Dinis I o Justo, rei de Portugal

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Dinis I 'o Justo' de Portugal, rei de Portugal

Also Known As: "o Lavrador", "The Just", "o Rei-Trovador", "o Rei-Agricultor", "o Rei-Poeta", "o Justo", "Le Fermier", "called the Farmer King (Rei Lavrador)", ""El Justo o El Labrador"", "Rei de Portugal"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lisbon, Portugal
Death: Died in Santarem, Portugal
Place of Burial: Lisbon, Portugal
Immediate Family:

Son of Afonso III o Restaurador, rei de Portugal and Beatriz de Castela, rainha consorte de Portugal
Husband of Aldonça and Sta. Isabel de Aragão, rainha consorte de Portugal
Partner of Gracia, senhora de Ribeyra; Marina Gomez; N.N.; Maria Pirez; N.N. and 1 other
Father of Pedro de Portugal; María Afonso de Portugal; Fernando Sanches de Portugal; João Afonso de Portugal, senhor da Lousã; Pedro Afonso de Portugal and 4 others
Brother of Blanca de Portugal, vizcondesa de Huelgas; Fernando, infante de Portugal; Afonso de Portugal, senhor de Portalegre; Sancha, infanta de Portugal; Maria, infanta de Portugal and 2 others
Half brother of D. Gilles Afonso de Portugal; Leonor Afonso de Portugal; Rodrigo Afonso de Portugal; Henrique Afonso de Portugal; Leonor Afonso de Portugal and 7 others

Occupation: Rei de Portugal, Rey de Portugal, Roi de Portugal et Algarve, King of Portugal, 'The Farmer King of Portugal', sixth King of Portugal and the Algarve
Managed by: Gustavo Latorre (c)
Last Updated:

About Dinis I o Justo, rei de Portugal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denis_of_Portugal (English)

Dionisio I de Borgoña, apodado el Labrador (Lisboa, 9 de octubre de 1261 - Santarém, 7 de enero de 1325) fue el sexto rey de Portugal. Era el hijo mayor del rey Alfonso III el Boloñés y de su segunda esposa, Beatriz de Castilla. Dionisio sucedió a su padre en el trono en 1279.

Con el Sur del actual portugués reconquistado, Alfonso III creo en 1263, para su hijo Dionisio el Reino de los Algarves. De allí hasta el final de la monarquía (salvo el período 1815 - 1826), el reino pasaría a denominarse de Portugal y de los Algarves.

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Dinis de Portugal

Origem: Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre. http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinis_de_Portugal

Monarca de Portugal

D. Dinis, rei de Portugal

Ordem: 6.º Monarca de Portugal

Cognome(s): o Lavrador, o Rei-Agricultor,

o Rei-Poeta, o Rei-Trovador

Início do Reinado: 16 de Fevereiro de 1279

Término do Reinado: 7 de Fevereiro de 1325

Aclamação: 1279

Predecessor: D. Afonso III

Sucessor: D. Afonso IV

Pai: D. Afonso III,

Mãe: D. Beatriz de Castela

Data de Nascimento: 9 de Outubro de 1261

Local de Nascimento: Santarém

Data de Falecimento: 7 de Janeiro de 1325

Local de Falecimento: Lisboa

Local de Enterro: Mosteiro de São Dinis e São Bernardo, Odivelas

Consorte(s): Rainha Santa Isabel, Infanta de Aragão

Príncipe Herdeiro: Infante D.Afonso (filho)

Dinastia: Borgonha (Afonsina)

D. Dinis (também existe a grafia arcaizante Diniz) (9 de Outubro 1261 — 7 de Janeiro 1325, Santarém) foi o sexto rei de Portugal. Filho de D. Afonso III e da infanta Beatriz de Castela, neto de Afonso X de Castela, foi aclamado em Lisboa em 1279.

Foi cognominado O Lavrador ou O Rei-Agricultor, pelo impulso que deu no reino àquela actividade, e ainda O Rei-Poeta ou O Rei-Trovador, pelas Cantigas de Amigo e de Amor que compôs, e pelo desenvolvimento da poesia trovadoresca a que se assistiu no seu reinado. Foi o primeiro rei português a assinar os seus documentos com o nome completo. Presume-se que tenha sido o primeiro rei português não analfabeto[1].

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http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Portuguese_Brazilian_Studies/ejph/html/issue9/html/arodrigues_main.html

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Denis of Portugal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denis_of_Portugal (English)

Denis (Portuguese: Dinis or Diniz, pronounced [diˈniʃ]; 9 October 1261 in Lisbon – 7 January 1325 in Santarém), called the Farmer King (Rei Lavrador), was the sixth King of Portugal and the Algarve. The eldest son of Afonso III of Portugal by his second wife, Beatrice of Castile, Dinis succeeded his father in 1279.

As heir to the throne Infante Dinis was summoned by his father (Afonso III) to share government responsibilities. At the time of his accession to the throne, Portugal was again in diplomatic conflicts with the Catholic church. Dinis signed a favouring agreement with the pope and swore to protect the Church's interests in Portugal. Due to this, he granted asylum to the Templar knights persecuted in France and created the Order of Christ, designed to be a continuation of the Order of the Temple.

