Eudes de France (1013 - 1057) MP

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Germigny-des-Prés, Centre, France
Death: Died
Managed by: Jacques Dupont
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About Eudes de France

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on France Capetian Kings (covering his birth family - he had no wife):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#RobertIIdied1031B

ROBERT (II) de France, son of HUGUES Capet King of France & his wife Adelais [de Poitou] (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Robertum regem et filiam Hadevidem…comitissam Hainonensium" as the children of King Hugues[148].

He was invested as associate-king with his father 25 Dec 987, consecrated 1 Apr 988 at the cathedral of Sainte-Croix in Orléans[149]. He succeeded his father in 996 as ROBERT II "le Pieux"[150] King of France.

He claimed the duchy of Burgundy on the death of his paternal uncle Duke Henri in 1002, but took 12 years to complete its conquest in the face of opposition from Otto-Guillaume Comte de Mâcon[151].

After the death of Emperor Heinrich II King of Germany in 1024, King Robert supported the rebels (led by Frédéric II Duke of Upper Lotharingia) opposed to King Konrad II but he refused the crown of Italy which they offered it to him. Robert nevertheless sent troops to attack Metz, but was repulsed[152].

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1031 of "rex Francorum Robertus"[153]. Rodolfus Glaber records the death of King Robert at Melun in July and his place of burial[154]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XII Kal Aug" of "Rotbertus rex"[155]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIII Kal Aug" of "Rotbertus…Francorum rex"[156].

m firstly (988, before 1 Apr, repudiated [991/92]) as her second husband, ROZALA [Suzanne] di Ivrea, widow of ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders, daughter of BERENGARIO II ex-King of Italy [Ivrea] & his wife Willa of Tuscany-Arles ([950/960]-13 Dec 1003 or 7 Feb 1004, bur Gent, church of the Abbey de Saint-Pierre du Mont-Blandin).

Richer records that King Robert repudiated his wife "Susannam…genere Italicam eo quod anus esset" but refused to allow her to retake her castle at Montreuil, whereupon she constructed another nearby[165]. She returned to Flanders after she was repudiated by her second husband, and became one of the principal advisers of her son Count Baldwin IV. France retained Montreuil-sur-Mer.

m secondly ([late 996/early 997], divorced Sep 1001) BERTHE of Burgundy, widow of EUDES I Comte de Blois et de Chartres, daughter of CONRAD I “le Pacifique” King of Burgundy [Welf] & his wife Mathilde de France [Carolingian] ([964/965]-16 Jan after 1010).

Pope Gregory V called on King Robert to repudiate his wife in 998 on grounds of consanguinity. The request was repeated in 1001 by the court of Rome. Robert at first refused and the kingdom of France was excommunicated[173]. The king, in reaction to the 1108 assassination of his favourite Hugues de Beauvais who had served Queen Berthe, visited Rome in 1008 in an unsuccessful attempt to divorce his third wife in order to take back Berthe[175].

m thirdly (after Sep 1001 before 25 Aug 1003) CONSTANCE d'Arles, daughter of GUILLAUME II “le Libérateur” Comte d’Arles [Provence] et Marquis & his wife Adelais [Blanche] d’Anjou ([987/89]-Château de Melun 22 or 25 Jul 1032, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Francorum names "Constantiam, filiam Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis, natam de Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of King Robert[178].

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also names "Constantia filia fuit Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as wife of "Robertus rex"[179]. The Chronicon Hugonis names "Constantiam" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "cognatam Hugonis Autisiodorensis episcopi comitis Cabilonensis"[180]. This is presumably based on Rodulfus Glaber who states incorrectly that "Constantiam…filiam…prioris Willemi Aquitanie ducis" was wife of King Robert II, specifying that she was "cognatam" of Hugues Comte de Chalon Bishop of Auxerre[181]. The only relationship so far identified between the two is that Constance's maternal uncle, Geoffroy I Comte d'Anjou, was the second husband of the mother of Comte Hugues.

Rodulfus Glauber dates her marriage to "about the year 1000"[182].

The king attempted to separate from Constance in 1008 in order to take back his second wife, according to Rodulfus Glaber through the influence of "Hugo dictus Beluacensis"[183], but he restored Constance's royal prerogatives end-1009[184].

She opposed her husband's proposal to crown their second son Henri as associate king in 1026, supporting the candidature of her third son Robert[185]. She organised two revolts against King Robert, and another against her son King Henri I after his accession in 1031[186].

Rodolfus Glaber records the death of Queen Constance in the same city as her husband [Melun] and in the same month [July] in the following year, as well as her place of burial[187]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "XI Kal Aug" of "regina Constancia"[188]. The necrology of Argenteuil Priory records the death "VIII Kal Aug" of "Constancia regina"[189].

King Robert & his third wife had [seven] children:

1. [CONSTANCE de France.

