Jan Joosten van Meteren

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Jan Joosten van Meteren

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Tiel, Gelderland, Nederland
Death: Died in Raritan, Somerset, NJ
Place of Burial: Raritan, NJ, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Joost Jans Jansen Van Meteren and Anneke Jans
Husband of Maeyken Hendrickse van den Oever
Father of Joost Jansen Van Meteren; Gysbert Janse Van Meeteren; Catherin or Cathelina Crom Mulliner and Janitje "Jane" Jane Hendrick

Occupation: Came to America in 1662 on the vessel "FOX".
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Jan Joosten van Meteren

New Amsterdam - Immigrants

Immigration: 12 SEP 1662 New Amsterdam (New York City)

   Jan Joosten Van Meteren and his wife Maeken Hendriksen came from Holland on the ship "Fox", arriving at New Amsterdam on September 12, 1662. They settled in Kingston, New York. The house is still in existence: a two story house with openings under the eaves to shoot from. It is now used as a guest house with meals served, rooms for tourists, etc. It is in excellent condition.
   http://www.vnla.com/vnl/gen/mcq/VanMeter.htm
   Jan, his wife and five children arrived in the ship Fox at New Netherland on 12 April 1662. He came
   from Thielerwardt, a fortified town in Gelderland, Holland, and his wife from Meppelen, Province of
   Drenth, where they were married and where their children were born. The family name was derived from
   Meteren, a town in Holland.
   Upon the death of Joost Adrienceson of 'Boswick', Long Island, about 1685, Jan Joosten Van Meteren
   was appointed administrator, tutor of decedent's children and arbitrator in proceedings regarding the
   sale of some land in Hurley, which had been sold to Derick Schepmoes by Adrience during his lifetime.
   Jan Joosten Van Meteren, with his family, settled at Wiltwyck during the summer of 1662, but he is
   not noted in the activities of the community until 7 June 1663 when the Indians raided the settlement
   and carried off women and children into captivity. Among the prisoners were Jan's wife and two of his
   children, Joost Janse being one of them. He is not named in Captain Krieger's journal of the rescue
   expedition, but it is elsewhere stated that due to his three months' association with the Indians at the
   time of his captivity, Joost Janse had knowledge of their habits, trails, plans and war feuds with other
   tribes, and was so impressed with a desire for their adventurous life.
   Jan Joosten's name appears on the list of inhabitants who subscribed to the Oath of Allegiance, due to
   a change in the sovereignty of the country, between the 21st and 26th of October 1664. After this date
   frequent notices of him occur upon the records of Kingston, as a farmer, and as a man of growing
   importance in civil and religious matters.
   Joost Janse was elected an Elder of the Church in 1667. During the trouble in Wiltwyck during that
   year, caused by the offensiveness of the soldiers of the English garrison, he with three other citizens
   acted as mediators in the dispute and were able to conciliate the inhabitants, thus preventing violence to
   lives and property.
   The first instance of his purchase of land appears in a record which reads 'Jan Joosten had from
   Governor Lovelace a deed for a lot, dated 20 March 1671, in Marbletown' and 'on 11 October 1671
   received confirmation of his 30 acre lot in Marbletown.'
   He was selected on 6 January 1673 as one of the four magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown to
   supervise the merging of the village of Nieuw Dorp into those of Hurley and Marbletown under the
   English rule. The other magistrates were: Jan Broerson, Louis DuBois, and Roelof Hendrickson.
   Notwithstanding the change of government Jan was continued in that civil office until the return of
   Dutch supremacy in 1675, when Governor Colve reappointed him to serve for another term.
   He was named Justice of Peace for Esopus, and was present at the Court of Assizes in New York from
   4 to 6 October 1682.
   Maeyken, wife of Jan Joosten, was named as a beneficiary in the Will of Evardt Pary dated 26 March
   1675 [Ulster Co. Probate Records].
   Jan Joosten Van Meteren obtained land grants in the Province of East Jersey through a period
   extending from 1689 to the year of his death, 1706 2E In company with his son-in-law, Jan Hamel, who
   had married his daughter Geertje Crom in 1682, Jan Joosten appeared in East Jersey where they jointly
   bought on 18 October 1695 from Edward Hunlocke, the deputy Governor, of Wingerworth, Burlington
   County,, a plantation of 500 acres, located at Lassa (or Lazy) Point on the Delaware River. Lassa Point
   was about 23 miles northeast of Philadelphia.
   Jan Joosten next appears as an individual purchaser of certain lands in Somerset County,, New Jersey,
   deed passing title from Governor Andrew Hamilton and Agnes, his wife, under date of 13 September
   1700 to Jan Joosten of Marbletown, New York, yeoman, lying contiguous on the South branch of the
   Raritan River near the present Somerville, New Jersey to three other parcels also granted. As a whole,
   the plantation aggregated 1835 acres.
   His Will filed with inventory of his personal property in Burlington County, Surrogate's Office, dated
   13 June 1706, was written in Dutch. His wife was to retain full possession of the estate during her
   lifetime, then in was to be divided, son Joost 1/2; Joost and Gysbert to have land at Marbletown, Joost
   to have 1/2 and then the other 1/2 to be divided between them; Geertje to have land at Wassemaker's;
   children of deceased daughter Lysbeth to have their portion in money from the other children of Jan the
   testator [Ulster County, Probate Record].

-------------------- Taken from GENEOLOGY OF THE VAN METER FAMILY, as compiled by Olive (Van Meter) Hamilton and Arthur Ashley Van Meter.

As far as is known, the family originated in Meteren, Province of Guelderland, the Netherlands. As far as available records show, the first Van Meter in this country arrived from Holland at New York, then New Amsterdam, on a sailing vessel call the "FOX" on September 12, 1662. The man was Jan Jooste Van Meteren (John George Van Meteren). The name has since been simplified to Van Metre or Van Meter.

He was accompanied by his wife, Maycken (Hendricksen) Van Meteren and several children, one of whom was Jooste Jan (George John) who married Sarah DuBois in 1682. This Sarah was one of the daughters of Louis Dubois whose ancestry can be traced back with more or less certainty to about 1200 A.D. Jooste Jan was born in Guelderland, Holland in 1660.

Jooste Jan and Sarah had several children. One was John (1683 - 1745) who is the ancester of the line to which we belong.


Others are Isaac (1691 - 1757), Rebecca, Lysbeth and Henry.

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will

New Jersey Wills and Abstracts Calendar of New Jersey Wills, 1901, New Jersey Historical Society

Dated: December 16, 1681. Signed: Jan Joosten & a mark for Mayken. Language: Dutch. Filed: with inventory of his personal property in Burlington Co. NJ Surrogate's Office. Proved: 13 Jun 1706 Listed: Ulster Co. Probate Record Translator: Gustave Anjou, in his Probate Records of Ulster County:

Inventory of the personal estate: £235.14, incl. 6 negro slaves, a man, a woman and four children, £145; made by Jooris van Neste and Hendreck Reinersen. Sworn to by John van Mater in Burlington.

Wife Maycken shall have full possession of the estate. She consents that the survivor shall possess everything, lands, houses, personal property, money, gold, silver, coined or uncoined. After their decrease, the property to be inherited by their children. Joost to have one half of the entire estate first, Joost and Gysbert to have the land at Marbletown, Joost one half, and then the other half to be divided between them. Geertie Crom to have the land at Wassemaker's Land. Children of Lysbeth, deceased, to have their portion, in money, from the other children.

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Calendar of New Jersey Wills, 1670-1760

Name: Isaac van Meter Date: 28 Nov 1758 Inventory of part of his estate found in Salem Co., in the custody of Jost Millar, viz., a negro man, "if he arrives at the age of 21 years," £50, proclamation money; a negro girl, £15, "if she arrives to full age." Signed by Bateman Lloyd and Joseph van Meter. Salem Wills, 1049 Q.

Calendar of New Jersey Wills, 1670-1760

Name: Isaac Vanmetre Date: 15 Feb 1754 Location: South Branch of the Potowmack, in Frederick Co. Va.; will of.

Wife, Hannah, to have £20 yearly and negro named Hannah. Lands in New Jersey, with the stock thereon, to remain under the leases now granted till they expire, then to be sold, and money to go to my children, viz., Henry, Jacob, Garret, Sarah Richman, Catherine Vanmetre, Rebecca Hite, Helita Vanmetre.

Lands in Virginia I bought of James Cebrun, located by Abraham Hite and Jonathan Heath, of 600 acres, to be divided, and the upper 200 I give to my son Garrett, the middle 200 to my son Jacob and the lower 200 to my son Henry, whereon he now lives. The land I purchased of Michael Hyder I give to my daughter Catherine, if she incline to dwell thereon, and, if she does not, then to be sold. The 200 acres which is in dispute, if it goes to me, then I give it to Abraham Hite, husband of my daughter Rebecca, joining his lot, and the other 200 acres I give to my daughter Hellita. If my daughters Catherine and Hellita die without marriage or issue, then my daughter Sarah, the wife of John Richman, to have said land. If sons Jacob or Garret die without marriage or issue, then their part to go to the surviving children. Executors--sons Henry, Jacob and Garret. Witnesses--Ebenezer Holme, Abel Randell, Joseph Carrell. Will proved Dec. 14, 1757, in Hampshire County, Va. Lib. 12, p. 119.

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Calendar of New Jersey Wills, 1670-1760

Name: Henry van Meter Date: 02 May 1752 Location: Piles Grove Township, Salem Co. will of. Children--Joseph, David, John, Ephraim, Fetters, Benjamin, Jacob, Elesabeth, and Rebecca. Homefarm of 350 acres; farm of 300 ac., now occupied by Philipp Sutter; farm of 350 ac., now occupied by Joshua Garrison; farm of 350 ac. adjoining the homefarm; 900 ac., bought of Langhorn Biles and Jeremiah Bates. Personal property, incl. a negro girl. Executors--sons Joseph and David. Witnesses--Joshua Garrison, Benjamin Worton and Onesimus Seagrave. Proved Dec. 8, 1759. Lib. 10, p. 507.

