Constantius I Chlorus, Roman Emperor

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Gaius Flavius Valerius Constantius Chlorus, Roman Emperor

Also Known As: "Caesar Gaius Flavius Valerius Constantius Chlorus", "Cysteman", "/Clorus/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dardania (Moesia Superior)
Death: Died in Eboracum, Yorkshire, , England
Place of Burial: Saint Helen's, York, Yorkshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Flavius Titus Eutropius and Claudia Crispina
Husband of Constantina of Rome; Armenian Woman; St. Helen of the Cross (Fictional Version); Saint Helena of the Cross and Flavia Maximiana Theodora
Father of King Costus; Constantine I "the Great", Roman Emperor; Anastasia; Flavius Dalmatius; Flavia Julia Constantia and 3 others
Brother of Valerius Constantinus Dardanus and Anastasia Constantina Eutropia

Occupation: Governor of Dalmatia, Caesar over Gaul and Britain, Emperor of the Western Roman Empire (vv.305-306), Empereur de Rome
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Constantius I Chlorus, Roman Emperor

Constantius Chlorus (Gaius Flavius Valerius Constantius Chlorus). The Historia Augusta says Constantius Chlorus was the son of Eutropius, a noble from northern Dardania in modern Kosovo, and Claudia, a niece of the emperors Claudius II and Quintillus. Historians, however, suspect this maternal connection to be a genealogical fabrication created by his son Constantine I, thus connecting his family to two rather highly regarded predecessors. His father, however, might have been the brother of Eutropia, wife of Maximian.

He claimed descent from the Greco-Roman god Apollon (Apollo). His original social standing is unclear, but he was an army officer by the time his son Constantine was born in 272/273. By 284 he was Governor of Dalmatia. Early in his career he contracted some form of marriage with Helena, but by 289 had divorced her and married Theodora, step-daughter of Maximian. On 1 March 293 he entered the imperial collegium as a Caesar, with responsibility for Gaul, Spain and Britain. Because Britain was held by Carausius, formerly commander of the Roman Channel fleet, Constantius began preparations for an invasion. Carausius died in 293 or 294, Constantius landed in Kent in 296, and re-took Britain. In 304 he held a triumphal procession at Rome, the last such celebration in the empire. In 305 the Emperors Diocletian and Maximian retired, and Constantius and Galerius became joint Emperors, with Constantius as the senior of the two. Galerius named two new Caesars and hoped to get the entire empire when Constantius died at York the following year, but within 18 months Constantius' son Constantine was elevated. According to a highly suspect local tradition, the church of Saint Helen's-on-the-Walls at York was built on the site of his tomb.

He is often called Constantius "Chlorus" from the pallor of his complexion. However, some contemporary sources refer to the rubor of his complexion. Therefore, the epithet "Chlorus" must be either a contemporary jest or a late tradition.

--------------------

NameConstantius Flavius Valerius Emperor of Rome Birth31 Mar 242, Britian Death25 Jul 306, Eboracum (York), Britain FatherEutropius MotherClaudia Crispina Misc. Notes Constantius I Chlorus (305-306 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr. Salve Regina University

Constantius' Early Life and Marriage

Born March 31st, Emperor Flavius Valerius Constantius may have come into the world ca. 250. His family was from Illyricum. In the army he served as a protector ,tribunus , and a praeses Dalmatiarum . During the 270s or the 280s, he became the father of Constantine by Helena , his first spouse. By 288 he was the Praetorian Prefect of the western emperor Maximianus Herculius. 1

Constantius' Reign as Caesar

On 1 March 293 Diocletian appointed Galerius as his Caesar (junior emperor) in the east and Constantius as the Caesar of Maximianus Herculius. Caesar in the west. Both Caesars had the right of succession. In order to strengthen the dynastic relationship between himself and Herculius. , Constantius put aside his wife Helena and married Theodora , the daughter, or perhaps stepdaughter, of Maximianus Herculius. . The union was fruitful and of it there were six issue: Flavius Dalmatius ,Julius Constantius ,Hannibalianus ,Constantia ,Anastasia , and Eutropia . To strengthen his bond with Galerius and Diocletian in the east, Constantius allowed Galerius to keep his son Constantine as a hostage for his good behavior. 2

In the remainder of the time that he was a Caesar , Constantius spent much of his time engaged in military actions in the west. In the summer of 293 Constantius expelled the troops of the usurper Carausius from northern Gaul; after Constantius' attack on Bononia (Boulogne), Carausius was murdered. At the same time he dealt with the unrest of the Germans. In 296 he invaded Britain and put down the revolt of the usurper Allectus . Between 300 and 305 A.D. the Caesar campaigned successfully several times with various German tribes. 3 It is worth noting in passing, that while his colleagues rigidly enforced the "Great Persecution in 303," Constantius limited his action to knocking down a few churches. 4

Constantius as Augustus and His Untimely Death

On 1 May 305 Diocletian , at Nicomedia, and Maximianus Herculius , at Mediolanum (Milan), divested themselves of the purple, probably because of the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian forced Maximianus to abdicate. They appointed as their successors Constantius and Galerius , with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Constantius, as had his predecessor, ruled in the west, while Galerius and Daia ruled in the east. 5 Almost as soon as he was appointed Augustus, he crossed to Britain to face incursions by the Picts where he died at York on 25 July 306 with his son at his side. 6

Bibliography

Barnes, T.D . Constantine and Eusebius, , Cambridge, 1980.

