Jonathan Cass (1753 - 1839)

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Birthplace: Salisbury, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died in Dresden, Muskingum County, Ohio, United States
Managed by: Wayne Matthew Jauss
Last Updated:

About Jonathan Cass

THE LAST COMMANDER OF THE FORT.

The latest command of the fort was Major Jonathan Cass, who was born in the year 1753, about fifteen miles from Newburyport, New Hampshire. His ancestors were from Devonshire, England. His remote ancestors were of Norman birth. He was living in Exeter, New Hampshire, when the news reached there of the battle of Lexington. With some half dozen comrades he set off at once, musket in hand, to join the army, marching from his home to Cambridge. He was where the balls flew thickest at the battle of Bunker Hill, and participated in the great battles of Trenton, Princeton, Germantown, Monmouth, and Saratoga, remaining in the army until the close of our great Revolutionary struggle. His accounts as brigade quartermaster were closed June 26, 1783, and a certificate was issued to him for the ballance due of 65 pounds 10s. 4d. Whether the government ever paid this certificate or not, is not now known. It is stated in Appleton's Cyclopedia, under article "Lewis CASS," that Major CASS retired to a 4000 acre tract of land in Muskingum County, Ohio, given to him by the government for services in the Revolutionary army. This is a mistake. He never received an acre of land for his services nor a dollar of pension money, although he died from injuries received while in the discharge of his duties in the public service. After the close of the war he resigned his commission and engaged successfully in the West India trade, living with his famiy at Exeter, New Hampshire. About the close of the year 1781 he married Miss Mary Gilman, daughter of Nicholas Gilman. Of this union, three sons and two daughters were born, all at Exeter. The oldest son was General Lewis Cass, and the youngest, Captain Charles Lee Cass, a brave officer of the "War of 1812," distinguishing himself at the battle (sortie) of Fort Erie. All of the children became citizens of Ohio, the last survivor (George W.) reaching the green old age of 87, in 1873.

When the regular army was increased, after the defeat of General St.Clair, General Knox, then Secretary of War, sent to Mr. Jonathan Cass, then a private citizen, a commission as major in the army. This commission was wholly unexpected and unsolicited, but was given by General Knox in recognition of long and faithful military service and soldierly character and bearing of one whom he knew personally. The personal presence of Major Cass was most striking and commanding; he had the look of one born to command. In height he was nearly or quite six feet, of perfect form, without superfluous flesh, black hair and piercing black eyes, and commanding brow. He joined his command at Winchester, VA, taking his family with him, excepting his oldest son, Lewis, who was left at Exeter, that he might continue his studies at "Phillips Academy." From Winchester he was ordered to take command at Fort Franklin, on the Alleghany River, in PA, north of Pittsburg. His route to his new command was via Fort Cumberland, and across the Alleghany Mountains, and along "Braddock's road" to Pittsburg, and thence up the Alleghany River in barges. From Fort Franklin he was ordered to Fort Washington (Cincinnati), to which point he went about the Fall of 1793, taking his family with him excepting son Lewis, who still remained at "Phillips Exeter Academy." He remained in command at Fort Washington nearly all the time that he was with the army of General Wayne. In 1794 and 1795 he was at Fort Hamilton. While in charge of a rconnoitering part, his horse, in jumping over the trunk of a prostrate tree, fell, and in coming down fell upon and broke one of Major Cass's legs below the knee. In consequence of bad surgery, the wounded leg never healed, and required daily dressing for about 35 years, and was painful all that period. It finally caused premature death, at the age of 77. His widow followed about 5 years later. In consequence of this injury, he was for a time so disabled from military duty that he was granted a leave of absence, and went with his family to Exeter, New Hampshire, traveling by a northern route. He went from Cincinnati to Detroit via Fort Wayne, Indiana (then "Block House No. 10"), descending the river from Fort Wayne to Lake Erie, and coasting thence to Detroit. From Detroit he went by boat ot Oswego, and thence to Albany; from Albany to Boston. This was in the year 1795 or 1796. In the year 1799 he was so far relieved from suffering that he applied for "orders," and was sent to Wilmington, Delaware, but was soon after ordered to the command at Winchester, VA, at that time a principal recruiting station.