With the Reconquista completed and the Portuguese territory freed from Moorish occupation, Dinis was essentially an administrative king, not a military one. However, a short war between Castile and Portugal broke during his reign, for the possession of the town of Serpa and Moura. After this, Dinis avoided war: he was a notably peace-loving monarch during a tempestuous time in European history. With Portugal finally recognized as an independent country by his neighbours, Dinis signed a border pact with Ferdinand IV of Castile (1297) which has endured to the present day. It should be noted that the global Muslim population had climbed to about 7 per cent as against the Christian population of 13 per cent by 1300.

Dinis' main priority of government was the organization of the country. He pursued his father's policies on legislation and centralization of power. Dinis promulgated the nucleus of a Portuguese civil and criminal law code, protecting the lower classes from abuse and extortion. As king, he travelled around the country, correcting unjust situations and resolving problems. He ordered the construction of numerous castles, created new towns, and granted privileges due cities to several others. With his wife, Infanta Isabella of Aragon, Dinis worked to improve the life of the poor and founded several social institutions.

Always concerned with the country's infrastructure, Dinis ordered the exploration of mines of copper, silver, tin and iron and organized the export of excess production to other European countries. The first Portuguese commercial agreement was signed with England in 1308. Dinis effectively founded the Portuguese navy under command of a Genoese admiral and ordered the construction of several docks.

His main concern was the redevelopment and promotion of rural infrastructure, hence the nickname of "the Farmer". Dinis redistributed the land, promoted agriculture, organized communities of farmers and took personal interest in the development of exports. He instituted regular markets in a number of towns and regulated their activities. One of his main achievements was the protection of agricultural lands from advancing coastal sands, by ordering the planting of a pine forest near Leiria. This forest still exists as one of the most important of Portugal and is known as the Pinhal de Leiria (Leiria Pinewood).

Culture was another interest of King Dinis. He had a fondness for literature and wrote several books himself, with topics ranging from administration to hunting, science and poetry. In his days, Lisbon was one of Europe's centers of culture and knowledge. The University of Lisbon (today's University of Coimbra) was founded by his decree Magna Charta Priveligiorum. He was also a great poet and troubadour. His poems and songs are preserved in mediaeval manuscripts of the Cancioneiro da Biblioteca Nacional, the Cancioneiro da Vaticana and the Pergaminho Sharrer, the latter comprising seven songs by King Dinis with musical notation.

The latest part of his peaceful reign was nevertheless marked by internal conflicts. The contenders were his two sons: Afonso the legitimate heir, and Afonso Sanches his natural son, who quarrelled frequently among themselves for royal favour. At the time of Dinis death in 1325 he had placed Portugal on an equal footing with the other Iberian Kingdoms.

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BIOGRAPHY: b. Oct. 9, 1261

d. Jan. 7, 1325

also spelled DINIZ, ENGLISH DENIS, sixth king of Portugal (1279-1325), who strengthened the kingdom by improving the economy and reducing the power of the nobility and the church.

The son of Afonso III, Dinis was educated at a court subject to both French and Castilian cultural influences and became a competent poet. He founded the first university in Portugal--in Lisbon--in 1290. A skilled negotiator, Dinis was able to establish with Castile a definitive frontier for Portugal. At home, he made the authority of the crown supreme, intervening in local government, reducing the power of the nobility, and combating the supremacy of the clergy, particularly in regard to their territorial wealth (laws of disentail in 1286, 1291, and 1309). Concordats with the papacy (1289 and 1290) ended the struggle with the church.

Dinis took a special interest in the land, encouraging forestry plantation and the fuller development of the country's agricultural resources. He also showed great concern for shipbuilding and for the extension and protection of commerce. The last years of the reign were disturbed by a rebellion of his son, the future Afonso IV, who succeeded to the throne on his father's death. Dinis' wife would become Saint Elizabeth (Isabel) of Portugal.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denis_of_Portugal

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BIOGRAPHY: b. Oct. 9, 1261

d. Jan. 7, 1325

also spelled DINIZ, ENGLISH DENIS, sixth king of Portugal (1279-1325), who strengthened the kingdom by improving the economy and reducing the power of the nobility and the church.

The son of Afonso III, Dinis was educated at a court subject to both French and Castilian cultural influences and became a competent poet. He founded the first university in Portugal--in Lisbon--in 1290. A skilled negotiator, Dinis was able to establish with Castile a definitive frontier for Portugal. At home, he made the authority of the crown supreme, intervening in local government, reducing the power of the nobility, and combating the supremacy of the clergy, particularly in regard to their territorial wealth (laws of disentail in 1286, 1291, and 1309). Concordats with the papacy (1289 and 1290) ended the struggle with the church.

Dinis took a special interest in the land, encouraging forestry plantation and the fuller development of the country's agricultural resources. He also showed great concern for shipbuilding and for the extension and protection of commerce. The last years of the reign were disturbed by a rebellion of his son, the future Afonso IV, who succeeded to the throne on his father's death. Dinis' wife would become Saint Elizabeth (Isabel) of Portugal.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. -------------------- SENHOR, EU VIVO COITADA

Senhor, eu vivo coitada

vida, des quando vos non vi:

mais, pois vós queredes assi,

por Deus, senhor ben talhada,

querede-vos de mim doer

ou ar leixade-mir morrer.

