Joan Plantagenet, Queen consort of Scotland (1210 - 1238) MP

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Nicknames: "Joan", "Princess of Wales and Lady of Snowdon also known as Siwan in Welsh"
Birthplace: Coucy, Alsne, France
Death: Died in London, Middlesex, England
Occupation: Princess of Wales, Queen of Scotland, Llan-Faes, Dindaethwy, Anglesey, Queen Consort of Scotland, Qeen of Scotland, Queen consort of Scotland
Managed by: Judith (Judy) A. Loubris
Last Updated:

About Joan Plantagenet, Queen consort of Scotland

Joan of England, Queen Consort of Scotland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Joan of England, Queen Consort of Scotland" redirects here. For other Joans of England, see Joan of England.

Joan of England, Queen Consort of Scotland (July 22, 1210 – March 4, 1238) was the eldest legitimate daughter and third child of John of England and Isabella of Angouleme.

Joan was brought up in the court of Hugh X of Lusignan who was promised to her in marriage from an early age, as compensation for him being jilted by her mother Isabella of Angouleme, however on the death of John of England, Isabella decided she should marry him herself and Joan was sent back to England, where negotiations for her hand with Alexander II of Scotland were taking place.

She and Alexander married on June 21, 1221, at York Minster[1]. Alexander was 23. Joan was 11. They had no children. Joan died in her brother's arms at Havering-atte-Bower in 1238, and was buried at Tarant Crawford Abbey in Dorset[2].

Nothing now remains of this church; the last mention of it is before the Reformation.

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Joan, Lady of Wales

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Joan, Princess of Wales and Lady of Snowdon, (c. 1188 – February 2, 1237) was the wife of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales and Gwynedd and effective ruler of most of Wales.

Joan (Joanna) was an illegitimate daughter of King John of England and a woman named Clemence Pinel. She should not be confused with her legitimate half-sister Joan, Queen Consort of Scotland.

Little is known about her early life; she was possibly born before her father, King John of England, married his first wife in 1189. Her mother's name is known only from Joan's obituary in the Tewkesbury Annals, where she is mysteriously called "Regina Clementina" (Queen Clemence). Joan seems to have spent her childhood in France, as King John had her brought to the Kingdom of England from Normandy in preparation for her wedding in December 1203 at 15 years of age or so.

Joan married Llywelyn the Great between December 1203 and October 1204. She and Llywelyn had at least two children together:

Elen ferch Llywelyn (Helen or Ellen) (1207-1253), married (1) John the Scot, Earl of Chester and (2) Robert II de Quincy

Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1215-1246) married Isabella de Braose, died at Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, (Aber).

Some of Llywelyn's other recorded children may also have been Joan's:

Gwladus Ddu (1206-1251), married (1) Reginald de Braose and (2) Ralph de Mortimer.

Susanna, who was sent to England as a hostage in 1228.

Margaret, who married Sir John de Braose, the grandson of William de Braose, 7th Baron Abergavenny and had issue.

In April 1226 Joan obtained a papal decree from Pope Honorius III, declaring her legitimate on the basis that her parents had not been married to others at the time of her birth, but without giving her a claim to the English throne.

At Easter 1230, William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny, who was Llywelyn's nominal prisoner at the time, was discovered together with Joan in Llywelyn's bedchamber. William de Braose was hanged in the marshland at the foot of Garth Celyn, the place known since as Gwern y Grog. Joan herself was placed out of public view, under virtual house arrest, at Garth Celyn, for twelve months after the incident. She was then (apparently) forgiven by Llywelyn, and restored as wife and princess. She may have given birth to a daughter early in 1231.

Joan was never called Princess of Wales, but, in Welsh, "Lady of Wales". She died at the royal home, Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd in 1237. Llywelyn's great grief at her death is recorded; he founded a Franciscan friary on the seashore at Llanfaes, opposite the royal home, in her honour. The friary was consecrated in 1240, shortly before Llywelyn died. It was closed down in 1537 by Henry VIII of England during the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

Joan's stone coffin can be seen in Beaumaris parish church, Anglesey. Above the empty coffin is a slate panel inscribed: "This plain sarcophagus, (once dignified as having contained the remains of JOAN, daughter of King JOHN, and consort of LLEWELYN ap IOWERTH, Prince of North Wales, who died in the year 1237), having been conveyed from the Friary of Llanfaes, and alas, used for many years as a horsewatering trough, was rescued from such an indignity and placed here for preseravation as well as to excite serious meditation on the transitory nature of all sublunary distinctions. By THOMAS JAMES WARREN BULKELEY, Viscount BULKELEY, Oct 1808"

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PRINCESS JOAN OF WALES of London, daughter of John I "Lackland", King of England and Clemence, was born circa 1188, died on 1 Jan. 1236 in Aberconwy and was buried in Llan-Faes, Dindaethwy, Isle of Anglesey, Wales. She married in England, INT after 16 (Aft 16 1205 Apr), (TO-5) LLEWELYN AP IORWERTH, PRINCE OF NORTH WALES, son of (TO-4) Prince Iorwerth "Drwyndwn" Ap and Margred Verch (MADOG), who was born in 1173 in Aberffraw Castle, Caernarvon, and died on 11 April 1240 in Aberconwy. [35, 85, 198, 1]

Natural dau. of King John, possibly by Constance, Duchess of Brittany. [2, 86]

