John 'Nolichucky Jack' Sevier, 1st Gov. of Tennessee

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John Sevier

Also Known As: "Nolichucky Jack", "Sevier", "Jean", "Xavier"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Rockingham, Virginia
Death: Died in Fort Decatur, Alabama, United States
Cause of death: Unknown Infection/Illness
Place of Burial: Knox County Courthouse Grounds, Knox County, Tennessee, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Col. Valentine "The Immigrant" Sevier and Joanna Sevier
Husband of Sarah Jane Sevier and Catherine 'Bonnie Kate' Sevier
Father of Joseph Sevier, II; Maj. James Sevier; Maj. John Sevier, Jr.; Elizabeth Clark; Sarah Hawkins Brown and 14 others
Brother of Capt. Robert Sevier; Col. Valentine Sevier; Mary Rutherford; Agnes D Crutchfield; Charles Sevier and 7 others

Occupation: Military-Frontiersman-Politician
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John 'Nolichucky Jack' Sevier, 1st Gov. of Tennessee

John Sevier (September 23, 1745–September 24, 1815) was an American soldier, frontiersman and politician, and one of the founding fathers of the State of Tennessee. He played a leading role, both militarily and politically, in Tennessee's pre-statehood period, and was elected the state's first governor in 1796. DAR Ancestor #: A102092

Executive Summary

Tennessee folk hero, Pioneer, Statesman, and one of the founders of the republic, Governor of the state of Franklin, six times Governor of Tennessee, four times elected to Congress, a typical pioneer who conquered the Wilderness and fashioned the State, a projector and hero of King's Mountain, fought thirty-five battles, won thirty-five victories. His Indian war cry 'Here they are, come on boys, come on' is etched in stone on John Sevier's grave marker at the Knox County Courthouse in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Feud with Andrew Jackson

Despite these claims [of bribery and land fraud], Sevier was successful in his campaign for governor, but he was still chafing under the humiliation of Jackson’s accusation. So when the two men encountered one another on the courthouse steps in Knoxville, Tennessee on October 1, 1803, a confrontation was inevitable.

H.W. Brands writes a vivid account of this courthouse confrontation in his book, Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times:

"One day they met outside the courthouse and exchanged words. Their voices rose as their emotions engaged, and onlookers gathered around. After heated words, Sevier apparently challenged Jackson to draw arms. But since Jackson carried only a cane, against Sevier's sword, he declined. The hot language continued. Evidently Sevier alluded to Jackson's lack of military experience before becoming major general, for Jackson defended his services to the state and the nation." "'Services?'" Sevier riposted. 'I know of no great service you rendered the country, except taking a trip to Natchez with another man's wife.'"

With that insult, John Sevier crossed a line from which he could not retreat. Stunned silence filled the air, but soon afterward "Old Hickory" came to the defense of his wife's honor. "Great God! Do you mention her sacred name?" said Jackson, who then lunged at Sevier. The crowd quickly separated the two men but this was only the beginning of their confrontation. The next day Andrew Jackson launched into a written tirade against the Governor and challenged him to a duel.

Family

Sevier is a distant relative of St. Francis Xavier, the name "Sevier" being an anglicized form of "Xavier."[3] In the 17th century, some members of the Xavier family became Protestants (Huguenots). In 1685, following the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, Sevier's grandfather, Don Juan Xavier, moved to London, and changed his name to John Sevier.[3] Sevier's father, Valentine "The Immigrant" Sevier (1712–1803), was born in London, and moved to America in 1740.[3]

Sevier married Sarah Hawkins (1746–1780) in 1761. They had ten children: Joseph, James, John, Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary Ann, Valentine, Rebecca, Richard, and Nancy. Following her death, Sevier married Catherine Sherrill (1754–1836). They had eight children: Catherine, Ruthe, George Washington, Samuel, Polly, Eliza, Joanna, and Robert.[17]

Sevier's grandnephew, Ambrose Hundley Sevier (1801–1848), served as one of the first U.S. senators from Arkansas. Sevier County, Arkansas, is named for him. The Conway family, which dominated early Arkansas state politics, were cousins of the Seviers. Henry Conway, the grandfather of Ambrose Sevier and Arkansas's first governor, James Sevier Conway, was a friend of Sevier, and served as Treasurer of the State of Franklin. Two of Sevier's sons, James and John, married Conway's daughters, Nancy and Elizabeth, respectively.[18]

A large family of Seviers in Madison Parish, Louisiana, also claim descent from John Sevier, among them State Senator Andrew L. Sevier of Tallulah, who served in the upper house in Baton Rouge from 1932 until his death in 1962.[19]

