Philippe III le Hardi, roi de France

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Philippe III 'le Hardi' de France, roi de France

Also Known As: "крал Филип III", "Phillip III", "The Bold", "Le Hardi", "El Atrevido", "King of France", "He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character.", "The Bold ~ 'le Hardi'", "Phillip the Bold", "Philip the Bold", "Duke of Or..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Poissy, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France
Death: Died in Perpignan, Pyrénées-Orientales, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
Cause of death: Sans doute mort de la dysenterie qui frappait son armée en Catalogne
Place of Burial: Basiqlique Saint Denis, Saint Denis, Seine-Saint-Denis, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Louis IX le Saint, roi de France; Louis IX of France; Marguerite de Provence, reine consort de France and Margaret of Provence
Husband of Isabella of Aragon; Isabelle d'Aragon, reine consort de France and Marie de Brabant, reine consorte de France
Father of Charles de France, comte de Valois; Louis de France; Philippe IV le Bel, roi de France; Robert de France; N.N. de France and 3 others
Brother of Blanche Capet de France, (mort jeune); Isabel de Francia, reina consorte de Navarra; Louis Capet de France; Jean Tristan Capet de France; Pierre Capet de France, Comte d'Alençon and 5 others

Occupation: King of France
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
Last Updated:

About Philippe III le Hardi, roi de France

From Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_III_of_France

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.

Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king.

Robert (1269 - 1271).

Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois.

Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux.

Blanca (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300.

Marguerite (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Name: *Phillip III "The Bold" of FRANCE

Sex: M

Birth: 3 APR 1245 in Poissy

Death: 5 OCT 1285 in Perpignan Burial: Saint Denis Basilica

Occupation: BET 1270 AND 1285 King of France

Note:

At the age of twenty-five he ascended to the throne. Indecisive, and dominated by the policies of his father, he followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Anjou, king of Naples.

In 1285, the last year of his reign, Philippe made an unsuccessful attempt to annex the kingdom of Aragon. In the aftermath of this struggle, while retreating from Girona, Philippe III died.

(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Philip III, King of France, was born April 3, 1245, died Oct. 5, 1285.

Philip was King of France 1270-1285.

He married 1st, May 28, 1262, Isabella, daughter of James I, King of Aragon;

2nd, 1274, Marie, daughter of Henry III, Duke of Brabant.

(

Father: *Louis IX of FRANCE b: 25 APR 1214 in Poissy, France

Mother: *Margaret BERENGAR b: 1221 in St. Main

Marriage 1 *Isabella of ARAGON b: 1247 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

Married: 28 MAY 1262 in Château de Vincennes, Vincennes, Île-de-France, France Children

Louis of FRANCE b: 1265
*Phillip IV "the Fair" of FRANCE b: 1268 in Palace of Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne, France
Robert FRANCE b: 1269
*Charles III of VALOIS b: 12 MAR 1270 in Vincennes, Isle De France, France

Marriage 2 *Marie of BRABANT b: 1256 in Leuven, Flemish-Brabant, Flanders, Belgium

Married: 21 AUG 1274

Children

*Louis EVREUX b: 3 MAY 1276
Blanche FRANCE b: 1278
*Marguerite of FRANCE b: 1282

  • *****************************************************************

Philip III the Bold (in April 3, 1245 - October 5, 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. A member of the Capetian dynasty, he was born in Poissy, the son of Louis IX of France and of Marguerite Berenger of Provence (1221 - 1295).

At the age of twenty-five he ascended to the throne. Indecisive, and dominated by the policies of his father, he followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Anjou, king of Naples.

In 1285, the last year of his reign, Philippe made an unsuccessful attempt to annex the kingdom of Aragon. In the aftermath of this struggle, while retreating from Girona, Philippe III died on October 5, 1285 at Perpignan (in the present-day département of Pyrénées-Orientales). He lies buried with his wife, Isabella of Aragon (1247 - 1271) in Saint Denis Basilica.

Philip III married (on 28 May 1262) Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon, and had the following children:

LOUIS - (1266 - May 1276)

PHILIPPE IV - (1268 - November 29, 1314)

CHARLES de Valois - (March 12, 1270 - December 16, 1325)

After the death of Isabella, he married on August 21, 1274,

MARIE de Brabant, daughter of 1276 - May 19, 1319) (married: Marguerite d' Artois)

BLANCHE - (1278 - March 19, 1305) (married: Rudolph III, duke of Austria)

MARGUERITE - (1282 - February 14, 1317) (married: Edward I of England)

King Philippe III's son, Philippe IV, succeeded him on the throne.

http://www.bambooweb.com/articles/p/h/Philip_III_of_France.html

  • ****************************************************************

WEBSITES with Info................