________. New Empire of Diocletian and Constantine . Cambridge, 1981.

DiMaio, Michael. Zonaras' Account of the Neo-Flavian Emperors , (Ph.D. diss., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1977).

Jones, A.H.M. J.R. Martindale, and J. Morris. "Fl. Val. Constantius 12." the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire , (Cambridge, 1971), 1.227-228.

Kienast, Dietmar. Römische Kaisertabelle: Grundzüge einer römischen Kaiserchronologie . Darmstadt, 1990.

MacMullen, R. Constantine , New York, 1969.

Mattingly, Harold, and B.H. Warmington ."Constantius (Chlorus)." OCD .2281-282.

Seeck, Otto. "Constantius 1." RE 4, col.1040ff.

Notes 1Constantius' full name: ILS , 630, 641-3, 648, 650-52; such variations as Marcus Flavius Valerius Constantius( ibid , 637), Valerius Constantius ( ibid. , 640), Gaius Valerius Constantius ( ibid , 649), and Gaius Fabius Constantius ( ibid. , 650a) appear on inscriptions.

Constantius' date of birth, homeland, and career: Michael DiMaio, Zonaras' Account of the Neo-Flavian Emperors: A Commentary , (Ph.D diss., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1977), 97-98, nn 11-14; Constantius as Maxiamianus' Praetorian prefect: T.D. Barnes, Constantine and Eusebius, , (Cambridge, 1980), 3, 7-8, New Empire of Diocletian and Constantine , (Cambridge, 1981), 36-37.

For a discussion of Constantius' marriage to Helen, see infra , n.2.

2For a listing of the sources on the dating Constantius rise to the rank of Caesar, see A.H.M. Jones, J.R. Martindale, and J. Morris, the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire , (Cambridge, 1971), s.v. "Fl. Val. Constantius 12," 1.227-228, and Dietmar Kienast, Römische Kaisertabelle , (Darmstadt, 1990), 276ff

The Caesarship of Constantius is discussed, for example, by O. Seeck, RE 4, s.v. "Constantius 1," col.1041.57ff, and Ramsey MacMullen, Constantine , (New York, 1969), 35ff.

Barnes has summarized the problems and the sources surrounding the marriages of Constantius to Helen and to Theodora ( New Empire ), 33, 36-37.

3Constantius' campaigns are discussed by Barnes, Constantine and Eusebius , 15ff, and by Harold Mattingly and B.H. Warmington, OCD ,2s.v ."Constantius (Chlorus)," 281-282.

4Lact., Mort. Pers. , 15.7

5For a listing of sources which treat the acclamation of Constantius to the rank of Augustus, see Barnes, New Empire , 4ff.

6For a discussion of the death of Constantius and the sources that treat it, see DiMaio, 96ff.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr. This file may be copied on the condition that the entire contents, including the header and this copyright notice, remain intact. Spouses

1St. Helena (Elaine) of Colchester Birth248, Drepanum, Bithynia , Britain Death328, Constantinople, Turkey FatherCoilus King of Colchester (Camulod) (<125-170) MotherStrada "the Fair" ChildrenConstantine the Great (272-337)

Constantina

2Theorda

--------------------

CONSTANTIUS I Chlorus Emperor of the West Born : 242 Died : 25 Jul 306 Eboracum (present-day York) Marriage - Helena Britannica ferch Princess of Britain Children 27 Feb 272 - Constantine I the Great Emperor of Rome Marriage - Theodora Empress of the West Children - - Constantia Princess of the West  - - Julius Constantinus Prince of the West  - - Flavius Dalmatius Prince of the West Forrás / Source: http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/persons/per02549.htm#0 ------------------------------ Constantius Chlorus From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Reign 293 – 305 (as Caesar with Maximian); 305 – 306 (as Augustus in the west, with Galerius as Augustus in the east) Full name Marcus Flavius Valerius Constantius Born 31 March c. 250 Birthplace Dardania (Serbia) Died 25 July 306 Place of death Eboracum, Britannia Predecessor Maximian (with Diocletian in the East) Successor Flavius Valerius Severus (with Galerius in the East) Wives Helena (?–293) Theodora (293–306) Offspring Constantine the Great Flavius Dalmatius Julius Constantius Flavia Julia Constantia Eutropia Anastasia Dynasty Constantinian Father Eutropius Mother Claudia Flavius Valerius Constantius[1] (March 31 c. 250 – July 25, 306), also Constantius I, was an emperor of the Western Roman Empire (305–306). He was commonly called Chlorus (the Pale)[2] an epithet given to him by Byzantine historians. He was the father of Constantine the Great and initiator of the Constantinian dynasty.

Contents [hide] 1 History 2 Legend 2.1 Christian legends 2.2 British legends 3 Notes 4 External links


[edit] History The Historia Augusta says Constantius was the son of Eutropius, a noble from northern Dardania in modern Kosovo, and Claudia, a niece of the emperors Claudius II and Quintillus.[3] Historians, however, suspect this maternal connection to be a genealogical fabrication created by his son Constantine I, thus connecting his family to two rather highly regarded predecessors. His father, however, might have been the brother of Eutropia, wife of Maximian.