 In the year 1800 he tendered his resignation as an officer of the army. The Secretary of War accepted it, to take effect at the end of the year. In the meantime he was granted a "leave of absence" to the date hsi resignation was accepted.
 The choice of the 4000 acre tracts of land in the United States military district in Ohio (west of the Ohio River, east of the Scioto, north of latitude 40 degrees, and south of the Greenville treaty line), was decided by a lottery, drawn in Philadelphia in 1799 while Major Cass was stationed at Wilmington, Delaware. He drew No. 1. He commissioned Bazaleel Wells, surveyor, of Steubenville, Ohio, to make a selection for him, and the latter chose the section at the mouth of Walkatomaka Creek, on the Muskingum River, 15 miles due north of Zanesville, Ohio, and for his services received 400 acres off of the north-west cornerof the section selected. No. 2 was drawn by Thomas Bachus, who "located" the section at the mouth of Whetstone Creek, above Columbus, on the Scioto.
 As soon as Major Cass received his "leave of absence" he proceeded with his family (excepting his oldest son, Lewis, who was left in Wilmington, Delaware, in charge of a Latin grammar school) to take possession of his purchase of lands in Ohio. The warrants which were given in payment of those lands were purchased in the open market in Philadelphia. He came West by way of Cumberland and Pittsburg, stopping long enough at the last named place to make purchases of furniture, farm implements, supplies, etc., for his new home. He descended the Ohio River to Marietta in a "broad-horn" boat. At Marietta he transferred his family and effects into large canoes, called pirogues, and thus ascended the Muskingum River about 100 miles, disembarking on his own lands. On arriving there he found several families from Maryland and Western Virginia living on the ground, each having a few acres in cultivation. On this farm Major Cass lived the remainder of his days, which terminated in September, 1830, in the 76th year of his age. As before stated, his death was premature, having been caused by 35 years of suffering, occasioned by an injury in the military service of his country.

Major Jonathan Cass son of (Joseph, Jonathan, Capt. Joseph, John) was born at Exter, New Hampshire on 29 October 1753. He was a blacksmith and farmer at Exeter. While still a very young man, he had a relationship with a young woman named Mary Bean or Bream. According to DAR records, they are believed to have lived in East Kingston and had several children: David, born in 1774, Rachel in 1775, John born in 1776, Samuel in 1780 and Philip in 1784. Jonathan enlisted as a private in the Revolution. Immediately after the Battle of Lexington in June of 1775, he left his forge and joined the Continental Army, serving in the Battle of Bunker Hill. He also fought in the Battle of Princeton, Trenton and Monmouth. Before the end of the war, he was commissioned Ensign and then Captain of the 2nd Regiment, New Hampshire Continental Line. He was elected an orginal member of the New Hampshire Society of the Cincinnati on 18 Nov 1783.

After he returned at the end of the war, J. C. married Mary Gilman "Mollie," daughter of Theophilus and Deborah (Webster) Gilman on 20 December 1781 at Exeter, New Hampshire, she was born there 6 August 1759, and she died on 13 August 1834 at the age of 71 at Muskingum, Ohio. He moved from Exeter to Boscawen and built the first house west of Blackwater River in New Hampshire and pursued his trades for some time.

On 20 October 1786 he accepted a commission in the army raised for the defense of the Western Frontier. This earned him the rank of Major, 3rd Regiment of the Army of the United States. He commanded Fort Hamilton, in Ohio.

The histories of Butler and Hamilton Counties of Ohio maintain that he was an expert with horses, but he broke and mangled his leg while his horse stumbled jumping over a log. He was forced to retire as commander of Fort Hamilton in 1800. His leg never healed and was debilitating until he died. On 15 Feburary 1801 he resigned his post and moved to Marieta, Ohio with his family. He died at his home, "Wacatomaka" in Dresden, Muskingum County, Ohio on 14 August 1830 at age 77. He had not received a pension but had been granted 4,500 acres of land there near Dresden, Ohio for his Military Service.

Name: Jonathan CASS

Cemetery: Dresden Cem

Location: Jefferson Twp, Muskingum Co OH 55

Reference: Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Vol.1, p. Serial: 11912; Volume: 4

He married twice. He married an unknown person. He married Mary Gilman in Exeter, Rockingham, NH, 20 Dec 1781. Mary was born in Exeter, Rockingham, NH about 1763. (Additional notes for Mary Gilman) Mary died 13 Aug 1834 in Muskingum, Muskingum, OH, at 71 years of age.

