Ramiro II 'el Monje' de Aragón, rey de Aragón (1075 - 1157) MP

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Nicknames: "Ramiro II", "//", "Ramiro II //", "Ramiro /Sanchez/", "el Monje", "the Monk", "El Monje", "El monje", "The Monk", "'the Monk'"
Birthplace: Aragon, Spain
Death: Died in Huesca, Aragon, Spain
Occupation: KING OF ARAGON, Rey de Aragón, King of Aragon, Rei de Aragão, Konge, Bishop, Roi d'Aragon, king, 'THE MONK', Évêque, de Barbastros, Roi, d'Aragon, de Navarre, Kung i Aragonien 1134-1137
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Ramiro II 'el Monje' de Aragón, rey de Aragón

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramiro_II_de_Arag%C3%B3n

Ramiro II de Aragón apodado el Monje (24 de abril de 1086 - 16 de agosto de 1157), rey de Aragón entre 1134 y 1157.

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Ramiro «Munken» var konge av Aragon 1134 - 1137.

Han var først munk, ble konge av Aragon i 1134, men resignerte 11.11.1137. 121

121 Erich Brandenburg: Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen. Leipzig 1935. Mogens Bugge: Våre forfedre, nr. 1070. Bent og

      Vidar Billing Hansen: Rosensverdslektens forfedre, side 14, 16.
 Ramiro II Sánchez "el Monje", rey de Aragón also went by the name of Ramiro "the Monk". He was born in 1075. The third son.3 He was the son of Sancho I, rey de Aragón y de Pamplona and Felicité de Roucy.2 Ramiro II Sánchez "el Monje", rey de Aragón was was a monk, known as San Pedro el Viego de Huesca between 1093 and 1134. He was bishop-elect of Barbastro before 1134.3 He selected by the Aragonese nobles to replace his brother, he renounced his vows, married, and ascended the throne of Aragon in 1134.3,4 King of Aragón at Spain between 1134 and 13 November 1137.3,5,6 He witnessed the will of Alfonso I Sánchez "el Batallador", rey de Aragón y Navarra in 1134; He left his kingdom to an order of Knights, something which the Aragonese nobles rejected and so they chose Alfonso's brother, Ramiro, to succeeded him.4 Ramiro II Sánchez "el Monje", rey de Aragón married Agnes de Poitiers, daughter of Guillaume IX "le Troubadour", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers and Mahaut, comtesse de Toulouse, in November 1135 at Jaca, Huesca Province, Aragón, Spain; His 2nd. Her 2nd (widowed).7 Ramiro II Sánchez "el Monje", rey de Aragón was the Ramiro II of the Bell of Heusca legend (Ramiro II's 12th-century massacre of mutinous nobles). He abdicated in favour of his daughter and son-in-law in 1137.3 He was returned to the cloister in 1137. He died in 1157 at Huesca, Aragón, Spain, at age 82 years.2
  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 95-30.
  2. [S882] Armerías ilustres, online http://members.xoom.com/chema, Corona de Aragón.
  3. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  4. [S468] Robert Hughes, Barcelona, pg. 103.
  5. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html
  6. [S653] PoH, online http://www.friesian.com/
  7. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé), Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., IV:191-192.
  8. [S270] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH II, pg. 825, genealogy table 22, the Castile and Aragon, 1033-c. 1300, (b) the House of Aragon, 1033-1327.
  9. [S512] H. J. Chaytor, Chaytor, H. J., Appendix II.

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Links:

Thepeerage: http://thepeerage.com/p11330.htm#i113293

Geneall: http://www.geneall.net/H/per_page.php?id=49

Wikipedia:

English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramiro_II_of_Aragon

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Ramiro II of Aragon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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La Campana de Huesca by José Casado del Alisal, illustrating the Bell of Huesca.Ramiro II (c.1075–16 August 1157, Huesca), called the Monk, was King of Aragon from 1134 until 1137. He was the youngest son of Sancho Ramírez, King of Aragon and Navarre, and Felicia of Roucy.

