Philip Livingston, signer of the "Declaration of Independence"

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About Philip Livingston, Jr.

Philip Livingston (January 15, 1716 – June 12, 1778), was an American merchant and statesman from New York City. He was a delegate for New York to the Continental Congress from 1775 to 1778, and signed the Declaration of Independence.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Livingston

He was born in Albany, New York into the prominent Livingston family. His grandfather, who had immigrated to New York and controlled the large grant called Livingston Manor, was known as Robert, 1st Lord of the Manor. His father, also named Philip was the 2nd Lord of the Manor. This Philip was, however, his fourth son, and thus could not inherit. The wife of the 2nd Lord of the Manor was a daughter of Albany, New York Mayor Pieter Van Brugh.

Philip attended and graduated from Yale College in 1737. He then settled in New York City and pursued a mercantile career. He became prominent as a merchant, and was elected Alderman in 1754. He was reelected to that office each year until 1763. Also in 1754, he went as a delegate to the Albany Congress. There, he joined delegates from several other colonies to negotiate with Indians and discuss common plans for dealing with the French and Indian War. They also developed a Plan of Union for the Colonies which was, however, rejected by King George.

Livingston became an active promoter of efforts to raise and fund troops for the war, and in 1759 was elected to the colony's House of Representatives. He would hold that office until 1769, serving as Speaker in 1768. In October of 1765, he attended the Stamp Act Congress, which produced the first formal protest to the crown as a prelude to the American Revolution. Philip became strongly aligned with the radical block in that Congress. He joined New York's Committee of Correspondence to continue communication with leaders in the other colonies.

When New York established a rebel government in 1775, he was the President of the Provincial Convention. They also selected him as one of their delegates to the Continental Congress that year. In the Congress, he strongly supported separation from Great Britain and in 1776 joined other delegates in the Declaration of Independence.

After the adoption of the new New York State Constitution, he was elected to the state Senate in 1777, while continuing in the national congress. He died suddenly while attending the sixth session of Congress in York, Pennsylvania and is buried in the Prospect Hill Cemetery there. Livingston was a Presbyterian, a Mason, and an original promoter of King's College, which became Columbia University.

His brother was New Jersey Governor William Livingston.

His cousin was New York Congressman Robert R. Livingston the Chancellor.

His wife was Christina Ten Broeck a great-granddaughter of Albany, New York Mayor Dirck Wesselse Ten Broeck[1] whose wife Margarita Cuyler was a niece of Maria Cuyler, the wife of New York City Mayor John Cruger. Mayor Cruger was father of New York City Mayor John Cruger Jr and grandfather of Henry Cruger and MP and loyalist Colonel John Henry Cruger. Colonel Cruger was a brother in law of Oliver De Lancey (the elder). De Lancy was a grandson of New York Mayor Stephanus Van Cortlandt and an uncle of wife of South Carolina Congressman Ralph Izard. Oliver's elder brother was New York Governor James DeLancey. A brother of Christina was Abraham Ten Broeck[2] - a Milita Brigadier General of Milita and a Albany, New York Mayor. Abraham Ten Broeck's wife was Elizabeth Van Rensselaer a sister of Stephen Van Renselaer II[3]. A cousin of Abraham Ten Broeck was Maria Ten Broeck who was the wife of Continental Army General Goose Van Schaick[4]-who was a son of Albany, New York Mayor Sybrant Van Schaick. Goose Van Schaick's sister was married to Continental Army General Peter Gansevoort-a great-grandnephew of Albany, New York Mayor Pieter Van Burgh.

A daughter, Catherina, married Stephen Van Rennsselaer II; their son, Stephen Van Rensselaer III, married Margarita Schuyler-daughter of General Philip Schuyler-a great nephew of Albany, New York Mayor Pieter Schuyler.

A great-grandson Edward Livingston married Sarah R. Lansing-a daughter of Albany Mayor and Congressman John Lansing.

Among his descendants were First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, actress Jane Wyatt, writer Harry Crosby, and cinematographer Floyd Crosby and his son David Crosby.


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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Livingston

Philip Livingston (January 15, 1716 – June 12, 1778) was an American merchant and statesman from New York City. He was a delegate for New York to the Continental Congress from 1775 to 1778, and signed the Declaration of Independence.

He was born in Albany, New York, to Robert, 1st Lord of the Manor. His father, also named Philip was the 2nd Lord of the Manor. Philip, however, was his fourth son, and thus could not inherit. The wife of the 2nd Lord of the Manor was a daughter of Albany, New York, Mayor Pieter Van Brugh.