Under the emperor Carus, he was governor of Dalmatia, and Carus is said to have considered adopting him as his heir in place of his dissolute son, Carinus.[4]

In 293 the emperor Diocletian created the Tetrarchy, dividing the Roman Empire into Western and Eastern portions. Each would be ruled by an Augustus, supported by a Caesar. Diocletian became Augustus of the Eastern empire, with Galerius as his Caesar. Constantius was appointed Caesar to the Western Augustus, Maximian, and married Theodora, Maximian's stepdaughter. They had six children. Constantius divorced his first wife (or concubine), Helena, by whom he already had a son, Constantine. Helena was probably from Nicomedia in Asia Minor.[5] He was given command of Gaul, Britain and possibly Hispania. In 293, Constantius defeated the forces of Carausius, who had declared himself emperor in Britain and northern Gaul in 286, near Bononia. Carausius was killed by his rationalis Allectus, who took command of Britain until 296, when Constantius sent Asclepiodotus, a prefect of the Praetorian Guard, to invade the island. Allectus was defeated and killed, and Roman rule in Britain restored.[6]

Also in 296, Constantius fought a battle against the Alamanni at the city of Lingonae (Langres) in Gaul. He was shut up in the city, but was relieved by his army after six hours, and defeated the enemy.[7] He defeated them again at Vindonissa (Windisch, Switzerland),[8] thereby strengthening the defenses of the Rhine frontier.


Medal of Constantius I capturing Londinium (inscribed as LON) after defeating Allectus. Beaurains hoard.Diocletian and Maximian stepped down as co-emperors in 305, possibly due to Diocletian's poor health, and the Caesars, Constantius and Galerius, became co-emperors. Constantius ruled the western empire, Galerius the eastern. Severus and Maximinus Daia were appointed Caesars. Constantine, who had hoped to be a Caesar, joined his father's campaigns in Gaul and Britain.[9] Constantius died in Britain, at York, in 306, and Constantine was declared emperor by the army.[10]

Forrás / Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantius_Chlorus -------------------- Roman emperor and father of Constantine I. A member of the tetrarchy (four-man ruling body) with his adoptive father Maximian, Diocletian, and Galerius, he was made caesar (subemperor) in the West (293-305) and later caesar augustus (senior emperor) (305-6). As ruler of Gaul, he subdued rebellion in Britain (296), ended piracy, restored the frontier, and largely ignored edicts against Christians. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantius_Chlorus -------------------- Chlorus' means Pale' (den Bleke')

Reference: http://fabpedigree.com/s040/f000008.htm

-------------------- Anmärkning: Flavius Valerius Constantius I " Chlorus " i Rom alias Aurelius Valerius Constantius ( I), kejsare av romerska riket , " Chlorus " medel " -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantius_Chlorus -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantius_Chlorus -------------------- Constantius I Chlorus (305-306 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.

Salve Regina University

Constantius' Early Life and Marriage

Born March 31st, Emperor Flavius Valerius Constantius may have come into the world ca. 250. His family was from Illyricum. In the army he served as a protector ,tribunus , and a praeses Dalmatiarum . During the 270s or the 280s, he became the father of Constantine by Helena , his first spouse. By 288 he was the Praetorian Prefect of the western emperor Maximianus Herculius. 1

Constantius' Reign as Caesar

On 1 March 293 Diocletian appointed Galerius as his Caesar (junior emperor) in the east and Constantius as the Caesar of Maximianus Herculius. Caesar in the west. Both Caesars had the right of succession. In order to strengthen the dynastic relationship between himself and Herculius. , Constantius put aside his wife Helena and married Theodora , the daughter, or perhaps stepdaughter, of Maximianus Herculius. . The union was fruitful and of it there were six issue: Flavius Dalmatius ,Julius Constantius ,Hannibalianus ,Constantia ,Anastasia , and Eutropia . To strengthen his bond with Galerius and Diocletian in the east, Constantius allowed Galerius to keep his son Constantine as a hostage for his good behavior. 2

In the remainder of the time that he was a Caesar , Constantius spent much of his time engaged in military actions in the west. In the summer of 293 Constantius expelled the troops of the usurper Carausius from northern Gaul; after Constantius' attack on Bononia (Boulogne), Carausius was murdered. At the same time he dealt with the unrest of the Germans. In 296 he invaded Britain and put down the revolt of the usurper Allectus . Between 300 and 305 A.D. the Caesar campaigned successfully several times with various German tribes. 3 It is worth noting in passing, that while his colleagues rigidly enforced the "Great Persecution in 303," Constantius limited his action to knocking down a few churches. 4

Constantius as Augustus and His Untimely Death

On 1 May 305 Diocletian , at Nicomedia, and Maximianus Herculius , at Mediolanum (Milan), divested themselves of the purple, probably because of the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian forced Maximianus to abdicate. They appointed as their successors Constantius and Galerius , with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Constantius, as had his predecessor, ruled in the west, while Galerius and Daia ruled in the east. 5 Almost as soon as he was appointed Augustus, he crossed to Britain to face incursions by the Picts where he died at York on 25 July 306 with his son at his side. 6

Bibliography

Barnes, T.D . Constantine and Eusebius, , Cambridge, 1980.