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from:Ruckman, Phil N. Sr. http://historical.whitleynet.org/ruckmanr.htm#vanmeter

1836 Will of Isaac VanMeter: Page 1

Page 2: (sons of William & Sally Cunningham) three Negro Boys names Charles, Lloyd & Hamilton (Sons of Teny.) My oldest Grandson to take choice.

Item 3. I give and devise to my son Garrett Vanmeter his heirs and assigns the Land I held in the State of Maryland and now in his possession as far north as the south east corner of the Land I bought of Thomas Nanett and with a line due East from said corner to bound it. Also several tracts of Land, I hold in Hampshire County Va. and now in his possession, which I bought of Solomon Heater, John Slagle, John House and the heirs of the widow Slagle Dec. Also I give to my son Garrett & my son David a tract of Land in the Allegheny Mountains, adjoining my son Garretts land, and the Land which has been devised to my son David, and on which Joseph Dixon now lives, to be divided by them equally, so as to suit them both. Also I give to my son Garrett one Negro Boy names Anthony (son of Matilada).

Item 4th. I give and devise to my son John Inskeep Vanmeter, his Heirs & assigns all those several tracts of land, I hold in the State of Ohio; adjoining each other, and commonly called Miller's Bottom near the mouth of Big Beaver Creek, and now in his possession. Also I give to my Son John I. Vanmeter, my part of a tract of land on the Scioto River, commonly called Laytons Bottom, the other parts belonging to the heirs of George Harness, dec. and the heir of Lionel Branson, dec.

Item 5th. I give and devise to my daughter Elizabeth Inskeep, her Heirs and Assigns, all the several tracts, or parts, or parcels of Tracts of land I hold adjoining and near the town of Frankfort in Hampshire County, Va. purchased of the Rogers, the Jones & others. and all my interest in law and or equity in and to lots and rents of lots in the said town of Frankfort and now in her possession.

Item 6th. I give and devise to my Son Jacob Vanmeter, his Heirs and Assigns all the Lands whereon I now live, including all the Lands I hold in Hardy County, Va. (and not otherwise devised) subject to the payment of three thousand dollars, payable to me, or to my executors in installments, of eight hundred dollars annually to be applied as hereafter directed. Also I give to my Son Jacob. a tract of land I hold in the Allegheny Mountains call the Copper Spring. Also I give to my son Jacob Vanmeter, whatever stock of Cattle, sheep and hogs that may be on hand, at my deceased; also all my household and kitchen Page 3 furniture, and all of farming utensils of every description. Also I give to my son Jacob Vanmeter the following names Slaves viz. James, Bill, Bob, Manual, Dan (son of Teny), Rachel and her children (not otherwise disposed of) and Lot and her children (not otherwise disposed of.).

Item 7th. I give and devise to my Daughter Ann Markee Gibson, her heirs and assigns, the several tracts of Land I hold & Lying in Hampshire County, Va. at the mouth of Pattersons' Creek, and which I bought of James Higgins and the Eversoles, and now in her possession. Also I give to my Daughter Ann M. Gibson the whole of my stock in the Bank of the Valley at Romney. Also I give to my Daughter Ann M. Gibson the following names Slaves vix Edmund and Henry, Caroline, Caty, Harriet & Rebecca.

It is my will and I do furthermore direct, that my executors, hereafter mentioned to collect all the debts due to me and likewise the sum which I have directed my son Jacob to pay which sum (if not paid to me) is to be paid over to my said Daughter, Ann M. Gibson, and I do furthermore direct, that my said Executors do dispose of all my property of every description belonging to me wherever it may be (and not hereto fore devised or Disposed of) and after paying my just debts and legacies, the remainder (if any) to be equally divided among my children. And Lastly. I do appoint and constitute my sons David Vanmeter, Garrett Vanmeter and Jacob Vanmeter to be the Executors of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills and Testaments. It is to be understand and I do hereby direct that my two old Salves named Jack and Surry shall remain, and be under the care and direction of my son Jacob, and that the remainder of my salve not otherwise disposed of, be sold to the highest bidder among my children. In testimony whereof I have here unto set my hand and Affixed my seal this thirtieth day of April 1836.

Signed Sealed and Acknowledged in Isaac Vanmeter SEAL Presence of US Philip ?W. Peck Hannah L. Peck John Inskeep +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Pages 90 & 91 of Unrecorded Wills and Inventories Monmouth County, New Jersey:

VAN MATRE, KRYNE of Middletown, Mon. Co., Yeoman, "Being ingood and perfect health." Dated Apr. 26, 1719. Proved by oath of William Lawrence, Junr, and Hendrick Smock, "two of the Evidences," who saw the other wits. sign; before John Barclay, Surrogate, Mch. 21, 1719.

"My Will is that My Son John Van Matre shall have and keep that Fifty-one pounds which I formerly paid to Ryk "Hendrickson for and towards a plantation for my said Son John, without being accountable to my Executors for the "same..."; " .... that at the time of the Marriage of My Daughter Yda she shall have two Cows and fifteen "pounds and my daughter Angletye to have at the time of her Marriage two Cows and fifteen pounds, And My daughter "Cornelia to have at the time of her Marriage two Cows and fifteen pounds to be delivered to them out of my perfonal "Estate by my Executors ...."; "to my loving Wife Neeltye Van Matre the use of my plantation and the use of the "Remainder of my personal Estate .... during the time that she shall Remain my Widow and after her decease or "Remarriage .... that the personal Estate that she has the use of be Equally divided Amongst all my Chilldren, "Namely, John, Yda, Ghisbert, Angeltye Benjamin, Cornelia, Sirynus and Joseph"; " .... my whole Real Estate ".... after the death or Remarriage of my Wife which shall first happen to my fowr Sons Namely Ghisbert Van "Matre, Benjamin Van Matre, Sirynus Van Matre and Joseph Van Matre as followeth, viz.... that if my Son Ghisbert shall within .... Three Years Next after the decease or Remarriage of my Wife pay unto my daughter Yda "or her heirs the Sum of Seventy-five pounds, that then I give .... One full and Equal fourth part of my Real "Estate to him ... his heirs ...., And if my Son Benjamin shall within .... Three Years Next "after the decease or Remarriage of my Wife pay unto my daughter Angeltye or her Heirs, the Sum of Seventy five pounds "then I give .... One full and Equal fourth part of my Real Estate to him .... his Heirs .... And "if my Son Sirinus shall live to the Age of Twenty-one years, and shall within three years after the Decease or Remarriage "of my Wife or at the Age of Twenty-One Years which shall last happen, pay to my Son John or his Heirs, the Sum of "Seventy-five pounds then I Give .... One full and Equal fourth part of my Real Estate to him .... his "Heirs .... And if my Son Joseph shall live to the Age of Twenty-One Years, and shall within three Years after the "Decease or Remarriage of my Wife or at the Age of Twenty One Years which shall last happen, pay to my daughter Cornelia "or her Heirs the Sum of Seventy-five pounds then I Give .... the Remaining fourth part of my Real Estate to "him.... Joseph his Heirs .... if Either of the said fowr Sons depart this Life before he attain the Age of "Twenty-One Years, or leave Issue of his Body, that then that fowrth part of my Estate be Equally divided between the "Remaining Three, they paying that Sum to the person that the party deceased was to pay .... I .... give "power to my Executors .... to divide my Lands in fowr Equall parts .... to my said fowr Sons."

Nominates "My two friends and Brothers in Law Benjamin Van Cleave and Philip folcoettson to be the Executors ...."

Wits.: kr"n G[orF]auffen van meteren Jacobus Swett [or Scott] Hendrick Smock John Lawrence Thomas Lawrence Willm Lawrence Junr

Oath of Executor, Benjamen Vancleave, before John Barclay, Surrogate, May 25, 1720.

New Jersey Historical Society. Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, etc. Newark, NJ: New Jersey Historical Society, 1901.

Page: 480 Name: Kryne Jansen van Matre Date: 26 Apr 1719 Location: Middletown, Monmouth Co. yeoman; will of. Wife Neeltye. Children--John, Yda, Angletye, Cornelia, Ghisbert, Benjamin, Sirynus and Joseph. Real and personal estate. Executors--brothers-in-law Benjamin van Cleave and Philip Folcoertson. Witnesses--Jacobus Swett (?), Hendrick Smock, John Lawrence, Thomas Lawrence, Wm. Lawrence junior. Proved March 21, 1719-20.

Page: 480 Name: Quiryn van Matre Date: 07 May 1720 Location: Middletown, Monmouth Co. Inventory of the personal estate, £194.11.4, incl. a large Bible and four other books £4.10, a bond of Hugh Fraizer £8.10, 163 bushels of wheat at 3/4, £27.3.4; made by Wm. Lawrence, Johannes Smack, Auken Hetfelsen and Wm. Lawrence junior.


Contributed by Linda Newhouse.

-------------------- The first evidence in the records of the actual presence of any of the Van Meter family in America is contained in the list of passengers arriving in the "Fox" at New Amsterdam 12 Sept 1662. Among the passengers were Jan Joosten, as he signed his name, from Tiederwelt, with wife and five children, ages 15, 12, 9, 6 and 2 1/2 (Lysbeth, Catharine, Geertiji, Joost Jansen and Gysbert Jansen.

His wife Macyken Hendricksen was of Meppel, Providence of Drente, Netherlands. Jan Joosten settled with his wife and family in Wyltwick (Kingston) late in the summer of 1662 and nothing more is learned of them until the Minnissink Indians came down upon the settlement on the Hudson, raiding and burning the villages of Hurley and Kingston on 7 Jun 1663. They carried away as captives the wife and two of the children of Joosten.

In March, 1671, he had from Governor Lovelace a deed for a lot in Marbletown and a confirmation 11 Oct. 1671 of thirty acre lot of ground in Marbletown.

