Sigurd "Fafnisbana" Sigmundsson, of Denmark

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Sigurd "Fafnisbana" Sigmundsson, of Denmark

Nicknames: "Fafnisbana", "Favnesbane", "Wolsung", "Fafnesbane", "Fafnir's Bane", "Fofnersbane", "Sigurd Wolsung FAVNESBANE //", "/Fafnisbana/", "Sigurd "Fafnisbana" /Sigmundsson/", "/Sigebert/ I", "Fovnesbane", "Sigurd "Fafnisbaba" Signundsson"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ringerike, Buskerud, Norway
Death: Died in Tyskland
Immediate Family:

Son of Sigmund Völsungsson and Hjørdis Eylimasdatter
Husband of Brynhild Budlasdotter; Brynhild Budlasdatter and Gudrun Giukasdatter
Father of Aslaug Kraka Sigurdsdatter and Swanhild
Brother of Hamund Or Amund Anund The Sigmundsson and Helge (Sigmundsson), "Hundingsbane"
Half brother of Innsten Of Sweden, Sweden; Fjotle Or Fitela and Sinfjøtle Sigmundsson

Occupation: Sagokung i Danmark, Roi des Huns de l'Est, Roi, de Danemark, Sagakonge i Danmark, Sagakonge, King Denmark, Norway
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sigurd "Fafnisbana" Sigmundsson, of Denmark

Sigurd (Old Norse: Sigurðr) was a legendary hero of Norse mythology, as well as the central character in the Völsunga saga. The earliest extant representations for his legend come in pictorial form from seven runestones in Sweden[1] and most notably the Ramsund carving (c. 1000) and the Gök Runestone (11th century).

As Siegfried, he is the hero in the German Nibelungenlied, and Richard Wagner's operas Siegfried and Götterdämmerung.

As Sivard Snarensven(d) he was the hero of several medieval Scandinavian ballads.

The name Sigurðr is a Norwegian adaptation of the German Siegfried, a more etymologically consistent Old Norse form would have been Sigruþr, a form which appears in the Ramsund carving that depicts the legend[2]. Sivard is a form of the name Sigurðr.

In the Völsunga saga, Sigurd is the posthumous son of Sigmund and his second wife, Hiordis. Sigmund dies in battle when he attacks Odin (who is in disguise), and Odin shatters Sigmund's sword. Dying, Sigmund tells Hiordis of her pregnancy and bequeaths the fragments of his sword to his unborn son.

Hiordis marries King Alf, and then Alf decided to send Sigurd to Regin as a foster. Regin tempts Sigurd to greed and violence by first asking Sigurd if he has control over Sigmund's gold. When Sigurd says that Alf and his family control the gold and will give him anything he desires, Regin asks Sigurd why he consents to a lowly position at court. Sigurd replies that he is treated as an equal by the kings and can get anything he desires. Then Regin asks Sigurd why he acts as stableboy to the kings and has no horse of his own. Sigurd then goes to get a horse. An old man (Odin in disguise) advises Sigurd on choice of horse, and in this way Sigurd gets Grani, a horse derived from Odin's own Sleipnir.

Finally, Regin tries to tempt Sigurd by telling him the story of the Otter's Gold. Regin's father was Hreidmar, and his two brothers were Ótr and Fafnir . Regin was a natural at smithing, and Otr was natural at swimming. Otr used to swim at Andvari's waterfall, where the dwarf Andvari lived. Andvari often assumed the form of a pike and swam in the pool.

One day, the Æsir saw Otr with a fish on the banks, thought him an otter, and Loki killed him. They took the carcass to the nearby home of Hreidmar to display their catch. Hreidmar, Fafnir, and Regin seized the Æsir and demanded compensation for the death of Otr. The compensation was to stuff the body with gold and cover the skin with fine treasures. Loki got the net from the sea giantess Rán, caught Andvari (as a pike), and demanded all of the dwarf's gold. Andvari gave the gold, except for a ring. Loki took this ring, too, although it carried a curse of death on its bearer. The Æsir used this gold and stuffed Otr's body with gold and covered its skin in gold and covered the last exposed place (a whisker) with the ring of Andvari. Afterward, Fafnir killed Hreidmar and took the gold.

