Jean de Brienne, King and Regent of Jerusalem (1210-25), Latin Emperor of Constantinople

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Jean de Brienne, Emperor of Constantinople

Also Known As: "Emperor of Constantinople", "King of Jerusalem", "John of /Brienne/", "né: Jean de Candia-Nevers", "John I.King of Jerusalem", "Jean de Brienne", "Imperador de Constantinople", "rei de Jérusalem (Geni Tree Match)"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Brienne-le-Chateau, Champange, France
Death: Died in Constantinople, Turkey
Place of Burial: Constantinople, Turkey
Immediate Family:

Son of Erard II, comte de Brienne; Erard de Brienne; Agnès de Montfaucon and Agnes de Brienne
Husband of Marie de Montferrat, Queen of Jerusalem; Stephanie Princess of Armenia and Berenguela de León, emperatriz consorte de Constantinopla
Father of Isabelle II, Queen of Jerusalem; John de Brienne, Crown Prince of Armenia (1216-20); Jean de Brienne, the Grand Butler of France; Alphonse de Brienne, comte d'Eu; Marie de Brienne, Regent of Constantinople and Namur and 1 other
Brother of Gauthier III, count of Brienne; Ida de Brienne and Guillaume de Brienne

Occupation: Imperador de Constantinopla e Rei de Jerusalém, comte d'Eu, roi de Jérusalem, empereur d'Orient, King of Jerusalem, Empereur, de Constantinople, Roi, de Jérusalem, Chevalier, Croisé, Comte, d'Eu, Poète, Emperor of Constantinople
Managed by: Nathan De Graw
Last Updated:

About Jean de Brienne, King and Regent of Jerusalem (1210-25), Latin Emperor of Constantinople

John of Brienne http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Brienne

Jean de Brienne http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_de_Brienne

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Image:

The coronation of John of Brienne as King of Jerusalem, with Maria of Montferrat, from a late 13th century MS of the Histoire d'Outremer, painted in Acre. (Biblioteca Medicea-Laurenziana, Florence).

John of Brienne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John of Brienne (c. 1170 – 27 March 1237) was a French nobleman who became John I King of Jerusalem by marriage, and was later invited to become John I Latin Emperor of Constantinople.

He was the second son of Erard II, count of Brienne, in Champagne, and of Agnes de Montfaucon. Destined originally for the Church, he had preferred to become a knight, and in forty years of tournaments and fights he had won himself a considerable reputation, when in 1208 envoys came from the Holy Land to ask Philip Augustus, king of France, to select one of his barons as husband to the heiress and ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Philip selected John of Brienne, and promised to support him in his new dignity. In 1210, John married the heiress (Mary) Maria (daughter of Isabella and Conrad of Montferrat), assuming the title of king in right of his wife. In 1211, after some desultory operations, he concluded a five years' truce with Malik-el-Adil; in 1212 he lost his wife, who left him a daughter, Yolande (also known as Isabella); soon afterwards he married the princess Stephanie, daughter of Leo II of Armenia.

During the Fifth Crusade (1218-1221) he was a prominent figure. The legate Pelagius of Albano, however, claimed the command; and insisting on the advance from Damietta, in spite of John's warnings, he refused to accept the favourable terms of the sultan, as the king advised, until it was too late. After the failure of the crusade, King John came to the West to obtain help for his kingdom. In 1223 he met Pope Honorius III and the emperor Frederick II at Ferentino, where, in order that he might be connected more closely with the Holy Land, Frederick was betrothed to John's daughter Isabella, now heiress of the kingdom. After the meeting at Ferentino, John went to France and England, finding little consolation; and thence he travelled to Santiago de Compostela, where King Alfonso IX of Leon offered him the hand of one of his daughters and the promise of his kingdom. John passed over Alfonso's eldest daughter and heiress in favor of a younger daughter, Berenguela of Leon. After a visit to Germany he returned to Rome (1225). Here he received a demand from Frederick II (who had now married Isabella) that he should abandon his title and dignity of king, which, so Frederick claimed, had passed to himself along with the heiress of the kingdom. John, though fifty or fifty-five years of age, was still vigorous enough to revenge himself on Frederick, by commanding the papal troops which attacked southern Italy during the emperor's absence on the Sixth Crusade (1228-1229).

In 1229, John was invited by the barons of the Latin Empire of Constantinople to become emperor-regent, on condition that Baldwin of Courtenay should marry his second daughter and succeed him. For nine years he ruled in Constantinople, and in 1235, with a few troops, he repelled a great siege of the city by John III Doukas Vatatzes, emperor of Nicaea, and Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria.

After this last feat of arms, which has perhaps been exaggerated by the Latin chroniclers, who compare him to Hector and the Maccabees, John died in the habit of a Franciscan friar. An aged paladin, somewhat uxorious and always penniless, he was a typical knight errant, whose wanderings led him all over Europe, and planted him successively on the thrones of Jerusalem and Constantinople.

Marriages and issue

John of Brienne married three times. By his first wife, Marie of Montferrat, he had one child, Yolande, later Queen of Jerusalem. He had also one child by his second wife, Stephanie of Armenia, a son named as successor in Armenia, but died in childhood. By his third wife, Berenguela of Leon, he had four children:

1. Marie of Brienne (1225-1275), who married Emperor Baldwin II of Constantinople.

2. Alphonso of Brienne (c. 1228-1270), who married Marie d'Issoudon, countess of Eu, and became count of Eu in right of his wife, and was also Great Chamberlain of France.