Jan Joosten was in every sense an enterprising and influential citizen, a man of vision and initiative culture and to the fine and useful qualities, and one in whom the people placed their matters of trust without fear of being betrayed or exploited. He was indeed a worthy progenitor of the line of descent who have distinguished themselves in every sphere of usefulness. http://leecase.tripod.com/vanmetre.htm

He was also said to have died after 13 June 1706 in Wiltwyck, NY. 1704

"Van Meter was derived from the place of residence and in this particular family they eventually adopted Van Meter (with various spellings) meaning 'of Meteren' the place from which they came afer arriving in America. We find many spellings for this Dutch settler, among them: van Meter, van Meteren, van Metren, Vanmiter, van Maitre, van Mater, van Metre, van Mieter, van Miter and even Briimeter in Virginia and West Virginia. There are some Dutch patronymics that are interesting such as 'Joost' which is derived from 'the just', the Dutch form of Justus." 1704

"Joost Jans was the son of Jan Joosten and Macyken Hendricksen Van Meteren, of the Province of Guelderland, holland. Their names are contained in the list of passengers arriving in the 'Fox' at New Amsterdam 12th September, 1662. (Passenger lists 1657-1664. Doc History, New York, Vol III, pp. 52-63, Year Book Hist. Coc. N.Y., 1896.)" 1705

" Jan Joosten Van Meteren, with his family, settled at Wiltwyck during the summer of 1662. On 30 March 1663 he was appointed an overseer of Esopus together with Albert Heymans Roosa and Jan Gerretsen. They were to act as 'supervisors (sic) for the purpose of assisting the new arrivals'. They were not magistrates. Their life was not to be peaceful. On 7 June 1663 the Indians came down from the catskill Mountains, raided the settlement and carried off women and children into captivity. Among the prisoners were Jan's wife and two of his children, Joost Jansen being one of them. Joost Jansen is not named in Captian Drieger's journal of the rescue expedition, but it is elsewhere stated that due to his three months association with the Indians at the time of his captivity, Joost Jansen gained knowledge of their habits, trails plans and war feuds with other tribes, and was improssed with a desire for their adventurous life." 1704

"Jan Joosten Van Meteren became prominent in the community as a pioneer and in civil and church affairs. His name appears on the list of inhabitants who subscribed to the Oath of Allegiance, due to a change in sovereignty of the country, between the 21st and 26th of October 1664. After this date, frequent notices of him occur upon the importance in civil and religious matters. He continued to be active in the affairs of the community for we find that on 5 May 1665 he was sworn in as Commissary for two years. He served as Commissary from May 1663 to May 1665 and was reappointed to hold that office on 21 June 1666. He retired from the office on 14 or 24 May 1667. He was again appointed by the Governor and sworn in as a commissary sometime between April and October 1668. He continued in office through June 1670." 1704

"He was elected an Elder of the church in 1667. During the trouble in Wiltwyck that year, caused of the offensiveness of the soldiers of the English garrison, he, with three other citizens acted as mediators in the dispute and were able to conciliate the inhabitants, thus preventing violence to lives and property. The first instance of his purchase of land appears in a record which reads 'Jan Joosten had from Governor Lovelace a deed for a lot, dated 20 March 1671 in Marbletown' and 'on 11 October 1671 received confirmation in Marbletown'. He was elected on 6 January 1673 as one of the four magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown to supervise the merging of the village of Nieuw Dorp into those of Hurley and Marbletown under the English rule. The other magistrates were: Jan Broerson, Louis du Bois and Roelof Hendrickson. Notwithstanding the change of government Jan was continued in that civil office until the return of Dutch supremacy in 1675, when Governor Colve reappointed him to serve for another term. He was named Justice of the Peach for Esopus and was present at the Court of Assizes in New York, on 4,5, and 6 October 1682." 1704

"Upon the death of Joost Adrienceson of 'Boswick' Long Island ca 1685, Jan Joosten van Meteren was appointed administrator, tutor of decedent's children and arb itrator in proceedings regarding the sale of some land in Hurley, which had been sold to Derick Schepmoes by Adrience during his lifetime. Jan Joosten van Meteren obtained land grants in the Province of East Jersey through a period extending from 1689 to the year of his death, 1706. In company with his son-in-law Jan Hamel, who had married his daughter Geertje Crom in 1682, Jan Joosten appeared in East Jersey where they jointly bought on 18 October 1695 from Edward Hunlocke, the Deputy Governor of Wingerworth, Burlington Co., a plantation of five hundred acres located at Lassa (or Lazy) Point on the Delaware River. Lassa Point was about twenty three miles northeast of Philadelphia and is known today as the city of Burlington." 1704

"Jan Joosten next appears as an individual purchaser of certain lands in Somerset County, New Jersey. A deed passed title from Governor Andrew Hamilton and Agnes, his wife, under date of 13 September 1700 to Jan Joosten of Marbletown, New York, yeoman, lying contiguous on the south branch of the Raritan River near the present Somerville, New Jersey to three other parcels also granted. As a whole, the plantation aggregated eighteen hundred thirty five acres."1704

"The Vanmetre Line - The name has been spelled in a large number of ways: Van Metren, Van Metre, Van Meter, Van Matre; at present the style more popular is Vanmetre. In the early history of the county the spelling of the name was Van Matre. . . The arms of the Dutch Van Metern family are: quartered: first and fourth of silver with a fleur-de-lis, gules; with second and third of gold,with two feses; gules accomplished with eight martlets of the same color arranged in orle. crest; a fleur-de-lis. It is said that the name is derived from Metern, a town of Guerlderland, Holland. If this be true, the correct spelling of the name should be Van Meter." 1685

"Jan Joosten, the founder of this family, arrived at New Ansterdam (now New York City), September 12, 1662, coming from Tiederwelt, with his wife and five children ranging in age from two to fifteen years; removed to Wyltrick, Kingston, New York, same year. In 1663 the Minnisik Indians raided and burned Wyltrick and carried off his wife and two children but these were rescued. Was a schephan at Wiltwick; was elected (1667) a deacon in the dutch Reformed Church. In 1673 was one of four magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown, New York; sowre allegiance to the English in Ulster County, New York, 1689; in 1695 purchased five hundred acres of land in Burlington County, New Jersey, on the Delaware River on the present site of Burlington, New Jersey; bought a large acreage of land in Somerset County, New Jersey, and died near Raritan, New Jersey; married Machyken Hendrickson of Meppelen Province of dreuthe, Holland." 1685

"The Van Meters in company with several other families, emigrated from Holland to the State of New York, between the years 1650 and 1660, settling at what is nnow known as Ulster county. Between the years 1712 and 1714, a company of the citizens of the Dutch Reformed, or Presbyterian faith removed from the neighborhood of Esopis, to Pilesgrove now Upper Pittsgrove, their minister David Evans accompanied them, and his tombstone, with appropriate inscriptions, can be seen in the Presbyterian burial ground at Daretown, in Upper Pittsgrove, Salem county, New Jersey. That these emigrants were families of respectability, may be inferred from the standing of their pastor, who was recognized as a man of learning and piety. These families seemed to have been mindful also, of the advantages of education, inasmuch as a first-class school for that early time, was established by them, and the most competent teachers procured. Parents from long distances sent their children to this school, and some of the most distinguished men in the State, in subsequent years, were proud of the learning obtained at the Pittsgrove College, as it was termed. . . Among the company who left New York, were three brothers, and their families by the name of VanMeter. Some of the family settled in East Jersey, chiefly in Monmouth county; one of the brothers, Joseph VanMeter settled in that county, and the other two brothers John and Isaac settled in Pilesgrove township, Salem county. Occasional intercourse, as one of the family writes, and visiting continued between the East Jersey and Salem county VanMeters, for some eyars, but as the older members of the family died, communication between the younger branches of the family gradually ceased."1714

"Jan Joosten, the founder of the family in America was born 1625. He came from Thielerwardt, a fortified town in Gelderland, Holland, The Netherlands. With his wife and five children he arrived on the ship 'Fox' at New Netherlands on 12 April 1662. " 1704

Jan Joosten VAN METEREN was born about 1621 in Holland.

He married Macyke Hendrickse in 1646 at Gelderland or at Meppelen, Dreuth, Holland.

Their children, all born at Gelderland as Van Metern, were:

  • Lysbeth, born in 1647;
  • Catherine, born in 1650;
  • Geertje, born in 1653, married Gysbert Krom of Marbletown;
  • Joost Jansen, born in 1656, married Sarah DuBois at Kingston on 12 December 1682, had nine children, and died at Salem County, New Jersey on 13 June 1706; and
  • Gysbert Jansen, born in 1660.

"Jan, his wife and five children arrived in the ship Fox at New Netherland on 12 April 1662. He came from Thielerwardt, a fortified town in Gelderland, Holland, and his wife from Meppelen, Province of Drenth, where they were married and where their children were born. The family name was derived from Meteren, a town in Holland.

"Upon the death of Joost Adrienceson of 'Boswick', Long Island, about 1685, Jan Joosten Van Meteren was appointed administrator, tutor of decedent's children and arbitrator in proceedings regarding the sale of some land in Hurley, which had been sold to Derick Schepmoes by Adrience during his lifetime.

"Jan Joosten Van Meteren, with his family, settled at Wiltwyck during the summer of 1662, but he is not noted in the activities of the community until 7 June 1663 when the Indians raided the settlement and carried off women and children into captivity. Among the prisoners were Jan's wife and two of his children, Joost Janse being one of them. He is not named in Captain Krieger's journal of the rescue expedition, but it is elsewhere stated that due to his three months' association with the Indians at the time of his captivity, Joost Janse had knowledge of their habits, trails, plans and war feuds with other tribes, and was so impressed with a desire for their adventurous life.