Sigurd agrees to kill Fafnir, who has turned himself into a dragon in order to be better able to guard the gold. Sigurd has Regin make him a sword, which he tests by striking the anvil. The sword shatters, so he has Regin make another. This also shatters. Finally, Sigurd has Regin make a sword out of the fragments that had been left to him by Sigmund. The resulting sword, Gram, cuts through the anvil. To kill Fafnir the dragon, Regin advises him to dig a pit, wait for Fafnir to walk over it, and then stab the dragon. Odin, posing as an old man, advises Sigurd to dig trenches also to drain the blood, and to bathe in it after killing the dragon; bathing in Fafnir's blood confers invulnerability. Sigurd does so and kills Fafnir; Sigurd then bathes in the dragon's blood, which touches all of his body except for one of his shoulders where a leaf was stuck. Regin then asked Sigurd to give him Fafnir's heart for himself. Sigurd drinks some of Fafnir's blood and gains the ability to understand the language of birds. Birds advise him to kill Regin, since Regin is plotting Sigurd's death. Sigurd beheads Regin, roasts Fafnir's heart and consumes part of it. This gives him the gift of "wisdom" (prophecy).

Sigurd met Brynhildr, a "shieldmaiden," after killing Fafnir. She pledges herself to him but also prophesies his doom and marriage to another. (In Völsunga saga, it is not clear that Brynhild is a Valkyrie or in any way supernatural.)

Sigurd went to the court of Heimar, who was married to Bekkhild, sister of Brynhild, and then to the court of Gjúki, where he came to live. Gjuki had three sons and one daughter by his wife, Grimhild. The sons were Gunnar, Hogni and Guttorm, and the daughter was Gudrun. Grimhild made an "Ale of Forgetfulness" to force Sigurd to forget Brynhild, so he could marry Gudrun. Later, Gunnar wanted to court Brynhild. Brynhild's bower was surrounded by flames, and she promised herself only to the man daring enough to go through them. Only Grani, Sigurd's horse, would do it, and only with Sigurd on it. Sigurd exchanged shapes with Gunnar, rode through the flames, and won Brynhild for Gunnar.

Some time later, Brynhild taunted Gudrun for having a better husband, and Gudrun explained all that had passed to Brynhild and explained the deception. For having been deceived and cheated of the husband she had desired, Brynhild plots revenge. First, she refuses to speak to anyone and withdraws. Eventually, Sigurd was sent by Gunnar to see what was wrong, and Brynhild accuses Sigurd of taking liberties with her. Gunnar and Hogni plot Sigurd's death and enchant their brother, Guttorm, to a frenzy to accomplish the deed. Guttorm kills Sigurd in bed, and Brynhild kills Sigurd's three year old son Sigmund (named for Sigurd's father). Brynhild then wills herself to die, and builds a funeral pyre for Sigurd, Sigurd's son, Guttorm (killed by Sigurd) and herself. Sigurd and Brynhild had the daughter Aslaug who married Ragnar Lodbrok.

Sigurd and Gudrun are parents to the twins Sigmund (named after Sigurd's father) and Svanhild. -------------------- Teutonic Myth and Legend, by Donald A. Mackenzie, [1912], at http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/tml/tml33.htm

p. 309 CHAPTER XXVIII Sigurd the Dragon Slayer

...When her son was born, the name he received was

p. 314

Sigurd. A Volsung was he indeed. Bright were his eyes, and his face was kingly, and Hjaalprek took pride in him. He grew up to be strong and fearless; a warman's skill had he ever and Volsung pride, and he had great wisdom, and was eloquent of speech.

His foster father was Regin, the wonder, Smith, brother of the dragon Fafner, and he gave the lad instruction in many arts, and in the mystery of runes, and taught him many languages.

One day Regin asked the lad if he knew that his father had left great treasure, and that Hjaalprek guarded it; and Sigurd said it was guarded for him and he had faith in the king. Then Regin urged him to ask a horse from Hjaalprek, and when the lad did that the king bade him select the one he desired.