He made a will in Dresden, Muskingum, OH, about 1830. Major Jonathan Cass' Last Will:

In the name of God, Amen, I Jonathan Cass of the Township of Jefferson,County of Muchingum in the State of Ohio being estreemly feeble in body, but of sound and ? disproving memory and understanding, do make, and publish this as my last will and testament in manner following- to wit

 In the first place , in a reasonable time after my decease, my funeral expenses, and my just debts are to be paid by my wife Mary, thro the hand of my execetors hereinafter named ---- To my beloved wife Mary, I give and bequeath rents if owed? and profits of all my cleared land owned by me in township of Jefferson aforesaid during her natural life, she paying the taxes for said land ---- To my daughter Deborah, I gereby give, bequeath and devise the one fourth part of all the real estate I own in the said township of Jefferson, to her and her children forever. To my daughter Mary, I also give, bequeath and devise, the one fourth part of the land I own in said township of Jefferson to her and her children forever. The remainder of my real estate I hereby bequeath to my son Charles Lee Cass-to him and his heirs forever. To my son Charles, I also bequeath all wearing apparel. To my daughter Deborah, I give and bequeath my gold watch. To my daughter Mary, I bequeath my sideboard To my son George, I bequeath my set of dining tables 
 These several bequeaths to my daughters of personal property are subject to the use and claim of my wife during her natural life should she so desire. With the decease of my wife, it is my will and desire that all the residue of my personal property, not herein before devised be equally divided by my Executor between my children, Deborah,Mary,Charles, my other children having been heretofore sufficiently provided for. My wife having the right to make hers during her life of whatever money she calls for from my Executor. My son George Cass, thereby constitute and appoint my Executor of this my last will and testament, believing that he will take special charge of the evidence of claim I hold against others, and faithfully and delegently, and collect and apply them strictly as herein devised. In testimony whereof I have here unto set my hand and seal this twenty day of in the year of our Lord eight hundred and thirty 

Signed,Sealed,published Jonathan Cass (seal)

and declares by the testator as his last will and testament in our presence,who at his request in his presence,and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witness thereto

Signed by: John C. Mary

 Jonathan learned and practiced the blacksmith trade before the Revolution. He had a wife, or a relationship, before he enlisted as a private after the Battle of Lexington. Although the records are clear for his second relationship, they are not for his first. It is quite clear the children of his first relationship did not press the point either. It is obvious that he did not marry Mary Bean. Jonathan and Mary Bean are believed to have lived in East Kingston and produced four or more children: Rachel in 1775, Samuel in 1780, another Jonathan in 1782 and Philip in 1784, long after Major Jonathan had come home from the war and married Mary Gilman about 1780. Major Jonathan left a Will in 1830 when he died in which he names his children by Mary Gilman except Lewis, without mention of any others. DAR records would show that the name of the first son by the first marriage was James, others were David b 1774, John b-1776,Joseph in 1776, and Mary. 
 Mary Gilman was used to better things, and Jonathan was hard pressed to make a living as a farmer and blacksmith. He moved from Exeter to Boscawen and built the first house west of Blackwater River and pursued his trades there for some time. He applied for a commission as a captain in the regular army and had some difficulty getting his old rank back. His good record at Bunker Hill, Princeton, Trenton, Monmouth, Germantown and with Sullivan made the difference. The History of Boscawen and Webster, NH by Coffin p-334 states that he had a son Burnard by his first marriage. This could not have been the same Bernard that went West. Jonathan became a major with service at Fort Hamilton in Ohio. He was an expert with horses. The histories of Butler and Hamilton Counties of Ohio state that he broke and mangled his leg while his horse stumbled jumping over a log. He was forced to retire as commander of Fort Hamilton in 1800.  His leg never healed and was debilitating until he died.  He never got a pension, but was able to get 4500 acres of desirable land near Dresden, Ohio. 

Listed as a Capt from NH in the D.A.R. Patriot Index. Later became a Major.

S.A.R. application shows birth place as Salisbury, MA and death place as Muskingum Co., OH. Shows death date as 4 Aug 1830.