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_III_of_France

http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Philip-III-of-France

http://www.ericjames.org/html/fam/fam07212.htm

ST DENIS BASILLICA, PARIS

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/france/paris-st-denis.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Denis_Basilica

--------------------

Philip III of France

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Philip III the Bold

King of France

Reign 25 August 1270 – 5 October 1285

Coronation 30 August 1271

Predecessor Louis IX

Successor Philip IV

Spouse Isabella of Aragon

Maria of Brabant

Issue

Philip IV

Charles, Count of Valois

Louis, Count of Évreux

Blanche, Duchess of Austria

Marguerite, Queen of England

Father Louis IX of France

Mother Marguerite of Provence

Born 30 April 1245(1245-04-30)

Poissy

Died 5 October 1285 (aged 40)

Perpignan

Burial Initially Narbonne, later Saint Denis Basilica

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

French Monarchy

Direct Capetians

Philip III

  Philip IV
  Charles III, Count of Valois
  Louis d'Evreux
  Margaret, Queen of England
  Blanche, Duchess of Austria

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

Contents

[hide]

   * 1 Marriage and children
   * 2 Ancestors
   * 3 Ancestry
   * 4 Notes
   * 5 Sources

[edit] Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

  1. Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.
  2. Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king.
  3. Robert (1269 - 1271).
  4. Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois.
  5. Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

  1. Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux.
  2. Blanca (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300.
  3. Marguerite (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

[edit] Ancestors

[edit] Ancestry

[show]

v • d • e

Ancestors of Philip III of France



















16. Louis VII of France








8. Philip II of France












17. Adèle of Champagne








4. Louis VIII of France















18. Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut








9. Isabelle of Hainaut












19. Margaret I, Countess of Flanders








2. Louis IX of France


















20. Sancho III of Castile








10. Alfonso VIII of Castile












21. Blanca Garcés of Navarre








5. Blanche of Castile















22. Henry II of England








11. Leonora of England












23. Eleanor of Aquitaine








1. Philip III of France





















24. Alfonso II of Aragon








12. Alfonso II, Count of Provence












25. Sancha of Castile








6. Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence















26. Renier de Sabran








13. Garsenda of Forcalquier












27. Garsenda of Forcalquier








3. Marguerite of Provence


















28. Humbert III, Count of Savoy








14. Thomas I, Count of Savoy












29. Beatrice of Viennois








7. Beatrice of Savoy















30. William I of Geneva








15. Marguerite of Geneva












31. Beatrix of Faucigny







[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Chaytor, p 105.

[edit] Sources

   * Chaytor, H. J. A History of Aragon and Catalonia. 1933.

Philip III of France

House of Capet

Born: 30 April 1245 Died: 5 October 1285

French nobility

New Creation Count of Orléans

?–25 August 1270 Merged into Crown

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Louis IX King of France

25 August 1270–5 October 1285 Succeeded by

Philip IV

[show]

v • d • e

List of French monarchs

Carolingians

(843–888, 898-922, 936-987)

Pepin (751-768) • Carloman I (768-771) • Charlemagne (768-814) • Louis I (814-840) • Charles I (843-877) • Louis II (877-879) • Louis III (879-882) • Carloman II (879-884) • Charles II (885-888) • Charles III (898-922) • Louis IV (936-954) • Lothair (954-986) • Louis V (986-987)

Robertians

(888-898, 922-936)

Odo of Paris (888-898) • Robert I (922-923) • Rudolph (923-936)

House of Capet

(987–1328)

Hugh (987–996) • Robert II (996–1031) • Henry I (1031–1060) • Philip I (1060–1108) • Louis VI (1108–1137) • Louis VII (1137–1180) • Philip II (1180–1223) • Louis VIII (1223–1226) • Louis IX (1226–1270) • Philip III (1270–1285) • Philip IV (1285–1314) • Louis X (1314–1316) • John I (1316) • Philip V (1316–1322) • Charles IV (1322–1328)

House of Valois

(1328–1498)

Philip VI (1328–1350) • John II (1350–1364) • Charles V (1364–1380) • Charles VI (1380–1422) • Charles VII (1422–1461) • Louis XI (1461–1483) • Charles VIII (1483–1498)