An old, grey-bearded man, with one eye, came to Sigurd, who knew not that he was Odin, and he chose for the lad a steed which was of Sleipner's race. Sigurd called it Grane because it was grey, nor was its equal to be found in the world.

Now Alv took Hjordis for wife, and they lived happily together.

Then a day came when Regin, perceiving that the lad grew to manhood's strength and wisdom while he was yet young, bethought to tell him of the treasure over which the dragon Fafner kept constant guard. He urged Sigurd to slay the monster.

"I am scarce more than a child yet," Sigurd said; "why dost thou urge me to do this mighty deed?"

Then Regin told the story of the treasure, and how Loke had taken it from the dwarf Andvari; how it was given to his own sire, whom his brother Fafner slew so that he might have all the gold for himself.

Sigurd heard him in silence, and when Regin said:

p. 315

"If thou shalt go forth to slay Fafner I shall forge a mighty sword for thee."

So the lad said: "Forge then a sword for me which shall be without an equal, for fain would I do mighty deeds."

Then Regin went to his smithy and made a sword; but the lad smote it on the anvil and it flew in pieces. A second sword he splintered also. 1

Thereafter Sigurd went to his mother and asked for the broken pieces of his sire's great sword Gram. Then he bade Regin forge it anew, and the Smith did that, although unwillingly. When it was made, the lad put the blade to test and clove the anvil in twain. Next he cut wool with it in the river, so keen was its edge. He was well pleased with Gram.

Regin then bade him promise to slay Fafner, and Sigurd said: "As I promised thee, so shall I do, but first I must set forth to avenge the death of my sire."

Stronger grew the lad, and he was of great stature 2 and skilled in feats of arms. Ere he set forth to do deeds of valour he paid visit to Griper, his mother's brother, who had power to foretell what would come to pass. Sigurd desired to know what the norns had decreed regarding him, and although Griper was at first unwilling to tell him, he at last unfolded to the lad his whole future life.

p. 316

Thereafter Sigurd went to the king and besought that he should get ships and war-men to go forth against the tribe of Hunding, and avenge upon King Lynge the death of Sigmund. Hjaalprek gave him according to his desire. A great storm broke forth as he crossed the seas, and as the ships came nigh a headland a man beckoned to Sigurd and desired to be taken aboard. The young hero commanded that this should be done. His name was Fjorner 1, and he carried out the behests of Urd. He sang strange runes regarding the battle that was to be. As he did so the storm passed away, and they drew nigh to the kingdom of King Lynge. Then Fjorner vanished.

Sigurd laid waste the country, and tidings were borne to King Lynge that fierce foemen had invaded the kingdom. A great army was collected to oppose them, but Sigurd was given victory, and he slew Lynge, and thus avenged his sire's death. With the sword Gram he clove the king in twain, and all the sons of Hunding who were there he slew also. So did Sigurd achieve great renown, and with the treasure he had captured he returned unto Hjaalprek.

Ere long Regin spake to him in secret, calling to mind his promise to slay the dragon Fafner.

"As I have promised," Sigurd said, "so shall I do."

Regin went forth towards the Glittering Heath with the young hero, whom he counselled to make a pit so that he might slay the dragon from beneath when it came out to drink.

"If the dragon's blood fills up the pit, how will it fare with me?" Sigurd exclaimed.

"Thou seem'st to be afraid," Regin said. "'Unlike thy kin art thou."

p. 317

Sigurd went towards the dragon's dwelling, but Regin waited at a distance. Then to the young hero came an old and grey-bearded man with one eye, and he gave counsel that he should dig many pits, so that the blood of the dragon might not drown him. 1 Sigurd knew not that the man was Odin, but he did as he was advised: he dug many pits, and in one of them he concealed himself and waited for the dragon to come forth.

In time Fafner crawled from his lair, roaring and spouting venom. The earth shook, and Regin trembled in his hiding place. But Sigurd was not afraid. He waited until the monster was over the pit in which he stood, then he plunged his sword Gram through the dragon right up to the hilt. He drew it forth again, and the blood reddened his arms, and ran into the pits.

Fafner tossed in fury, and destroyed all things that were nigh him, but soon he knew well that he was wounded unto death. As he lay helpless and weak he beheld Sigurd coming forth.