________. New Empire of Diocletian and Constantine . Cambridge, 1981.

DiMaio, Michael. Zonaras' Account of the Neo-Flavian Emperors , (Ph.D. diss., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1977).

Jones, A.H.M. J.R. Martindale, and J. Morris. "Fl. Val. Constantius 12." the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire , (Cambridge, 1971), 1.227-228.

Kienast, Dietmar. Römische Kaisertabelle: Grundzüge einer römischen Kaiserchronologie . Darmstadt, 1990.

MacMullen, R. Constantine , New York, 1969.

Mattingly, Harold, and B.H. Warmington ."Constantius (Chlorus)." OCD .2281-282.

Seeck, Otto. "Constantius 1." RE 4, col.1040ff.

Notes

1Constantius' full name: ILS , 630, 641-3, 648, 650-52; such variations as Marcus Flavius Valerius Constantius( ibid , 637), Valerius Constantius ( ibid. , 640), Gaius Valerius Constantius ( ibid , 649), and Gaius Fabius Constantius ( ibid. , 650a) appear on inscriptions.

Constantius' date of birth, homeland, and career: Michael DiMaio, Zonaras' Account of the Neo-Flavian Emperors: A Commentary , (Ph.D diss., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1977), 97-98, nn 11-14; Constantius as Maxiamianus' Praetorian prefect: T.D. Barnes, Constantine and Eusebius, , (Cambridge, 1980), 3, 7-8, New Empire of Diocletian and Constantine , (Cambridge, 1981), 36-37.

For a discussion of Constantius' marriage to Helen, see infra , n.2.

2For a listing of the sources on the dating Constantius rise to the rank of Caesar, see A.H.M. Jones, J.R. Martindale, and J. Morris, the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire , (Cambridge, 1971), s.v. "Fl. Val. Constantius 12," 1.227-228, and Dietmar Kienast, Römische Kaisertabelle , (Darmstadt, 1990), 276ff

The Caesarship of Constantius is discussed, for example, by O. Seeck, RE 4, s.v. "Constantius 1," col.1041.57ff, and Ramsey MacMullen, Constantine , (New York, 1969), 35ff.

Barnes has summarized the problems and the sources surrounding the marriages of Constantius to Helen and to Theodora ( New Empire ), 33, 36-37.

3Constantius' campaigns are discussed by Barnes, Constantine and Eusebius , 15ff, and by Harold Mattingly and B.H. Warmington, OCD ,2s.v ."Constantius (Chlorus)," 281-282.

4Lact., Mort. Pers. , 15.7

5For a listing of sources which treat the acclamation of Constantius to the rank of Augustus, see Barnes, New Empire , 4ff.

6For a discussion of the death of Constantius and the sources that treat it, see DiMaio, 96ff.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr. This file may be copied on the condition that the entire contents, including the header and this copyright notice, remain intact. -------------------- His full name is Flavius Valerius Constantius, called Constantius Chlorus. He was a general and administrator under Emperor Maximian, who adopted him and gave him the government of Gaul and the rank of caesar in 293. When his coemperors, Maximian and Diocletian, abdicated in 305, Constantius became emperor in the West and prepared to conquer the Picts of Scotland. He died during the campaign, after proclaiming his son Constantine his successor as emperor. -------------------- He died as a war casualty at the age of 64 on July 25th, 0306 in Eboracum, Yorkshire, England. -------------------- The Historia Augusta says Constantius was the son of Eutropius, a noble from northern Dardania in modern Serbia, and Claudia, a niece of the emperors Claudius II and Quintillus.[3] Historians, however, suspect this maternal connection to be a genealogical fabrication created by his grandson Constantine II, thus connecting his family to two rather highly regarded predecessors. Under the emperor Carus, he was governor of Dalmatia, and Carus is said to have considered adopting him as his heir in place of his dissolute son, Carinus.[4]

In 293 the emperor Diocletian created the Tetrarchy, dividing the Roman Empire into Western and Eastern portions. Each would be ruled by an Augustus, supported by a Caesar. Diocletian became Augustus of the Eastern empire, with Galerius as his Caesar. Constantius was appointed Caesar to the Western Augustus, Maximian, and married Theodora, Maximian's stepdaughter. They had six children. Constantius divorced his first wife (or concubine), Helena, by whom he already had a son, Constantine. Helena was probably from Nicomedia in Asia Minor.[5] He was given command of Gaul, Britain and possibly Hispania.

In 293, Constantius defeated the forces of Carausius, who had declared himself emperor in Britain and northern Gaul in 286, near Bononia. Carausius was killed by his rationalis Allectus, who took command of Britain until 296, when Constantius sent Asclepiodotus, a prefect of the Praetorian Guard, to invade the island. Allectus was defeated and killed, and Roman rule in Britain restored.[6]

Also in 296, Constantius fought a battle against the Alamanni at the city of Lingonae (Langes) in Gaul. He was shut up in the city, but was relieved by his army after six hours, and defeated the enemy.[7] He defeated them again at Vindonissa (Windisch, Switzerland),[8] thereby strengthening the defenses of the Rhine frontier.