House of Lancaster

(1422-1453)

Henry VI of England (1422-1453)(disputed)

House of Valois-Orléans

(1498–1515)

Louis XII (1498–1515)

House of Valois-Angoulême

(1515–1589)

Francis I (1515–1547) • Henry II (1547–1559) • Francis II (1559–1560) • Charles IX (1560–1574) • Henry III (1574–1589)

House of Bourbon

(1589–1792)

Henry IV (1589–1610) • Louis XIII (1610–1643) • Louis XIV (1643–1715) • Louis XV (1715–1774) • Louis XVI (1774–1792) • Louis XVII (claimant, 1792–1795)

House of Bonaparte

First Empire (1804–1814, 1815)

Napoleon I (1804–1814, 1815) • Napoleon II (1815)

House of Bourbon

Bourbon Restoration (1814, 1815–1830)

Louis XVIII (1814–1815, 1815–1824) • Charles X (1824–1830) • Louis XIX (1830)(disputed) • Henry V (1830)(disputed)

House of Orléans

July Monarchy (1830–1848)

Louis-Philippe I (1830–1848)

House of Bonaparte

Second Empire (1852–1870)

Napoleon III (1852–1870)

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_III_of_France"

Categories: French monarchs | Roman Catholic monarchs | House of Capet | People of the Eighth Crusade (Christians) | 1245 births | 1285 deaths | People from Poissy

THE ROYAL ANCESTRY CONNECTION TO THE TILLINGHAST LINE

Posted by: Elton L. Powell (ID *****3093) Date: August 30, 2002 at 18:56:48

 	of 329

For many years there has been an effort of some of the Tillinghast descendents to find a blood connection to British

Royalty. Unfortunately for some of these they obviously found the earliest effort to make a Royal connection to King Edward III which in all cases has turned out to be WRONG. This effort had been put forth by a Dr.Wiess in a set of volumns called, "The American Genealogist", 'TAGS, if you will. The Doctor later admitted his error and stated that there was no provable connection through a Mrs Tichbourne. As I have stated in other messages, I have not found any marriage between a Tillinghast and a Tichbourne. Right now there are only some 100 messages on this Tillinghast Message board and all could be read in a reasonable length of time. Pay particular attention to these.

  1. 's 25 / 29 / 66 / 68 / 69 / 82 / 94 / 97 / & 99. I am not the expert but I can report on what I have found and I have already passed along this info to others; Mss.Debbie Richardson; Mr.Todd Lawrence; etc. And I stated on where I found it. But there IS a Tillinghast connection to the Royal

Blood of Britain and a Mss Vaughn in Britain researched it.

It goes through the wife of the 1st Pardon Tillinghast, the beer barrel maker,[cooper if you will].

Kg EDWARD I; 1239-1307 -M- Princess MARGARITTE, dau. / Kg. Philip III of France. Issue:

THOMAS de BROTHERTON, Earl of Norfolk. 1301-1338 -M- ALICE

de HALLES, dau./Sir Roger de Halles. Issue:

MARGARET PLANTEGENET, Duchess of Norfolk; -M- JOHN, 4th Baron Seagrave. Issue:

ELIZABETH SEAGRAVE, dau.& heir. -M- JOHN, 4th Baron Mowbray

Issue:

ELEANOR MOWBRAY; -M- JOHN, 5th Baron de Welles. Issue:

EDO de WELLES; -M- MAUDE de GREYSTOCK, dau./Ralph, 5th /Baron de Greystock. Issue:

SIR LIONEL de WELLES; 6th Baron de Welles, K. G.{Knight of the Garter]. -M- CECILIA,[or Joan] DAU./ROBERT WATERTON of

Methley. Issue:

ELEANOR de WELLES, -M- THOMAS, Lord Hoo, K.G./ Chancellor to France. Issue:

ANNA de HOO, dau. & co-heir; -M- Sir ROGER de COPLEY,[15th in descent from King Athelred II. Issue:

ANN COPLEY; -M- WILLIAM LUSHER, Lord of Rodsell Manor.