He spent most of his early life as monk in a French monastery and later as abbot of St. Peter at Huesca. In 1134, when his brother Alfonso the Battler died heirless, Ramiro was bishop of Barbastro-Roda. He temporarily gave up his monastic vows in order to secure the succession to the crown of Aragon, while losing Navarre, which had formed part of his late brother's dominions but in 1134 became independent under García Ramírez. He fought off two other claimants to the throne, one, Pedro de Atarés, descended from an illegitimate brother of king Sancho Ramírez, and the other, Alfonso VII, king of Castile.

The reign of Ramiro the Monk, as he is known, was tumultuous. At the beginning of his reign he had problems with his nobles, who thought he would be docile and easily steered to their wishes, but discovered him to be inflexible. In order to produce an heir, he married Agnes, daughter of Duke William IX of Aquitaine. Once wed, his wife bore a daughter, Petronila, who was betrothed to Ramon Berenguer IV at the age of two. The marriage contract, signed at Barbastro on 11 August 1137, made Petronila the heiress to the crown of Aragon, which in event of her childless death would pass to Ramon Berenguer and any children he might have by another wife. Ramon accepted Ramiro as "King, Lord and Father", renounced his family name in favor of the House of Aragon and united the County of Barcelona with the Kingdom. This union, which came to be called the Confederacion Catalanoaragonesa (Catalan-Aragonese Confederation), created the Crown of Aragon, returning the 'pocket kingdom' of Aragon to the position of peninsular power it had held prior to the loss of Navarre, as well as giving it a window to the Western Mediterranean it would come to dominate.

In the time between his accession and the betrothal of his daughter, Ramiro II had already had to put down a rebellion of the nobles, and knowing himself not to be a war king, he passed royal authority to son-in-law Ramon Berenguer on 13 November 1137. Ramon became the "Prince of the Aragonesse people" and effective chief of the kingdom's armies. While Ramiro never formally resigned his royal rights and kept aware of the business of the kingdom, he then withdrew from public life, retiring to the San Pedro Monastery in Huesca. He later became known for the famous and passionate legend of the Bell of Huesca. He died there 16 August 1157, the crown then formally passing to his daughter Petronila.

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Ramiro II of Aragon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ramiro II of Aragon 'the Monk' (c. 1075-August 16, 1157, at Huesca/Uesca), son of Sancho Ramírez, King of Aragón and Navarre and Felicie of Roucy, was king of Aragon from 1134 until 1137.

He spent most of his early life as monk in a French monastery and later as abbot of St. Peter at Huesca. In 1134, when his brother Alfonso the Battler died heirless, Ramiro was bishop of Barbastro-Roda. He temporarily gave up his monastic vows in order to secure the succession to the crown. Although Ramiro had to put up with the loss of Navarre, which had formed part of his late brother's dominions but in 1134 became independent under García Ramírez, he fought off two other claimants to the throne, one Pedro de Atarés, an illegitimate connection of the royal line, and the other, Alfonso VII, king of Castile.

The reign of Ramiro the Monk, as he is known, was a turmoil and although he never renounced to his legitimate Royal Rights (until his death in Huesca, 16-VIII-1157) he relied his Royal Authority quite soon to his son in law Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona. Ramiro was not a war king and he was aware of it. At the beginning of this reign he had a lot of problems with his nobles who though he was going to be a docile man and they discovered he was a piece of ice. However, in that short time he managed to put down the rebellion of his nobles. In order to produce an heir, he married Agnes, daughter of Duke William IX of Aquitaine. Once wed, his wife bore a daughter, Petronila, who was betrothed to Ramon Berenguer IV at age two.