Fafner spake and asked him: "Who art thou that feared me not? What is thy name, and what is thy sire's name?"

Sigurd answered: "My folk are strangers among men. My name is Lordly Beast. I have nor sire nor mother, and hither came I alone." 2

Fafner said: "Wilt thou lie to me in my hour of death) by saying that thou hast nor sire nor mother or other name than Lordly Beast?"

p. 318

Sigurd thereupon said: "My name is Sigurd, and I am Sigmund's son."

"Brave was thy sire," said the dragon, "but didst thou never hear that I was feared among men? Name thou him who urged thee to slay me."

Sigurd told not of Regin, and the dragon warned him that the gold would be a curse to him.

But the young hero said: "We can but keep our gold till life's end, and a man dieth once only."

Fafner then said: "By Regin was I betrayed. Thee too would he betray; he desires my death and thine."

Soon afterwards the dragon died, whereupon Regin came forth from his hiding place. He came humbly towards the young hero and spake words of flattery to him. Then he said: "But, alas! thou hast slain my brother, nor am I myself without blame."

Sigurd said angrily: "When I performed this great deed thou didst crouch like a coward in a bush."

"It was I who forged the sword with which thou didst slay Fafner," said Regin.

Then Sigurd answered: "Better in battle is a brave heart than a strong sword."

Again Regin said: "Alas! thou hast slain my brother, nor am I myself without blame."

Sigurd cut out the dragon's heart, and Regin drank the blood. Then the wonder smith bade the young hero to roast the heart for him while he lay down to sleep. The lad thrust a rod through it and roasted it over a fire. When the heart frizzled he laid his finger on the spot, lest the blood should come forth, and then he thrust his finger in his mouth. When he did that he at once understood the language of birds. 1 ...

Fafnir From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In Norse mythology, Fáfnir (Old Norse and Icelandic) or Frænir was a son of the dwarf king Hreidmar and brother of Regin and Ótr. In the Volsunga saga, Fáfnir was a dwarf gifted with a powerful arm and fearless soul. He guarded his father's house of glittering gold and flashing gems. He was the strongest and most aggressive of the three brothers.

After Ótr was killed by Loki, Hreidmar received the cursed gold of Andvari's as repayment for the loss of his son. Fáfnir and Regin then killed their father to get the gold, but Fáfnir decided he wanted it all, turning into a dragon (symbol of greed). Regin then sent his foster-son, Sigurd, to kill the dragon. Sigurd succeeded by digging a pit under the trail Fáfnir used to walk to a stream and plunging his sword Gram into his heart as he walked past. Regin, however, corrupted by the curse on Andvari's gold, planned to kill Sigurd to take the treasure for himself, but Sigurd, having eaten part of Fáfnir's cooked heart, was warned by birds of Regin's attack and ended up killing him.

As Fafner, he is featured in Richard Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen, although he began life as a giant rather than a dwarf, before once again turning into a dragon to better guard the gold.

Some versions are more specific about Fafnir's treasure hoard, mentioning the swords Ridill and Hrotti as part of it. -------------------- Sigrud "Fafnisbana" Sigmundsson - was born about 0735, lived in Norway. He is the son of Sigmund Volsungsson and Hjordis Eylimasdatter. Sigrud married Brunhild Budlasdatter. Brunhild was born about 0738, lived in Norway. She is the daughter of Budli Leinfnisson.

Children:

i. Aslaug Sigurdsatter was born about 0765, lived in Denmark.

Aslaug married Ragnar Sigurdsson about 0763 while living in Denmark. Ragnar was born about 0765 in Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden. He was the son of King Sigrud Randversson and Alfhild Gandolfsdatter. He died in 0845 in England -------------------- Biografi Sagokung i Danmark. Född 735 i Norge. Död 775 i Tyskland. Fadern heter enligt sagorna Sigurd 'Fafnesbane' Wolsung och modern var sköldmön Brynhilda. Namnet Kraka är alias liten Aslög. Föräldrarna miste livet nere i Tyskland, men Aslög räddades av sin fosterfar Heimer. På vandring i Norge dödades han av ett äldre par som hette Åke och Grima. De tog hand om flickebarnet, och hon växte upp i hårt arbete och stor fattigdom på Spangarhed i Norge. (Källa: En nordisk kronologi, Alf Henriksson)

-------------------- Sigurd Fåvnesbane var en germansk helt.