Roberts says Joan was "illegitimate by Clemence, possibly Clemence Dauntsey, wife of Nicholas de Verdun. " and "For the identification of Clemence, mother of Joan, Princess of Wales, see a forthcoming article in TG by Douglas Richardson of Tucson, Arizona". [197]

Children: See (TO-5) Llewelyn ap IORWERTH, Prince of North Wales

25. KING HENRY III8 OF ENGLAND (John I "Lackland"7, Henry II6, Geoffrey V PLANTAGENET5, Fulk V the Young of ANJOU4, Fulk IV "Rechin"3, Aubri-Geoffrey II de GASTONOIS2, Geoffrey I1), son of (20) John I "Lackland"7, King of England and (BH-9) Isabella (of ANGOULÊME) (LUSIGNAN), was born on 1 Oct. 1207 in Winchester[209], died on 16 Nov. 1272[209] and was buried on 20 Nov. 1272 in Westminster Abbey, Westminster, Middlesex. He married INT Jan. 1236 (37 ()), (CW-9) ELEANOR OF PROVENCE, QUEEN OF ENGLAND[214], daughter of (CW-7) Count Raymond Berenger V and (AGF-5) Countess Beatrix (of SAVOY), who was born in 1217[209], and died on 25 June 1291 in Amesbury[215]. [214, 6, 71, 137, 148, 196, 58, 109, 90, 1]

King of England 1216-1272. [83]

Children:

+ 35 i. EDWARD I "LONGSHANKS"9, KING OF ENGLAND, b. on 17 June 1239 in Westminster, London, England, d. on 7 July 1307 in Burgh-On-The-Sands, Cumbria, England; m. (1) (UC-31) ELEANOR OF CASTILE on 18 Oct. 1254 in Burgos; m. (2) (T-62) PRINCESS MARGUERITE OF FRANCE on 8 Sept. 1299 in Canterbury Cathedral, Kent.

+ 36 ii. PRINCE EDMUND "CROUCHBACK", b. on 16 Jan. 1244/5 in London, Middlesex, d. on 5 June 1296 in Bayonne, Pyr.-Atlantiques, France; m. (T-57) BLANCHE OF ARTOIS, PRINCESS OF FRANCE between 1 Jan. 1276/7 and in Paris, Seine, France.

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Joan of England, Queen Consort of Scotland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Joan of England, Queen Consort of Scotland (22 July 1210 – 4 March 1238) was the eldest legitimate daughter and third child of John of England and Isabella of Angouleme.

Joan was brought up in the court of Hugh X of Lusignan who was promised to her in marriage from an early age, as compensation for him being jilted by her mother Isabella of Angouleme, however on the death of John of England, Isabella decided she should marry him herself and Joan was sent back to England, where negotiations for her hand with Alexander II of Scotland were taking place.

She and Alexander married on 21 June 1221, at York Minster. Alexander was twenty-three. Joan was ten, almost eleven. They had no children. Joan died in her brother's arms at Havering-atte-Bower in 1238, and was buried at Tarant Crawford Abbey in Dorset.

Nothing now remains of this church; the last mention of it is before the Reformation.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_of_England,_Queen_Consort_of_Scotland

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Lady Joan de Beaufort was born circa 1375 at Château de Beaufort, Meuse-et-Loire, Anjou, France.3 She was the daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Katherine Roët. She married, firstly, Sir Robert de Ferrers, 3rd Lord Ferrers (of Wem), son of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Lord Ferrers (of Wem) and Elizabeth le Botiler, Baroness le Botiller, in 1391 at Château de Beaufort, Meuse-et-Loire, Anjou, France.3 She married, secondly, Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, son of John de Neville, 3rd Lord Neville and Maud de Percy, before 29 November 1396 at Château de Beaufort, Maine-et-Loire, Anjou, France.1,3 She died on 13 November 1440 at Howden, Yorkshire, England.4 She was buried at Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.4

    From before 29 November 1396, her married name became Lady Neville.1 In February 1397 She was born before parent's marriage but legitimated by Parliament. As a result of her marriage, Lady Joan de Beaufort was styled as Countess of Westmorland on 29 September 1397. She was invested as a Lady Companion, Order of the Garter (L.G.) in 1399.4 Her last will was dated 10 May 1440.5

Children of Lady Joan de Beaufort and Sir Robert de Ferrers, 3rd Lord Ferrers (of Wem)

1.Elizabeth Ferrers3 b. c 1378, d. c 1434

2.Mary Ferrers+3 b. c 1379, d. 25 Jan 1458

Children of Lady Joan de Beaufort and Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland

1.John Neville6

2.Sir Edward Neville, 1st Lord Abergavenny+1 d. 18 Oct 1476

3.William de Neville, 1st and last Earl of Kent+1 d. 9 Jan 1462/63

4.George Neville, 1st Lord Latimer+1 d. 30 Dec 1469

5.Cuthbert de Neville1

6.Thomas de Neville1

7.Henry de Neville1

8.Joan Neville1

9.Lady Anne Neville+4 d. 20 Sep 1480

10.Lady Katherine Neville+1 b. c 1397, d. a 1483

11.Lady Eleanor de Neville+4 b. c 1397, d. 1472

12.Richard de Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury+7 b. 1400, d. 31 Dec 1460

13.Robert de Neville1 b. c 1404, d. 8 Jul 1457 or 9 Jul 1457

14.Lady Cecily Neville+6 b. 3 May 1415, d. 31 May 1495

Citations

1.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 108. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

2.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 27. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

3.[S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.