Diocletian and Maximian stepped down as co-emperors in 305, due to Diocletian's poor health, and the Caesars, Constantius and Galerius, became co-emperors. Constantius ruled the western empire, Galerius the eastern. Severus and Maximinus were appointed Caesars. Constantine, who had hoped to be a Caesar, joined his father's campaigns in Gaul and Britain.[9] Constantius died in Britain, at York, in 306, and Constantine was declared emperor by the army.[10]

As the father of Constantine, a number of Christian legends have grown up around Constantius. Eusebius's Life of Constantine claims that Constantius was himself a Christian, although he pretended to be a pagan, and while Caesar under Diocletian, took no part in the emperor's persecutions.[11] His first wife, Helena, is the subject of many legends, including the finding of the True Cross.

Constantius's activities in Britain were remembered in medieval British legend. In Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain (1136), he is sent to Britain by the Senate after Asclepiodotus, here a British king, is overthrown by Coel of Colchester. Coel submits to Constantius and agrees to pay tribute to Rome, but dies only eight days later. Constantius marries Coel's daughter Helena and becomes king of Britain. He and Helena have a son, Constantine, who succeeds to the throne of Britain when his father dies at York eleven years later.[12] The identification of Helena as British had previously been made by Henry of Huntingdon,[13] but has no historical validity: Constantius had divorced Helena before he went to Britain.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantius_Chlorus -------------------- •ID: I122463

•Name: CONSTANTIUS I (NOTES) EMPEROR (L) ROMAN EMPIRE

•Sex: M

•ALIA: CONSTANTIUS I (NOTES) EMPEROR (L) /ROME/

•Name: AKA CONSTANTIUS (NOTES) (L) CHLORUS

•Name: AKA CONSTANTIUS (NOTES) (L) CHLORUS

•Birth: BET 230 AND 31 MAR 250 1 2

•Death: BET 25 JUL AND 3 OCT 306 1 2

•Event: 1 AKA CONSTANTIUS I (NOTES) EMPEROR (L) DE ROME

•Event: 2 AKA (NOTES) 1ST EMPEROR OF ROME (L) CONSTANTIUS

•Event: 3 AKA CONSTANTIUS I (NOTES) CHLORUS EMPEROR (L) ROMAN EMPIRE

•Event: 4 AKA CONSTANTIUS I (NOTES) "FLAVIUS VALERIUS" (L) ROME

•Event: 5 AKA GAIUS (NOTES) FLAVIUS VALERIUS (L) CONSTANTIUS

•Event: 6 AKA FLAVIUS (NOTES) VALERIUS CONSTANTIUS I (L) ROMAN EMPEROR

•Event: 8 AKA FLAVIUS (NOTES) AURELIUS VALERIUS (L) CONSTANTIUS

•Event: .1. AKA FLAVIUS (NOTES) VALERIUS I CLOVIS (L) CONSTANTANUS

•Note:

SOME SOURCES SAY GAIUS'S PARENTS WERE EUTROPIUS (NOTES) OR FLAVIUS (L) DE ROME AND CLAUDIA CRISPINA (L) ILLYRIA

OTHER POSSIBLE PARENTS ARE SHOWN BELOW BUT THIS INDIVIDUAL IS NOT SHOWN AS A CHILD ON THE FOLLOWING POSSIBLE PARENTS' FAMILY PAGES, TO DO SO WOULD BE CONSIDERED ERRORS BY THIS PROGRAM. EVEN THOUGH THESE LAST POSSIBLE PARENTS MAY BE THE CORRECT ONES, SHOWING MORE THAN ONE SET OF PARENTS COULD CAUSE MY "FAMILY TREE" PROGRAM TO MALFUNCTION.

OTHER SOURCES SAY HIS FATHER WAS EUTROPIUS (NOTES) OF (L) DARDANIA ANOTHER OF HIS MOTHER CLAUDIA'S HUSBANDS.

STILL OTHER SOURCES SAY HIS PARENTS WERE COLIUS II (NOTES) "OLD KING COLE" (L) COLCHESTER AND STRADA YSTRADWEL (NOTES) VERCH (L) CADFAN AND HIS SISTER WAS THEN HELENA "SAINT" (NOTE)OF THE CROSS (L) COLCHESTERWHILE STILL OTHER SOURCES SAY HIS WIFE WAS (HIS SISTER?) THE SAME.HELENA "SAINT" (NOTE)OF THE CROSS (L) COLCHESTER.

I SHOW HELENA AS HIS WIFE NOT AS HIS SISTER HERE.

Father: EUTROPIUS (NOTES) OR FLAVIUS (L) DE ROME b: BET 200 AND 240

Mother: CLAUDIA (NOTES) CRISPINA (L) ILLYRIA b: BET 192 AND 230

Marriage 1 HELENA "SAINT"(NOTE) OF THE CROSS (L) COLCHESTER b: BET 248 AND 273 in Colchester, Britain or Drepanum, Bithynia, Asia Minor

Children

1. CONSTANTINE I (NOTES) 2ND EMP (L) ROMAN EMPIRE b: BET 17 FEB 265 AND 27 FEB 288

2. (NOTES) (L) CONSTANTINA b: BET 270 AND 280

Marriage 2 THEODORA (NOTES) PRINCESS OF (L) ROME b: BET 265 AND 272

Children

1. CONSTANTINA OF ROME OR (L) CONSTANIA b: BET 270 AND 280

2. JULIUS "CONSTANTIUS" CONSUL OF (L) ROME b: ABT 290

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pusch&id=I122463 -------------------- His ancestry is found elsewhere in this chart...