3. Jean (John) de Brienne (c. 1230-1296), who in 1258 became Grand Butler of France. Married as his first wife, Jeanne, daughter of Geoffrey VI, Viscount of Chateaudun, and as his second wife, Marie de Coucy, widow of King Alexander II of Scotland. Had one daughter, Blanche by his first marriage.

4. Louis of Acre (c. 1235-1263), who married Agnes of Beaumont and became Viscount of Beaumont in her right. His children included Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan, an ancestor of England's Royal House of Lancaster.

References

  • Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 114-28, 120-29
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Brienne

John of Brienne (c. 1170 – 27 March 1237) was a French nobleman who became King of Jerusalem by marriage, and was later invited to become Latin Emperor of Constantinople.

He was the second son of Erard II, count of Brienne, in Champagne, and of Agnes de Montfaucon. Destined originally for the Church, he had preferred to become a knight, and in forty years of tournaments and fights he had won himself a considerable reputation, when in 1208 envoys came from the Holy Land to ask Philip Augustus, king of France, to select one of his barons as husband to the heiress and ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Philip selected John of Brienne, and promised to support him in his new dignity. In 1210, John married the heiress (Mary) Maria (daughter of Isabella and Conrad of Montferrat), assuming the title of king in right of his wife.

In 1212 he lost his wife, who left him a daughter, Yolande (also known as Isabella); soon afterwards he married the princess Stephanie, daughter of Leo II of Armenia.

John of Brienne married three times. By his first wife, Marie of Montferrat, he had one child, Yolande, later Queen of Jerusalem. He had also one child by his second wife, Stephanie of Armenia, a son named as successor in Armenia, but died in childhood. By his third wife, Berenguela of Leon, he had four children:

Marie of Brienne (1225-1275), who married Emperor Baldwin II of Constantinople.

Alphonso of Brienne (c. 1228-1270), who married Marie d'Issoudon, countess of Eu, and became count of Eu in right of his wife, and was also Great Chamberlain of France.

Jean (John) de Brienne (c. 1230-1296), who in 1258 became Grand Butler of France. Married Marie de Coucy as his first wife. Second wife was Jeanne, daughter of Geoffrey VI, Viscount of Chateaudun.

Louis of Acre (c. 1235-1263), who married Agnes of Beaumont and became Viscount of Beaumont in her right. His children included Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan, an ancestor of England's Royal House of Lancaster.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Brienne

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Jean De Count De Brienne (Bryan)King of Jerusalem b. 1168 in Acre, Palenstine d. 1237 in Constantinople m. Beregaria Alfonsez b. 1195 in Leon, Spain

John of Brienne (né: Jean de Candia-Nevers, c. 1148 – 1237) was King of Jerusalem and Latin Emperor-Regent or Associate "Consort" Emperor of Constantinople.

He was the second son of Erard II de Candia, count of Brienne, in Champagne, and of Agnes de Montfaucon, countess of Montbéliard (né: Agnès de Nevers, daugther of Guillaume III de Nevers). Destined originally for the Church, he had preferred to become a knight, and in forty years of tournaments and fights he had won himself a considerable reputation, when in 1208 envoys came from the Holy Land to ask Philip Augustus, king of France, to select one of his barons as husband to the heiress and ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Philip selected John of Brienne, and promised to support him in his new dignity. In 1210, John married the heiress (Mary) Maria (daughter of Isabella and Conrad of Montferrat), assuming the title of king in right of his wife. In 1211, after some desultory operations, he concluded a six years' truce with Malik-el-Adil; in 1212 he lost his wife, who left him a daughter, Yolande (also known as Isabella); soon afterwards he married the princess Stephanie, daughter of Leo II of Armenia.

During the Fifth Crusade (1218-1221) he was a prominent figure. The legate Pelagius of Albano, however, claimed the command; and insisting on the advance from Damietta, in spite of John's warnings, he refused to accept the favourable terms of the sultan, as the king advised, until it was too late. After the failure of the crusade, King John came to the West to obtain help for his kingdom. In 1223 he met Pope Honorius III and the emperor Frederick II at Ferentino, where, in order that he might be connected more closely with the Holy Land, Frederick was betrothed to John's daughter Isabella, now heiress of the kingdom. After the meeting at Ferentino, John went to France and England, finding little consolation; and thence he travelled to Santiago de Compostela, where King Alfonso IX of Leon offered him the hand of one of his daughters and the promise of his kingdom. John passed over Alfonso's eldest daughter and heiress in favor of a younger daughter, Berengaria of Castile. After a visit to Germany he returned to Rome (1225). Here he received a demand from Frederick II (who had now married Isabella) that he should abandon his title and dignity of king, which, so Frederick claimed, had passed to himself along with the heiress of the kingdom. John was now a septuagenarian "king in exile," but he was still vigorous enough to revenge himself on Frederick, by commanding the papal troops which attacked southern Italy during the emperor's absence on the Sixth Crusade (1228-1229).

In 1229, John, now eighty years of age, was invited by the barons of the Latin Empire of Constantinople to become emperor-regent, on condition that Baldwin of Courtenay should marry his second daughter and succeed him. For nine years he ruled in Constantinople, and in 1235, with a few troops, he repelled a great siege of the city by John III Doukas Vatatzes, emperor of Nicaea, and Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria.