Ifølge legenden var han sønn av Sigmund og Hjørdis. Sigurd klarte å drepe dragen Fåvne med sverdet Gram og sikret seg dermed en stor skatt. Hans liv er beskrevet i heltediktene i Den eldre Edda og i det tyske Nibelungenlied (diktet om Nivlungene) og i Volsungesaga.

En kan gå ut fra at sagnet er spunnet sammen av forskjellige historiske hendelser fra forskjellig tid.

Dersom sagnet om Sigurd ses symbolsk er det ifølge nyere litteraturforskning mye som taler for at Sigurd Fåvnesbane er identisk med kjeruskerkongen Arminius (16 f.Kr. – 21 e.Kr.). I år 9 lokket han tre av keiser Augustus' legioner (lindorm, ca. 6 km lange tog av soldater) i et bakhold ved Teutoburger Wald (Gnitaheide, rundt 1150 stadfestet av den islandske abbeden Nikulás) og tilintetgjorde disse. Etter dette nederlaget ga romerne opp å utvide romerriket nordover. Arminius var det romerske navnet, det germanske navnet er ikke kjent, men en vet at de fleste menn in ætten på denne tiden hadde navn som begynte med Segi. Et interessant indis er at Sigurd i diktene ofte blir symbolisert av en hjort, noe som egentlig ikke passer riktig til en hærfører - men hjorten var kjeruskenes totemdyr.

Også kjent som Sigurd Fåvnesbane

Marriage: Unknown Sigurd married. Sources

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Brian C. Tompsett, Directory of Royal Genealogical (Datahttp://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/catalog.html Brian Tompsett Department of Computer Science University of Hull Hull, UK, HU6 7RX B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk).

-------------------- Blev ca 40 år.

Född: omkring 735 Norge Död: omkring 775 Ingelheim, Tyskland

Noteringar SIGURD & THE DRAGON FAFNIR Origin: Norse Myth Sigurd (also known as Siegfried) Volsung was told by the dwarf Regin to gain fame and power to slay a terrible dragon named Fafnir that guarded a huge mound of treasure. Sigurd took up interest in this dragon, and recently was awarded with his father's broken sword (named Gram) which Regin forged back into one whole massive sword. Sigurd and the dwarf rode to find the fearless beast. What Sigurd did not know is that Regin's brother murdered their father to gain the wealth of the kingdom. This brother's name was Fafnir. Fafnir, because of his greed for gold and jewels changed his corrupt self into a massive dragon to protect his hoard better. From what Sigurd knew of dragons, their tough,scaly hide on the top of the body was impregnable to any weapon. Regin suggested building a pit in which Sigurd could hide. So they both dug a pit outside of the dragon's lair. With Sigurd hiding, Regin covered the pit with branches. He waited hours for the dragon to come back from its daily visit to the watering hole nearby. Finally, a shadow covered the top of the pit, and Sigurd took the huge sword Gram in both hands and shoved as hard as he could up towards the exposed, soft belly of the dragon. With the dragon dead, Sigurd climbed out of his hiding place.

Regin then caved out the beast's heart to roast. When handing it to Sigurd to share, he burnt his hand and sucked on his fingers. Moments later he heard chattering, and surprised, looked up to see birds talking. They were saying how the dwarf was planning Sigurd's murder. He saw the truth in the dwarf's eyes and took out the sword and sliced off Regin's head. He went into the cave to claim the treasure as his own.