Gaius was born on March 31st, 0250 in Eboracum, York, England.1 Gaius' father was Flavius Eutropius of the Gordiani and his mother was Claudia Crispina Illyria. His paternal grandparents were Titus Flavius and Gordiana Balba; his maternal grandparents were Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antonius of Rome and Bruttia Crispin.

He died at the age of 56 on October 3rd, 0306 in Eboracum, York, England -------------------- Wikipedia:

Flavius Valerius Constantius (March 31 c. 250 – July 25, 306), also Constantius I, was an emperor of the Western Roman Empire (305–306). He was commonly called Chlorus (the Pale) an epithet given to him by Byzantine historians. He was the father of Constantine the Great and initiator of the Constantinian dynasty.

History

The Historia Augusta says Constantius was the son of Eutropius, a noble from northern Dardania in modern Serbia, and Claudia, a niece of the emperors Claudius II and Quintillus. Historians, however, suspect this maternal connection to be a genealogical fabrication created by his son Constantine I, thus connecting his family to two rather highly regarded predecessors. His father, however, might have been the brother of Eutropia, wife of Maximian.

Under the emperor Carus, he was governor of Dalmatia, and Carus is said to have considered adopting him as his heir in place of his dissolute son, Carinus.

In 293 the emperor Diocletian created the Tetrarchy, dividing the Roman Empire into Western and Eastern portions. Each would be ruled by an Augustus, supported by a Caesar. Diocletian became Augustus of the Eastern empire, with Galerius as his Caesar. Constantius was appointed Caesar to the Western Augustus, Maximian, and married Theodora, Maximian's stepdaughter. They had six children. Constantius divorced his first wife (or concubine), Helena, by whom he already had a son, Constantine. Helena was probably from Nicomedia in Asia Minor. He was given command of Gaul, Britain and possibly Hispania.

n 293, Constantius defeated the forces of Carausius, who had declared himself emperor in Britain and northern Gaul in 286, near Bononia. Carausius was killed by his rationalis Allectus, who took command of Britain until 296, when Constantius sent Asclepiodotus, a prefect of the Praetorian Guard, to invade the island. Allectus was defeated and killed, and Roman rule in Britain restored.

Also in 296, Constantius fought a battle against the Alamanni at the city of Lingonae (Langres) in Gaul. He was shut up in the city, but was relieved by his army after six hours, and defeated the enemy. He defeated them again at Vindonissa (Windisch, Switzerland), thereby strengthening the defenses of the Rhine frontier.

Medal of Constantius I capturing Londinium (inscribed as LON) after defeating Allectus. Beaurains hoard.

Diocletian and Maximian stepped down as co-emperors in 305, possibly due to Diocletian's poor health, and the Caesars, Constantius and Galerius, became co-emperors. Constantius ruled the western empire, Galerius the eastern. Severus and Maximinus Daia were appointed Caesars. Constantine, who had hoped to be a Caesar, joined his father's campaigns in Gaul and Britain. Constantius died in Britain, at York, in 306, and Constantine was declared emperor by the army.

Legend

Christian legends

As the father of Constantine, a number of Christian legends have grown up around Constantius. Eusebius's Life of Constantine claims that Constantius was himself a Christian, although he pretended to be a pagan, and while Caesar under Diocletian, took no part in the emperor's persecutions. His first wife, Helena, is the subject of many legends, including the finding of the True Cross.

British legends

Constantius's activities in Britain were remembered in medieval British legend. In Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain (1136), he is sent to Britain by the Senate after Asclepiodotus, here a British king, is overthrown by Coel of Colchester. Coel submits to Constantius and agrees to pay tribute to Rome, but dies only eight days later. Constantius marries Coel's daughter Helena and becomes king of Britain. He and Helena have a son, Constantine, who succeeds to the throne of Britain when his father dies at York eleven years later. The identification of Helena as British had previously been made by Henry of Huntingdon, but has no historical validity: Constantius had divorced Helena before he went to Britain. -------------------- Reference: http://familytrees.genopro.com/318186/jarleslekt/default.htm?page=toc_families.htm -------------------- Occupation: Emperor of Rome -------------------- Occupation: Emperor of Rome -------------------- Flavius Valerius Constantius[1] (March 31 c. 250 – July 25, 306), also Constantius I, was an emperor of the Western Roman Empire (305–306). He was commonly called Chlorus (the Pale)[2] an epithet given to him by Byzantine historians. He was the father of Constantine the Great and initiator of the Constantinian dynasty.

he Historia Augusta says Constantius was the son of Eutropius, a noble from northern Dardania in modern Kosovo, and Claudia, a niece of the emperors Claudius II and Quintillus.[3] Historians, however, suspect this maternal connection to be a genealogical fabrication created by his son Constantine I, thus connecting his family to two rather highly regarded predecessors. His father, however, might have been the brother of Eutropia, wife of Maximian.