After this last feat of arms, which has perhaps been exaggerated by the Latin chroniclers, who compare him to Hector and the Maccabees, John died in the habit of a Franciscan friar. An aged paladin, somewhat uxorious and always penniless, he was a typical knight errant, whose wanderings led him all over Europe, and planted him successively on the thrones of Jerusalem and Constantinople.

KINGS OF JERUSALEM

   1099-1100 Godfrey of Bouillon
   1100-1118 Baldwin of Le Bourg
   1118-1131 Baldwin II
   1131-1143 Fulk of Anjou
   1143-1152 (Queen Melisende as Regent)
   1143-1163 Baldwin III
   1163-1174 Amalric I
   1174-1185 Baldwin IV
   1185-1191 Guy of Lusignan
   1192-1197 Henry of Champagne
   1197-1205 Amalric II,
   1210-1225 Jean of Brienne, who ceded his rights to his daughter,
   1225-1228 Isabella/Yolande, , who married Frederick II Hohenstaufen (d.= 1250). 

After this it gets complicated:

The Cypriot Claim

In 1243, the high court of St-Jean-d'Acre declared Frederick's son Conrad deposed and assigned the regency to the kings of Cyprus, and then (in 1268) the crown as well. Hence the following kings of Cyprus would claim the title:

   1218-1253 Henry I
   1253-1267 Hugh II
   1267-1284 Hugh III
   1284-1285 John
   1285-1331 Henry II 

The kings of Cyprus go on to 1474, at which point Rene d'Anjou may have acquired the title

The Neapolitan claim

According to E. Leonard, Les Angevins de Naples, Presses Universitaires de France, 1954), Marie d'Antioche, petite-fille of the King of Jerusalem Amalric I, ceded, in 1269, to Charles I, King of Naples and Count of Provence, the right which she had to the Kingdom of Jerusalem. This cession was confirmed by the pope in 1277.

It follows then, that the kings of Naples and Counts of Provence henceforth possessed the title of King of Jerusalem. Thus the list of later kings of Jerusalem would be as follows:

   1277-1285 Charles I
   1285-1309 Charles II
   1309-1343 Robert I
   1343-1382 Jeanne I
   1382-1384 Louis I
   1382-1417 Louis II
   1427-1343 Louis III
   1434-1480 René d'Anjou
   1480-1481 Charles III

See also: P. Durrieu. "Le titre de roi de Jerusalem et la France" in Travaux du Congres francais de la Syrie 2 (1919)

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John of Brienne (c. 1170 – 27 March 1237) was a French nobleman who became John I King of Jerusalem by marriage, and was later invited to become John I Latin Emperor of Constantinople.

He was the second son of Erard II, count of Brienne, in Champagne, and of Agnes de Montfaucon. Destined originally for the Church, he had preferred to become a knight, and in forty years of tournaments and fights he had won himself a considerable reputation, when in 1208 envoys came from the Holy Land to ask Philip Augustus, king of France, to select one of his barons as husband to the heiress and ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Philip selected John of Brienne, and promised to support him in his new dignity. In 1210, John married the heiress (Mary) Maria (daughter of Isabella and Conrad of Montferrat), assuming the title of king in right of his wife. In 1211, after some desultory operations, he concluded a five years' truce with Malik-el-Adil; in 1212 he lost his wife, who left him a daughter, Yolande (also known as Isabella); soon afterwards he married the princess Stephanie, daughter of Leo II of Armenia.


Coat of arms of the Latin Empire of Constantinople.During the Fifth Crusade (1218-1221) he was a prominent figure. The legate Pelagius of Albano, however, claimed the command; and insisting on the advance from Damietta, in spite of John's warnings, he refused to accept the favourable terms of the sultan, as the king advised, until it was too late. After the failure of the crusade, King John came to the West to obtain help for his kingdom. In 1223 he met Pope Honorius III and the emperor Frederick II at Ferentino, where, in order that he might be connected more closely with the Holy Land, Frederick was betrothed to John's daughter Isabella, now heiress of the kingdom. After the meeting at Ferentino, John went to France and England, finding little consolation; and thence he travelled to Santiago de Compostela, where King Alfonso IX of Leon offered him the hand of one of his daughters and the promise of his kingdom. John passed over Alfonso's eldest daughter and heiress in favor of a younger daughter, Berenguela of Leon. After a visit to Germany he returned to Rome (1225). Here he received a demand from Frederick II (who had now married Isabella) that he should abandon his title and dignity of king, which, so Frederick claimed, had passed to himself along with the heiress of the kingdom. John, though fifty or fifty-five years of age, was still vigorous enough to revenge himself on Frederick, by commanding the papal troops which attacked southern Italy during the emperor's absence on the Sixth Crusade (1228-1229).

In 1229, John was invited by the barons of the Latin Empire of Constantinople to become emperor-regent, on condition that Baldwin of Courtenay should marry his second daughter and succeed him. For nine years he ruled in Constantinople, and in 1235, with a few troops, he repelled a great siege of the city by John III Doukas Vatatzes, emperor of Nicaea, and Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria.

After this last feat of arms, which has perhaps been exaggerated by the Latin chroniclers, who compare him to Hector and the Maccabees, John died in the habit of a Franciscan friar. An aged paladin, somewhat uxorious and always penniless, he was a typical knight errant, whose wanderings led him all over Europe, and planted him successively on the thrones of Jerusalem and Constantinople.

[edit] Marriages and issue

John of Brienne married three times. By his first wife, Marie of Montferrat, he had one child, Yolande, later Queen of Jerusalem. He had also one child by his second wife, Stephanie of Armenia, a son named as successor in Armenia, but died in childhood. By his third wife, Berenguela of Leon, he had four children:

Marie of Brienne (1225-1275), who married Emperor Baldwin II of Constantinople.