Vós sodes tan poderosa

de min que meu mal e meu ben

en vós é todo; [e] por en,

por Deus, mha senhor fremosa,

querede-vos de mim doer

ou ar leixade-mir morrer.

Eu vivo por vós tal vida

que nunca estes olhos meus

dormen, mnha senhor; e, por Deus,

que vos fez de ben comprida,

querede-vos de mim doer

ou ar leixade-mir morrer.

Ca, senhor, todo m é prazer

quant i vós quiserdes fazer.

D. DINIS

-------------------- Denis, King of Portugal and the Algarve


Reign February 6, 1279—January 7, 1325

Consort Elizabeth of Aragon

Father Afonso III

Mother Beatrice of Castile

Born October 9, 1261

Lisbon, Kingdom of Portugal

Died January 7, 1325

Santarém, Kingdom of Portugal

Burial St. Denis Convent, Odivelas, District of Lisbon, Portugal

Denis called the Farmer King (Rei Lavrador), was the sixth King of Portugal and the Algarve. The eldest son of Afonso III of Portugal by his second wife, Beatrice of Castile, Dinis succeeded his father in 1279.

As heir to the throne Infante Dinis was summoned by his father (Afonso III) to share government responsibilities. At the time of his accession to the throne, Portugal was again in diplomatic conflicts with the Catholic church. Dinis signed a favouring agreement with the pope and swore to protect the Church's interests in Portugal. He granted asylum to Templar knights persecuted in France and created the Order of Christ, designed to be a continuation of the Order of the Temple.

With the Reconquista completed and the Portuguese territory freed from Moorish occupation, Dinis was essentially an administrative king, not a military one. However, a short war between Castile and Portugal broke during his reign, for the possession of the town of Serpa and Moura. After this, Dinis avoided war: he was a notably peace-loving monarch during a tempestuous time in European history. With Portugal finally recognized as an independent country by his neighbours, Dinis signed a border pact with Ferdinand IV of Castile (1297) which has endured to the present day.

Dinis' main priority of government was the organization of the country. He pursued his father's policies on legislation and centralization of power. Dinis promulgated the nucleus of a Portuguese civil and criminal law code, protecting the lower classes from abuse and extortion. As king, he travelled around the country, correcting unjust situations and resolving problems. He ordered the construction of numerous castles, created new towns, and granted privileges due cities to several others. With his wife, Infanta Isabella of Aragon, Dinis worked to improve the life of the poor and founded several social institutions.

Always concerned with the country's infrastructure, Dinis ordered the exploration of mines of copper, silver, tin and iron and organized the export of excess production to other European countries. The first Portuguese commercial agreement was signed with England in 1308. Dinis effectively founded the Portuguese navy under command of a Genoese admiral and ordered the construction of several docks.

His main concern was the redevelopment and promotion of rural infrastructure, hence the nickname of "the Farmer". Dinis redistributed the land, promoted agriculture, organized communities of farmers and took personal interest in the development of exports. He instituted regular markets in a number of towns and regulated their activities. One of his main achievements was the protection of agricultural lands from advancing coastal sands, by ordering the planting of a pine forest near Leiria. This forest still exists as one of the most important of Portugal and is known as the Pinhal de Leiria (Leiria Pinewood).

Culture was another interest of King Dinis. He had a fondness for literature and wrote several books himself, with topics ranging from administration to hunting, science and poetry. In his days, Lisbon was one of Europe's centers of culture and knowledge. The University of Lisbon (today's University of Coimbra) was founded by his decree Magna Charta Priveligiorum. He was also a great poet and troubadour. His poems and songs are preserved in mediaeval manuscripts of the Cancioneiro da Biblioteca Nacional, the Cancioneiro da Vaticana and the Pergaminho Sharrer, the latter comprising seven songs by King Dinis with musical notation.

The latest part of his peaceful reign was nevertheless marked by internal conflicts. The contenders were his two sons: Afonso the legitimate heir, and Afonso Sanches his natural son, who quarrelled frequently among themselves for royal favour. At the time of Dinis death in 1325 he had placed Portugal on an equal footing with the other Iberian Kingdoms.

Dinis is buried in the Monastery of Saint Denis of Odivelas, a Cistercian monastery founded by him in 1295.

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Dinis I o Justo, rei de Portugal's Timeline

1261
October 9, 1261
Lisbon, Portugal
1279
February 16, 1279
- February 7, 1325
Age 17
reino de Portugal
February 16, 1279
Age 17
1280
1280
Age 18
1282
June 24, 1282
Age 20
Trancoso, Guarda, Portugal
1285
December 6, 1285
Age 24
Coimbra, Coimbra District, Portugal
1287
1287
Age 25
1287
Age 25
1289
1289
Age 27
1291
February 8, 1291
Age 29
Lisbon, Portugal