Issue:

GEORGE LUSHER, Gentleman, -M- Alice...........Issue:

ANNE LUSHER; -M- Sir RICHARD LECHFORD,Knight, of Shellwood Manor in Leigh, Surrey County. Issue:

SARAH LECHFORD, -M- Rev. BENJAMIN BROWNE, Vicar of Ifiel County, Sussex. Issue:

SARAH BROWNE, bn.1600- dd. ? ; -M- PARDON TILLINGHAST, yeoman and cooper of Streat, Sussez County, bn. 1601

Notice that this connection is made through Sarah Browne, the emigrant's mother. The name, Tillinghast , has not always been spelled this way. And the earliest that I have found it even in its earliest forms,[like Tyllynghrst, etc.] is about 800 AD. At a later date I will give what info I have on earlier antecedents but I never found a continual'bloodline'

in this family. [Somebody! Please go to England].

Elton.

--------------------

Philip III the Bold , King of France


Reign 25 August 1270 – 5 October 1285

Coronation 30 August 1271

Successor Philip IV

Consort Isabella of Aragon

Father Louis IX of France

Mother Marguerite of Provence

Born 30 April 1245

Poissy

Died 5 October 1285 (aged 40)

Perpignan

Burial Initially Narbonne, later Saint Denis Basilica

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy." On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.

Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king.

Robert (1269 - 1271).

Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois.

Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux.

Blanche (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300.

Marguerite (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

--------------------

Philip III of France

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quick Facts:

Philip III the Bold, King of France

Reign 25 August 1270 – 5 October 1285

Coronation 30 August 1271

Predecessor Louis IX

Successor Philip IV


Spouse:

Isabella of Aragon

Maria of Brabant

Issue:

Philip IV

Charles, Count of Valois

Louis, Count of Évreux

Blanche, Duchess of Austria

Margaret, Queen of England

House:

House of Capet

Father Louis IX of France

Mother Marguerite of Provence

Born 30 April 1245(1245-04-30) Poissy

Died 5 October 1285 (aged 40) Perpignan

Burial Initially Narbonne, later Saint Denis Basilica

Details:

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.


Coronation of Philip III French Monarchy

Direct Capetians


Philip III

  Philip IV 
  Charles III, Count of Valois 
  Louis d'Evreux 
  Margaret, Queen of England 
  Blanche, Duchess of Austria 

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.

Philip IV (1268 – 29 November 1314), successor as king.

Robert (1269 - 1271).

Charles (12 March 1270 – 16 December 1325), Count of Valois.

Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

Louis (May 1276 – 19 May 1319), Count of Évreux.

Blanca (1278 – 19 March 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on 25 May 1300.

Marguerite (1282 – 14 February 1317), married Edward I of England

--------------------

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

--------------------

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

French Monarchy

Direct Capetians


Philip III

  Philip IV 
  Charles III, Count of Valois 
  Louis d'Evreux 
  Margaret, Queen of England 
  Blanche, Duchess of Austria 

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

Contents [hide]

1 Marriage and children

2 Ancestors

3 Ancestry

4 Notes

5 Sources


[edit] Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.

Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king.

Robert (1269 - 1271).

Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois.

Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux.

Blanca (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300.

Marguerite (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

--------------------

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Contents

[hide]

   * 1 Biography
   * 2 Marriage and children
   * 3 Ancestry
   * 4 Notes
   * 5 Sources

[edit] Biography

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Margaret of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

Coronation of Philip III.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, pope Martin IV excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

French Monarchy

Direct Capetians

France Ancient.svg

Philip III

  Philip IV
  Charles III, Count of Valois
  Louis d'Evreux
  Margaret, Queen of England
  Blanche, Duchess of Austria

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

[edit] Marriage and children

Philip with Marie

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

  1. Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.
  2. Philip IV (1268 – 29 November 1314), successor as king.
  3. Robert (1269 - 1271).
  4. Charles (12 March 1270 – 16 December 1325), Count of Valois.
  5. Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Maria of Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

  1. Louis (May 1276 – 19 May 1319), Count of Évreux.
  2. Blanche (1278 – 19 March 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on 25 May 1300.
  3. Margaret (1282 – 14 February 1317), married Edward I of England

[edit] Ancestry

[show]

v • d • e

Ancestors of Philip III of France



















16. Louis VII of France








8. Philip II of France












17. Adèle of Champagne








4. Louis VIII of France















18. Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut








9. Isabelle of Hainaut












19. Margaret I, Countess of Flanders








2. Louis IX of France


















20. Sancho III of Castile








10. Alfonso VIII of Castile












21. Blanca Garcés of Navarre








5. Blanche of Castile















22. Henry II of England








11. Eleanor of England












23. Eleanor of Aquitaine








1. Philip III of France





















24. Alfonso II of Aragon








12. Alfonso II, Count of Provence












25. Sancha of Castile








6. Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence















26. Renier de Sabran








13. Garsenda of Forcalquier












27. Garsenda of Forcalquier








3. Margaret of Provence


















28. Humbert III, Count of Savoy








14. Thomas I, Count of Savoy












29. Beatrice of Viennois








7. Beatrice of Savoy















30. William I of Geneva








15. Marguerite of Geneva












31. Beatrix of Faucigny







[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Chaytor, p 105.