Alphonso of Brienne (c. 1228-1270), who married Marie d'Issoudon, countess of Eu, and became count of Eu in right of his wife, and was also Great Chamberlain of France.

Jean (John) de Brienne (c. 1230-1296), who in 1258 became Grand Butler of France. Married as his first wife, Jeanne, daughter of Geoffrey VI, Viscount of Chateaudun, and as his second wife, Marie de Coucy, widow of King Alexander II of Scotland. Had one daughter, Blanche by his first marriage.

Louis of Acre (c. 1235-1263), who married Agnes of Beaumont and became Viscount of Beaumont in her right. His children included Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan, an ancestor of England's Royal House of Lancaster.

[edit] References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

[edit] External links

John of Brienne on Find-A-Grave

FMG on Jean de Brienne

Preceded by

Maria King of Jerusalem

1210–1215

(with Maria) Succeeded by

Yolande

Preceded by

Baldwin II Regent for Emperor of Constantinople

1229–1237

Emperor: Baldwin II Succeeded by

Baldwin II

[show]v • d • eMonarchs of the Kingdom of Jerusalem


Godfrey* · Baldwin I · Baldwin II · Melisende · Fulk Co-Ruler with Melisende · Baldwin III Co-Ruler with Melisende · Amalric I · Baldwin IV · Baldwin V · Sibylla · Guy Co-Ruler with Sibylla · Isabella I · Conrad I Co-Ruler with Isabella I · Henry I Co-Ruler with Isabella I · Amalric II Co-Ruler with Isabella I · Maria · John Co-Ruler with Maria · Isabella II · Conrad II · Conrad III · Hugh I · John II · Henry II


  • Did not take the title "King"

[show]v • d • eMonarchs of the Latin Empire of Constantinople


Reigning emperors

(1204–1261) Baldwin I · Henry · Peter · Yolanda · Robert I · Baldwin II (with John of Brienne as regent)


Titular emperors

(1261–1383) Baldwin II · Philip I · Catherine I (with Charles of Valois) · Catherine II (with Philip II) · Robert II · Philip III · James of Baux


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Brienne"

Categories: 1140s births | 1237 deaths | Kings of Jerusalem | Jure uxoris kings | Latin Emperors of Constantinople | Franciscans | Christians of the Fifth Crusade | House of Brienne | 13th-century viceregal rulers | Regents

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ohn of Brienne (c. 1170 – 27 March 1237) was a French nobleman who became King of Jerusalem by marriage, and was later invited to become Latin Emperor of Constantinople.

He was the second son of Erard II, count of Brienne, in Champagne, and of Agnes de Montfaucon. Destined originally for the Church, he had preferred to become a knight, and in forty years of tournaments and fights he had won himself a considerable reputation, when in 1208 envoys came from the Holy Land to ask Philip Augustus, king of France, to select one of his barons as husband to the heiress and ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Philip selected John of Brienne, and promised to support him in his new dignity. In 1210, John married the heiress (Mary) Maria (daughter of Isabella and Conrad of Montferrat), assuming the title of king in right of his wife. In 1211, after some desultory operations, he concluded a five years' truce with Malik-el-Adil; in 1212 he lost his wife, who left him a daughter, Yolande (also known as Isabella); soon afterwards he married the princess Stephanie, daughter of Leo II of Armenia.

Coat of arms of the Latin Empire of Constantinople.

During the Fifth Crusade (1218-1221) he was a prominent figure. The legate Pelagius of Albano, however, claimed the command; and insisting on the advance from Damietta, in spite of John's warnings, he refused to accept the favourable terms of the sultan, as the king advised, until it was too late. After the failure of the crusade, King John came to the West to obtain help for his kingdom. In 1223 he met Pope Honorius III and the emperor Frederick II at Ferentino, where, in order that he might be connected more closely with the Holy Land, Frederick was betrothed to John's daughter Isabella, now heiress of the kingdom. After the meeting at Ferentino, John went to France and England, finding little consolation; and thence he travelled to Santiago de Compostela, where King Alfonso IX of Leon offered him the hand of one of his daughters and the promise of his kingdom. John passed over Alfonso's eldest daughter and heiress in favor of a younger daughter, Berenguela of Leon. After a visit to Germany he returned to Rome (1225). Here he received a demand from Frederick II (who had now married Isabella) that he should abandon his title and dignity of king, which, so Frederick claimed, had passed to himself along with the heiress of the kingdom. John, though fifty or fifty-five years of age, was still vigorous enough to revenge himself on Frederick, by commanding the papal troops which attacked southern Italy during the emperor's absence on the Sixth Crusade (1228-1229).

In 1229, John was invited by the barons of the Latin Empire of Constantinople to become emperor-regent, on condition that Baldwin of Courtenay should marry his second daughter and succeed him. For nine years he ruled in Constantinople, and in 1235, with a few troops, he repelled a great siege of the city by John III Doukas Vatatzes, emperor of Nicaea, and Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria.

After this last feat of arms, which has perhaps been exaggerated by the Latin chroniclers, who compare him to Hector and the Maccabees, John died in the habit of a Franciscan friar. An aged paladin, somewhat uxorious and always penniless, he was a typical knight errant, whose wanderings led him all over Europe, and planted him successively on the thrones of Jerusalem and Constantinople.