4.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 109.

5.[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 547.

6.[S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 17. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.

7.[S8] Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, volume 1, page 15.

http://thepeerage.com/p10198.htm#i101973

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Beaufort,_Countess_of_Westmorland

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Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster and his third wife, Katherine Swynford. Joan was a half-sister of Henry IV of England. Her paternal grandparents were Edward III of England and his Queen consort, Philippa of Hainault.

She married Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland (c. 1364 – October 21, 1425) in November 29, 1396. They had fourteen children:

  1. Lady Katherine Neville, married first on January 12, 1411 John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk; married second Sir Thomas Strangways; married third John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont; married fourth Sir John Woodville (d. August 12, 1469).
  2. Lady Eleanor Neville (1398-1472), married first Richard le Despencer, 4th Baron Burghersh, married second Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland
  3. Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400-1460)
  4. Robert Neville (d. 1457), Bishop of Durham
  5. William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent (d. 1463)
  6. Edward Neville, 1st Lord Bergavenny (d. 1476)
  7. Anne Neville (1414-1480), married Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham
  8. Cecily Neville (1415-1495) ("Proud Cis"), married Richard, 3rd Duke of York and mothered Kings Edward IV of England and Richard III of England
  9. George Neville, 1st Baron Latymer (d. 1469)
  10. John Neville, died young
  11. Cuthbert Neville, died young
  12. Thomas Neville, died young
  13. Henry Neville, died young
  14. Joan Neville, a nun

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Granddaughter of King Edward III of England (1327-1377)

Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (c. 1379 – 13 November 1440), was the third or fourth child (and only daughter) of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster and his mistress, later wife, Katherine Swynford. She was born at the Château de Beaufort in Champagne, France (whence the Beaufort children derive their surname). In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married Robert Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Wemme, and they had two daughters before he died about 1395. Along with her three brothers, Joan had been privately declared legitimate by their cousin Richard II of England in 1390, but for various reasons their father secured another such declaration from Parliament in January 1397. Joan was already an adult when she was legitimized by the marriage of her mother and father with papal approval. The Beauforts were later barred from inheriting the throne by a clause inserted into the legitimation act by their half-brother, Henry IV of England. Soon after this declaration, on 3 February 1397, when she was eighteen, Joan married Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, who had also been married once before.

When Ralph de Neville died in 1425, his lands and titles should, by law of rights, have passed on to his eldest surviving son from his first marriage, another Ralph de Neville. Instead, while the title of Earl of Westmorland and several manors were passed to Ralph, the bulk of his rich estate went to his wife, Joan Beaufort. Although this may have been done to ensure that his widow was well provided for; by doing this, Ralph essentially split his family into two, and the result was years of bitter conflict between Joan and her stepchildren, who fiercely contested her acquisition of their father's lands. Joan however, with her royal blood and connections, was far too powerful to be called to account, and the senior branch of the Nevilles received little redress for their grievances. Inevitably, when Joan died, the lands would be inherited by her own children.

Joan died on 13 November 1440 at Howden in Yorkshire. Rather than be buried with her husband Ralph (who was buried with his first wife) she was entombed next to her mother in the magnificent sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral. Joan's is the smaller of the two tombs; both were decorated with brass plates — full-length representations of them on the tops, and small shields bearing coats of arms around the sides — but those were damaged or destroyed in 1644 during the English Civil War. A 1640 drawing of them survives, showing what the tombs looked like when they were intact, and side-by-side instead of end-to-end, as they are now.

Joan Beaufort was the grandmother of Edward IV of England and Richard III of England, whom Henry VII defeated to take the throne. (Henry then married Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV, and their son became Henry VIII of England). She was also the grandmother of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick 'the Kingmaker'.

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Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

• Ten things you may not know about Wikipedia •

Beaufort coat of arms

Joan Beaufort and mother, Katherine Swynford's tomb

1640 drawing of the tombs of Joan Beaufort and mother, Katherine Swynford in Lincoln Cathedral before the tombs were despoiled in 1644 by the Roundheads.

Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (c. 1379 – 13 November 1440), was the fourth child (and only daughter) of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and his mistress Katherine Swynford. She was born at the Chateau de Beaufort in Anjou, France (from where the Beaufort children derive their surname). In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married Robert Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Wemme, and they had two daughters before he died about 1395. Along with her three brothers, Joan had been privately declared legitimate by their cousin Richard II of England in 1390, but for various reasons their father secured another such declaration from Parliament in January 1397. Joan was already an adult when she was legitimized by the marriage of her mother and father with papal approval. The Beauforts were later barred from inheriting the throne by a clause inserted into the legitimation act by their half-brother, Henry IV of England. Soon after this declaration, on 3 February 1397, when she was eighteen, Joan married Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, who had also been married once before.

When Ralph de Neville died in 1425, his lands and titles should, by law of rights, have passed on to his eldest surviving son from his first marriage, another Ralph de Neville. Instead, while the title of Earl of Westmorland and several manors were passed to Ralph, the bulk of his rich estate went to his wife, Joan Beaufort. Although this may have been done to ensure that his widow was well provided for; by doing this, Ralph essentially split his family into two, and the result was years of bitter conflict between Joan and her step-children, who fiercely contested her acquisition of their father's lands. Joan however, with her royal blood and connections, was far too powerful to be called to account, and the senior branch of the Nevilles received little redress for their grievances. Inevitably, when Joan died, the lands would be inherited by her own children.