Philip attended and graduated from Yale College in 1737. He then settled in New York City and pursued a mercantile career. He became prominent as a merchant, and was elected Alderman in 1754. He was reelected to that office each year until 1763. Also in 1754, he went as a delegate to the Albany Congress. There, he joined delegates from several other colonies to negotiate with Indians and discuss common plans for dealing with the French and Indian War. They also developed a Plan of Union for the Colonies which was, however, rejected by King George.

Livingston became an active promoter of efforts to raise and fund troops for the war, and in 1759 was elected to the Province of New York assembly. He would hold that office until 1769, serving as Speaker in 1768. In October of 1765, he attended the Stamp Act Congress, which produced the first formal protest to the crown as a prelude to the American Revolution. Philip became strongly aligned with the radical block in that Congress. He joined New York City's Committee of Correspondence to continue communication with leaders in the other colonies, and New York City's Committee of Sixty.

When New York established the New York Provincial Congress in 1775, he was the President. They also selected him as one of their delegates to the Continental Congress that year. In the Congress, he strongly supported separation from Great Britain and in 1776 joined other delegates in the Declaration of Independence.

After the adoption of the new New York State Constitution, he was elected to the state Senate in 1777, while continuing in the national congress. He died suddenly while attending the sixth session of Congress in York, Pennsylvania and is buried in the Prospect Hills Cemetery there. Livingston was a Presbyterian, a Mason, and an original promoter of King's College, which became Columbia University.

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A signor.

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Philip Livingston (January 15, 1716 – June 12, 1778), was an American merchant and statesman from New York City. He was a delegate for New York to the Continental Congress from 1775 to 1778, and signed the Declaration of Independence.

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Associated Ancestor (Revolutionary) Record

LIVINGSTON, PHILIP Ancestor #: A070818

Service: NEW YORK

Rank(s): SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF

   INDEPENDENCE, PATRIOTIC SERVICE

Service Source: BARTHELMAS, THE SIGNERS OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, P 164

Service Description:

1) SIGNER OF DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

2) MEMBER OF CONTINENTAL CONGRESS

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Livingston

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Livingston

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Philip Livingston (January 15, 1716 – June 12, 1778), was an American merchant and statesman from New York City. He was a delegate for New York to the Continental Congress from 1775 to 1778, and signed the Declaration of Independence.

He was born in Albany, New York into the prominent Livingston family. His grandfather, who had immigrated to New York and controlled the large grant called Livingston Manor, was known as Robert, 1st Lord of the Manor. His father, also named Philip was the 2nd Lord of the Manor. This Philip was, however, his fourth son, and thus could not inherit. The wife of the 2nd Lord of the Manor was a daughter of Albany, New York Mayor Pieter Van Brugh.

Philip attended and graduated from Yale College in 1737. He then settled in New York City and pursued a mercantile career. He became prominent as a merchant, and was elected Alderman in 1754. He was reelected to that office each year until 1763. Also in 1754, he went as a delegate to the Albany Congress. There, he joined delegates from several other colonies to negotiate with Indians and discuss common plans for dealing with the French and Indian War. They also developed a Plan of Union for the Colonies which was, however, rejected by King George.

Livingston became an active promoter of efforts to raise and fund troops for the war, and in 1759 was elected to the colony's House of Representatives. He would hold that office until 1769, serving as Speaker in 1768. In October of 1765, he attended the Stamp Act Congress, which produced the first formal protest to the crown as a prelude to the American Revolution. Philip became strongly aligned with the radical block in that Congress. He joined New York's Committee of Correspondence to continue communication with leaders in the other colonies.

When New York established a rebel government in 1775, he was the President of the Provincial Convention. They also selected him as one of their delegates to the Continental Congress that year. In the Congress, he strongly supported separation from Great Britain and in 1776 joined other delegates in the Declaration of Independence.

After the adoption of the new New York State Constitution, he was elected to the state Senate in 1777, while continuing in the national congress. He died suddenly while attending the sixth session of Congress in York, Pennsylvania and is buried in the Prospect Hill Cemetery there. Livingston was a Presbyterian, a Mason, and an original promoter of King's College, which became Columbia University.

His brother was New Jersey Governor William Livingston.

His cousin was New York Congressman Robert R. Livingston the Chancellor.

His wife was Christina Ten Broeck a great-granddaughter of Albany, New York Mayor Dirck Wesselse Ten Broeck[1] whose wife Margarita Cuyler was a niece of Maria Cuyler, the wife of New York City Mayor John Cruger. Mayor Cruger was father of New York City Mayor John Cruger Jr and grandfather of Henry Cruger and MP and loyalist Colonel John Henry Cruger. Colonel Cruger was a brother in law of Oliver De Lancey (the elder). De Lancy was a grandson of New York Mayor Stephanus Van Cortlandtand an uncle of wife of South Carolina Congressman Ralph Izard. Oliver's elder brother was New York Governor James DeLancey. A brother of Christina was Abraham Ten Broeck[2] - a Milita Brigadier General of Milita and a Albany, New York Mayor. Abraham Ten Broeck's wife was Elizabeth Van Rensselaer a sister of Stephen Van Renselaer II[3]. A cousin of Abraham Ten Broeck was Maria Ten Broeck who was the wife of Continental Army General Goose Van Schaick[4]-who was a son of Albany, New York Mayor Sybrant Van Schaick. Goose Van Schaick's sister was married to Continental Army General Peter Gansevoort-a great-grandnephew of Albany, New York Mayor Pieter Van Burgh.