Marriages and issue

John of Brienne married three times. By his first wife, Marie of Montferrat, he had one child, Yolande, later Queen of Jerusalem. He had also one child by his second wife, Stephanie of Armenia, a son named as successor in Armenia, but died in childhood. By his third wife, Berenguela of Leon, he had four children:

  1. Marie of Brienne (1225-1275), who married Emperor Baldwin II of Constantinople.
  2. Alphonso of Brienne (c. 1228-1270), who married Marie d'Issoudon, countess of Eu, and became count of Eu in right of his wife, and was also Great Chamberlain of France.
  3. Jean (John) de Brienne (c. 1230-1296), who in 1258 became Grand Butler of France. Married as his first wife, Jeanne, daughter of Geoffrey VI, Viscount of Chateaudun, and as his second wife, Marie de Coucy, widow of King Alexander II of Scotland. Had one daughter, Blanche by his first marriage.
  4. Louis of Acre (c. 1235-1263), who married Agnes of Beaumont and became Viscount of Beaumont in her right. His children included Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan, an ancestor of England's Royal House of Lancaster.

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://wpcontent.answers.com/wikipedia/commons/6/6d/Maria_of_Montferrat_Coronation.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.answers.com/topic/john-of-brienne&usg=__D-MFDmLIC0edmEV2RL1_IwWjD9s=&h=384&w=339&sz=53&hl=en&start=2&tbnid=B5coG71dL1e8hM:&tbnh=123&tbnw=109&prev=/images%3Fq%3Djean%2Bcount%2Bde%2Bbrienne%2Bking%2Bof%2Bjerusalem%26gbv%3D2%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG

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John of Brienne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John of Brienne (né: Jean de Candia-Nevers, c. 1170/1175 – 27 March 1237) was Consort King of Jerusalem, Consort Presumptive Prince Heir of Armenia and Latin Emperor-Regent or Associate "Consort" Emperor of Constantinople.

He was the second son of Erard II de Candia, count of Brienne, in Champagne, and of Agnes de Montfaucon, countess of Montbéliard (né: Agnès de Nevers, daughter of Guillaume III de Nevers). Destined originally for the Church, he had preferred to become a knight, and in forty years of tournaments and fights he had won himself a considerable reputation, when in 1208 envoys came from the Holy Land to ask Philip Augustus, king of France, to select one of his barons as husband to the heiress and ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Philip selected John of Brienne, and promised to support him in his new dignity. In 1210, John married the heiress (Mary) Maria (daughter of Isabella and Conrad of Montferrat), assuming the title of king in right of his wife. In 1211, after some desultory operations, he concluded a six years' truce with Malik-el-Adil; in 1212 he lost his wife, who left him a daughter, Yolande (also known as Isabella); soon afterwards he married the princess Stephanie, daughter of Leo II of Armenia.

During the Fifth Crusade (1218-1221) he was a prominent figure. The legate Pelagius of Albano, however, claimed the command; and insisting on the advance from Damietta, in spite of John's warnings, he refused to accept the favourable terms of the sultan, as the king advised, until it was too late. After the failure of the crusade, King John came to the West to obtain help for his kingdom. In 1223 he met Pope Honorius III and the emperor Frederick II at Ferentino, where, in order that he might be connected more closely with the Holy Land, Frederick was betrothed to John's daughter Isabella, now heiress of the kingdom. After the meeting at Ferentino, John went to France and England, finding little consolation; and thence he travelled to Santiago de Compostela, where King Alfonso IX of Leon offered him the hand of one of his daughters and the promise of his kingdom. John passed over Alfonso's eldest daughter and heiress in favor of a younger daughter, Berenguela of Leon. After a visit to Germany he returned to Rome (1225). Here he received a demand from Frederick II (who had now married Isabella) that he should abandon his title and dignity of king, which, so Frederick claimed, had passed to himself along with the heiress of the kingdom. John was now a septuagenarian "king in exile," but he was still vigorous enough to revenge himself on Frederick, by commanding the papal troops which attacked southern Italy during the emperor's absence on the Sixth Crusade (1228-1229).

In 1229, John, now eighty years of age, was invited by the barons of the Latin Empire of Constantinople to become emperor-regent, on condition that Baldwin of Courtenay should marry his second daughter and succeed him. For nine years he ruled in Constantinople, and in 1235, with a few troops, he repelled a great siege of the city by John III Doukas Vatatzes, emperor of Nicaea, and Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria.

After this last feat of arms, which has perhaps been exaggerated by the Latin chroniclers, who compare him to Hector and the Maccabees, John died in the habit of a Franciscan friar. An aged paladin, somewhat uxorious and always penniless, he was a typical knight errant, whose wanderings led him all over Europe, and planted him successively on the thrones of Jerusalem and Constantinople.

Marriages and issue

John of Brienne married three times. By his first wife, Marie of Montferrat, he had one child, Yolande, later Queen of Jerusalem. He had also one child by his second wife, Stephanie of Armenia, a son named as successor in Armenia, but died in childhood. By his third wife, Berenguela of Leon, he had four children:

Marie of Brienne (1225-1275), who married Emperor Baldwin II of Constantinople.

Alphonso of Brienne (c. 1228-1270), who married Marie d'Issoudon, countess of Eu, and became count of Eu in right of his wife, and was also Great Chamberlain of France.

Jean (John) de Brienne (c. 1230-1296), who in 1258 became Grand Butler of France. Married Marie de Coucy as his first wife. Second wife was Jeanne, daughter of Geoffrey VI, Viscount of Chateaudun.