This way Ramiro was sure to have a great commanding general for his (the Aragonesse) armies. The conditions for this marriage were arranged and signed in the city of Barbastro the August 11 of 1137. Ramon Berenger IV had to accepted Ramiro as his "King, Lord and Father", he had to renounce his family name in favour of the House of Aragon and the Count of Barcelona united to the Kingdom. The "Corona de Aragon" was initially formed. The name Confederacion Catalanoaragonesa was not recorded until XIX siecle. This denomination comes from the renaixença, and was stablished in books as the "monografía de Antonio de Bofarull y Broca" and "La confederación catalano-aragonesa" (Barcelona, Luis Tasso, 1872)).

Ramon Berenguer became then the "Prince of the Aragonesse people" (as the meaning of that time was "Chief of the Army")and then "Count of Barcelona". This document is now kept and can be checked in the "Archivos de la Corona de Aragón" in Barcelona. Later this year, the November 13, Ramiro II gives the authority of the kingdom to his son in law but never his title, instead he came back to San Pedro Monastery in Huesca where he was always aware of the bussiness of the Kingdom, this way he will be always known as the "Ramiro the Monk" and he is also celebre for the famous and passionate legend "The bell of Huesca". The heir-line for the Aragonesse Crown fixed in the marriage contract was: Petronila de Aragón became the Queen of Aragon and the Countess of Barcelona. Then the line passed to her descendants, if she was dead with no child then the right could have passed to Ramon Berenguer. Her son Alfonso II became King of Aragon and Count of Barcelona.

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Wikipedia gives his death year as 1157

other sources gives 1147 as the death year

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramiro_II_of_Aragon

http://www.mathematical.com/aragonramiro2.html

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Ramiro II, called "the Monk," was King of Aragón from 1134 until 1137.

He spent most of his early life as monk in a French monastery and later as abbot of St. Peter at Huesca. In 1134, when his brother Alfonso the Battler died heirless, Ramiro was bishop of Barbastro-Roda. He temporarily gave up his monastic vows in order to secure the succession to the crown of Aragón, while losing Navarre, which had formed part of his late brother's dominions, but in 1134 became independent under García Ramírez. He fought off two other claimants to the throne, one, Pedro de Atarés, descended from an illegitimate brother of king Sancho Ramírez, and the other, Alfonso VII, King of Castile.

The reign of Ramiro the Monk, as he is known, was tumultuous. At the beginning of his reign he had problems with his nobles, who thought he would be docile and easily steered to their wishes, but discovered him to be inflexible. In order to produce an heir, he married Agnes, daughter of Duke William IX of Aquitaine. Once wed, his wife bore a daughter, Petronila, who was betrothed to Ramon Berenguer IV at the age of two. The marriage contract, signed at Barbastro on 11 August 1137, made Petronila the heiress to the crown of Aragón, which in event of her childless death would pass to Ramon Berenguer and any children he might have by another wife. Ramon accepted Ramiro as "King, Lord and Father," renounced his family name in favor of the House of Aragón and united the County of Barcelona with the Kingdom. This union, which came to be called the Confederacion Catalanoaragonesa (Catalan-Aragonese Confederation), created the Crown of Aragón, returning the "pocket kingdom" of Aragón to the position of peninsular power it had held prior to the loss of Navarre, as well as giving it a window to the western Mediterranean it would come to dominate.

In the time between his accession and the betrothal of his daughter, Ramiro II had already had to put down a rebellion of the nobles, and knowing himself not to be a war king, he passed royal authority to son-in-law Ramon Berenguer on 13 November 1137. Ramon became the "Prince of the Aragonesse people" and effective chief of the kingdom's armies. While Ramiro never formally resigned his royal rights and kept aware of the business of the kingdom, he then withdrew from public life, retiring to the San Pedro Monastery in Huesca. He later became known for the famous and passionate legend of the Bell of Huesca. He died there 16 August 1157, the crown then formally passing to his daughter Petronila.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramiro_II_of_Aragon for more information. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramiro_II_of_Aragon

Ramiro II (c.1075–16 August 1157, Huesca), called the Monk, was King of Aragon from 1134 until withdrawing from public life in 1137 (although he used the royal title until his death). He was the youngest son of Sancho Ramírez, King of Aragon and Navarre, and Felicia of Roucy.