From Heitman's book: "CASS, Jonathan (N.H.) served as PVT Bunker Hill, June 1775 Ensign 3rd N.H. 8 Nov 1776, 2 LT 4 August 1777, 1st LT 1 May 1778, transferred to 2nd NH on 1 Jan 1781. Capt on 8 Dec 1782, served to close of war. Capt. 2nd U.S. Infantry 4 May 1791, was in 2nd Sub Legion 4 Sep 1792, and Major in 3rd Sub Legion 21 Feb 1793 which became 3rd U.S. Infantry 1 Nov 1796. He resigned 15 Feb 1801, and died 14 Aug 1830."

1819- Dresden Presbyterian Church History -1919

written by Mrs. T.M. (Mary Louise Cresap) Stevenson

CHRONOLOGY

First Pastor-Rev. Prescott B. Smith 

(1819-1823)

Rev. Prescott B. Smith, the third member of the Presbyterial Commitee and noble Triumvirate, became our very first Pastor. He was a native of Vermont, was educated at Middlebury College, and ordained at Newark in 1818. He began preaching in 1818 soon after his ordination, lived in Irville. He so continued until his death in 1823, aged only twenty-nine.

 Though only twenty-nine at his death, Rev. Prescott B. Smith was the Nestor of our Pastors. Some of our honored guests this evening are his grandchildren, viz., the familie of the late Mr. Horace Smith, of Adams Mills, faithful, active members of the Adams Mills Presbyterian Church. His works do follow him and his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren are amoung us, a blessing today.

Charter Members

The Church records give the Charter members in the following order: Daniel Stillwell, Esq., Joseph F. Munro, John C. Stockton, Mrs Mary Smith, (wife of pastor), Mary Munro, (wife of J.F.), Mrs. Sohpie Cass, (wife of G.W.), Mrs. Mary Cass, (wife of Major Jonathan), and Rev. Hildreth adds Major Jonathan Cass. As Mrs. Munro was the daughter of Major Jonathan Cass, and Rev. and Mrs. Hildreth made their home with Mrs. Munro, Mrs. Hildreth's mother, Rev. Hildreth's testimony is accurate.

 Major Jonathan Cass was the great-grandfather of Mrs. J.W.P. Ried, Zanesville; Miss Mary Munro, Granville; Mrs. Rhoda Dunmead, Newark; Mrs. Minnie Dunmead, of the Old Munro Home; former members of the Dresden chruch and now active Presbyterians in their home towns, with one exception, and we welcome them to this Centennial reunion as we look in their faces.

Mrs. Sophie Cass, wife of George W. Cass, another Charter member, is represented in Dresden today by the widow of Dr. Edward Cass and their two sons, Dr. Edward McDowell Cass and George Cass, both soldiers in the Great War. Dr. Edward attained the title of his ancestor, "Major" overseas, and George, a non-Com on this side.

Daniel Stillwell, Esq., was great-grandfather to the Scott families, of Adams Mills, as well as to the Horace Smith families, and wonder of wonders, Hamilton Scott's daughter, great-great-grandaughter, is present tonight helping us to celebrate and to keep the ideas of Daniel Stillwell, Esq., in the Church active. The Scotts are also grandchildren of another of our Charter members, John C. Stockton. John F. Munro, the very first elder of this Church, and his wife, Mary G. Munro, both Charter members, were also represented by here Mrs. Ried, Miss Munro and Mrs. R. Drunmead, her grandchildren. Was ever a church so blessed?

Think of it! The descendants of every single one of the Founders of this Church gathered together to help celebrate its Centennial, and all still faithful workers in the Presbyterian Church. We heartily welcome you all to this, our "Home-coming."

Sources:

Abbrev: Gilman Genealogy, the Story of the Gilmans

Title: The story of the Gilmans and a Gilman Genealogy of the Descendants of Edward Gilman of Hingham, England 1550-1950 by Constance Le Neve Gilman Ames, Yakima, Washington, Copyright 1950 by Constance Le Neve Gilman Ames, Printed for the Author by Shields Rainier Printing Company, Yakima, Wahington.

Page: Page 115.

Note:

Jonathan's date of death is also stated as 30 Sep 1830. He was a Patriot soldier in the Continental Army during the American Revolution: a Private when he fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775; promoted through the ranks to Captain on December 8, 1782; and remained a Captain through the end of the Revolution. Jonathan was with General George Washington at Yorktown, Virginia when the British General Charles Cornwallis surrendered on Oct. 19, 1781. He remained in the army as a career soldier after the war ended. His home was Exeter, New Hampshire. He knew President George Washington well enough for Washington to stay with him when the President visited New Hampshire. On February 21, 1793 Jonathan was promoted to Major. He resigned from the army on February 15, 1801.