Joan died on 13 November 1440 at Howden in Yorkshire. Rather than be buried with her husband Ralph (who was buried with his first wife) she was entombed next to her mother in the magnificent sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral. Joan's is the smaller of the two tombs; both were decorated with brass plates — full-length representations of them on the tops, and small shields bearing coats of arms around the sides — but those were damaged or destroyed in 1644 during the English Civil War. A 1640 drawing of them survives, showing what the tombs looked like when they were intact, and side-by-side instead of end-to-end, as they are now.

Joan Beaufort was the grandmother of Edward IV of England and Richard III of England, whom Henry VII defeated to take the throne. (Henry then married Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV, and their son became Henry VIII of England).

[edit]Children of Joan Beaufort and Ralph Neville:

They had fourteen children:

Lady Katherine Neville, married first on January 12, 1411 John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk; married second Sir Thomas Strangways; married third John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont; married fourth Sir John Woodville (d. August 12, 1469).

Lady Eleanor Neville (d. 1472), married first Richard le Despencer, 4th Baron Burghersh, married second Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland

Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400–1460)

Robert Neville (d. 1457), Bishop of Durham

William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent (d. 1463)

Edward Nevill, 3rd Baron Bergavenny (d. 1476)

Anne Neville (?1411–1480), married Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham

Cecily Neville (1415–1495) ("Proud Cis"), married Richard, 3rd Duke of York and mothered Kings Edward IV of England and Richard III of England

George Neville, 1st Baron Latymer (d. 1469)

John Neville, died young

Cuthbert Neville, died young

Thomas Neville, died young

Henry Neville, died young

Joan Neville, a nun

--------------------

Lady Joan de Beaufort was born circa 1375 at Château de Beaufort, Meuse-et-Loire, Anjou, France.3 She was the daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Katherine Roët. She married, firstly, Sir Robert de Ferrers, 3rd Lord Ferrers (of Wem), son of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Lord Ferrers (of Wem) and Elizabeth le Botiler, Baroness le Botiller, in 1391 at Château de Beaufort, Meuse-et-Loire, Anjou, France.3 She married, secondly, Sir Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, son of Sir John de Neville, 3rd Baron Neville and Maud de Percy, before 29 November 1396 at Château de Beaufort, Meuse-et-Loire, Anjou, France.1,3 She died on 13 November 1440 at Howden, Yorkshire, England.4 She was buried at Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.4

    From before 29 November 1396, her married name became Lady Neville.1 In February 1397 She was born before parent's marriage but legitimated by Parliament. As a result of her marriage, Lady Joan de Beaufort was styled as Countess of Westmorland on 29 September 1397. She was invested as a Lady Companion, Order of the Garter (L.G.) in 1399.4 Her last will was dated 10 May 1440.5

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Beaufort,_Countess_of_Westmoreland

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Beaufort,_Countess_of_Westmorland

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Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (c. 1379 – 13 November 1440), was the fourth child (and only daughter) of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and his mistress Katherine Swynford. She was born at the Chateau de Beaufort in Anjou, France (from where the Beaufort children derive their surname). In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married Robert Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Wemme, and they had two daughters before he died about 1395. Along with her three brothers, Joan had been privately declared legitimate by their cousin Richard II of England in 1390, but for various reasons their father secured another such declaration from Parliament in January 1397. Joan was already an adult when she was legitimized by the marriage of her mother and father with papal approval. The Beauforts were later barred from inheriting the throne by a clause inserted into the legitimation act by their half-brother, Henry IV of England. Soon after this declaration, on 3 February 1397, when she was eighteen, Joan married Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, who had also been married once before.

When Ralph de Neville died in 1425, his lands and titles should, by law of rights, have passed on to his eldest surviving son from his first marriage, another Ralph de Neville. Instead, while the title of Earl of Westmorland and several manors were passed to Ralph, the bulk of his rich estate went to his wife, Joan Beaufort. Although this may have been done to ensure that his widow was well provided for; by doing this, Ralph essentially split his family into two, and the result was years of bitter conflict between Joan and her step-children, who fiercely contested her acquisition of their father's lands. Joan however, with her royal blood and connections, was far too powerful to be called to account, and the senior branch of the Nevilles received little redress for their grievances. Inevitably, when Joan died, the lands would be inherited by her own children.

Joan died on 13 November 1440 at Howden in Yorkshire. Rather than be buried with her husband Ralph (who was buried with his first wife) she was entombed next to her mother in the magnificent sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral. Joan's is the smaller of the two tombs; both were decorated with brass plates — full-length representations of them on the tops, and small shields bearing coats of arms around the sides — but those were damaged or destroyed in 1644 during the English Civil War. A 1640 drawing of them survives, showing what the tombs looked like when they were intact, and side-by-side instead of end-to-end, as they are now.

Joan Beaufort was the grandmother of Edward IV of England and Richard III of England, whom Henry VII defeated to take the throne. (Henry then married Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV, and their son became Henry VIII of England).

[edit]Children of Joan Beaufort and Ralph Neville:

They had fourteen children:

Lady Katherine Neville, married first on January 12, 1411 John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk; married second Sir Thomas Strangways; married third John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont; married fourth Sir John Woodville (d. August 12, 1469).