"Jan Joosten's name appears on the list of inhabitants who subscribed to the Oath of Allegiance, due to a change in the sovereignty of the country, between the 21st and 26th of October 1664. After this date frequent notices of him occur upon the records of Kingston, as a farmer, and as a man of growing importance in civil and religious matters.

"Joost Janse was elected an Elder of the Church in 1667. During the trouble in Wiltwyck during that year, caused by the offensiveness of the soldiers of the English garrison, he with three other citizens acted as mediators in the dispute and were able to conciliate the inhabitants, thus preventing violence to lives and property.

"The first instance of his purchase of land appears in a record which reads 'Jan Joosten had from Governor Lovelace a deed for a lot, dated 20 March 1671, in Marbletown' and 'on 11 October 1671 received confirmation of his 30 acre lot in Marbletown.'

"He was selected on 6 January 1673 as one of the four magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown to supervise the merging of the village of Nieuw Dorp into those of Hurley and Marbletown under the English rule. The other magistrates were: Jan Broerson, Louis DuBois, and Roelof Hendrickson. Notwithstanding the change of government Jan was continued in that civil office until the return of Dutch supremacy in 1675, when Governor Colve reappointed him to serve for another term.

"He was named Justice of Peace for Esopus, and was present at the Court of Assizes in New York from 4 to 6 October 1682.

"Maeyken, wife of Jan Joosten, was named as a beneficiary in the Will of Evardt Pary dated 26 March 1675 [Ulster Co. Probate Records].

"Jan Joosten Van Meteren obtained land grants in the Province of East Jersey through a period extending from 1689 to the year of his death, 1706 2E In company with his son-in-law, Jan Hamel, who had married his daughter Geertje Crom in 1682, Jan Joosten appeared in East Jersey where they jointly bought on 18 October 1695 from Edward Hunlocke, the deputy Governor, of Wingerworth, Burlington County, a plantation of 500 acres, located at Lassa (or Lazy) Point on the Delaware River. Lassa Point was about 23 miles northeast of Philadelphia.

"Jan Joosten next appears as an individual purchaser of certain lands in Somerset County, New Jersey, deed passing title from Governor Andrew Hamilton and Agnes, his wife, under date of 13 September 1700 to Jan Joosten of Marbletown, New York, yeoman, lying contiguous on the South branch of the Raritan River near the present Somerville, New Jersey to three other parcels also granted. As a whole, the plantation aggregated 1835 acres.

"His Will filed with inventory of his personal property in Burlington County Surrogate's Office, dated 13 June 1706, was written in Dutch. His wife was to retain full possession of the estate during her lifetime, then in was to be divided, son Joost 1/2; Joost and Gysbert to have land at Marbletown, Joost to have 1/2 and then the other 1/2 to be divided between them; Geertje to have land at Wassemaker's; children of deceased daughter Lysbeth to have their portion in money from the other children of Jan the testator [Ulster County Probate Record]." Jan died in 1706. "1698

"All these names under the conditions I have named, underwent some change and many came to be written with a radical variation from the original. Take, for instance: Joost Janz Van Meteren (i.e. of Meteren - so-called, from the village of Meteren, a short distance southwest of Buren in the province of Gelderland, in Holland), whose name has been variously written or expressed in these forms: Van Meteren, Van metre, Van Meter, La Meeter, Lameeter, La Maetre, La Maitre, de la Meter, &c., &c. . . ." 1696

"Jan Joosten Van Meteren, his wife and five children, whose ages ranged from two and a half to fifteen eyars of age, arrived in the ship 'Fox,' at New Amsterdam, in New Netherlands, on the 12th of April, 1662. The wife's name was Macyek Hendricksen, and she is supposed to have been the siser of Femmetjen Hendricksen, who married Jooste Adriensen, of Pynnaker, Holland, on the 20th of March, 1663-4. She was of Meppelen, in teh province of Dreuth, in Holland; and upon the death of Jooste Ariencesen, of 'Boswick,' upon Long Island, circa 1685, Jan Joosten Van Meteren was appointed administrator, tutor of decedent's children, and arbitrator in proceedings regarding the sale of some land in Hurley which had been sold to Derick Schepmos by Arience during his lifetime. Jan Joosten's children were: Lysbeth, Cathrin, Geertje, Jooste Jans, and Gysbert; Jooste Jans being the eldest, as appears by the father's records. Jan Joosten hailed fromt he Thielerwaardt, a fortified town in Gelderland, Hollans; and his wife was of Meppelen, in the province of Dreuth, in Hollans, where they were married and their children born. The family patronymic was derived from Van, 'of,' and 'Meteren,' a town in Holland. Prior to 1662, there is a record that Jan Joosten had been in America at least a year earlier. Evidence shows that he was appointed in 1661, along with Jan Gerrettsen, Roosa Gerrettsen and Allard Huymans, on a committee to superintend the enclosing of the village of Nieuw Dorp, in Ulster Co., N.Y." 1679

Jan Joostern, with his family, settled in Wyltwick [now Kingston] in the summer of 1662, but he is not noted in the activities of that community until the 7th of Jjune, 1663, the date when the Minnisink Indians made an attack on the village and its vicinity, raiding and burning the settlement and carrrying away women and children in captivity. Among the latter were Jan's wife and two of his children, Jooste Jans being one of them. Captain Kreier's journal, which given a general account of the expedition of rescue, unfortunately does not name him, but it is elsewhere stated that it was due to Jooste Jan's three months' association with the Indians, during his captivity, that gave him the knowledge of their habits, trails, plans and war feuds with other tribes, and so impressed him with a desire for their adventurous life. In a list of the inhabitants of Ulster county, New York, who subscribed to the oath of allegiance, due to a change in the sovereignty of the country, between the 21st and 26th of October, 1664, the name of Jan Joosten appears among them. After this date frequent notice of him occurs upon tahe records of Kingston - as a farmer, and a man of growing importance in civil and religious matters. In 1665 he was appointed referee in a law-suit between two of the citizens; and on August 26, of the same year, he is mentioned as an appraiser of the personal estate of dr. Gysbert van Imbrock, who was a physician and apothecary fo the vicinity. The decedent's inventory included, among other valuable books, a copy of Emmanuel Van Meteren's History; and at a sale of the effects, on the 9th of September, following, Jan was a purchaser to the extent of nearly 100 guilders - two of the items he bought were the 'Beehive,' by the famous Marnix, Lord of St. Aldegonde, and 'The Chronicles of the Kings of England'; and these books aptly showed the character of Jan Joosten's culture. A further appointment came to Jan as 'Scheppen,' or to a position synonymous to that of the minor judiciary, which, under the laws of the time, gave him jurisdiction in all civil cases under the sum of 100 guilders; but in casdes above that amount such action must be referred to the Director-General and the Council . He could pronounce sentence in criminal actions, subject to appeal, so we may assume that he enjoyed a position but little removed below the highest court in the province." 1679

"From about this time Jan Joosten was frequently sought as a witness to various marriages, or as sponsor at the baptisms of children at the home of relatives and friends. In some instances baptisms were performed 'at Jan Joosten's in the presence of the whole consistory'" these distinctions were, no doubt, due to his position in the church, in which he had been elected an elder, in 1667; or, as a civil officer in the community. During the touble in Wyltwick in the same year, caused by the offensiveness of the soldiers of the English garriosn, Jan Joosten, with three other citizens, acted as mediators in the dispute and were able to conciliate the inhabitants and thus prevented violence to lives and property. The first instance of his purchase of land appears in a record which reads: 'Jan Joosten had, from Governor Lovelace, a deed for a lot, dated March 20th, 1671, in Marbletown,' and 'on the 11th. October following - received confirmation of his 30 acre lot in Marbletown.' Jan Joosten was selected, October 6, 1673, as one of the four magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown - to supervise the merging of the village of Niew-Dorp into those of Hurley and Marbletown under the English rule. The other magistrates were Jan Broerson, Louis du Bois, and Roelof Hendricksen. And notwithstanding the change of government, Jan was continued in that civil office until the return of Dutch supremacy, in 1675, when Governor Colve reappointed him to serve for another term. Jan Joosten if names as justice of the peach for Eusopus and was present at the Court of Assizes, in New York, on October 4, 5, and 6, 1682." 1679

"With the regaining of the country by the English, the inhabitants were again required to swear allegiance to their new overlords, so it is recorded that Jan Joosten once more performed this act of fealty, 1st Sept., 1689. We now approach a very interesting phase of Jan Joosten's career, in which he takes on the status of a patroon, or landed proprietor. Aside from what he had acquired in Ulster County - the Wassemaker's land, for instance, and possibly other parcels - he obtained land grants in the province of east Jersey through a period extending from 1689 to the year of his death, in 1706. In company with his son-in-law, Jan Hamel, who had married his daughter Geertje Crom [sometimes called 'Girty Jans'] in 1682, Jan Joosten appeared in East Jersey, where they jointly bought, on October 18, 1695, from Edward Hunloke, the deputy Governor, of Wingerworth, Burlington County, a plantation of 500 acres located at Lassa, or 'Lazy Point,' on the Delaware River, opposite the present city of Burlington. This property was on the path much prequented by the Dutch traders passing between the settlements of the upper Hudson and their kindred villagers on the lower Delaware. Lassa Point lay about 23 miles northeast of Philadelphia; and was originally seated by three or four Dutch families 'who were there' - said Governor Philip Carteret - 'in 1666,' and to whom he confirmed patents in 1678. The Mattincock Island, which lay in the river opposite Burlington and Lassa Point, was subsequently the home of Peter Jegue, a noted colonial character and trader. The record of this purchase by Joosten and Hamel read that title was given 'to John Joosten and John Hamel, both now or late of Sopus [Eusopus in the Kingston locality], N.Y., yeomen.' At the same time Hunloke gave the grantees a bond guaranteeing them undisputed possession of the premises; and on the following day the grantees executed and delivered to Hunloke their bond and mortgage on the 500 acres. Later, Jan Joosten, in his own name, granted two hundred acres of this land at Lassa Point, and the title was confirmed by law in 1697." 1679

