hector reigned in Troy, and Aeneas Silvius was ruling Alba Longa in Italy. Although the Historia Britonum, from which Geoffrey drew the core of this story, claims Britain was named after Brutus, this personage has no basis in actual fact, and is generally considered a medieval fiction created to provide a distinguished genealogy for one or more Welsh royal families. The Historia Britonum not only describes Brutus as a descendent of Troy but also places him in the Trojan genealogy, which he probably created himself to relate Troy to the Christian God. Brutus became part of the Matter of Britain, a pseudo-historical account of the events of that island, which was widely accepted as historical fact until the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, when reliable historical records and inscriptions were available and studied by scholars who gradually disproved much of it but is still occasionally cited in popular or ceremonial accounts in contemporary England. duplicate line Brutus the Dardanian King of Britons son of Silvius Aeneas the Dardarian. He is speculated to have lived approximatedly 1100 BCE and reigned for 23 years in Britain. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

-------------------- Brutus (Welsh: Brutus) or Brute of Troy is a legendary descendant of the Trojan hero Aeneas, was known in medieval British legend as the eponymous founder and first king of Britain. This legend first appears in the Historia Britonum, a 9th century historical compilation attributed to Nennius, but is best known from the account given by the 12th century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Historia Regum Britanniae. However, he is not mentioned in any classical text and is not considered to be historical.

[edit] Historia Britonum

The Historia Britonum states that "The island of Britain derives its name from Brutus, a Roman consul" who conquered both Spain and Britain. A more detailed story, set before the foundation of Rome, follows, in which Brutus is the grandson or great grandson of Aeneas.

Following Roman sources such as Livy and Virgil, the Historia tells how Aeneas settled in Italy after the Trojan War, and how his son Ascanius founded Alba Longa, one of the precursors of Rome. Ascanius married, and his wife became pregnant. In a variant version, the father is Silvius, who is identified as either the second son of Brutus, previously mentioned in the Historia, or as the son of Ascanius. A magician, asked to predict the child's future, said it would be a boy and that he would be the bravest and most beloved in Italy. Enraged, Ascanius had the magician put to death. The mother died in childbirth.

The boy, named Brutus, later accidentally killed his father with an arrow and was banished from Italy. After wandering among the islands of the Tyrrhenian Sea and through Gaul, where he founded the city of Tours, Brutus eventually came to Britain, named it after himself, and filled it with his descendants. His reign is synchronised to the time the High Priest Eli was judge in Israel, and the Ark of the Covenant was taken by the Philistines.[1]

A variant version of the Historia Britonum makes Brutus the son of Ascanius's son Silvius, and traces his genealogy back to Ham, son of Noah.[2] Another chapter traces Brutus's genealogy differently, making him the great-grandson of the legendary Roman king Numa Pompilius, who was himself a son of Ascanius, and tracing his descent from Noah's son Japheth.[3] These Christianising traditions conflict with the classical Trojan genealogies, relating the Trojan royal family to Greek gods.

Yet another Brutus, son of Hisicion, son of Alanus the first European, also traced back across many generations to Japheth, is referred to in the Historia Britonum. This Brutus's brothers were Francus, Alamanus and Romanus, also ancestors of significant European nations.[4]

[edit] Historia Regum Britanniae

Geoffrey of Monmouth's account tells much the same story, but in greater detail.[5] In this version, Brutus is explicitly the grandson, rather than son, of Ascanius; his father is Ascanius' son Silvius. The magician who predicts great things for the unborn Brutus also foretells he will kill both his parents. He does so, in the same manner described in the Historia Britonum, and is banished. Travelling to Greece, he discovers a group of Trojans enslaved there. He becomes their leader, and after a series of battles and some judicious hostage-taking, forces the Greek king Pandrasus to let his people go. He is given Pandrasus's daughter Ignoge in marriage, and ships and provisions for the voyage, and sets sail.

The Trojans land on a deserted island and discover an abandoned temple to Diana. After performing the appropriate ritual, Brutus falls asleep in front of the goddess's statue and is given a vision of the land where he is destined to settle, an island in the western ocean inhabited only by a few giants.