There is no proof that Constance, wife of Manassès de Dammartin, was the daughter of King Robert II, the affiliation being proposed for onomastic reasons only[190]. It is, however, supported by the presence of the king and queen at a donation by Comte Manassès in 1031[191]. Rodolfus Glaber records that King Robert had two daughters by his wife Constance[192], presumably referring to Hedwige and Adela. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[193], the wife of Manassès was "Constance [de Dammartin]", presumably on the theory that she brought her husband the county of Dammartin.

m ([1023 or before]) MANASSES Comte de Dammartin-en-Goële, son of HILDUIN II de Montdidier Seigneur de Ramérupt & his wife --- (-killed in battle Ornel, near Etain, Bar-le-Duc 15 Nov or 15 Dec 1037).]

2. HEDWIGE [Avoie] de France ([1003]-5 Jun after 1063).

Rodolfus Glaber records that "Rainaldus…Landrici comitis filius" married a daughter of King Robert[194]. The Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis names "Adelaidem…Rainaldi comitis Nivernensis uxorem" as the daughter of King Robert and his wife Constance[195]. The Historia Nivernensium Comitum records that the wife of "Renaldum" was "sorori Regis Roberti, filii Hugonis Capitonis"[196]. The Annales Vizeliacenses also specifies that Renaud's wife was the sister not daughter of King Robert II[197]. However, this is chronologically unlikely given that King Robert and his known sisters were born in the 970s, more than twenty years before the earliest possible date of birth of Comte Renaud. Her marriage was agreed by her father as part of his alliance with Landry Comte de Nevers after capturing Auxerre, which the king gave to his daughter as dowry[198]. "Rainaldus comes Nivernensis" donated property "Belmontis" to Cluny, for the souls of "…uxoris mee Advise…" by charter dated to [1028/40][199]. She founded the abbeys of Crisenon and Issenon.

m (1006, soon after 25 Jan 1016) RENAUD de Nevers, son of LANDRY Comte de Nevers & his wife Mathilde de Bourgogne-Comté (-killed in battle Sainte-Vertu, Yonne 29 May 1040, bur Auxerre, Saint-Germain). He succeeded his father in 1028 as RENAUD I Comte de Nevers. He was killed in battle against Robert I Duke of Burgundy, his brother-in-law.

3. HUGUES de France (1007-28 Aug 1025, bur Compiègne, church of the Abbaye de Saint-Corneille).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[200].

He was consecrated associate-king 9 Jun 1017, at Compiègne, church of the Abbaye de Saint-Corneille, when he was "barely 10 years old" according to Rodolfus Glaber[201]. He rebelled against his father claiming the full authority of his position as associate-king, but later submitted[202].

The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "V Kal Sep" of "Hugo iuvenis rex Francorum"[203]. The necrology of Argenteuil Priory records the death "V Kal Sep" of "Hugo iuvenis rex"[204]. Rodolfus Glaber records his place of burial[205].

4. HENRI de France ([end 1009/May 1010]-Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret 4 Aug 1060, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[206].

He succeeded his father in 1031 as HENRI I King of France.

5. ROBERT de France ([1011/12]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Saint-Seine-l'Abbaye, Côte d’Or).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[207]. Rodulfus Glauber names "Heinricus rex…germanium suum Rotbertum" when recording the latter's installation as duke of Burgundy by his brother[208]. His mother supported him as candidate to be consecrated associate king in 1027, in place of his older brother Henri who was supported by their father. His father named him heir to the duchy of Burgundy in 1030. He was installed as ROBERT I "le Vieux" Duke of Burgundy in 1032 by his brother King Henri I.

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6. EUDES de France ([1013]-Germigny-des-Prés, near Sully, Loiret 15 May [1057/59]).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[209].

He allied himself with Eudes II Comte de Blois in the war against his brother Henri I King of France 1034-1041. He was defeated and imprisoned at Orléans. After his release, he fought for the king in Normandy, but was defeated in 1054 at Mortemer.

Orderic Vitalis records the war between the Normans and "Henricum regem" in 1054 when "Odonem fratrem suum" was defeated by "Roberti Aucensis comiitis et Rogerii de Mortuomari" who led the Norman forces "apud Mortuum-mare"[210]. He owned land near Bellême[211].

The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Id Mai" of "Odo Roberti regis filius"[212].

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7. ADELA de France (-Messines 8 Jan 1079, bur Messines, Benedictine monastery).

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "soror…regis Henrici Adela" as wife of "Balduino Insulano"[213]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Alam comitissam Flandrensem" as the daughter of King Robert[214]. She is named as daughter of King Robert in a manuscript whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, which also refers to her marriage[215].

Kerrebrouck mentions her betrothal to Duke Richard "très jeune" but does not cite the primary source on which this is based[216]. "Richardus Nortmannorum dux" agreed grants of property to "Adela" on the occasion of their marriage by charter dated Jan 1026, which does not specify her parentage[217]. Her father gave her the seigneurie of Corbie as her dowry.