 

-------------------- Noteringar SIGURD & THE DRAGON FAFNIR Origin: Norse Myth Sigurd (also known as Siegfried) Volsung was told by the dwarf Regin to gain fame and power to slay a terrible dragon named Fafnir that guarded a huge mound of treasure. Sigurd took up interest in this dragon, and recently was awarded with his father's broken sword (named Gram) which Regin forged back into one whole massive sword. Sigurd and the dwarf rode to find the fearless beast. What Sigurd did not know is that Regin's brother murdered their father to gain the wealth of the kingdom. This brother's name was Fafnir. Fafnir, because of his greed for gold and jewels changed his corrupt self into a massive dragon to protect his hoard better. From what Sigurd knew of dragons, their tough,scaly hide on the top of the body was impregnable to any weapon. Regin suggested building a pit in which Sigurd could hide. So they both dug a pit outside of the dragon's lair. With Sigurd hiding, Regin covered the pit with branches. He waited hours for the dragon to come back from its daily visit to the watering hole nearby. Finally, a shadow covered the top of the pit, and Sigurd took the huge sword Gram in both hands and shoved as hard as he could up towards the exposed, soft belly of the dragon. With the dragon dead, Sigurd climbed out of his hiding place.

Regin then caved out the beast's heart to roast. When handing it to Sigurd to share, he burnt his hand and sucked on his fingers. Moments later he heard chattering, and surprised, looked up to see birds talking. They were saying how the dwarf was planning Sigurd's murder. He saw the truth in the dwarf's eyes and took out the sword and sliced off Regin's head. He went into the cave to claim the treasure as his own.

 

-------------------- Sigurd Fafnersbane Fra Wikipedia, den frie encyklopædi Gå til: navigation, søg


Valkyrierne Brynhild og Gudrun. Sigurd Fafnersbane er gift med Gudrun.Sigurd Fafnersbane er en figur i nordisk mytologi, søn af Sigmund og Hjørdis. Med sværdet Gram dræber han Fafner, som er i slange/drageskikkelse, og får derefter tilnavnet "Fafnersbane". Sigurd er gift med Gudrun.

Sigurd bliver efter sin død én af Einherjerne sammen med sin far.

Sigurd-figuren har en del ligheder med den germanske Nibelung-sagnheld Siegfred, der bla. indtager en fremtrædende rolle i Wagners cykliske opera-epos om Nibelungens Ring.

[redigér] Eksterne links -------------------- In the Völsunga saga, Sigurd is the posthumous son of Sigmund and his second wife, Hiordis. Sigmund dies in battle when he attacks Odin (who is in disguise), and Odin shatters Sigmund's sword. Dying, Sigmund tells Hiordis of her pregnancy and bequeaths the fragments of his sword to his unborn son.

Hiordis marries King Alf, and then Alf decided to send Sigurd to Regin as a foster. Regin tempts Sigurd to greed and violence by first asking Sigurd if he has control over Sigmund's gold. When Sigurd says that Alf and his family control the gold and will give him anything he desires, Regin asks Sigurd why he consents to a lowly position at court. Sigurd replies that he is treated as an equal by the kings and can get anything he desires. Then Regin asks Sigurd why he acts as stableboy to the kings and has no horse of his own. Sigurd then goes to get a horse. An old man (Odin in disguise) advises Sigurd on choice of horse, and in this way Sigurd gets Grani, a horse derived from Odin's own Sleipnir.

Finally, Regin tries to tempt Sigurd by telling him the story of the Otter's Gold. Regin's father was Hreidmar, and his two brothers were Ótr and Fafnir. Regin was a natural at smithing, and Otr was natural at swimming. Otr used to swim at Andvari's waterfall, where the dwarf Andvari lived. Andvari often assumed the form of a pike and swam in the pool.

One day, the Æsir saw Otr with a fish on the banks, thought him an otter, and Loki killed him. They took the carcass to the nearby home of Hreidmar to display their catch. Hreidmar, Fafnir, and Regin seized the Æsir and demanded compensation for the death of Otr. The compensation was to stuff the body with gold and cover the skin with fine treasures. Loki got the net from the sea giantess Rán, caught Andvari (as a pike), and demanded all of the dwarf's gold. Andvari gave the gold, except for a ring. Loki took this ring, too, although it carried a curse of death on its bearer. The Æsir used this gold and stuffed Otr's body with gold and covered its skin in gold and covered the last exposed place (a whisker) with the ring of Andvari. Afterward, Fafnir killed Hreidmar and took the gold.