Lady Eleanor Neville (d. 1472), married first Richard le Despencer, 4th Baron Burghersh, married second Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland

Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400–1460)

Robert Neville (d. 1457), Bishop of Durham

William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent (d. 1463)

Edward Nevill, 3rd Baron Bergavenny (d. 1476)

Anne Neville (?1411–1480), married Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham

Cecily Neville (1415–1495) ("Proud Cis"), married Richard, 3rd Duke of York and mothered Kings Edward IV of England and Richard III of England

George Neville, 1st Baron Latymer (d. 1469)

John Neville, died young

Cuthbert Neville, died young

Thomas Neville, died young

Henry Neville, died young

Joan Neville, a nun

--------------------

Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (c. 1379 – 13 November 1440), was the fourth child (and only daughter) of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and his mistress Katherine Swynford. She was born at the Château de Beaufort in Champagne, France (from where the Beaufort children derive their surname). In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married Robert Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Wemme, and they had two daughters before he died about 1395. Along with her three brothers, Joan had been privately declared legitimate by their cousin Richard II of England in 1390, but for various reasons their father secured another such declaration from Parliament in January 1397. Joan was already an adult when she was legitimized by the marriage of her mother and father with papal approval. The Beauforts were later barred from inheriting the throne by a clause inserted into the legitimation act by their half-brother, Henry IV of England. Soon after this declaration, on 3 February 1397, when she was eighteen, Joan married Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, who had also been married once before.

When Ralph de Neville died in 1425, his lands and titles should, by law of rights, have passed on to his eldest surviving son from his first marriage, another Ralph de Neville. Instead, while the title of Earl of Westmorland and several manors were passed to Ralph, the bulk of his rich estate went to his wife, Joan Beaufort. Although this may have been done to ensure that his widow was well provided for; by doing this, Ralph essentially split his family into two, and the result was years of bitter conflict between Joan and her stepchildren, who fiercely contested her acquisition of their father's lands. Joan however, with her royal blood and connections, was far too powerful to be called to account, and the senior branch of the Nevilles received little redress for their grievances. Inevitably, when Joan died, the lands would be inherited by her own children.

Joan died on 13 November 1440 at Howden in Yorkshire. Rather than be buried with her husband Ralph (who was buried with his first wife) she was entombed next to her mother in the magnificent sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral. Joan's is the smaller of the two tombs; both were decorated with brass plates — full-length representations of them on the tops, and small shields bearing coats of arms around the sides — but those were damaged or destroyed in 1644 during the English Civil War. A 1640 drawing of them survives, showing what the tombs looked like when they were intact, and side-by-side instead of end-to-end, as they are now.

Joan Beaufort was the grandmother of Edward IV of England and Richard III of England, whom Henry VII defeated to take the throne. (Henry then married Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV, and their son became Henry VIII of England). She was also the grandmother of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick 'the Kingmaker'.

[edit] Children of Joan Beaufort and Ralph Neville:

They had fourteen children:

Lady Katherine Neville, married first on January 12, 1411 John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk; married second Sir Thomas Strangways; married third John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont; married fourth Sir John Woodville (d. August 12, 1469).

Lady Eleanor Neville (d. 1472), married first Richard le Despencer, 4th Baron Burghersh, married second Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland

Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400–1460)

Robert Neville (d. 1457), Bishop of Durham

William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent (d. 1463)

Edward Nevill, 3rd Baron Bergavenny (d. 1476)

Anne Neville (?1411–1480), married Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham

Cecily Neville (1415–1495) ("Proud Cis"), married Richard, 3rd Duke of York and mothered Kings Edward IV of England and Richard III of England

George Neville, 1st Baron Latymer (d. 1469)

John Neville, died young

Cuthbert Neville, died young

Thomas Neville, died young

Henry Neville, died young

Joan Neville, a nun

[edit] References

thePeerage.com

[edit] External links

The Katherine Swynford Society

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Beaufort,_Countess_of_Westmorland"

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_of_England,_Queen_of_Scots

Joan of England, Queen of Scots

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Joan of England

Queen consort of Scotland

Tenure 21 June 1221 – 4 March 1238

Spouse Alexander II, King of Scots

House House of Plantagenet (by birth)

House of Dunkeld (by marriage)

Father John Lackland, King of England

Mother Isabella of Angoulême

Born 22 July 1210(1210-07-22)

Died 4 March 1238 (aged 27)

Havering-atte-Bower, London

Burial Tarant Crawford Abbey, Dorset

   For the wife of David II of Scotland see Joan of The Tower.

Joan of England (22 July 1210 – 4 March 1238) was Queen consort of Scotland from 1221 until 1238.

Joan was the eldest legitimate daughter and third child of King John of England and Countess Isabella of Angoulême.

Joan was brought up in the court of Hugh X of Lusignan who was promised to her in marriage from an early age, as compensation for him being jilted by her mother Isabella of Angoulême, however on the death of John of England, Isabella decided she should marry him herself and Joan was sent back to England, where negotiations for her hand with Alexander II of Scotland were taking place.

She and Alexander married on 21 June 1221, at York Minster[1]. Alexander was twenty-three. Joan was ten, almost eleven. They had no children. Joan died in her brother's arms at Havering-atte-Bower in 1238, and was buried at Tarrant Crawford Abbey in Dorset[2].

Nothing now remains of this church; the last mention of it is before the Reformation.l

Notes

  1. ^ Agnes Mure Mackenzie, The Foundations of Scotland (1957), p. 251.
  2. ^ Mackenzie, p. 260.