"Jan Joosten next appears as an individual purchaser of certain lands in Somerset County, East Jersey, as may be seen from the record of a deed passing title from Governor Andrew Hamilton and Agnes, his wife, and under date of September 13, 1700, to 'Jane [Jan] Joosten of Marbletown, New York, yeoman.' There were four parcels of this land, separately numbered, and designated as unsurveyed and unappropriated lands, lying contiguous on the South Branch of the Raritan River, in the neighborhood of the present city of Somerville, N.J., the county seat of Somerset. As a whole, the plantation aggregated 1,835 acres. It consisted of broad and fertile meadows on the Raritan; and the locality was already partially seated by groups of Dutch and Scotch people from the Kill-von-Bull and Perth, with a few French from Staten Island, who had come into this region about fifteen or twenty eyars before. On the above date there is a record of Jan Joosten being at Piscataway [Perth], where he probably went to meet the Governor and obtain his grant. The above seems to be the extent of his purchases. His will was found filed, with an inventory of his personal property, in the Burlington County Surogate's office. This instrument is endorsed 'Will of Jan Joosten of . . . June 13th, 1706,' and is further marked 'Dutch.' His personal estate included six slaves, a negro man, woman and four children. The appraisers were Joris van Neste and Hendrix Reinersen; it was sworn to by 'John Van Mator.' Antedating this document is a 'testamentary disposition' signed jointly by Jan Joosten and his wife, Maycke Hendricksen, and dated 16th December, 1681, which reads: 'Macyke Hendricksen shall retain full possession of the estate. She consents that the survivor shall possess everything, lands, houses, pesonal property, money, gold, silver - coined or uncoined. After their decease the property is to be inherited by their children - Jooste to have one-hald the entire estate first. Jooste and Gysbert to to have the land at Marbletown - Jooste one-half and then the other half to be divided between them. Gertje to have the land at Wassemaker's land. Children of Lysbeth, deceased, to have their portion in money from the other children." 1679

"Centuries ago a part of the province of Gelderland, in the Netherlands was called Meteren. The origin of the name is not known. It is suggestive of a personality and may have come from one or more of the French Huguenots who there found a refuge from persecution. Others have thought the people who left that town, or village, adopted Meteren as a surname, with the addition of 'Van,' which represents the preposition 'from,' as well as a mark of nobility. . . The description of the family coat of arms, given in J.B. Rietstap's 'Armorial General,' is in French (the polite language of Holland). Meteren (van) Hollande ecartele: aux 1 et 1-4 d'argent a une fleur de lis de gueules: aux 2 et 3 d'or a'deux fasces de gueules, accompagne de huit merlettes du meme, rangees en orle. Cimier la fleur de lis." 1680

"The ship D'Vos, sailing from Amsterdam, arrived in New Ansterdam, August 31, 1662, with a family of seven persons on board, described on the ship's list as 'Jan Joosten, from the Tielderweert, wife, and five children, 15, 12, 9, 6, and 2 1/2 years old.' By December, 1662, this family had found its way to the Esopus (now Kingston, New York), the two parents being received on the sixteenth day in that month as members of the Wiltwyck (Kingston) reformed Dutch Church (No. 63 in Dominie Blom's List of Members of the Dutch Church in Kingston, 1666-1712). In the register of the same church the name of Jan Joosten's wife is given as Maycke Hendricks, or sometimes as Maycke only. The will of Jan Joosten is headed: 'Jan Joosten van Meteren.' Jan Joosten and his family were among the first settlers of the New Village (Hurley); and during the raid by the Indians on June 7, 1663, a woman and two children of this family were captured. The woman is generally considered to have been Maycke Hendricks; which two of the children were taken is not known." 630

"The branch of the family with whom we are concerned came to America in 1662, as revealed in the papers of the ship 'Vos' (Fox), ariving at New Amsterdam on the 12th of September of that year, though there is some evidence that lead us to suppose that the emigrant ancestor was here at least a year before this date. The coming of the Van Meteren family in the latter part of the seventeenth century to New Netherland was in the period when the colony was progressing under the most favorable conditions and at a time which coincided with the founding of a settlement among the foot-hills of the Catskill Mountains on the west side of the Hudson, in Ulster County, New York, and about sixty miles above the Bay. Here, a group of Dutch, and another of French Huguenot emigrants, had obtained patents for lands and were already established and the settlements were constantly being increased by additions from the Bay towns below and in a short time the fertile valleys of the Waalkill and the Esopus sheltered a collection of thrifty little communities, thus, in the twenty-odd years between 1660 and the maturity of the Van Meteren or Van Metre children, about 1680, the settlements known as New Paltz, Wyltwick, Eusopus, Hurley, and Marbletown were founded in close proximity to each other and were finally merged into what has since been called the Kingston County. Behind them rose the bulwark of the Catskills, and beyond these mountains, and out of their western slopes, gushed the head-springs of the Delaware and the Susquehanna rivers, which, in their respective curses, first provided trails for the native tribes, and by whch they had intercourse with their southern contemporaries."1707

"Jan Joost Van Meteren of Thierlewoodt, with his wife and five children, whose ages ranged from two and a half to fifteen years, arrived in the ship 'Fox', at New Amsterdam in New Netherlands on the 12th of April, 1662. He married in 1646 Macyke Hendricksen or (Hendrygksen) of Mappelen, in the provice of Dreuth in Holland, the daughter of Hendricks of Laeckervelt and his wife Anne Jan Jans. She is supposed to have been the sister of Femmetjen Hendricksen, who married Jooste Adriensen, of Pynnaker Holland, on the 20th of March, 1663-4. Upon the death of Jooste Ariencesen of 'Bostwick', upon Long Island circa 1685, Jan Joosten Van Meteren was appointed administrator, tutor of decedent's children, and arbitrator in the proceedings regarding the sale of some land in Hurley which had been sold to Derick Schepmos by Arience during his life time." 1707

"Jan Joosten Van Meteren's children were: Joste Jans, Cathrin, Geertje, Lsybeth, and Gysbert; Jooste Jans, being the eldest son, as appears by the father's records. In the fall of 1662 Jan Joosten Van Meteren settled in Wildwych (now Kingston, Ulster County, New Jersey) and dwelt many years in that vicinity, which included the town of Hurley, Marbletown, and Esoppus. He is not noted in the activities of that community until the 7th of June, 1663, the date when the Minnisink Indians made an attack on the village and its vicinity raiding and burning the settlement of Hurley and Kingston and carrying away women and children in captivity. Among the latter were Jan's wife and children, Jooste Jans being one of them as well as Catherine du Bois,the wife of Louis du Bois, and their daughter Sarah; whom Jooste Jan Van Meteren later married. These were taken to the fastnesses of the Catskill Mountains and remained in captivity for months, but were rescued on the eve of torture by du Bois and Captain Martin Kreiger's compan of Manhattan soldiers; the trainband finally rounded up the Indians and defeated them on September 3, 1663. In connection with this tragic experience the following statement if quoted: 'About ten weeks after the capture of the women and children, the Indians decided to celebrate their own escape from pursuit by burning some of their victims and the ones selected were Catherine du Bois, and her baby Sara. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child placed thereon; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catherine began to sing the 137th Psalm as a death chant. The Indians withhelf the fire and gave her respite while they listened; when she had finished they demanded more, and before she had finished the last one her husband and the Dutch soldier's from New Amsterdam arrived and surrounded the savages, killed and captured some, and otherwise indlicted terrible punishment upon them, and released the prisoners.' Captain Kreier's Journal which gives a general account of the expedition of rescue, unfortunately does not name him, but it is elsewhere state that it was due to Jooste Jan's three months' association with the Indians, during his captivity, that gave him the knowledge of their habits, trails, lans and war feuds with other tribes, and so impressed him a desire for their adventurous life."1707

"In a list of inhabitants of Ulster County, New York, who subscribed to the oath of allegiance, due t a change in the sovereighty of the country, etween the 21st and 26th of October, 1664, the name of Jan Joosten appears amog them. After this date frequent notice of him occurs upon the records of Kingston as a farmer, and a man of growing importance in civil and religious matters. In 1665 he was aponted referee in a law suit between two of the citizens, and on August 26, of the same year, he is mentioned as an appraiser of the personal estate of Dr. Gysbert van Inbrock, who was a physician and apothecary of the vicinity. The decendent's inventory included among other valuable books, a copy of Emmanuel Van Meteren's History; and at a sale of the effects, on the 9th of September, following, Jan was a purchaser to the extent of nearly 100 guilders - tow of the items he bought were the 'Beehive', by the famous Marnix, Lord of St. Aldengonde, and 'The Chronicles of the Kings of England', and these books aptly showed the character of Jan Joosten's culture. A further appointment came to Jan a 'Scheppen', or to a position synonymous to that of theminor judiciary, which, under the laws of the time, gave him jurisdiction in all civil cases under the sum of 100 guilders; but in cases above that amount such action must be referred to the director-General and the Council. He could pronounch sentence in criminal actions, subject to appeal, so we may assume that he enjoyed a position but little removed below the highest court in the province." 1707

"From about this time Jan Joosten was frequently sought as a witness to various marriages, or as sponsor at the baptisms of children at the home of relatives and friends. In some instances baptisms were performed 'at Jan Joosten's in the presence of the whole consistory,' these distinctions were no doubt due to his position in the church, in which he had been elected an elder, in 1667, or, as a civil officer in the community. During the trouble in Wyltwick in the same year, caused by the offensiveness of the soldiers of the English garrison, Jan Joosten, with three other citizens, acted as mediators in the dispute and were able to concilate the inhabitants and thus prevented violence to lives and property. The first instance of his purchase of land appears in a record which reads: 'Jan Joosten had, from Governor Lovelace, a deed for a lot dated March 20th 1671, in Marbletown,' and 'on the 11th October following - received confirmation of his 30 acre lot in Marbletown.' " 1707