After some adventures in north Africa and a close encounter with the Sirens, Brutus discovers another group of exiled Trojans living on the shores of the Tyrrhenian Sea, led by the prodigious warrior Corineus. In Gaul, Corineus provokes a war with Goffarius Pictus, king of Aquitaine, after hunting in the king's forests without permission. Brutus's nephew Turonus dies in the fighting, and the city of Tours is founded where he is buried. The Trojans win most of their battles but are conscious that the Gauls have the advantage of numbers, so go back to their ships and sail for Britain, then called Albion. They meet the giant descendants of Albion and defeat them.

Brutus renames the island after himself and becomes its first king. Corineus becomes ruler of Cornwall, which is named after him.[6] They are harassed by the giants, but kill all of them but their leader, Gogmagog, who is saved for a wrestling match against Corineus. Corineus throws him over a cliff to his death. Brutus then founds a city on the banks of the River Thames, which he calls Troia Nova, or New Troy, siting his palace where is now Guildhall and a temple to Diana on what is now St Paul's (with the London Stone being a part of the altar at the latter). The name is in time corrupted to Trinovantum, and is later called London.[7] He creates laws for his people and rules for twenty-four years. He is buried at a temple at Tower Hill. After his death the island is divided between his three sons, Locrinus (England), Albanactus (Scotland) and Kamber (Wales).

[edit] Legacy The Brutus Stone in Totnes

Early translations and adaptations of Geoffrey's Historia, such as Wace's Norman French Roman de Brut, Layamon's Old English Brut, were named after Brutus, and the word "Brut" came to mean a chronicle of British history. One of several Middle Welsh adaptations was called the Brut y Brenhinedd ("Chronicle of the Kings"). Brut y Tywysogion ("Chronicle of the Princes"), a major chronicle for the Welsh rulers from the 7th century to loss of independence, is a purely historical work containing no legendary material but the title reflects the influence of Geoffrey's work and in one sense can be seen as a "sequel" to it.

Geoffrey's Historia says that Brutus and his followers landed at Totnes in Devon. A stone on Fore Street in Totnes, known as the "Brutus Stone", commemorates this. -------------------- Brutus (Welsh: Brutus) or Brute of Troy is a legendary descendant of the Trojan hero Aeneas, was known in medieval British legend as the eponymous founder and first king of Britain. This legend first appears in the Historia Britonum, a 9th century historical compilation attributed to Nennius, but is best known from the account given by the 12th century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Historia Regum Britanniae. However, he is not mentioned in any classical text and is not considered to be historical.

[edit] Historia Britonum

The Historia Britonum states that "The island of Britain derives its name from Brutus, a Roman consul" who conquered both Spain and Britain. A more detailed story, set before the foundation of Rome, follows, in which Brutus is the grandson or great grandson of Aeneas.

Following Roman sources such as Livy and Virgil, the Historia tells how Aeneas settled in Italy after the Trojan War, and how his son Ascanius founded Alba Longa, one of the precursors of Rome. Ascanius married, and his wife became pregnant. In a variant version, the father is Silvius, who is identified as either the second son of Brutus, previously mentioned in the Historia, or as the son of Ascanius. A magician, asked to predict the child's future, said it would be a boy and that he would be the bravest and most beloved in Italy. Enraged, Ascanius had the magician put to death. The mother died in childbirth.

The boy, named Brutus, later accidentally killed his father with an arrow and was banished from Italy. After wandering among the islands of the Tyrrhenian Sea and through Gaul, where he founded the city of Tours, Brutus eventually came to Britain, named it after himself, and filled it with his descendants. His reign is synchronised to the time the High Priest Eli was judge in Israel, and the Ark of the Covenant was taken by the Philistines.[1]

A variant version of the Historia Britonum makes Brutus the son of Ascanius's son Silvius, and traces his genealogy back to Ham, son of Noah.[2] Another chapter traces Brutus's genealogy differently, making him the great-grandson of the legendary Roman king Numa Pompilius, who was himself a son of Ascanius, and tracing his descent from Noah's son Japheth.[3] These Christianising traditions conflict with the classical Trojan genealogies, relating the Trojan royal family to Greek gods.