Louis of Acre (c. 1235-1263), who married Agnes of Beaumont and became Viscount of Beaumont in her right.

References

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 114-28, 120-29

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

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Note: John, by name JOHN OF BRIENNE, French JEAN DE BRIENNE (b. c.1148--d. March 1237, Constantinople), count of Brienne who became titular king of Jerusalem (1210-29) and Latin emperor of Constantinople (1231-37).

A penniless younger son of the French count Erard II of Brienne and Agnes of Montb‚liard, John passed most of his life as a minor noble until befriended by King Philip II Augustus of France, who arranged for him to marry Mary (Marie) of Montferrat, queen of the crusader state of Jerusalem, in 1210.John reached the Palestinian town of Acre on Sept. 13, 1210,married Mary the following day, and was crowned at Tyre on October 3. Mary died in 1212, and John was named regent for their infant daughter, Yolande de Brienne, who inherited the crown as Isabella II. In 1214 John married Princess Stephanie ofArmenia, daughter of the Armenian king Leo II, and later had a son by her.

As regent, John arranged a five-year truce with al-Malikal-'Adil, sultan of Egypt and Syria, in July 1212, and during the truce he persuaded Pope Innocent III to launch the Fifth Crusade in support of his daughter's kingdom. In 1218 he joined the crusading force from the West in an expedition against the Egyptian port of Damietta. After quarrelling with the crusade leader, the cardinal legate Pelagius, John left Egypt in February 1220, returning in July 1221 to witness the humiliating defeat of the crusaders and the abandonment of the siege of Damietta.

Stephanie died in 1219; John then married Berengaria, daughter of Ferdinand III of Castile, and in 1225 gave his daughter Isabella in marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Frederick II,trying to retain his rights as regent of the kingdom of Jerusalem. Immediately following the marriage, however,Frederick began to contest these rights.

In 1228 John was invited to Constantinople to be regent and co-emperor with the young Baldwin II and arranged a match between Baldwin and his four-year-old daughter by Berengaria.Crowned in 1231, John helped fend off attacks by the Bulgarian tsar Ivan Asen II and the Nicaean emperor John III Vatatzes, but shortly before his death he was forced to appeal to the West for help.

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N° Stradonitz : 337.515.032

Roi de Jérusalem (1210)

Empereur de Constantinople (1231)

Troisième fils des précédents.

Né vers 1170

Etait veuf de Marie de Montferrat, Reine de Jérusalem, épousée le 14 septembre 1209, décédée en 1219, lorsqu'il épousa Bérengère de Castille en 1222 à Tolède.

-------------------- ID: I120243

Name: Jean Count De BRIENNE 1

Sex: M

Name: Jean Count De Brienne , King of Jerusalem

Birth: ABT 1195 in Of, Acre, Palestine

Birth: ABT 1195 in Of, Acre, , Palestine

Death: 21 MAR 1235/36 in CONSTANTINOPLE, TURKEY

Death: 21 MAR 1235/36 in Constantinople

Change Date: 14 JAN 2004

Marriage 1 Berengaria Alfonsez Princess Leon b: 1193 in Of, Leon, Spain

Married: 1222 1

Children

Alphonse De BRIENNE b: ABT 1176
Jean De BRIENNE b: ABT 1217 in Acre, Palestine
Louis "D'Acre" De BRIENNE b: ABT 1265 in Acre, Jerusalem, Palestine

Marriage 2 Berengaria Princess Of Castile b: ABT 1199 in Of, Leon, Spain

Married: 1222

Marriage Ending Status: Divorce

Children

Louis "D'Acre" Brienne , Vicount Beaumont b: in Acre, Jerusalem, Palestine
Jean "D'Acre" De Brienne , Grand Butler Of France b: 1225
Alphonse De BRIENNE b: ABT 1176

Sources:

Title: GEDCOM File : 842428.ged

Note: ABBR GEDCOM File : 842428.ged

Text: 8 AUG 2000

—— sponsored links ——  

-------------------- Jean I de Brienne, Emperor of Constantinople was born circa 1148.1 He was the son of Erard II, Comte de Brienne and Agnes de Montfaucon.1 He married, firstly, Maria de Montferrat, Queen of Jerusalem, daughter of Conrad, Marquis de Montferrat and Isabella d'Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem, on 15 September 1210.1 He married, secondly, Stephania of Armenia, daughter of Leo II, King of Armenia, in 1214.1 He married, thirdly, Berengaria de Castilla, daughter of Alfonso IX, Rey de Castilla y León and Berengaria de Castilla, in 1223.1 He died on 21 March 1237.1

    Jean I de Brienne, Emperor of Constantinople fought in the Third Crusade.1 He gained the title of King John of Jerusalem.2 Between 1205 and 1221 he was the Regent of the County of Brienne for his nephew.1 He succeeded to the title of King Jean I of Jerusalem in 1210, in right of his wife, although he reigned at Acre as Jerusalem was in Saracen hands.1 He abdicated as King of Jerusalem in 1212.3 He fought in the Fifth Crusade from 1218 to 1219, which he led.1 He was created Emperor Jean I of Constantinople in 1229.1 He was a Franciscan friar.1

Child of Jean I de Brienne, Emperor of Constantinople and Maria de Montferrat, Queen of Jerusalem

   * Isabel de Brienne, Queen of Jerusalem+2 b. c 1212, d. 30 Apr 1228

Children of Jean I de Brienne, Emperor of Constantinople and Berengaria de Castilla