Ctss de Contenance. She founded the Benedictine monastery at Messines near Ypres.

The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Jan" of "Adelaidis comitissa"[218].

Betrothed (Jan 1027) to RICHARD III Duke of Normandy, son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his first wife Judith de Bretagne ([1001]-6 Aug 1027).

m (Amiens 1028) BAUDOUIN de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders & his first wife Ogive de Luxembourg ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille, Saint-Pierre). He succeeded his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V “le Pieux/Insulanus” Count of Flanders. He was regent of France for his nephew Philippe I King of France 1060-1066/67.

References:

[148] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252.

[149] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 55.

[150] This nickname was applied to the king from the early years of his reign, see Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 59 footnote 2.

[151] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 55.

[152] Poull (1994), pp. 21-2.

[153] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1031, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783.

[154] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.36, p. 159.

[155] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 16.

[156] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.

[157] Reginonis Chronicon 965, MGH SS I, p. 627.

[158] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.

[159] Annales Elnonenses Minores [950-968], MGH SS V, p. 19.

[160] Nicholas, D. (1992) Medieval Flanders (Longman), p. 44.

[161] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 96, p. 92.

[162] Vita Sancti Bertulfi Abbatis Renticensis, RCGF 10, p. 365.

[163] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 60 footnote 32.

[164] Nicholas (1992), p. 45.

[165] Guadet, J. (ed.) (1845) Richeri Historiarum (Paris) IV.LXXXVII, p. 270.

[166] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 102, p. 96.

[167] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 107, p. 101.

[168] Annales Elnonenses Minores 1003, MGH SS V, p. 19.

[169] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 299.

[170] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 387.

[171] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64.

[172] Richer IV, supplementary notes following CVII, p. 308.

[173] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 62 footnote 42.

[174] Lecesne, H. (ed.) (1874) Cartulaire de Marmoutier pour le Dunois III, p. 4.

[175] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Mathilde, Reine de France inconnue', Journal des Savants (Oct-Dec 1971), pp. 241-60, 242 footnote 8.

[176] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Père de Chartres (Paris) ("Chartres Saint-Père"), I, Liber Quintus, Cap. V, p. 96.

[177] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 5.

[178] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[179] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780.

[180] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis I 996, MGH SS VIII, p. 368.

[181] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107.

[182] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.40, p. 165.

[183] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107.

[184] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 57.

[185] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.34, p. 157.

[186] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 56 and 57.

[187] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.36, p. 159.

[188] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 267.

[189] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Prieuré d'Argenteuil, p. 348.

[190] Depoin, J. (1912) Recueil des chartes et documents de Saint-Martin-des-Champs, monastère parisien, Vol. 1 (Paris), no. 6, pp. 15-16, expanded by Mathieu, J. N. (1996) 'Recherches sur les premiers Comtes de Dammartin', Mémoires publiés par la Fédération des sociétés historiques et archéologiques de Paris et de l'Ile-de-France, t. 47 (1996), pp. 7-60, 15-16, both cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 63.

[191] Cartulaire de Notre-Dame de Chartres d'après les cartularies et les titres originaux, ed. Lépinois, E. de and Merlet, L. (Chartres, 1862-1865), no. XIII, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 63 footnote 57.

[192] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107.

[193] ES III 676.

[194] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum IV.26, p. 213.

[195] Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis, RHGF X, p. 222.

[196] Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum, RHGF X, p. 258.

[197] Bouchard (1987), pp. 343-4, the author highlighting the "unreliable genealogies" of Raoul Glaber and preferring the Annales Vizeliacenses as a reliable source.

[198] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.

[199] Cluny Tome IV, 2811, p. 13.

[200] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[201] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.32, p. 151.

[202] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.

[203] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 270.

[204] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Prieuré d'Argenteuil, p. 348.

[205] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.33, p. 157.

[206] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[207] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[208] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64.

[209] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[210] Le Prévost, A. (1840) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. I, Liber I, p. 184, and Vol. III, Liber VII, p. 160.

[211] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.

[212] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 317.

[213] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1060, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792.

[214] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252.

[215] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Appendix I, p. 350.

[216] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.

[217] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 390.

[218] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.

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According to the Wikipedia page on his father, Robert II of France:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II_of_France

Odo (1013–c.1056), who may have been mentally retarded and died after his brother's failed invasion of Normandy.

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Eudes de France's Timeline

1013
1013
Germigny-des-Prés, Centre, France
1057
1057
Age 44
1934
July 23, 1934
Age 44
July 23, 1934
Age 44
July 23, 1934
Age 44
July 23, 1934
Age 44
July 23, 1934
Age 44
July 23, 1934
Age 44
July 23, 1934
Age 44
July 23, 1934
Age 44