Under the emperor Carus, he was governor of Dalmatia, and Carus is said to have considered adopting him as his heir in place of his dissolute son, Carinus.[4]

In 293 the emperor Diocletian created the Tetrarchy, dividing the Roman Empire into Western and Eastern portions. Each would be ruled by an Augustus, supported by a Caesar. Diocletian became Augustus of the Eastern empire, with Galerius as his Caesar. Constantius was appointed Caesar to the Western Augustus, Maximian, and married Theodora, Maximian's stepdaughter. They had six children. Constantius divorced his first wife (or concubine), Helena, by whom he already had a son, Constantine. Helena was probably from Nicomedia in Asia Minor.[5] He was given command of Gaul, Britain and possibly Hispania.

In 293, Constantius defeated the forces of Carausius, who had declared himself emperor in Britain and northern Gaul in 286, near Bononia. Carausius was killed by his rationalis Allectus, who took command of Britain until 296, when Constantius sent Asclepiodotus, a prefect of the Praetorian Guard, to invade the island. Allectus was defeated and killed, and Roman rule in Britain restored.[6]

Also in 296, Constantius fought a battle against the Alamanni at the city of Lingonae (Langres) in Gaul. He was shut up in the city, but was relieved by his army after six hours, and defeated the enemy.[7] He defeated them again at Vindonissa (Windisch, Switzerland),[8] thereby strengthening the defenses of the Rhine frontier.

Medal of Constantius I capturing Londinium (inscribed as LON) after defeating Allectus. Beaurains hoard.

Diocletian and Maximian stepped down as co-emperors in 305, possibly due to Diocletian's poor health, and the Caesars, Constantius and Galerius, became co-emperors. Constantius ruled the western empire, Galerius the eastern. Severus and Maximinus Daia were appointed Caesars. Constantine, who had hoped to be a Caesar, joined his father's campaigns in Gaul and Britain.[9] Constantius died in Britain, at Eboracum (York), in 306, and Constantine was declared emperor by the army.[10]

[edit] Legend

[edit] Christian legends

As the father of Constantine, a number of Christian legends have grown up around Constantius. Eusebius's Life of Constantine claims that Constantius was himself a Christian, although he pretended to be a pagan, and while Caesar under Diocletian, took no part in the emperor's persecutions.[11] His first wife, Helena, found the True Cross.

[edit] British legends

Constantius's activities in Britain were remembered in medieval British legend. In Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain (1136), he is sent to Britain by the Senate after Asclepiodotus, here a British king, is overthrown by Coel of Colchester. Coel submits to Constantius and agrees to pay tribute to Rome, but dies only eight days later. Constantius marries Coel's daughter Helena and becomes king of Britain. He and Helena have a son, Constantine, who succeeds to the throne of Britain when his father dies at York eleven years later.[12] The identification of Helena as British had previously been made by Henry of Huntingdon,[13] but has no historical validity: Constantius had divorced Helena before he went to Britain. -------------------- Gaius was born on March 31st, 0250 in Eboracum, York, England.1 Gaius' father was Flavius Eutropius of the Gordiani and his mother was Claudia Crispina Illyria. His paternal grandparents were Titus Flavius and Gordiana Balba; his maternal grandparents were Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antonius of Rome and Bruttia Crispin. He was an only child. He died at the age of 56 on October 3rd, (or July 25th) 0306 in Eboracum, York, England.1 -------------------- Caesar Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus (27 February c. 272[2] – 22 May 337), commonly known in English as Constantine I, Constantine the Great, or (among Eastern Orthodox, Coptic Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Byzantine Catholic Christians) Saint Constantine (pronounced /ˈkɒnstɛntaɪn/), was Roman emperor from 306, and the undisputed holder of that office from 324 until his death in 337. Best known for being the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine reversed the persecutions of his predecessor, Diocletian, and issued (with his co-emperor Licinius) the Edict of Milan in 313, which proclaimed religious toleration throughout the empire.

The Byzantine liturgical calendar, observed by the Eastern Orthodox Church and Eastern Catholic Churches of Byzantine rite, lists both Constantine and his mother Helena as saints. Although he is not included in the Latin Church's list of saints, which does recognize several other Constantines as saints, he is revered under the title "The Great" for his contributions to Christianity.

Constantine also transformed the ancient Greek colony of Byzantium into a new imperial residence, Constantinople, which would remain the capital of the Byzantine Empire for over one thousand years.

As the emperor who empowered Christianity throughout the Roman Empire and moved the Roman capital to the banks of the Bosphorus, Constantine was a ruler of major historical importance, but he has always been a controversial figure. The fluctuations in Constantine's reputation reflect the nature of the ancient sources for his reign. These are abundant and detailed, but have been strongly influenced by the official propaganda of the period, and are often one-sided. There are no surviving histories or biographies dealing with Constantine's life and rule. The nearest replacement is Eusebius of Caesarea's Vita Constantini, a work that is a mixture of eulogy and hagiography. Written between 335 and circa 339, the Vita extols Constantine's moral and religious virtues. The Vita creates a contentiously positive image of Constantine, and modern historians have frequently challenged its reliability. The fullest secular life of Constantine is the anonymous Origo Constantini. A work of uncertain date, the Origo focuses on military and political events, to the neglect of cultural and religious matters.