A daughter, Catherina, married Stephen Van Rennsselaer II; their son, Stephen Van Rensselaer III, married Margarita Schuyler-daughter of General Philip Schuyler-a great nephew of Albany, New York Mayor Pieter Schuyler.

A great-grandson Edward Livingston married Sarah R. Lansing-a daugther of Albany Mayor and Congressman John Lansing.

Among his descendants were First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, actress Jane Wyatt, writer Harry Crosby, and cinematographer Floyd Crosby and his son David Crosby.

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Signed Declaration of Independence -------------------- One of the signers of 'The Declaration of Independence'

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Birth: Jan. 15, 1716 Death: Jun. 12, 1778

Signer of the Declaration of Independence from New York. He and his brother, William, were ardent patriots, and William would later sign the US Constitution. Born in Albany, New York, to a prosperous family. His family estate was over 160,000 acres (about 250 square miles). Young Philip was tutored at home, then sent to Yale University, where he graduated in 1737. In 1740, he married Christina Ten Broeck, daughter of the mayor of Albany, and the couple would have nine children. Philip Livingston became a merchant in New York City, and took an active part in civic affairs. He devoted much of time and money to civic improvements, helping to build the New York Chamber of Commerce, the New York Hospital, and the New York Society Library. He would also help establish Columbia University in New York City and Rutgers University in New Jersey. In 1758, he was elected to New York’s Colonial Legislature. As problems with England developed, he would urge moderation. He served as a delegate to the Stamp Act Congress in 1765, and though he hated the taxes, he continued to call for reason in dealing with Britain. He opposed the violence welcomed by the Sons of Liberty and dreaded the idea of war with Britain. Independence was a “vain, empty, shallow, and ridiculous project” he warned, and predicted that America would collapse if separated from England. In 1774, he was elected to the First and Second Continental Congress, serving from 1774 to 1778. Eventually he accepted the fact that independence was coming, and from that moment on, actively supported his new country. He would spent a large part of his own money to purchase supplies for the Army. When the British Army captured New York City, they seized his two homes, turning one into a military hospital and the other into a barracks. His family fled to Kingston, New York. Livingston did not live to see independence won; he died while attending Congress in York, Pennsylvania (where Congress had fled to when the British seized Philadelphia), in 1778 at the age of 62. He was first buried in the churchyard of the German Reformed Church on West Market Street, York, Pennsylvania. When the land was needed to build a Sunday School addition, all graves were moved to Prospect Hill Cemetery, York, Pennsylvania. (bio by: Kit and Morgan Benson)


Family links:

Parents:
 Philip Livingston (1686 - 1749)
 Catharina Van Brugh Livingston (1689 - 1756)

Spouse:
 Christina Ten Ten Broeck Livingston (1718 - 1801)*

Children:
 Robert R. Livingston (____ - 1813)*
 William Livingston (1723 - 1790)*
 Philip Livingston (1741 - 1787)*
 Catherine Livingston Westerlo (1745 - 1810)*
 Sarah Livingston Livingston (1752 - 1814)*

Siblings:
 Sara Livingston Alexander (____ - 1805)*
 Robert Livingston (1708 - 1790)*
 Peter Van Brugh Livingston (1710 - 1792)*
 Philip Livingston (1716 - 1778)
 William Livingston (1732 - 1790)*
  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Prospect Hill Cemetery York York County Pennsylvania, USA GPS (lat/lon): 39.97294, -76.73296


Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]


Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Apr 26, 1998 Find A Grave Memorial# 2776 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=2776

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Philip Livingston, signer of the "Declaration of Independence"'s Timeline

1716
January 15, 1716
Livingston Manor, Albany, New York
1740
April 14, 1740
Age 24
Albany, Albany, NY, United States
1740
Age 23
New York, New York, United States
1741
May 28, 1741
Age 25
Albany, NY, USA
1743
June 6, 1743
Age 27
New York, New York, United States
1745
August 25, 1745
Age 29
New York, NY
1747
1747
Age 30
Albany, New York, United States
1751
March 13, 1751
Age 35
New York, New York, United States
1752
December 7, 1752
Age 36
New York City, New York County, New York, United States
1754
July 3, 1754
Age 38
New York, New York, United States