"Jan Joosten was selected, October 6, 1673, as one of the four magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown - to supervise the merging of the vilalge of Niew-Drop into those of Hurley and Marbletown under the English rule. The other magistrates were Jan Broerson, Louis du Bois, and Roelof Hendricksen. And not-withstanding the change of government, Jan was continued in that civil office until the return of Dutch supremacy, in 1675, when Governor Colve reappointed him to serve for another term. Jan Joosten is named as justice of the peace for Eusopus and was present at the Court of Azzizes, in New York, on October 4, 5, and 6, 1682." 1707

"With the regaining of the Country by the English, the inhabitants were again required to swear allegiance to their new overlords, so it is recorded that Jan Joosten once once more performed this act of fealty 1st September, 1689. We now approach a very interesting phase of Jan Joosten's career, in which he takes on the status of a patroon, or landed proprietor. Aside from what he had acquired in Ulster County - the Wassemaker's land, for instance, and possibly other parcels - he obtained land grants in the province of East Jersey through a period extending from 1689 to the year of his death, in 1706." 1707

"In company with his son-in-law, Jan Hamel, who had married his daughter Geertje Crom (sometimes called 'Girty Jans') in 1682 Jan Joosten appeared in East Jersey, where they jointly bought on October 18, 1695, from Edward Hunloke, the deputy Governor, of Wingerworth, Burlington County, a plantation of 500 acres located at Lassa, or 'Lazy Point' on the Delaware River, opposite the present city of Burlington. Lassa Point lay about twenty-three miles northeast of Philadelphia, and was originally seated by three or four Dutch families 'who were there' - said Governor Philip Carteret - 'in 1666', and to whom he confirmed patents in 1678. . . The record of this purchase by Joosten and Hamel reads that title was given 'to John Joosten and John Hamel, both now or late of Sopus (Eusopus in the Kingston locality) N.Y., yeoman'. At the same time Hunloke gave the grantees a bond guaranteeing them undisputed possession of the premises; and on the following day the grantees executed and delivered to Hunloke their bond and mortgage on the 500 acres. Later, Jan Joosten, in his own name, granted two hundred acres of this land at Lassa Point, and the title was confirmed by law in 1697." 1707

"Jan Joosten next appears as an individual purchaser of certain lands in Somerset County East Jersey, as may be seen from the record of a deed passing title from Governor Andrew Hamilton and Agnes, his wife, and under date September 13, 1700, to 'Jane (Jan) Joosten of Marbletown, New York, Yeoman.' There were four parcels of this land, separately numbered, and designated as unsurveyed and unappropriated lands, lying continuous on the south Branch of the Raritan River, in the neighborhood of the present city of Somerville, N.J., the County seat of Somerset. As a whole, the plantation aggregated 1,835 acres. It consisted of broad and fertile meadows on the Raritan; and the locality was already partially seated by groups of Dutch and Scotch people from the Kill-Van-Kull and Perth, with a few French from Staten Island, who had come into this region about fifteen or twenty eyars before. On the above date there is a record of Jan Joosten being at Piscataway (Perth), where he probably went to meet the Governor and obtain his grant. The above seems to be the extent of his purchases. His will was found filed, with an inventory of his personal property, in the Burlington County Surrogate's office. This instrument is endorsed 'Will of Jan Joosten of . . . June 13th, 1706,' and is further marked 'Dutch'. His personal estate included six slaves, a negro man, women and four children. The appraisers wer Joris Van Neste and Hendrix Runersen; it was sworn to by 'John Van Meter.' Antedating this document is 'a testamentary disposition' signed jointly by Jan Joosten and his wife, Macyke Henricksen, and dated 16th december, 1681, which reads: Macyek Hendricksen shall retain full possession the the estate, She consents that the survivor shall possess everything, lands, houses, personal property, money, gold, silver - coined or uncoined. After their decease the property is to be inherited by their children - Jooste to have one half the entire estate first. Jooste and Gysbert to have the land at Marbletown - Jooste one-half and then the other half to be divided between them. Geertye to have the land at Wassemaker's land. Children of Lysbeth, deceased, to have their portion in money from the other children. Jooste Jans was the eldest son - therefore, the heir-in-law and entitled to a double portion. Geertze was the eldest daughter, who, from the additional name of 'Crom,' suggests that she had been married before this time, or that she was the daughter of Jan Joosten by a former marriage and carried her mother's name as the custom was in Holland. Lysbeth pre-deceased her father and left children. Another daughter, not named in the will, is supposed to have been Cathrin, and can only be accounted for by her marriage and in having received her portion and so disappears from consideration in the distribution of the property. Jan Joosten Van Meteren was in every sense, an enterprising and influential citizen; a man of vision, initiative, culture and other fine and useful qualities, and in whom the people placed their matters of trust without fear of being betrayed or exploited. He was indeed, a worthy progenitor of the line of descendants who have distinguished themselves in every sphere of usefulness. He died in 1706, his will dated June 12th of this year being filed among the Dutch wills of New Jersey. His Colonial Record is 'He took the oath of allegiance 1664,was referee in a lawsuit 1665, Schepen 1665 and 1668.' In 1673 he was one of the four Magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown and in 1676 petitioned for a minister to governor Andros." 1707

"On August 31, 1662, the ship Vos (Fox) Captain Jacob Jansen Huys had among its many passengers Jan Josten, (who probably was returning to New Netherland) his wife and five children, respectively fifteen, twelve, nine, six and two and a half years old. The family's original home was the Thielerwaard (district near the city of Thiel) in the province of Gelderland. Upon their arrival, the family immediately went to Wildwyck, in the Esopus, where they seem to have lived previously, for in 1661 Jan Joosten, in company with Allard Heymans Roosa and Jan Gerritssen, had been appointed a committee to superintend the enclosing of the new village of Niew Dorp (Hurley) in the present County of Ulster. Jan Joosten, who usually signed himself Jan Joosten Van Meteren, took up farming and speedily became prominent. He was appointed referee in a law suit in 1665, elected schepen (magistrate) in the same year, a deacon in 1667, and re-elected a schepen in 1668. During his term of office the then historic name of Wildwyck was, on Septembr 25, 1669, changed to Kingston by the English and Jan Joosten, no more than his fellow magistrates, was consulted about the change. " 1702

"Wildwyck's surgeon, Gysbert Van Imbroch . . . had died on august 29, 1665. . . On September 2, Willem Beeckman, Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh (Hotaling, Houghtaling), and Jan Joosten had taken an inventory of the property which included a copy of the celebrated work by Emanuel Van Meteren, alluded to efore. At the sale on September 9, following, Jan Joosten was a generous buyer, his purchases amounting to nearly a hundred guilders. Two of his purchases were the Beehive, by the famous Marnix, Lord of St. Aldegonde, and the Chronicles of the Kings of England (in Dutch.) this shows the bent of the man's mind, and proves that the New Netherlanders were not the ignorant boors that the English of this and later periods were fond of characterizing the pioneers and founders of New Netherland and their descendants - simply because they did not understand the language of the usurpers." 1702

"During the troubles at Wildwyck, in 1667, originating from the outrageous conduct of the English garrison there, Jan Joosten took no sides, but with Willem Beeckman, Roelof Swartwout, Thomas Chambers and Evert Pels, attempted the role of mediator and of dissuading the excited inhabitants from committing any rash act, which would only have resulted in the destruction of their lives and property either then or later. At the rebuilding of New Dorp (Hurley), Jan Joosten appears to have removed there, and through an adjustment of the boundaries between Hurley and Marbletown on March 30, 1669 (1670?) was, with seven of his fellow citizens, annexed to the latter place. When, after the Dutch reconquest, Colve became governor of New Netherland, Jan Joosten and Jan Broersen Decker, on October 6, 1673, were appointed magistrates of Marbletown, or at Marbledorp, as the named, in place of the appointees of the former English government. When, on March 7, 1681, Wessel Ten Broeck and his wife, Maria Ten Eyck, made a joint will, it was witnessed by Tierck Claessen De Witt and Jan Joosten, who, at the time was a justice. A few months later, on December 16, 1681, Jan Joosten and his wife, Maycken Henricks, also made a joint will, which was witnessed by Benjamin Provoost and Severyen Ten Hout. In this will two sons, Joost and Gysbert, are named, and from the contents of the document it is evident that most of the real estate was located at Marbletown and a smaller quantity at Wassemaker's land, all in the County of Ulster. The probate of this will at Burlington, N.J. on June 13, 1706, shows that Jan Joosten survived his wife." [Actually, the witnessing of agreement by widow Maycken shows that Jan Joosten died first] 1702

Jan Joosten is listed as a sponsor of Jannetie, daughter of Joost Adriansen, baptized april 5, 1672; Willem, bapt. October 13, 1678; and Hendrick bapt. April 24, 1681." 630

" 'John Joosten of Marbletown' is named as administrator to the estate of 'Joost Adrians, late of Boswick uppon Long Island, deceased,' in two Ulster County deeds, dated April 25, 1685 and August 6, 1685, respectively (Ulster County Deeds AA, pp. 13-14 or Abstracts by the present writer, I:p.4.)." 630

"Jan Joosten and his wife Macyken Hendrickse, were sponsors to Joost Jan's first child: Jan, along with Jacob du Bois, the next older brother of Joost Jan's wife Sara. Jan Joosten and his wife were sponsors also, to Joost Adriansen's child; Jannetje, bap. 1672; and again in 1682, - for another child, Sara, the dau. of Joost Adrian. This Jan Joosten was evidently a man of prominence in the religious community, as mey be inferred from the fact, that Thomas Cook - in January, and a dau. of Thomas Garton, in February, 1682, - were 'Baptised at Jan Joosten's in the presence of the whole Consistory.' "1696