 The new U. S. federal government could afford to pay its Revolutionary War veterans only part of their salary in cash.  Jonathan Cass got the rest of what Congress owed him by taking part in a drawing in Philadelphia.  He chose 4,000 acres of prime land in the Muskingum River Valley in the new State of Ohio where he became one of this area's first settlers.  He arrived at his new property near the Indian village of Wakatomica.  This village developed into the town of Dresden, Ohio.  Jonathan's body was moved to the Dresden Cemetery in 1920.

"Cass, Lewis," Grolier's 1995 Multimedia Encyclopedia;

Dunbar, Willis, "Lewis Cass: A Biography;"

Heitman, Francis B., "Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army," Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1982.

Ohio Census, 1790-1890


Name:    JONATHAN CASS 

State: OH

County: Washington County

Township: Miscellaneous Townships

Year: 1800

Record Type: Tax list

Page: 005

Database: OH Early Census Index

Name: JONATHAN CASS

State: OH

County: Washington County

Township: Newton Township.

Year: 1803

Record Type: State or Colonial Census

Database: OH Early Census Index

Name: JONATHAN CASS

State: OH

County: Muskingum County

Township: No Township Listed

Year: 1806

Record Type: Tax list

Page: 011

Database: OH Early Census Index

Name: JONATHAN CASS

State: OH

County: Muskingum County

Township: Salem Township

Year: 1807

Record Type: Tax List

Page: 005

Database: OH Early Census Index

Name: JONATHAN CASS

State: OH

County: Muskingum County

Township: No Township Listed

Year: 1809

Record Type: Tax list

Page: 002

Database: OH Early Census Index

Name: JONATHAN CASS

State: OH

County: Muskingum County

Township: Miscellaneous Township

Year: 1810

Record Type: Tax list

Page: 004

Database: OH 1810 Washington Co. Census Index

Cass, Jonathan. N H. N H. Served as a private at Bunker Hill June 1775; ensign 3 N H 8 Nov 1776; 2 lieutenant 4 Aug 1777; 1 lieutenant 1 May 1778; transferred to 1 N H 1 Jan 1781; captain 8 Dec 1782 and served to close of war; captain 2 infantry 4 Mar 1791; 2 subsistence legion 4 Sept 1792; major 3 subsistence legion 21 Feb 1793; 3 infantry 1 Nov 1796; resigned 15 Feb 1801; [died 14 Aug 1830.]

Name: Jonathan Cass

Residence: Exeter, N. H.

Agency: [E.] Harris

Shares: 1

First Ownership of Ohio Lands

Ohio Land Records

Name: JONATHAN CASS

Warrantee Name: JONATHAN CASS

Land Office: OHIO

Total Acres: 4000

Signature: Yes

Canceled Document: No

Issue Date: May 12, 1800

Metes and Bounds: No

Statutory Reference: 1 Stat. 480

Multiple Warantee Names: No

Act or Treaty: June 1, 1796

Multiple Patentee Names: No

Entry Classification: United Brethren Warrant Act

Land Description: 1 US MILITARY SURVEY No 3 N 7 W 2

Name: JONATHAN CASS

Warrantee Name: CATO WALLINGFORD

Land Office: OHIO

Total Acres: 100

Signature: Yes

Canceled Document: No

Issue Date: January 02, 1804

Metes and Bounds: No

Statutory Reference: 1 Stat. 480

Multiple Warantee Names: No

Act or Treaty: June 1, 1796

Multiple Patentee Names: No

Entry Classification: United Brethren Warrant Act

Land Description: 1 23 US MILITARY SURVEY No 2 N 8 W 1


Name: JONATHAN CASS

Warrantee Name: POMP PETERS

Land Office: OHIO

Total Acres: 100

Signature: Yes

Canceled Document: No

Issue Date: January 02, 1804

Metes and Bounds: No

Statutory Reference: 1 Stat. 480

Multiple Warantee Names: No

Act or Treaty: June 1, 1796

Multiple Patentee Names: No

Entry Classification: United Brethren Warrant Act

Land Description: 1 22 US MILITARY SURVEY No 2 N 8 W 1


American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI)

Name: Jonathan CASS

Birth Date: 1753

Birthplace: Massachusetts, Ohio,

Volume: 26

Page Number: 133

Biographical Info: maj.