He spent most of his early life as a monk in a French monastery and later as abbot of the monastery of San Pedro el Viejo at Huesca. In 1134, when his brother Alfonso the Battler died heirless, Ramiro was bishop of Barbastro-Roda. He temporarily gave up his monastic vows in order to secure the succession to the crown of Aragon, while losing Navarre, which had formed part of his late brother's dominions but in 1134 became independent under García Ramírez. He fought off two other claimants to the throne, one, Pedro de Atarés, descended from an illegitimate brother of king Sancho Ramírez, and the other, Alfonso VII, king of Castile. -------------------- called the Monk, was King of Aragon from 1134 until withdrawing from public life in 1137 (although he used the royal title until his death). He was the youngest son of Sancho Ramírez, King of Aragon and Navarre, and Felicia of Roucy.

He spent most of his early life as a monk in a French monastery and later as abbot of the monastery of San Pedro el Viejo at Huesca. In 1134, when his brother Alfonso the Battler died heirless, Ramiro was bishop of Barbastro-Roda. He temporarily gave up his monastic vows in order to secure the succession to the crown of Aragon, while losing Navarre, which had formed part of his late brother's dominions but in 1134 became independent under García Ramírez. He fought off two other claimants to the throne, one, Pedro de Atarés, descended from an illegitimate brother of king Sancho Ramírez, and the other, Alfonso VII, king of Castile.

The reign of Ramiro the Monk, as he is known, was tumultuous. At the beginning of his reign he had problems with his nobles, who thought he would be docile and easily steered to their wishes, but discovered him to be inflexible. In order to produce an heir, he married Agnes, daughter of Duke William IX of Aquitaine. Once wed, his wife bore a daughter, Petronila, who was betrothed to Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona at the age of one. The marriage contract, signed at Barbastro on 11 August 1137, made Petronila the heiress to the crown of Aragon, which in event of her childless death would pass to Ramon Berenguer and any children he might have by other wives. Ramon accepted Ramiro as "King, Lord and Father", 'renounced his family name' in favor of the House of Aragon and united the County of Barcelona with the Kingdom. This union, which came to be called the Confederacion Catalanoaragonesa (Catalan-Aragonese Confederation)[1], created the Crown of Aragon,[2] returning the previously-landlocked kingdom of Aragon to the position of peninsular power it had held prior to the loss of Navarre, as well as giving it a window to the Western Mediterranean it would come to dominate.

In the time between his accession and the betrothal of his daughter, Ramiro II had already had to put down a rebellion of the nobles, and knowing himself not to be a war king, he passed royal authority to his son-in-law Ramon Berenguer on 13 November 1137. Ramon became the "Prince of the Aragonese people" (Princeps Aragonensis) and effective chief of the kingdom's armies. Ramiro never formally resigned his royal rights, continuing to use the royal title,[3] and keeping aware of the business of the kingdom, he withdrew from public life, returning to the Abbey of San Pedro in Huesca. He later became known for the famous and passionate legend of the Bell of Huesca. He died there[4] on 16 August 1157, the crown then formally passing to his daughter Petronila

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Ramiro II el Monje, rey de Aragón's Timeline

1075
1075
Aragon, Spain
1134
1134
Age 59
Arragon, , , Spain
1134
- 1137
Age 59
1134
Age 59
King of Aragon, Monk at, Barbires, Spain
1134
Age 59
King of Aragon, Monk at, Barbires, Spain
1134
Age 59
King of Aragon, Monk at, Barbires, Spain
1136
June 29, 1136
Age 61
Huesca, Huesca, Spain
1157
August 16, 1157
Age 82
Huesca, Aragon, Spain
1993
April 17, 1993
Age 82
1994
March 22, 1994
Age 82