Preceded by

Ermengarde de Beaumont Queen consort of Scotland

1221–1238 Succeeded by

Marie de Coucy

This page was last modified on 13 June 2010 at 17:36.

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Joan, Princess of Wales and Lady of Snowdon, (c. 1191 – 2 February 1237) was the wife of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales and Gwynedd and effective ruler of most of Wales.

Contents [hide]

1 Early life

2 Marriage

3 Adultery with William de Braose

4 Fiction

5 References

6 Sources

7 External links


[edit] Early life

Joan was a natural daughter of King John of England. She should not be confused with her half-sister Joan, Queen Consort of Scotland.

Little is known about her early life. Her mother's name is known only from Joan's obituary in the Tewkesbury Annals, where she is called "Regina Clementina" (Queen Clemence); there is no evidence that her mother was in fact of royal blood. Joan seems to have spent part of her childhood in France, as King John had her brought to the Kingdom of England from Normandy in December 1203 in preparation for her wedding to prince Llywelyn ab Iorwerth.

[edit] Marriage

Joan married Llywelyn the Great between December 1203 and October 1204. She and Llywelyn had at least two children together:

1.Elen ferch Llywelyn (Helen or Ellen) (1207-1253), married (1) John the Scot, Earl of Chester and (2) Robert II de Quincy

2.Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1215-1246) married Isabella de Braose, died at Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, (Aber).

Some of Llywelyn's other recorded children may also have been Joan's:

1.Gwladus Ddu (1206-1251), married (1) Reginald de Braose and (2) Ralph de Mortimer.

2.Susanna, who was sent to England as a hostage in 1228.

3.Margaret, who married Sir John de Braose, the grandson of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber and had issue.

In April 1226 Joan obtained a papal decree from Pope Honorius III, declaring her legitimate on the basis that her parents had not been married to others at the time of her birth, but without giving her a claim to the English throne.

[edit] Adultery with William de Braose

At Easter 1230, William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny, who was Llywelyn's prisoner at the time, was discovered with Joan in Llywelyn's bedchamber. William de Braose was hanged at Aber Garth Celyn on 2 May 1230; the place was known as 'Gwern y Grog' and the incident remembered down the generations by the local community. A recent suggestion that the execution might have taken place at Crogen near Bala rests on the suggestion that 'Crogen' and 'Crokein' are one and the same: there is however no further eveidence in the area to lend this substance.

Joan was placed under house arrest for twelve months after the incident. She was then, according to the Chronicle of Chester, forgiven by Llywelyn, and restored to favour. She may have given birth to a daughter early in 1231.

Joan was never called Princess of Wales, but, in Welsh, "Lady of Wales". She died at the royal home, Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd in 1237. Llywelyn's great grief at her death is recorded; he founded a Franciscan friary on the seashore at Llanfaes, opposite the royal home, in her honour. The friary was consecrated in 1240, shortly before Llywelyn died. It was destroyed in 1537 by Henry VIII of England during the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

Joan's stone coffin can be seen in Beaumaris parish church, Anglesey. Above the empty coffin is a slate panel inscribed: "This plain sarcophagus, (once dignified as having contained the remains of JOAN, daughter of King JOHN, and consort of LLEWELYN ap IOWERTH, Prince of North Wales, who died in the year 1237), having been conveyed from the Friary of Llanfaes, and alas, used for many years as a horsewatering trough, was rescued from such an indignity and placed here for preseravation as well as to excite serious meditation on the transitory nature of all sublunary distinctions. By THOMAS JAMES WARREN BULKELEY, Viscount BULKELEY, Oct 1808"

[edit] Fiction

Joan and her affair with William de Braose is the subject of Saunders Lewis's Welsh verse play Siwan.

Edith Pargeter's novel The Green Branch.

Sharon Kay Penman's novel Here Be Dragons.

[edit] References

[edit] Sources

Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi I, p. 12.

Henry Luard. Annales Monastici 1, 1864

Tewkesbury Annals

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 By Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 27-27, 29A-28, 29A-29, 176B-27, 254-28, 254-29

[edit] External links

llywelyn.co.uk

Joan, Lady of Wales on Garth Celyn

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan,_Lady_of_Wales"

Categories: 1191 births | 1237 deaths | House of Plantagenet | Illegitimate children of British monarchs | Women of medieval Wales | Welsh royalty

--------------------

Conflicting information exists on the net about whether or not she ever had children. According to a wikipedia entry for Joan of England, Queen consort of Scotland:

Joan of England, Queen Consort of Scotland (22 July 1210 – 4 March 1238) was the eldest legitimate daughter and third child of John of England and Isabella of Angouleme.

Joan was brought up in the court of Hugh X of Lusignan who was promised to her in marriage from an early age, as compensation for him being jilted by her mother Isabella of Angouleme, however on the death of John of England, Isabella decided she should marry him herself and Joan was sent back to England, where negotiations for her hand with Alexander II of Scotland were taking place.

She and Alexander married on 21 June 1221, at York Minster[1]. Alexander was twenty-three. Joan was ten, almost eleven. They had no children. Joan died in her brother's arms at Havering-atte-Bower in 1238, and was buried at Tarant Crawford Abbey in Dorset[2].

Nothing now remains of this church; the last mention of it is before the Reformation."

According to some amateur genealogical websites (e.g. TK), Joan mothered Dernell.