[edit] Sources

   * Chaytor, H. J. A History of Aragon and Catalonia. 1933.

--------------------

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

French Monarchy

Direct Capetians


Philip III

  Philip IV 
  Charles III, Count of Valois 
  Louis d'Evreux 
  Margaret, Queen of England 

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

[edit] Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

Louis (1266 – May 1276)

Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king

Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux

Blanche (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300

Margaret (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

--------------------

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_III_of_France

--------------------

Philip III of France,called the Bold (French: Philippe III le Hardi) (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. A member of the House of Capet, he was born in Poissy, the son of Louis IX of France and of Marguerite of Provence.

He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

French Monarchy

Direct Capetians

Philip III

  Philip IV
  Charles III, Count of Valois
  Louis d'Evreux
  Margaret, Queen of England

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

[edit] Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

  1. Louis (1266 – May 1276)
  2. Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king
  3. Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

  1. Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux
  2. Blanche (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300
  3. Margaret (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

--------------------

King of France

--------------------

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.

Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king.

Robert (1269 - 1271).

Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois.

Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux.

Blanca (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300.

Marguerite (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_III_of_France

--------------------

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

French Monarchy

Direct Capetians


Philip III

  Philip IV 
  Charles III, Count of Valois 
  Louis d'Evreux 
  Margaret, Queen of England 
  Blanche, Duchess of Austria 

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

Contents [hide]

1 Marriage and children

2 Ancestors

3 Ancestry

4 Notes

5 Sources


[edit] Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.

Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king.

Robert (1269 - 1271).

Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois.

Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux.

Blanca (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300.

Marguerite (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

[edit] Ancestors

[edit] Ancestry

[show]v • d • eAncestors of Philip III of France

                                 

 16. Louis VII of France 
 
         

 8. Philip II of France   
 
               

 17. Adèle of Champagne 
 
         

 4. Louis VIII of France   
 
                     

 18. Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut 
 
         

 9. Isabelle of Hainaut   
 
               

 19. Margaret I, Countess of Flanders 
 
         

 2. Louis IX of France   
 
                           

 20. Sancho III of Castile 
 
         

 10. Alfonso VIII of Castile   
 
               

 21. Blanca Garcés of Navarre 
 
         

 5. Blanche of Castile   
 
                     

 22. Henry II of England 
 
         

 11. Leonora of England   
 
               

 23. Eleanor of Aquitaine 
 
         

 1. Philip III of France   
 
                                 

 24. Alfonso II of Aragon 
 
         

 12. Alfonso II, Count of Provence   
 
               

 25. Sancha of Castile 
 
         

 6. Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence   
 
                     

 26. Renier de Sabran 
 
         

 13. Garsenda of Forcalquier   
 
               

 27. Garsenda of Forcalquier 
 
         

 3. Marguerite of Provence   
 
                           

 28. Humbert III, Count of Savoy 
 
         

 14. Thomas I, Count of Savoy   
 
               

 29. Beatrice of Viennois 
 
         

 7. Beatrice of Savoy   
 
                     

 30. William I of Geneva 
 
         

 15. Marguerite of Geneva   
 
               

 31. Beatrix of Faucigny 
 
         


[edit] Notes

^ Chaytor, p 105.

[edit] Sources

Chaytor, H. J. A History of Aragon and Catalonia. 1933.

Philip III of France

House of Capet

Born: 30 April 1245 Died: 5 October 1285

French nobility

New Creation Count of Orléans

?–25 August 1270 Merged into Crown

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Louis IX King of France

25 August 1270–5 October 1285 Succeeded by

Philip IV

--------------------

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Contents [hide]

1 Biography

2 Marriage and children

3 Ancestry

4 Notes

5 Sources


[edit] Biography

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Margaret of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.


Coronation of Philip III.After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, pope Martin IV excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

French Monarchy

Direct Capetians


Philip III

  Philip IV 
  Charles III, Count of Valois 
  Louis d'Evreux 
  Margaret, Queen of England 
  Blanche, Duchess of Austria 

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

[edit] Marriage and children


Philip with MarieOn 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

1.Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.