Lactantius' De Mortibus Persecutorum, a polemical Christian pamphlet on the reigns of Diocletian and the Tetrarchy, provides valuable but tendentious detail on Constantine's predecessors and early life. The ecclesiastical histories of Socrates, Sozomen, and Theodoret describe the ecclesiastic disputes of Constantine's later reign. Written during the reign of Theodosius II (408–50), a century after Constantine's reign, these ecclesiastic historians obscure the events and theologies of the Constantinian period through misdirection, misrepresentation and deliberate obscurity. The contemporary writings of the Orthodox Christian Athanasius and the ecclesiastical history of the Arian Philostorgius also survive, though their biases are no less firm.

The epitomes of Aurelius Victor (De Caesaribus), Eutropius (Breviarium), Festus (Breviarium), and the anonymous author of the Epitome de Caesaribus offer compressed secular political and military histories of the period. Although pagan, the epitomes paint a favorable image of Constantine, but omit reference to Constantine's religious policies. The Panegyrici Latini, a collection of panegyrics from the late third and early fourth centuries, provide valuable information on the politics and ideology of the tetrarchic period and the early life of Constantine. Contemporary architecture, like the Arch of Constantine in Rome and palaces in Gamzigrad and Córdoba, epigraphic remains, and the coinage of the era complement the literary sources.

Constantine, named Flavius Valerius Constantinus, was born in the Moesian military city of Naissus (Niš, Serbia) on the 27th of February of an uncertain year, probably near 272. His father was Flavius Constantius, a native of Moesia Superior (later Dacia Ripensis). Constantius was a tolerant and politically skilled man. Constantine probably spent little time with his father. Constantius was an officer in the Roman army in 272, part of the Emperor Aurelian's imperial bodyguard. Constantius advanced through the ranks, earning the governorship of Dalmatia from Emperor Diocletian, another of Aurelian's Illyrian companions, in 284 or 285. Constantine's mother was Helena, a Bithynian Greek of humble origin. It is uncertain whether she was legally married to Constantius or merely his concubine.

In July 285, Diocletian declared Maximian, another colleague from Illyricum, his co-emperor. Each emperor would have his own court, his own military and administrative faculties, and each would rule with a separate praetorian prefect as chief lieutenant. Maximian ruled in the West, from his capitals at Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) or Augusta Treverorum (Trier, Germany), while Diocletian ruled in the East, from Nicomedia (İzmit, Turkey). The division was merely pragmatic: the Empire was called "indivisible" in official panegyric, and both emperors could move freely throughout the Empire. In 288, Maximian appointed Constantius to serve as his praetorian prefect in Gaul. Constantius left Helena to marry Maximian's stepdaughter Theodora in 288 or 289.

Diocletian divided the Empire again in 293, appointing two Caesars (junior emperors) to rule over further subdivisions of East and West. Each would be subordinate to their respective Augustus (senior emperor) but would act with supreme authority in his assigned lands. This system would later be called the Tetrarchy. Diocletian's first appointee for the office of Caesar was Constantius; his second was Galerius, a native of Felix Romuliana (Gamzigrad, Serbia). According to Lactantius, Galerius was a brutal, animalistic man. Although he shared the paganism of Rome's aristocracy, he seemed to them an alien figure, a semi-barbarian. On 1 March, Constantius was promoted to the office of Caesar, and dispatched to Gaul to fight the rebels Carausius and Allectus. In spite of meritocratic overtones, the Tetrarchy retained vestiges of hereditary privilege, and Constantine became the prime candidate for future appointment as Caesar as soon as his father took the position. Constantine left the Balkans for the court of Diocletian, where he lived as his father's heir presumptive.

-------------------- Han var av Romersk avstamning -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantius_Chlorus

Father of Constantine I (The Great)

http://larryvoyer.com/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I141644&tree=v7_28 -------------------- Empereur de Rome (305-306) -

Keizer van Rome (305-306) -

Emperor of Rome (305-306) -------------------- Bio at Wikipedia His full name is Flavius Valerius Constantius, called Constantius Chlorus. He was a general and administrator under Emperor Maximian, who adopted him and gave him the government of Gaul and the rank of caesar in 293. When his co emperor, Maximian and Diocletian, abdicated in 305, Constantius became emperor in the West and prepared to conquer the Picts of Scotland. He died during the campaign, after proclaiming his son Constantine his successor as emperor. --Other Fields Ref Number: + EVEN: Reigned Date: 305/306

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Constantius I Chlorus, Roman Emperor's Timeline

242
242
Dardania (Moesia Superior)
242
Flavius Valerius Constantius Chlorus
270
270
Age 28
Naissus, Moesia Superior, Modern Nish In Serbia
272
February 27, 272
Age 30
Naissus, Moesia Superior (now Nish), Serbia
286
286
Age 44
Emperor, Roman Empire, King of, Britian
286
Age 44
Emperor, Roman Empire, King of, Britian
286
Age 44
Emperor, Roman Empire, King of, Britian
289
289
Age 47
294
294
Age 52
Gallic Tolosa
296
296
Age 54
Gallic Tolosa