"Prominent as he was in the Esopus section of the colony of New York , it would appear that Jan Joosten Van Meteren did not consider the prospects here as promising as in the more southern part of the country, and at an advanced age joined in the migration southward by other New York families. With the evident exception of his son Joost, who, on May 27, 1697, had surveyed for him 'a tract of stoney woodland, lying within the bounds of Marbletown, in Ulster County,' it would appear that Jan Joosten Van Meteren moved with his family to Salem County, in the Colony of New Jersey, where land was to be acquired on more advantageous terms. Here his grandsons, Jan, Hendrick and Isaac Van Meteren, first bought 3000 acres of land, which subsequently grew into 6000 acres, so that the Van Meterens were early among the largest property owners and most prominent residents of southern New Jersey." 1702

"Jan Joosten, Maycke Hendrick's husband, had meanwhile left Ulster County and in company with Jan Hamel . . . bought, by deed of October 18, 1695, from Edward Hunloke of Wingerworth, Burlington County, New Jersey a five-hundred-acre plantation at Lessa Point, 'alias Wingerworth,' on the Delaware River on the site of the present city of Burlington (NJA:31:464 & 516). He and Hamel or Hammel were called 'both late of Sopas.' On May 1, 1699, 'John Joosten, of Marbletown, Ulster County, New York,' sold his share to John Hamel (Ibid: 517). Jan Joosten also bought lands in Somerset County, New Jersey, September 13, 1700 (Ibid:318). He died before April 18, 1704, as a deed recorded in Ulster County and signed on that date, refers to him as deceased (Ulster County Deeds AA, p. 361). An inventory of the personal estate of 'John Joost van Metere' was attested by 'John Van Mater' (the grandson), in Burlington, New Jersey, June 13, 1706. The above John Van Mater was Jan Joosten, son of Joost Jans and Sara Du Bois, baptized in Kingston, October 14, 1683 (KgB:No. 329)." 630

"The will of Jan Joosten van Meteren, or as he signed it, Jan Joosten, was dated December 16, 1681. Maycken Hendrix signed it also, by mark. It was in Dutch, and has been translated by Gustave Anjou, in his Probate Records of Ulster County, as follows: 'Wife Maycken shall have full possession of the estate. She consents that the survivor shall possess everything, lands, houses, personal property, money, gold, silver, coined or uncoined. fter their decrease, the property to be inherited by their children. Joost to have one half of the entire estate first, Joost and Gysbert to have the land at Marbletown, Joost one half, and then the ther half to be divided between them. Geertie Crom to have the land at Wassemaker's Land. Children of Lysbeth, deceased, to have their portion, in money, from the other children.' " 630

He must have died after 16 Dec 1681 but before Apr 23 1705 when Maycken was called widow. 630

"Jan Joosten Van Meteren had died before June 13, 1706, when he left a personal estate valued at £235.14, including six Negro slaves, a man, a woman and four children, valued together at £145. The inventory had been made by John Van Nest and Hendrick Reinersen, and was sworn to by John Van Mater at Burlington, N.J. The document recording these transactions is in Dutch, showing that the longue of New Netherland at the time was still vigorous in its southeren bounds." 1702

"Jan Joosten Van Meteen, immigrant ancestor of the Virginia Van Metres, arrived in New Amsterdam (New York) on the sailing vessel, 'Fox', 12 Sept. 1662. Came from Tiederwelt, Holland, with wife Macyken Henricksen (native of Meppelin, Province of dreuth, Holland) and five children: Lysbeth, born 1647, Catharine 1650, Geertje Hamel (or Crom) 1653, and their brothers joost Janse 1656, and Gysbert Janse 1660. In 1662 they moved to Wyltwick (Kingston) Ulster Co., N.Y. The Minnisink Indians raided and burned the villges of Hurley and Kingston 1663, carrying away captive the wife and two children of Jan Joosten, who were not rescued until ten weeks later. It is believed one of the captives was Joost Janse, because of his later association with the Indians and knowledge of their ways. In 1664, Jan Joosten was prominent in the civil and religious affairs of Kingston, held a minor judiciary position, and was a deacon in the reformed Dutch Church. When the Dutch government and possessions came under English rule, 1689, he swore allegiance to the new sovereign. he was living in Ulster Co., N.Y. at this time, and in 1671, held a deed for lots in Marbletown (Marlboro?) Ulster Co., and in 1673 was one of the magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown. Now the immigrant ancestor develops into a New Jersey land owner. He obtained land grants in the Province of East New Jersey, 1689 to 1706. the land was located on lassa Point on the Delaware River in Burlington Co., now the city of Burlington, about 20 miles NE of Philadelphia. This land was transferred to another owner in 1699, when he bought other property in Somerset Co., East Jersey, on the So. branch of Raritan River, near the present Somerville. He probably died in 1706." 1703

In a letter written by Smyth to Mrs. Garden, he writes, 'Jan Gysbertsin is probably a brother of Jan Joosten'. Mrs. Garden records Emanuel Van Meteren as the father of jan Joosten, Smyth and B.F. Van Meter do not give this connection tho they both give full narratives of Emanuel in Holland and London." 1703

Tuesday, November 18, 1664: "the Noble Heer Petrus Stuyvesant, Plaintiff vs. Jan Joosten, Defendant Plaintiff demands from defendant 60 gldrs. in sewan, passage money for taking him, wife, children and baggage in Dirck Smith's yacht from the Manhatans, and further 127 gldrs., 12 stivers in wheat for merchandise sold defendant, the schepel reckoned at 50 stivers. Further restitution of seed corn, being 37 sch. of oats, 5 1/2 sch. of summer barley, 4 sch. of summer wheat, and for the loss of horses plaintiff refers to the contract. Further butter from two cows for two years, each year 16 pounds for each animal. Defendant admits the debt of 127 gldrs. 12 stivers inwheat, the sch. at 50 stivers. As to the 60 gldrs. in sewan for his passage, says that the secretary Van Ruyven allowed him the passage free of cost. Also admits having received the aforenamed seed corn, and also admits owing one year's butter-rent for two cows. Both parties having been heard, it is decided that defendant shall pay plaintiff 127 gldrs. 12 st. in wheat at 50 st. per sch. Also 32 pounds of butter, also the seed corn he borrowed, as per specification mentioned before. And as for the 60 gldrs. in sewan that defendant shall prove that the secretary Van Ruyvan allowed him a free passage; if not he shall pay plaintiff." 1717

Tuesday, December 9, 1664: "Evert Prys, Plaintiff vs. Jan Josten, Defendant Plaintiff says that he hired himself out to defendant at 40 gldrs. heavy money for one month, before the time of the war against the savages, and also demands for five days spent in looking for lost horses as much as he earned with him in one month. Defendant says that plaintiff worked two and one-half weeks for him, and that his time was cut short throught he war against the savages. He also therefore paid him as per account 30 gldrs. in heavy money. Concerning the horses, he says having issued a general information to those who might have found the horses, and having promised a silver ducaton for their return. Also say not having specially employed plaintiff to look for the horses. The hon. court decides whereas plaintiff in his bill demands pay for making shirt, and the other shirt was being made, and then taken by the savges, therefore defendant shall pay plaintiff six gldrs. heavy money." 1717

Tuesday, December 16, 1664: "Jan Joosten and Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh show their village bills which were sent to them, having found that they have been debited for the preacher's salary for the whole year 1664, as also the expenses for the diet. And whereas they two did not take hold of Jeronimus Ebbingh's farm until May last, they maintain that they owe nothing for previous times. On this account petitioners reguest the hon. court's moderation and decision. The hon. court decides that petitioners are not obliged to contribute for the previous eight months from September 1663 till May 1664 to the preacher's salary, but that their predecessor Cornelis Barentsen Slecht shall pay the same, because he still had the lease of Jeronimus Ebbingh's land. The remaining four months shall be paid by petitioners. Also that they, petitioners, shall be orbliged to contribute to the expenses to the diet of the delegates, because the delegates were considering at the diet future and not past affairs." 1717

"Jan Joosten Van Meteren, his wife and five children, arrived in the ship 'Fox' at New Netherland on 4-12-1662. He came from Thielerwardt, a fortified town in Gelderland, Holland, and his wife from Meppelen, Province of Drenth, where they were married and where their children were born: Lysbeth b. 1647; Catherine b. 1650; Geertje b. 1653 m. Gysbert Krom of Marbletown; Gysbert Jansen b. 1660; Joost Jansen b. 1656 m. Sarah DuBois. The family name was derived from Meteren, a town in Holland. Upon the death of Joost Adrienceson of 'Bostwick', Long Island, c1685, Jan Joosten Van Meteren was appointed administrator, tutor of decedent's children and arbitrator in proceedings regarding the sale of some land in Hurley, which had been sold to Derick Schepmoes by Adrience during his lifetime." 1668

Jan Joosten Van Meteren, with his family, settled at Wiltwyck during the summer of 1662, but he is not noted in the activities of the community until 6-7-1663 when the Indians raided the settlement and carried off women and children into captivity. Among the prisoners were Jan's wife and two of his children, Joost Janse being one of them. He is not named in Captain Krieger's Journal of the rescue expedition, but it is elsewhere stated that due to his three months' association with the Indians at the time of his captivity, Joost Janse had knowledge of their habits, trails, plans and war feuds with other tribes, and was so impressed with a desire for their adventurous life. Jan Joosten's name appears on the list of inhabitants who subscribed to the Oath of Allegiance, due to a change in the sovereignty of the country, between the 21st and 26th of October, 1664. After this date frequent notices of him occur upon the records of Kingston, as a farmer, and as a man of growing importance in civil and religious matters." 1668