Reference: McCutcheon (Cutcheon) fam. Recds. And allied fams. By Flor. (McCutcheon) McKee. Grand Rapids, 1931. (316, 46p.):235

Name: Jonathan CASS

Birth Date: 175?

Birthplace: Massachusetts,

Volume: 26

Page Number: 133

Biographical Info: priv.

Reference: soldiers and sailors of the Rev. War. Comp. By secy. Of the commonwealth, Ms. Boston. 1896-1908. (17v.):3:192

Name: Jonathan CASS

Birth Date: 175?

Birthplace: Massachusetts,

Volume: 26

Page Number: 133

Biographical Info: serg.

Reference: soldiers and sailors of the Rev. War. Comp. By secy. Of the commonwealth, Ms. Boston. 1896-1908. (17v.):3:191

Name: Jonathan CASS

Birth Date: 175?

Birthplace: New Hampshire

Volume: 26

Page Number: 133

Reference: Heads of Fams. at the first U.S. census. NH. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington, 1908. (146p.):22, 64, 66, 98 miscellaneous Rev. docs. Of NH. Ed. By Albert Sillman Batchellor. Manchester, NH, 1910. (17,658p.):48, 139, 177, 478, 483 Rolls of the soldiers in the Rev. War, 1775 to May, 1777; and diaries of Lt. Jona Burton, Ed. By Issac Weare Hammond, v. 1 of War Rolls, NH. 1885. (13,3,) 799p.) Rolls of the soldiers in the Rev. War May 1777 to 1780: with names of NH. Men in Ms. regiments. V.2 of War Rolls. Concord, NH. 1886. (14,2,847p.), Rolls and documents relating to soldiers in the Rev. War, including some Indian and French rolls. V.3 of War Rolls. Manchester, NH. 1887. (10,2, 1021p.), Rolls and documents relating to soldiers in the Rev. War. Pt.11. Misc. Provincial papers from 1629 to 1725. V. 4 of War Rolls. Machester, NH. 1889. (22,2,819p.):1: 30, 112, 146, 195, 261, 661; 2:421, 562, 726, 748; 3:+; 4:269, 359, 364, 368, 465 Gen. Column of the " Boston Transcript". 1906-1941.( The greatest single source of material for gen. Data for the N.E. area and for the period 1600-1800. Completely indexed in the Index.): 27 Oct 1924, 2338; 10 Oct 1932, 5250


Name: JONATHAN CASS

State: NH

County: Rockingham County

Township: East Kingston

Year: 1776

Page: NPN

Database: NH Early Census Index

United States Federal Census

Name: Jonathan Cass

Township: Exeter

County: Rockingham

State: New Hampshire

Year: 1790

Roll: M637_5

Page: 66

Image: 0117

Name: Jonathan Cass

Township: Jefferson

County: Muskingum

State: Ohio

Year: 1820

Roll: M33_92

Page: 137

Image Number: 99

Maj Jonathan Cass

Birth: unknown

Death: Aug. 4, 1830


He was a soldier at the Battle of Bunker Hill. An officer of the Revolution and of the Army under Gen. Wayne which brought peace to the frontier. From New England he emigrated to this part of the wilds of the Northwest Territory. On the 4,000 acres of Military Lands he purchased, he led a peaceful life until death claimed him. He was agent for the founders of Dresden in 1817.

Inscription: 77y

Note: h/o Mary (Gilman)

 

Burial:

Dresden Cemetery

Dresden

Muskingum County

Ohio, USA

-------------------- Jonathan Cass was a soldier at the Battle of Bunker Hill. An officer of the Revolution and of the army under Gen. Wayne. From New England he emigrated to Ohio which was part of the wilds of the Northeast Territory. He purchased 400 acres of land, under Military grant, and resided there until his death.

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Jonathan Cass's Timeline

1753
October 29, 1753
Salisbury, Massachusetts, United States
1781
December 20, 1781
Age 28
Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire, United States
1782
October 9, 1782
Age 28
Exeter, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States
1784
April 16, 1784
Age 30
Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire, United States
1786
1786
Age 32
1787
1787
Age 33
1788
August 12, 1788
Age 34
1808
1808
Age 54
1839
August 14, 1839
Age 85
Dresden, Muskingum County, Ohio, United States