Other sites name Alexander II of Scotland as Dernell's father, but do not name her mother, or refer to an unknown mistress, or suggest Isabella of Atholl, or Marie de Coucy (2nd wife of Alexander?)

--------------------

Joan, Princess of Wales and Lady of Snowdon, (c. 1188 – 2 February 1237) was the wife of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales and Gwynedd and effective ruler of most of Wales.

Contents [hide]

1 Early life

2 Marriage

3 Adultery with William de Braose

4 Fiction

5 References

6 Sources

7 External references


[edit] Early life

Joan (Joanna) was an illegitimate daughter of King John of England and a woman named Clemence Pinel.[1] She should not be confused with her legitimate half-sister Joan, Queen Consort of Scotland.

Little is known about her early life; she was possibly born before her father, King John of England, married his first wife in 1189. Her mother's name is known only from Joan's obituary in the Tewkesbury Annals, where she is mysteriously called "Regina Clementina" (Queen Clemence). Joan seems to have spent her childhood in France, as King John had her brought to the Kingdom of England from Normandy in preparation for her wedding in December 1203 at 15 years of age or so.

[edit] Marriage

Joan married Llywelyn the Great between December 1203 and October 1204. She and Llywelyn had at least two children together:

Elen ferch Llywelyn (Helen or Ellen) (1207-1253), married (1) John the Scot, Earl of Chester and (2) Robert II de Quincy

Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1215-1246) married Isabella de Braose, died at Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, (Aber).

Some of Llywelyn's other recorded children may also have been Joan's:

Gwladus Ddu (1206-1251), married (1) Reginald de Braose and (2) Ralph de Mortimer.

Susanna, who was sent to England as a hostage in 1228.

Margaret, who married Sir John de Braose, the grandson of William de Braose, 7th Baron Abergavenny and had issue.

In April 1226 Joan obtained a papal decree from Pope Honorius III, declaring her legitimate on the basis that her parents had not been married to others at the time of her birth, but without giving her a claim to the English throne.

[edit] Adultery with William de Braose

At Easter 1230, William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny, who was Llywelyn's nominal prisoner at the time, was discovered together with Joan in Llywelyn's bedchamber. William de Braose was hanged, probably at Crogen, near Bala, on 2 May 1230. Joan herself was placed under house arrest for twelve months after the incident. She was then (apparently) forgiven by Llywelyn, and restored as wife and princess. She may have given birth to a daughter early in 1231[citation needed].

Joan was never called Princess of Wales, but, in Welsh, "Lady of Wales". She died at the royal home, Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd in 1237. Llywelyn's great grief at her death is recorded; he founded a Franciscan friary on the seashore at Llanfaes, opposite the royal home, in her honour. The friary was consecrated in 1240, shortly before Llywelyn died. It was closed down in 1537 by Henry VIII of England during the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

Joan's stone coffin can be seen in Beaumaris parish church, Anglesey. Above the empty coffin is a slate panel inscribed: "This plain sarcophagus, (once dignified as having contained the remains of JOAN, daughter of King JOHN, and consort of LLEWELYN ap IOWERTH, Prince of North Wales, who died in the year 1237), having been conveyed from the Friary of Llanfaes, and alas, used for many years as a horsewatering trough, was rescued from such an indignity and placed here for preseravation as well as to excite serious meditation on the transitory nature of all sublunary distinctions. By THOMAS JAMES WARREN BULKELEY, Viscount BULKELEY, Oct 1808"

[edit] Fiction

Joan and her affair with William de Braose is the subject of Saunders Lewis's Welsh verse play Siwan.

Edith Pargeter's novel The Green Branch.

Sharon Kay Penman's novel Here Be Dragons.

[edit] References

^ Charles Cawley Medieval Lands, Wales

[edit] Sources

Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi I, p. 12.

Henry Luard. Annales Monastici 1, 1864

Tewkesbury Annals

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 By Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 27-27, 29A-28, 29A-29, 176B-27, 254-28, 254-29

[edit] External references

http://www.llywelyn.co.uk

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan,_Lady_of_Wales"

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan,_Lady_of_Wales

--------------------

Joan, Lady of Wales

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Joan, Princess of Wales and Lady of Snowdon, (c. 1188 – February 2, 1237) was the wife of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales and Gwynedd and effective ruler of most of Wales.

Early life

Joan (Joanna) was an illegitimate daughter of King John of England and a woman named Clemence. She should not be confused with her legitimate half-sister Joan, Queen Consort of Scotland.

Little is known about her early life; she was possibly born before her father, King John of England, married his first wife in 1189. Her mother's name is known only from Joan's obituary in the Tewkesbury Annals, where she is mysteriously called "Regina Clementina" (Queen Clemence). Joan seems to have spent her childhood in France, as King John had her brought to the Kingdom of England from Normandy in preparation for her wedding in December 1203 at 15 years of age or so.

[edit]Marriage

Joan married Llywelyn the Great between December 1203 and October 1204. She and Llywelyn had at least two children together:

Elen ferch Llywelyn (Helen or Ellen) (1207-1253), married (1) John the Scot, Earl of Chester and (2) Robert II de Quincy

Dafydd ap Llywelyn (1208-1246) married Isabella de Broase, died at Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, (Aber).

Some of Llywelyn's other recorded children may also have been Joan's:

Gwladus Ddu (1206-1251), married (1) Reginald de Braose and (2) Ralph de Mortimer.

Susanna, who was sent to England as a hostage in 1228.