"Joost Janse was elected an Elder of the Church in 1667. During the trouble inWiltwyck during that year, caused by the offensiveness of the soldiers of the English garrison, he with three other citizens acted as mediators in the dispute and were able to conciliate the inhabitants, thus preventing violence to lives and property. The first instance of his purchase of land appears in a record which reads 'Jan Joosten had from Governor Lovelace a deed for a lot, dated 3-20-1671, in Marbletown' and 'on 10-11-1671 received confirmation of his 30 acres lot in Marbletown.' He was selected on 1-6-1673 as one of the four magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown to supervise the merging of the village of Nieuw Dorp into those of Hurley and Marbletown under the English rule. The other magistrates were: Jan Broerson, Louis DuBois, and Foelof Hendrickson. Notwithstanding the change of government Jan was continued in that civil office until the return of Dutch supremacy in 1675, when Governor Colve reappointed him to serve for another term. He was named Justice of Peach for Esopus, and was present at the court of Assizes in New York, October 4, 5, and 6, 1682." 1668

"Jan Joosten Van Meteren obtained land grants in the Province of East Jersey through a period extending from 1689 to the year of his death, 1706. In company with his son-in-law, Jan Hamel, who had married his daughter Geertje Crom in 1682, Jan Joosten appeared in East Jersey where they jointly bought on 10-18-1695 from Edward Hunlocke, the deputy Governor, of Wingerworth, Burlington Co., a plantation of 500 acres; located at Lassa (or Lazy) Point on the Delaware River. Lassa Point was about 23 miles northeast of Philadelphia. Jan Joosten next appears as an individual purchaser of certain lands in Somerset Co., N.J. deed passing title from Governor Andrew Hamilton and Agnes, his wife, under date of 9-13-1700 to Jan Joosten of Marbletown, N.Y. yeoman, lying contiguous on the South branch of the Raritan River near the present Somerville, N.J. to three other parcels also granted. As a whole, the plantation aggregated 1835 acres." 1668

"Very shortly after the founding of this community [Wyltyick] Jan Joosten is named, especially in the village of Marbletown. Evidently he was a widowed when his name first appears for nowhere throughout the long list of names given int he records of the Dutch church at Kingston does the name of his wife appear. From 1672 and through two decades his name most frequently occurs, and generally first in the groups of sponsors at baptisms. In two instances, I think, such functions wer held 'at Jan Joosten's in the presence of the whole consistory;' and this might indicate that Jan stood in some such high official relation to the church synonymous with elder or vestryman, or his popularity as a godfather may be reckoned either as that of a respected village patriarch, or, through an extensive relationship to the parents of the baptized children, or again, to both circumstances. The fact remains, however, that he was more generally called upon for that service than were others of his neighborhood." 1718

"By this reasoning we may readily deduce the fact that 'Joost Jans,' 'Joste Jan,' 'Jost Janse,' &c., &c., were but different forms of writing the name of the same person and that person in this case was the son of Jan Joosten van Meteren. It is plain, then, that Jan Joosten had at least one son - the one whose name has been previously mentioned in these pages and whose marriage to Sara du Bois is taken from the Kingston church register." 1718

"The first mode of travel in this section was afoot. . . This was the mode of transportation used by the early explorers, John Lederer, John Howard and his son, and John VanMatre. They carried the long rifle, ammunition, a bag of parched corn and depended on wild game for their meat." 1685

"We find that Albert Heymans Roosa, an Overseer, together with Jan Joosten and Jan Gerretsen, also overseers, wrote to Stuyvesant in 1662 and again on 7 April 1663 of their need and desire to enclose the village because of the 'threats of the savages.' How wise were these men! Only two months later the New Village and Wiltwyck fell victim to a surprise atttack by the Indians in broad daylight. This became known as the Second Esopus War."1704

"His Will filed with inventory of his personal property in Burlington Co. Surrogate's Office, dated 6-13-1706, was written in Dutch. His wife was to retain full possession of the estate during her lifetime, then it was to be divided, son Joost 1/2; Joost & Gysbert to have land at Marbletown, N.Y., Joost to have 1/2 and then the other 1/2 to be divided between them. Geeretje to have land at Wassemaker's; children of deceased dau. Lysbeth to have their portion in money from the other children of Jan the testator. (Ulster Co. Probate Record)." 1668

"Jan Joosten's Will was filed with inventory of his personal property in Burlington County Surrogate's office, dated 13 June 1706. It was written in Dutch. His wife was to retain full possession of the estate during her lifetime, then it was to be divided with son Joost to receive one half; Joost and Gysbert to have land at Marbletown, New York; Joost to have one half and then the other one half to be divided between them. Geertje was to have land at Wassemaker's; children of deceased daughter Lysbeth to have their portion in money from the other children of Jan the testator. (Ulster County Porbate Records) The inventory included six negroes, a man, woman and four children valued at $145." 1704

"Jan Joosten van Meteren's descendants have joined the National Society of Daughters of Colonial Wars, the National Society Colonial Dames of the Seventeenth Century and Sons and Daughters of Pilgrims." 1704

"Testamentary disporition, dated dec. 16, 1681, and written in Dutch. 'Wife Maycken shall retain full possession (of the estate). She consents that the survivor shall possess everything, lands, houses, personal property, money, gold, silver, coined or uncoined. After their decease, the property to be inherited by their children, Joost to have one half of the entire estate first. Joost and Gysbert to have the land at Marbletown, Joost one half, and then the other half to be divided between them. Geertie Crom to have the land at Wassemaker's land. Children of Sysbeth, deceased, to have their portion, in money, from the other children. Benjamin Provoost Jan Joosten Leveryen Ten hout Maycken Hendrix (her mark)' (Jan Joosten came from Tiederwalt with wife and five children, aged 15, 12, 9, 6, 2 1/2, on Sept. 2, 1662, in the ship 'Fox'. J.JU. had, March 30, 1671, from Gov. Lovelace, a deed for a lot in Marbletown (N.Y. Land Papers, I., p. 37), and on Oct. 11, 1671, a confirmation of 30 acres lot of ground in M. (ibid., p. 42). (See also Joost Adriaensen vermeulen). Jan Joosten van Meeteren and Mayke Hendrix, his wife, had issue: i. Joost Janzen, van Meeteren, Gelderland, m., Dec. 12, 1682, Sra Dubois, of Kingston, res. New Paltz (see Louis Du Bois): a. Jan, bt. Jan. 14, 1683, b. Rebecca, m. Sept. 3, 1704, Cornelis Eltinge (see Elting Roelofsen); ii. Gysbert (m. Catherina, and had Hester Jans, who m. Lourents Barentse, and had, Helena, bt. N.Y. Dec. 5, 1712); iii. Lysbeth - Jan Jooste, Jooste Jansen and geertje Krom frequently appear as witnesses to the baptisms of children of Gysbert Crom and Geertie Van Vliet, dau. of Dirck Aryensse Van Vliet and Machteld, his wife, and to the baptisms of children of Jan Hamel and Geetrud Crom)." 1719

"The name Van Meter comes from the Dutch Van Meteren, pronounced "Van Mayteren", which means from the manor or village of Meteren located in the Waal Valley about halfway between Rotterdam and Nijmegen. In America the name was shortened to Van Meter, but still pronounced Van Mater. Some adopted this phonetic spelling. Others, probably influenced by English court clerks' familiar "re" ending, began using spellings like Van Matre and Van Metre, either one or two words. All are related no matter what spelling! The manor Meteren in Holland was part of the estate of the family Van Cuick Van Meteren. One of the earliest mentions of the manor Meteren is in a deed dated September 1253. The family thus had a long history before Jan Joosten Van Meteren brought his wife and children to America in 1662. Numerous references to Van Meterens in knighthood lists make it clear that this was a prominent, influential and wealthy family. Although Jan Joosten's connection to the family in Holland is lost, someday it may be known again. In any case, there were some interesting Van Meterens in Holland to whom we are somehow related. . . . The Dutch had sponsored Hudson's exploration and quickly exploited the opportunities it opened up. In June 1623 New Netherland was formally established as a province of the West India Company, and in 1626 New Amsterdam became the seat of government on Manhattan Island. By the time of the transfer of New Netherland to English control in 1664 the population stood at about 10,000. Two years before this transfer Jan Joosten Van Meteren arrived at New Amsterdam with his family on the ship "Vos" (Fox) on April 12, 1662. He settled in an area on the west side of the Hudson River about 60 miles upstream where a group of Dutch and Huguenot immigrants were establishing a collection of little communities -- New Paltz, Wiltwyck, Esopus, Hurley and Marbletown -- near the present Kingston, Ulster County, New York at the foothills of the Catskill mountains. Jan Joosten brought with him his wife Maycke Hendricks and five children, three of them by Maycke's first husband Willem Krorn (Gysbert, Lysbet and Geertje ages 15, 12 and 9) and two of his own, Joost Jansen age 6 and Catherine age 2 1/2."1716

"Let's trace this activity in more detail, beginning with Joost's father Jan Joosten Van Meteren, our immigrant ancestor. In 1667 he was elected an elder in the Dutch Reformed Church in Wiltwyck and became more and more prominent in civil and religious affairs. His house was a popular place for baptisms. In 1673 he was elected one of the four magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown. Beginning in 1689 he began to accumulate land grants in the Province of East Jersey on the South Branch of the Raritan River in the area of the present Somerville, New Jersey in Somerset County. Here he owned 1835 acres, the home for a number of years of Joost, his sons and grandsons. Jan Joosten Van Meteren died in New Jersey in about 1706."1716

"Kingston Baptisms 1683: Parents: Joost Janz Sara du Bois Child: Jan Date: 14 Oct Witnesses and Sponsors: Jan Joosten. Gysbert Crom. Mayken Hendricx." 1706 http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbpretz/PS05/PS05_063.HTM

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Jan Joosten van Meteren's Timeline

1626
1626
Tiel, Gelderland, Nederland
1646
1646
Age 20
Gelderland, Dreuth
1656
1656
Age 30
Drenthe, Holland
1660
1660
Age 34
Nederland
1662
August 31, 1662
Age 36
November 14, 1662
Age 36
New Amsterdam, New York
1662
- April 12, 1662
Age 36
1663
1663
Age 37
1680
1680
Age 54
Amelia, Virginia
1681
December 16, 1681
Age 55
Kingston, Ulster Co., New York