Biographical information

SEVIER, John, a Representative from North Carolina and from Tennessee; born near Harrisonburg, Rockingham County, Va., September 23, 1745; attended the common schools and the academy at Fredericksburg, Va.; moved with his brothers to Watauga County, N.C., in 1773 and settled on the Holston River, N.C. (now Tennessee); county clerk and district judge 1777-1780; elected Governor of "the proclaimed" State of Franklin in March 1785 and served for three years; elected from North Carolina to the First Congress and served from June 16, 1790, until March 3, 1791; appointed in 1791 as brigadier general of militia for the Washington district of the territory south of the Ohio; upon the admission of Tennessee as a State into the Union was chosen Governor and served from 1796 to 1801, and again from 1803 to 1809; appointed in 1798 as brigadier general of the Provisional Army; served one term in the State senate 1810-1811; elected as a Republican from Tennessee to the Twelfth, Thirteenth, and Fourteenth Congresses and served from March 4, 1811, until his death; appointed in 1815 as one of the commissioners to determine the boundary between Georgia and the Creek territory in Alabama and served until his death, near Fort Decatur, Ala., September 24, 1815; interment at Fort Decatur, Ala.; reinterred in Knoxville, Tenn., in 1889.

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State Court Judge North Carolina, 1777-1790 - 5th Congressional District, U.S. House Represenatives, North Carolina 1790-1791 - 1st Governor State Tennessee, 1796-1801 - 3rd Governoe State Tennessee 1803-1808 - State Senator State Tennessee 1810-1811 - 2nd Congressional District, U.S. House Represenatives, State of Tennessee - 1811-1815. Previous to entering the Political arena he was Commander of the Tennesse, Washington County at Overton Mountain in the Battle of Kings Mountain. He had 2 wives and sired 18 children with these 2 wives.

John Seiver ( 1745 - 1815)

John Seiver -- Governor of State of Franklin for 12 years; 1st and 3rd Governor of Tennessee and U.S. Representative from Tennessee until his death. Served as commander (General) of the Washington Co., TN, contingent of the Overmountain Men in the Battle of Kings Mountain.

Elizabethton, Tennessee, site of the muster of the Overmountain Men.

Colonel Rev War

Lt Col Lord Dunmore War

The State of Franklin was an autonomous, secessionist United States territory created not long after the end of the American Revolution, from territory that later was ceded by North Carolina to the federal government. The territory comprising Franklin later became part of the state of Tennessee.

Franklin was never officially admitted into the Union of the United States and existed for only four years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Sevier

-------------------- http://www.johnsevier.com/bio_johnsevier.html

John Sevier

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John Sevier "Nolichucky Jack"

Capsule Biography


SEVIER, John, a Representative from North Carolina and from Tennessee; born near Harrisonburg, Rockingham County, Va., September 23, 1745; attended the common schools and the academy at Fredericksburg, Va.; moved with his brothers to Watauga County, N.C., in 1773 and settled on the Holston River, N.C. (now Tennessee); county clerk and district judge 1777-1780; elected Governor of "the proclaimed" State of Franklin in March 1785 and served for three years; elected from North Carolina to the First Congress and served from June 16, 1790, until March 3, 1791; appointed in 1791 as brigadier general of militia for the Washington district of the territory south of the Ohio; upon the admission of Tennessee as a State into the Union was chosen Governor and served from 1796 to 1801, and again from 1803 to 1809; appointed in 1798 as brigadier general of the Provisional Army; served one term in the State senate 1810-1811; elected as a Republican from Tennessee to the Twelfth, Thirteenth, and Fourteenth Congresses and served from March 4, 1811, until his death; appointed in 1815 as one of the commissioners to determine the boundary between Georgia and the Creek territory in Alabama and served until his death, near Fort Decatur, Ala., September 24, 1815; interment at Fort Decatur, Ala.; reinterred in Knoxville, Tenn., in 1889.

Bibliography: DAB; Driver, Carl S. "John Sevier, A Pioneer of the Old Southwest." Phd dissertation, Vanderbilt University, 1929.

From the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress

View copies of his original letters at the URL below.

http://www.johnsevier.com/letters.html -------------------- American soldier, frontiersman and politician, and one of the founding fathers of the State of Tennessee. First Governor of Tennessee

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John 'Nolichucky Jack' Sevier, 1st Gov. of Tennessee's Timeline

1745
September 23, 1745
Rockingham, Virginia
1761
1761
Age 15
Shenandoah County, VA, USA
1763
March 17, 1763
Age 17
Rockingham County, VA, USA
1764
October 25, 1764
Age 19
Rockingham County, VA, USA
1766
June 20, 1766
Age 20
Washington County, Tennessee, USA
1768
1768
Age 22
Frederick, Virginia, Colonial America
1770
July 1770
Age 24
Shenandoah County, VA, USA
1772
March 10, 1772
Age 26
Shenandoah, Virginia, Colonial America
1773
December 25, 1773
Age 28
Watauga Settlement, Carter, North Carolina now TN, Colonial America
1775
1775
Age 29
Carter County, TN, USA