2.Philip IV (1268 – 29 November 1314), successor as king.

3.Robert (1269 - 1271).

4.Charles (12 March 1270 – 16 December 1325), Count of Valois.

5.Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Maria of Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

1.Louis (May 1276 – 19 May 1319), Count of Évreux.

2.Blanche (1278 – 19 March 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on 25 May 1300.

3.Margaret (1282 – 14 February 1317), married Edward I of England

[edit] Ancestry

[show]v • d • eAncestors of Philip III of France

                                 

 16. Louis VII of France 
 
         

 8. Philip II of France   
 
               

 17. Adèle of Champagne 
 
         

 4. Louis VIII of France   
 
                     

 18. Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut 
 
         

 9. Isabelle of Hainaut   
 
               

 19. Margaret I, Countess of Flanders 
 
         

 2. Louis IX of France   
 
                           

 20. Sancho III of Castile 
 
         

 10. Alfonso VIII of Castile   
 
               

 21. Blanca Garcés of Navarre 
 
         

 5. Blanche of Castile   
 
                     

 22. Henry II of England 
 
         

 11. Eleanor of England   
 
               

 23. Eleanor of Aquitaine 
 
         

 1. Philip III of France   
 
                                 

 24. Alfonso II of Aragon 
 
         

 12. Alfonso II, Count of Provence   
 
               

 25. Sancha of Castile 
 
         

 6. Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence   
 
                     

 26. Renier de Sabran 
 
         

 13. Garsenda of Forcalquier   
 
               

 27. Garsenda of Forcalquier 
 
         

 3. Margaret of Provence   
 
                           

 28. Humbert III, Count of Savoy 
 
         

 14. Thomas I, Count of Savoy   
 
               

 29. Beatrice of Viennois 
 
         

 7. Beatrice of Savoy   
 
                     

 30. William I of Geneva 
 
         

 15. Marguerite of Geneva   
 
               

 31. Beatrix of Faucigny 
 
         


[edit] Notes

1.^ Chaytor, p 105.

[edit] Sources

Chaytor, H. J. A History of Aragon and Catalonia. 1933.

Philip III of France

House of Capet

Born: 30 April 1245 Died: 5 October 1285

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Louis IX King of France

25 August 1270–5 October 1285 Succeeded by

Philip IV

French royalty

Preceded by

Louis Heir to the Throne

as Heir apparent

January 1260 — 25 August 1270 Succeeded by

Louis

French nobility

New Creation Count of Orléans

?–25 August 1270 Merged into Crown

[show]v • d • e


--------------------

Philip III of France

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France."

Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

Louis (1266 – May 1276)

Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king

Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux

Blanche (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300

Margaret (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

--------------------

Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.

Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I.

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris.

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children:

Louis (1265 – May 1276). He was poisoned, possibly by orders of his stepmother.

Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king.

Robert (1269 - 1271).

Charles (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325), Count of Valois.

Stillborn son (1271).

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were:

Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux.

Blanca (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300.

Marguerite (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

--------------------

BIOGRAPHY: b. April 3, 1245, Poissy, Fr.

d. Oct. 5, 1285, Perpignan

byname PHILIP THE BOLD, French PHILIPPE LE HARDI, king of France (1270-85), in whose reign the power of the monarchy was enlarged and the royal domain extended, though his foreign policy and military ventures were largely unsuccessful.

Philip, the second son of Louis IX of France (Saint Louis), became heir to the throne on the death of his elder brother Louis (1260). Accompanying his father's crusade against Tunis in 1270, he was in Africa when Louis IX died. He was anointed king at Reims in 1271.

Philip continued his father's highly successful administration by keeping in office his able and experienced household clerks. Mathieu de Vendôme, abbot of Saint-Denis, whom Louis IX had left as regent in France, remained in control of the government. The death in 1271 of Alphonse of Poitiers and his wife, heiress of Toulouse, enabled Philip early in his reign to annex their vast holdings to the royal demesne. Nevertheless, in 1279 he was obliged to cede the county of Agenais to Edward I of England. The marriage in 1284 of Philip's son, the future Philip IV, to Joan, the heiress of the crown of Navarre and the countships of Champagne and Brie, brought these important areas also under Capetian control. In addition Philip over the years made numerous small territorial acquisitions.