"Sigurd proofs the sword Gram" (1901) by Johannes Gehrts.Sigurd agrees to kill Fafnir, who has turned himself into a dragon in order to be better able to guard the gold. Sigurd has Regin make him a sword, which he tests by striking the anvil. The sword shatters, so he has Regin make another. This also shatters. Finally, Sigurd has Regin make a sword out of the fragments that had been left to him by Sigmund. The resulting sword, Gram, cuts through the anvil. To kill Fafnir the dragon, Regin advises him to dig a pit, wait for Fafnir to walk over it, and then stab the dragon. Odin, posing as an old man, advises Sigurd to dig trenches also to drain the blood, and to bathe in it after killing the dragon; bathing in Fafnir's blood confers invulnerability. Sigurd does so and kills Fafnir; Sigurd then bathes in the dragon's blood, which touches all of his body except for one of his shoulders where a leaf was stuck. Regin then asked Sigurd to give him Fafnir's heart for himself. Sigurd drinks some of Fafnir's blood and gains the ability to understand the language of birds. Birds advise him to kill Regin, since Regin is plotting Sigurd's death. Sigurd beheads Regin, roasts Fafnir's heart and consumes part of it. This gives him the gift of "wisdom" (prophecy).

Sigurd met Brynhildr, a "shieldmaiden," after killing Fafnir. She pledges herself to him but also prophesies his doom and marriage to another. (In Völsunga saga, it is not clear that Brynhild is a Valkyrie or in any way supernatural.)

Sigurd went to the court of Heimar, who was married to Bekkhild, sister of Brynhild, and then to the court of Gjúki, where he came to live. Gjuki had three sons and one daughter by his wife, Grimhild. The sons were Gunnar, Hogni and Guttorm, and the daughter was Gudrun. Grimhild made an "Ale of Forgetfulness" to force Sigurd to forget Brynhild, so he could marry Gudrun. Later, Gunnar wanted to court Brynhild. Brynhild's bower was surrounded by flames, and she promised herself only to the man daring enough to go through them. Only Grani, Sigurd's horse, would do it, and only with Sigurd on it. Sigurd exchanged shapes with Gunnar, rode through the flames, and won Brynhild for Gunnar.

Some time later, Brynhild taunted Gudrun for having a better husband, and Gudrun explained all that had passed to Brynhild and explained the deception. For having been deceived and cheated of the husband she had desired, Brynhild plots revenge. First, she refuses to speak to anyone and withdraws. Eventually, Sigurd was sent by Gunnar to see what was wrong, and Brynhild accuses Sigurd of taking liberties with her. Gunnar and Hogni plot Sigurd's death and enchant their brother, Guttorm, to a frenzy to accomplish the deed. Guttorm kills Sigurd in bed, and Brynhild kills Sigurd's three year old son Sigmund (named for Sigurd's father). Brynhild then wills herself to die, and builds a funeral pyre for Sigurd, Sigurd's son, Guttorm (killed by Sigurd) and herself. Sigurd and Brynhild had the daughter Aslaug who married Ragnar Lodbrok.

Sigurd and Gudrun are parents to the twins Sigmund (named after Sigurd's father) and Svanhild.

-------------------- Legendary killer of the serpent Fafnir.

-------------------- Sigurd Fåvnesbane var en germansk helt.

Ifølge legenden var han sønn av Sigmund og Hjørdis. Sigurd klarte å drepe dragen Fåvne med sverdet Gram og sikret seg dermed en stor skatt. Hans liv er beskrevet i heltediktene i Den eldre Edda og i det tyske Nibelungenlied (diktet om Nivlungene) og i Volsungesaga.

En kan gå ut fra at sagnet er spunnet sammen av forskjellige historiske hendelser fra forskjellig tid.