   * Louis de Brienne+4 d. a 1263
   * Alphonse, Comte d'Eu+1 d. 25 Aug 1270
   * Marie de Brienne+1 b. 1225, d. a 5 May 1275

http://thepeerage.com/p824.htm#i8239

Jean I de Brienne, Emperor of Constantinople fought in the Third Crusade.1 He gained the title of King John of Jerusalem.2 Between 1205 and 1221 he was the Regent of the County of Brienne for his nephew.1 He succeeded to the title of King Jean I of Jerusalem in 1210, in right of his wife, although he reigned at Acre as Jerusalem was in Saracen hands.1 He abdicated as King of Jerusalem in 1212.3 He fought in the Fifth Crusade from 1218 to 1219, which he led.1 He was created Emperor Jean I of Constantinople in 1229.1 He was a Franciscan friar.

http://www.multiwords.de/genealogy/Be24%20Jean%20I%20de%20Brienne.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Brienne

   John, byname JOHN OF BRIENNE, French JEAN DE BRIENNE (b. c. 1148--d. March 1237, Constantinople), count of Brienne who became titular king of Jerusalem (1210-29) and Latin emperor of Constantinople (1231-37).
   A penniless younger son of the French count Erard II of Brienne and Agnes of Montbéliard, John passed most of his life as a minor noble until befriended by King Philip II Augustus of France, who arranged for him to marry Mary (Marie) of Montferrat, queen of the crusader state of Jerusalem, in 1210. John reached the Palestinian town of Acre on Sept. 13, 1210, married Mary the following day, and was crowned at Tyre on October 3. Mary died in 1212, and John was named regent for their infant daughter, Yolande de Brienne, who inherited the crown as Isabella II. In 1214 John married Princess Stephanie of Armenia, daughter of the Armenian king Leo II, and later had a son by her.
   As regent, John arranged a five-year truce with al-Malik al-'Adil, sultan of Egypt and Syria, in July 1212, and during the truce he persuaded Pope Innocent III to launch the Fifth Crusade in support of his daughter's kingdom. In 1218 he joined the crusading force from the West in an expedition against the Egyptian port of Damietta. After quarrelling with the crusade leader, the cardinal legate Pelagius, John left Egypt in February 1220, returning in July 1221 to witness the humiliating defeat of the crusaders and the abandonment of the siege of Damietta.
   Stephanie died in 1219; John then married Berengaria, daughter of Ferdinand III of Castile, and in 1225 gave his daughter Isabella in marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Frederick II, trying to retain his rights as regent of the kingdom of Jerusalem. Immediately following the marriage, however, Frederick began to contest these rights.
   In 1228 John was invited to Constantinople to be regent and co-emperor with the young Baldwin II and arranged a match between Baldwin and his four-year-old daughter by Berengaria. Crowned in 1231, John helped fend off attacks by the Bulgarian tsar Ivan Asen II and the Nicaean emperor John III Vatatzes, but shortly before his death he was forced to appeal to the West for help. [Encyclopaedia Britannica CD '97]

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jweber&id=I09034 -------------------- Portrait of the coronation of John of Brienne as King of Jerusalem, with Maria of Montferrat, from a late 13th century MS of the Histoire d'Outremer, painted in Acre. (Biblioteca Medicea-Laurenziana, Florence).

John of Brienne (c. 1155 – 27 March 1237) was a French nobleman who became King of Jerusalem by marriage, and ruled the Latin Empire of Constantinople as regent.


Jean de Candia-Nevers was the second son of Erard II, count of Brienne, in Champagne, and of Agnes de Montfaucon. Destined originally for a clerical career, he had preferred to become a knight, and in forty years of tournaments and fights he had won himself a considerable reputation, when in 1208 envoys came from the Holy Land to ask Philip Augustus, king of France, to select one of his barons as husband to the heiress and ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Philip selected John of Brienne, and promised to support him in his new dignity. In 1210, John married the heiress (Mary) Maria (daughter of Isabella and Conrad of Montferrat), assuming the title of king in right of his wife. In 1211, after some desultory operations, he concluded a five years' truce with Malik-el-Adil; in 1212 he lost his wife, who left him a daughter, Yolande (also known as Isabella); soon afterwards he married the princess Stephanie, daughter of Leo II of Armenia.

During the Fifth Crusade (1218–1221) he was a prominent figure. The legate Pelagius of Albano, however, claimed the command; and insisting on the advance from Damietta, in spite of John's warnings, he refused to accept the favourable terms of the sultan, as the king advised, until it was too late. After the failure of the crusade, King John came to the West to obtain help for his kingdom. In 1223 he met Pope Honorius III and the emperor Frederick II at Ferentino, where, in order that he might be connected more closely with the Holy Land, Frederick was betrothed to John's daughter Isabella, now heiress of the kingdom. After the meeting at Ferentino, John went to France and England, finding little consolation; and thence he travelled to Santiago de Compostela, where King Alfonso IX of Leon offered him the hand of one of his daughters and the promise of his kingdom. John passed over Alfonso's eldest daughter and heiress in favor of a younger daughter, Berenguela of Leon. After a visit to Germany he returned to Rome (1225). Here he received a demand from Frederick II (who had now married Isabella) that he should abandon his title and dignity of king, which, so Frederick claimed, had passed to himself along with the heiress of the kingdom. John, though fifty or fifty-five years of age, was still vigorous enough to avenge himself on Frederick, by commanding the papal troops which attacked southern Italy during the emperor's absence on the Sixth Crusade (1228–1229).