Philip was less successful militarily. In 1276 he declared war to support the claims of his nephews as heirs in Castile but soon abandoned the venture. In 1284, at the instigation of Pope Martin IV, Philip launched a campaign against Peter III of Aragon, as part of the War of the Sicilian Vespers, in which the Aragonese opposed the Angevin rulers of Sicily. Philip crossed the Pyrenees with his army in May 1285, but the atrocities perpetrated by his forces provoked a guerrilla uprising. After a meaningless victory at Gerona and the destruction of his fleet at Las Hormigas, Philip was forced to retreat. He died of fever on the way home.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

History: Philip III (of France), called The Bold (1245-85), king of France (1270-85), the son of King Louis IX, born in Poissy, near Paris. A weak ruler, he was dominated at various times by his chamberlain, his wife, his mother, and especially his uncle Charles I of Anjou, king of the Two Sicilies. In 1285, the last year of his reign, Philip made an unsuccessful attempt to annex the kingdom of Aragón

Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

--------------------

BIOGRAPHY: b. April 3, 1245, Poissy, Fr.

d. Oct. 5, 1285, Perpignan

byname PHILIP THE BOLD, French PHILIPPE LE HARDI, king of France (1270-85), in whose reign the power of the monarchy was enlarged and the royal domain extended, though his foreign policy and military ventures were largely unsuccessful.

Philip, the second son of Louis IX of France (Saint Louis), became heir to the throne on the death of his elder brother Louis (1260). Accompanying his father's crusade against Tunis in 1270, he was in Africa when Louis IX died. He was anointed king at Reims in 1271.

Philip continued his father's highly successful administration by keeping in office his able and experienced household clerks. Mathieu de Vendôme, abbot of Saint-Denis, whom Louis IX had left as regent in France, remained in control of the government. The death in 1271 of Alphonse of Poitiers and his wife, heiress of Toulouse, enabled Philip early in his reign to annex their vast holdings to the royal demesne. Nevertheless, in 1279 he was obliged to cede the county of Agenais to Edward I of England. The marriage in 1284 of Philip's son, the future Philip IV, to Joan, the heiress of the crown of Navarre and the countships of Champagne and Brie, brought these important areas also under Capetian control. In addition Philip over the years made numerous small territorial acquisitions.

Philip was less successful militarily. In 1276 he declared war to support the claims of his nephews as heirs in Castile but soon abandoned the venture. In 1284, at the instigation of Pope Martin IV, Philip launched a campaign against Peter III of Aragon, as part of the War of the Sicilian Vespers, in which the Aragonese opposed the Angevin rulers of Sicily. Philip crossed the Pyrenees with his army in May 1285, but the atrocities perpetrated by his forces provoked a guerrilla uprising. After a meaningless victory at Gerona and the destruction of his fleet at Las Hormigas, Philip was forced to retreat. He died of fever on the way home.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

History: Philip III (of France), called The Bold (1245-85), king of France (1270-85), the son of King Louis IX, born in Poissy, near Paris. A weak ruler, he was dominated at various times by his chamberlain, his wife, his mother, and especially his uncle Charles I of Anjou, king of the Two Sicilies. In 1285, the last year of his reign, Philip made an unsuccessful attempt to annex the kingdom of Aragón

Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

--------------------

BIOGRAPHY: b. April 30, 1245, Poissy, Fr.

d. Oct. 5, 1285, Perpignan

byname PHILIP THE BOLD, French PHILIPPE LE HARDI, king of France (1270-85), in whose reign the power of the monarchy was enlarged and the royal domain extended, though his foreign policy and military ventures were largely unsuccessful.

Philip, the second son of Louis IX of France (Saint Louis), became heir to the throne on the death of his elder brother Louis (1260). Accompanying his father's crusade against Tunis in 1270, he was in Africa when Louis IX died. He was anointed king at Reims in 1271.

Philip continued his father's highly successful administration by keeping in office his able and experienced household clerks. Mathieu de Vendôme, abbot of Saint-Denis, whom Louis IX had left as regent in France, remained in control of the government. The death in 1271 of Alphonse of Poitiers and his wife, heiress of Toulouse, enabled Philip early in his reign to annex their vast holdings to the royal demesne. Nevertheless, in 1279 he was obliged to cede the county of Agenais to Edward I of England. The marriage in 1284 of Philip's son, the future Philip IV, to Joan, the heiress of the crown of Navarre and the countships of Champagne and Brie, brought these important areas also under Capetian control. In addition Philip over the years made numerous small territorial acquisitions.