Margaret, who married Sir John de Braose, the grandson of William de Braose, 7th Baron Abergavenny and had issue.

In April 1226 Joan obtained a papal decree from Pope Honorius III, declaring her legitimate on the basis that her parents had not been married to others at the time of her birth, but without giving her a claim to the English throne.

[edit]Adultery with William de Braose

At Easter 1230, William de Braose, 10th Baron Abergavenny, who was Llywelyn's nominal prisoner at the time, was discovered together with Joan in Llywelyn's bedchamber. William de Braose was hanged in the marshland at the foot of Garth Celyn, the place known since as Gwern y Grog. Joan herself was placed out of public view, under virtual house arrest, at Garth Celyn, for twelve months after the incident. She may have given birth to a daughter early in 1231[citation needed].

Joan was never called Princess of Wales, but, in Welsh, "Lady of Wales". She died at the royal home, Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd in 1237. Llywelyn's great grief at her death is recorded; he founded a Franciscan friary on the seashore at Llanfaes, opposite the royal home, in her honour. The friary was consecrated in 1240, shortly before Llywelyn died. It was closed down in 1537 by Henry VIII of England during the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

Joan's stone coffin can be seen in Beaumaris parish church, Anglesey.

Fiction

Joan and her affair with William de Braose is the subject of Saunders Lewis's Welsh verse play Siwan.

Edith Pargeter's novel The Green Branch.

Sharon Kay Penman's novel Here Be Dragons.

Sources

Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi I, p. 12.

Henry Luard. Annales Monastici 1, 1864

Tewkesbury Annals

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 By Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 27-27, 29A-28, 29A-29, 176B-27, 254-28, 254-29

--------------------

Joan, Princess of Wales and Lady of Snowdon, (c. 1188 – February 2, 1237) was the wife of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales and Gwynedd and effective ruler of most of Wales.

Joan (Joanna) was an illegitimate daughter of King John of England and a woman named Clemence Pinel. She should not be confused with her legitimate half-sister Joan, Queen Consort of Scotland.

Little is known about her early life; she was possibly born before her father, King John of England, married his first wife in 1189. Her mother's name is known only from Joan's obituary in the Tewkesbury Annals, where she is mysteriously called "Regina Clementina" (Queen Clemence). Joan seems to have spent her childhood in France, as King John had her brought to the Kingdom of England from Normandy in preparation for her wedding in December 1203 at 15 years of age or so.

Joan married Llywelyn the Great between December 1203 and October 1204. She and Llywelyn had at least two children together:

Elen ferch Llywelyn (Helen or Ellen) (1207-1253), married (1) John the Scot, Earl of Chester and (2) Robert II de Quincy

Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1215-1246) married Isabella de Braose, died at Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, (Aber).

Some of Llywelyn's other recorded children may also have been Joan's:

Gwladus Ddu (1206-1251), married (1) Reginald de Braose and (2) Ralph de Mortimer.

Susanna, who was sent to England as a hostage in 1228.

Margaret, who married Sir John de Braose, the grandson of William de Braose, 7th Baron Abergavenny and had issue.

In April 1226 Joan obtained a papal decree from Pope Honorius III, declaring her legitimate on the basis that her parents had not been married to others at the time of her birth, but without giving her a claim to the English throne.

--------------------

Joan of England, Queen Consort of Scotland (July 22, 1210 – March 4, 1238) was the eldest legitimate daughter and third child of John of England and Isabella of Angouleme.

Joan was brought up in the court of Hugh X of Lusignan who was promised to her in marriage from an early age, as compensation for him being jilted by her mother Isabella of Angouleme, however on the death of John of England, Isabella decided she should marry him herself and Joan was sent back to England, where negotiations for her hand with Alexander II of Scotland were taking place.

She and Alexander II of Scotland married on June 21, 1221, at York Minster. Alexander was 23. Joan was 11. They had no children. Joan died in her brothers arms at Havering-atte-Bower in 1238, and was buried at Tarant Crawford Abbey in Dorset.

Nothing now remains of this church as the last mention of it is before the reformation. -------------------- Joan of England (22 July 1210 – 4 March 1238) was Queen consort of Scotland from 1221 until 1238. Joan was the eldest legitimate daughter and third child of King John of England and Countess Isabella of Angoulême. Joan was brought up in the court of Hugh X of Lusignan who was promised to her in marriage from an early age, as compensation for him being jilted by her mother Isabella of Angoulême, however on the death of John of England, Isabella decided she should marry him herself and Joan was sent back to England, where negotiations for her hand with Alexander II of Scotland were taking place. She and Alexander married on 21 June 1221, at York Minster[1]. Alexander was twenty-three. Joan was ten, almost eleven. They had no children. Joan died in her brother's arms at Havering-atte-Bower in 1238, and was buried at Tarrant Crawford Abbey in Dorset[2]. Nothing now remains of this church; the last mention of it is before the Reformation.

view all 76

Joan of England, Queen Consort of Scotland's Timeline

1210
July 22, 1210
Coucy, Alsne, France
1221
June 21, 1221
Age 10
York Minster, England
1237
February 2, 1237
Age 26
Tarrant Keynstan,Dorsetshire,England
1238
March 4, 1238
Age 27
London, Middlesex, England
1893
December 12, 1893
Age 27
December 12, 1893
Age 27
December 12, 1893
Age 27
December 12, 1893
Age 27
December 12, 1893
Age 27
December 12, 1893
Age 27