In 1229, John was invited by the barons of the Latin Empire of Constantinople to become emperor-regent, on condition that Baldwin of Courtenay should marry his second daughter and succeed him. For nine years he ruled in Constantinople, and in 1235, with a few troops, he repelled a great siege of the city by John III Doukas Vatatzes, emperor of Nicaea, and Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria, killing around 10,000 of the enemy single-handedly at the age of eighty.[1]

After this last feat of arms, which has perhaps been exaggerated by the Latin chroniclers, who compare him to Hector, Roland and the Maccabees, John died in the habit of a Franciscan friar. An aged paladin, he was around 80 years old, somewhat uxorious and always penniless, he was a typical knight errant, whose wanderings led him all over Europe, and planted him successively on the thrones of Jerusalem and Constantinople.

John of Brienne married three times. By his first wife, Marie of Montferrat, he had one child, Yolande, later Queen of Jerusalem. He had also one child by his second wife, Stephanie of Armenia, a son named as successor in Armenia, but died in childhood. By his third wife, Berenguela of Leon, he had four children:

Marie of Brienne (1225–1275), who married Emperor Baldwin II of Constantinople. Alphonso of Brienne (c. 1228–1270), who married Marie d'Issoudon, countess of Eu, and became count of Eu in right of his wife, and was also Great Chamberlain of France. Jean (John) de Brienne (c. 1230–1296), who in 1258 became Grand Butler of France. Married as his first wife, Jeanne, daughter of Geoffrey VI, Viscount of Chateaudun, and as his second wife, Marie de Coucy, widow of King Alexander II of Scotland. Had one daughter, Blanche by his first marriage. Louis of Acre (c. 1235–1263), who married Agnes of Beaumont and became Viscount of Beaumont in her right. His children included Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan, an ancestor of England's Royal House of Lancaster.

Notes: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Hy8OAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA1082&lpg=PA1082&dq=john+of+brienne&source=bl&ots=PGjGUrYq-o&sig=pARWMRCkq8QdiMzEZTRPN6K_jNI&hl=en&ei=l_nZS6PwFpGUOL-XuAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CAUQ6AEwADgK#v=onepage&q=john%20of%20brienne&f=false

This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh ed.). Cambridge University Press.  

John, byname JOHN OF BRIENNE, French JEAN DE BRIENNE (b. c. 1148--d. March 1237, Constantinople), count of Brienne who became titular king of Jerusalem (1210-29) and Latin emperor of Constantinople (1231-37).

A penniless younger son of the French count Erard II of Brienne and Agnes of Montbéliard, John passed most of his life as a minor noble until befriended by King Philip II Augustus of France, who arranged for him to marry Mary (Marie) of Montferrat, queen of the crusader state of Jerusalem, in 1210. John reached the Palestinian town of Acre on Sept. 13, 1210, married Mary the following day, and was crowned at Tyre on October 3. Mary died in 1212, and John was named regent for their infant daughter, Yolande de Brienne, who inherited the crown as Isabella II. In 1214 John married Princess Stephanie of Armenia, daughter of the Armenian king Leo II, and later had a son by her.

As regent, John arranged a five-year truce with al-Malik al-'Adil, sultan of Egypt and Syria, in July 1212, and during the truce he persmacded Pope Innocent III to launch the Fifth Crusade in support of his daughter's kingdom. In 1218 he joined the crusading force from the West in an expedition against the Egyptian port of Damietta. After quarrelling with the crusade leader, the cardinal legate Pelagius, John left Egypt in February 1220, returning in July 1221 to witness the humiliating defeat of the crusaders and the abandonment of the siege of Damietta.

Stephanie died in 1219; John then married Berengaria, daughter of Ferdinand III of Castile, and in 1225 gave his daughter Isabella in marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Frederick II, trying to retain his rights as regent of the kingdom of Jerusalem. Immediately following the marriage, however, Frederick began to contest these rights.

In 1228 John was invited to Constantinople to be regent and co-emperor with the young Baldwin II and arranged a match between Baldwin and his four-year-old daughter by Berengaria. Crowned in 1231, John helped fend off attacks by the Bulgarian tsar Ivan Asen II and the Nicaean emperor John III Vatatzes, but shortly before his death he was forced to appeal to the West for help. [Encyclopaedia Britannica CD '97]

________________________

King of Jerusalem 1210-1212, ruled from Acre since Saracens had Jerusalem. [Burke's Peerage]

Sources: 1.Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley {1999} Repository: Media: Book Page: 227 2.Title: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten; W. K. Prinz von Isenburg {1975} Page: II:47, 136 3.Title: Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom; GE Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd {2000} Repository: Media: Book Page: V:168 4.Title: Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families; Douglas Richardson {2004} Page: Brienne 5

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Jean de Brienne, King and Regent of Jerusalem (1210-25), Latin Emperor of Constantinople's Timeline

1170
1170
Brienne-le-Chateau, Champange, France
1210
September 15, 1210
Age 40
Tyrus
1210
- 1215
Age 40
King of Jerusalem
1212
1212
Age 42
Brienne-le-Château, Bar-sur-Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1214
1214
Age 44
1221
1221
Age 51
Acre, Palestine
1222
1222
Age 52
Toledo, Castile, Spain
1225
1225
Age 55
Acre, Israel
1225
Age 55
Jerusalem, Israel
1227
1227
Age 57
Jerusalem, Palestine, Israel