Philip was less successful militarily. In 1276 he declared war to support the claims of his nephews as heirs in Castile but soon abandoned the venture. In 1284, at the instigation of Pope Martin IV, Philip launched a campaign against Peter III of Aragon, as part of the War of the Sicilian Vespers, in which the Aragonese opposed the Angevin rulers of Sicily. Philip crossed the Pyrenees with his army in May 1285, but the atrocities perpetrated by his forces provoked a guerrilla uprising. After a meaningless victory at Gerona and the destruction of his fleet at Las Hormigas, Philip was forced to retreat. He died of fever on the way home.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

History: Philip III (of France), called The Bold (1245-85), king of France (1270-85), the son of King Louis IX, born in Poissy, near Paris. A weak ruler, he was dominated at various times by his chamberlain, his wife, his mother, and especially his uncle Charles I of Anjou, king of the Two Sicilies. In 1285, the last year of his reign, Philip made an unsuccessful attempt to annex the kingdom of Aragón

Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

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BIOGRAPHY: b. April 30, 1245, Poissy, Fr.

d. Oct. 5, 1285, Perpignan

byname PHILIP THE BOLD, French PHILIPPE LE HARDI, king of France (1270-85), in whose reign the power of the monarchy was enlarged and the royal domain extended, though his foreign policy and military ventures were largely unsuccessful.

Philip, the second son of Louis IX of France (Saint Louis), became heir to the throne on the death of his elder brother Louis (1260). Accompanying his father's crusade against Tunis in 1270, he was in Africa when Louis IX died. He was anointed king at Reims in 1271.

Philip continued his father's highly successful administration by keeping in office his able and experienced household clerks. Mathieu de Vendôme, abbot of Saint-Denis, whom Louis IX had left as regent in France, remained in control of the government. The death in 1271 of Alphonse of Poitiers and his wife, heiress of Toulouse, enabled Philip early in his reign to annex their vast holdings to the royal demesne. Nevertheless, in 1279 he was obliged to cede the county of Agenais to Edward I of England. The marriage in 1284 of Philip's son, the future Philip IV, to Joan, the heiress of the crown of Navarre and the countships of Champagne and Brie, brought these important areas also under Capetian control. In addition Philip over the years made numerous small territorial acquisitions.

Philip was less successful militarily. In 1276 he declared war to support the claims of his nephews as heirs in Castile but soon abandoned the venture. In 1284, at the instigation of Pope Martin IV, Philip launched a campaign against Peter III of Aragon, as part of the War of the Sicilian Vespers, in which the Aragonese opposed the Angevin rulers of Sicily. Philip crossed the Pyrenees with his army in May 1285, but the atrocities perpetrated by his forces provoked a guerrilla uprising. After a meaningless victory at Gerona and the destruction of his fleet at Las Hormigas, Philip was forced to retreat. He died of fever on the way home.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

History: Philip III (of France), called The Bold (1245-85), king of France (1270-85), the son of King Louis IX, born in Poissy, near Paris. A weak ruler, he was dominated at various times by his chamberlain, his wife, his mother, and especially his uncle Charles I of Anjou, king of the Two Sicilies. In 1285, the last year of his reign, Philip made an unsuccessful attempt to annex the kingdom of Aragón

Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_III_of_France

Philip III of France

House of Capet

Born: 30 April 1245 Died: 5 October 1285

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Louis IX King of France

25 August 1270–5 October 1285 Succeeded by

Philip IV

French royalty

Preceded by

Louis Heir to the Throne

as Heir apparent

January 1260—25 August 1270 Succeeded by

Louis

French nobility

New Creation Count of Orléans

?–25 August 1270 Merged into Crown

This page was last modified on 3 July 2010 at 01:35.

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Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Born in Poissy, to Louis IX (the later Saint Louis) and Marguerite of Provence, Philip was prior to his accession Count of Orleans. He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily.

After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre.


Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put u

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Philippe III le Hardi, roi de France's Timeline

1245
May 1, 1245
Poissy, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France
May 1, 1245
1262
May 28, 1262
Age 17
Clermont-en-Auvergne, Puy-de-Dome, Franc

This couple had four sons.

1264
1264
Age 18
1268
April 8, 1268
Age 22
Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
1269
1269
Age 23
1270
March 12, 1270
Age 24
Vincennes, Île-de-France, France
1270
- 1285
Age 24
France
1270
Age 24
France, King until 1285
1271
January 28, 1271
Age 25