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Philip Glass

Birthdate: (78)
Birthplace: Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Benjamin Charles Glass and Ida Glass
Husband of <private> Critchlow; <private> Akalitis and <private> Glass
Ex-husband of JoAnne Akalaitis
Father of <private> Glass; <private> Glass; Juliet Glass and Private User
Brother of <private> Abramowitz (Glass) and <private> Glass
Half brother of <private> Abramowitz and <private> Glass

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

    • <private> Critchlow
      spouse
    • <private> Glass
      child
    • <private> Glass
      child
    • <private> Akalitis
      spouse
    • <private> Glass
      spouse
    • daughter
    • Private User
      child
    • mother
    • <private> Abramowitz (Glass)
      sibling
    • <private> Glass
      sibling

About Philip Glass

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/DVD/Glass-A-Portrait-of-Philip-in-Twelve-Parts/Philip-Glass/e/741952316497 Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is an American music composer. He is considered one of the most influential composers of the late 20th century[1][2][3] and is widely acknowledged as a composer who has brought art music to the public (along with precursors such as Richard Strauss, Kurt Weill and Leonard Bernstein). Born in 1937 and grew up in Baltimore. He studied at the University of Chicago, the Juilliard School and in Aspen with Darius Milhaud. Finding himself dissatisfied with much of what then passed for modern music, he moved to Europe, where he studied with the legendary pedagogue Nadia Boulanger (who also taught Aaron Copland , Virgil Thomson and Quincy Jones) and worked closely with the sitar virtuoso and composer Ravi Shankar. He returned to New York in 1967 and formed the Philip Glass Ensemble – seven musicians playing keyboards and a variety of woodwinds, amplified and fed through a mixer.

The new musical style that Glass was evolving was eventually dubbed “minimalism.” Glass himself never liked the term and preferred to speak of himself as a composer of “music with repetitive structures.” Much of his early work was based on the extended reiteration of brief, elegant melodic fragments that wove in and out of an aural tapestry. Or, to put it another way, it immersed a listener in a sort of sonic weather that twists, turns, surrounds, develops.

There has been nothing “minimalist” about his output. In the past 25 years, Glass has composed more than twenty operas, large and small; eight symphonies (with others already on the way); two piano concertos and concertos for violin, piano, timpani, and saxophone quartet and orchestra; soundtracks to films ranging from new scores for the stylized classics of Jean Cocteau to Errol Morris’s documentary about former defense secretary Robert McNamara; string quartets; a growing body of work for solo piano and organ. He has collaborated with Paul Simon, Linda Ronstadt, Yo-Yo Ma, and Doris Lessing, among many others. He presents lectures, workshops, and solo keyboard performances around the world, and continues to appear regularly with the Philip Glass Ensemble.