Yet another Brutus, son of Hisicion, son of Alanus the first European, also traced back across many generations to Japheth, is referred to in the Historia Britonum. This Brutus's brothers were Francus, Alamanus and Romanus, also ancestors of significant European nations.[4]

[edit] Historia Regum Britanniae

Geoffrey of Monmouth's account tells much the same story, but in greater detail.[5] In this version, Brutus is explicitly the grandson, rather than son, of Ascanius; his father is Ascanius' son Silvius. The magician who predicts great things for the unborn Brutus also foretells he will kill both his parents. He does so, in the same manner described in the Historia Britonum, and is banished. Travelling to Greece, he discovers a group of Trojans enslaved there. He becomes their leader, and after a series of battles and some judicious hostage-taking, forces the Greek king Pandrasus to let his people go. He is given Pandrasus's daughter Ignoge in marriage, and ships and provisions for the voyage, and sets sail.

The Trojans land on a deserted island and discover an abandoned temple to Diana. After performing the appropriate ritual, Brutus falls asleep in front of the goddess's statue and is given a vision of the land where he is destined to settle, an island in the western ocean inhabited only by a few giants.

After some adventures in north Africa and a close encounter with the Sirens, Brutus discovers another group of exiled Trojans living on the shores of the Tyrrhenian Sea, led by the prodigious warrior Corineus. In Gaul, Corineus provokes a war with Goffarius Pictus, king of Aquitaine, after hunting in the king's forests without permission. Brutus's nephew Turonus dies in the fighting, and the city of Tours is founded where he is buried. The Trojans win most of their battles but are conscious that the Gauls have the advantage of numbers, so go back to their ships and sail for Britain, then called Albion. They meet the giant descendants of Albion and defeat them.

Brutus renames the island after himself and becomes its first king. Corineus becomes ruler of Cornwall, which is named after him.[6] They are harassed by the giants, but kill all of them but their leader, Gogmagog, who is saved for a wrestling match against Corineus. Corineus throws him over a cliff to his death. Brutus then founds a city on the banks of the River Thames, which he calls Troia Nova, or New Troy, siting his palace where is now Guildhall and a temple to Diana on what is now St Paul's (with the London Stone being a part of the altar at the latter). The name is in time corrupted to Trinovantum, and is later called London.[7] He creates laws for his people and rules for twenty-four years. He is buried at a temple at Tower Hill. After his death the island is divided between his three sons, Locrinus (England), Albanactus (Scotland) and Kamber (Wales).

[edit] Legacy The Brutus Stone in Totnes

Early translations and adaptations of Geoffrey's Historia, such as Wace's Norman French Roman de Brut, Layamon's Old English Brut, were named after Brutus, and the word "Brut" came to mean a chronicle of British history. One of several Middle Welsh adaptations was called the Brut y Brenhinedd ("Chronicle of the Kings"). Brut y Tywysogion ("Chronicle of the Princes"), a major chronicle for the Welsh rulers from the 7th century to loss of independence, is a purely historical work containing no legendary material but the title reflects the influence of Geoffrey's work and in one sense can be seen as a "sequel" to it.

Geoffrey's Historia says that Brutus and his followers landed at Totnes in Devon. A stone on Fore Street in Totnes, known as the "Brutus Stone", commemorates this. -------------------- "About the year 1150 B.C. there appeared off the shores of England (in those far off days called Albion) a vast fleet of ships, Trojan vessels of magnificent design, bearing with them all manner of merchandise and precious jewels from the ancient worlds of Greece and Troy.With them came warriors and craftsmen, their families and servants, seeking a new land. Leading this great expedition was one Brutus, a Trojan General of renown who had won for the Trojans freedom from their Greek oppressors." -------------------- Events in the life of Brutus the Dardanian

† death 1 .

1091 BC .

event

·gave his name to "Britain"

event

·exiled out of Italy for having caused the deaths of both his parents

event

·sailed to the British Isles via Greece and the Mediterranean with a group of Trojan captives whom he freed from King Pandrasus

event

·came across another group of Trojans led by Corineus, who were likewise escaping abroad from their captors

Expelled from Italy for having killed his Father. At the age of 15

years, he accidentally shot his father dead with an arrow while hunting.The Trojans accepted Brutus as their leader. Reigned 23 years. -------------------- Death: in 1091 BC

view all

Brutus "The Trojan", King of Britian's Timeline

-1132
-1132
Britain?
-1131
-1131
Britain, England
-1125
-1125
Wales
-1124
-1124
Britain, England
-730
-730
BC, King of, Britian, Siluria
????
Alba Longa, Italy
????
Britain, England
????
buried at a temple at Tower Hill, Britain (UK)