Dersom sagnet om Sigurd ses symbolsk er det ifølge nyere litteraturforskning mye som taler for at Sigurd Fåvnesbane er identisk med kjeruskerkongen Arminius (16 f.Kr. – 21 e.Kr.). I år 9 lokket han tre av keiser Augustus' legioner (lindorm, ca. 6 km lange tog av soldater) i et bakhold ved Teutoburger Wald (Gnitaheide, rundt 1150 stadfestet av den islandske abbeden Nikulás) og tilintetgjorde disse. Etter dette nederlaget ga romerne opp å utvide romerriket nordover. Arminius var det romerske navnet, det germanske navnet er ikke kjent, men en vet at de fleste menn in ætten på denne tiden hadde navn som begynte med Segi. Et interessant indis er at Sigurd i diktene ofte blir symbolisert av en hjort, noe som egentlig ikke passer riktig til en hærfører - men hjorten var kjeruskenes totemdyr.

Også kjent som Sigurd Fåvnesbane

-------------------- Notes for Sigurd Fafnirstöter

SIGURD & THE DRAGON FAFNIR

Origin: Norse Myth

Sigurd (also known as Siegfried) Volsung was told by the dwarf Regin to gain fame and power to slay a terrible dragon named Fafnir that guarded a huge mound of treasure.

Sigurd took up interest in this dragon, and recently was awarded with his father's broken sword (named Gram) which Regin forged back into one whole massive sword. Sigurd and the dwarf rode to find the fearless beast. What Sigurd did not know is that Regin's brother murdered their father to gain the wealth of the kingdom. This brother's name was Fafnir. Fafnir, because of his greed for gold and jewels changed his corrupt self into a massive dragon to protect his hoard better.

From what Sigurd knew of dragons, their tough,scaly hide on the top of the body was impregnable to any weapon. Regin suggested building a pit in which Sigurd could hide. So they both dug a pit outside of the dragon's lair. With Sigurd hiding, Regin covered the pit with branches. He waited hours for the dragon to come back from its daily visit to the watering hole nearby. Finally, a shadow covered the top of the pit, and Sigurd took the huge sword Gram in both hands and shoved as hard as he could up towards the exposed, soft belly of the dragon. With the dragon dead, Sigurd climbed out of his hiding place.

Regin then caved out the beast's heart to roast. When handing it to Sigurd to share, he burnt his hand and sucked on his fingers. Moments later he heard chattering, and surprised, looked up to see birds talking. They were saying how the dwarf was planning Sigurd's murder. He saw the truth in the dwarf's eyes and took out the sword and sliced off Regin's head. He went into the cave to claim the treasure as his own.

To learn more, look at <a href=”http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/sigurdstone.html”>The Sigurd Runestone</a>

Source: http://www.draconian.com/history/history.htm

-------------------- Biografi

Sagokung i Danmark. Född 735 i Norge. Död 775 i Tyskland. Fadern heter enligt sagorna Sigurd 'Fafnesbane' Wolsung och modern var sköldmön Brynhilda. Namnet Kraka är alias liten Aslög. Föräldrarna miste livet nere i Tyskland, men Aslög räddades av sin fosterfar Heimer. På vandring i Norge dödades han av ett äldre par som hette Åke och Grima. De tog hand om flickebarnet, och hon växte upp i hårt arbete och stor fattigdom på Spangarhed i Norge. (Källa: En nordisk kronologi, Alf Henriksson)

Gifte och barn

Brynhild Budlasdotter.

Gift

 Aslög "Kraka" Sigurdsdotter.   

-------------------- Sigurd (Old Norse: Sigurðr) is a legendary hero of Norse mythology, as well as the central character in the Völsunga saga. The earliest extant representations for his legend come in pictorial form from seven runestones in Sweden[1] and most notably the Ramsund carving (c. 1000) and the Gök Runestone (11th century).

As Siegfried, he is the hero in the German Nibelungenlied, and Richard Wagner's operas Siegfried and Götterdämmerung.

As Sivard Snarensven(d) he was the hero of several medieval Scandinavian ballads.

The name Sigurðr is not the same name as the German Siegfried. The Old Norse form would have been Sigruþr, a form which appears in the Ramsund carving that depicts the legend.[2] Sivard is another variant name of Sigurðr; these name forms all share the first element Sig-, which means victory.

-------------------- Sigurd Fafnesbane eller Sigurd Völsung (familjenamnet) var en hjälte i nordisk mytologi, son till Sigmund.

Sigurd lyckades dräpa draken Fafner och komma över en stor skatt. Skatten innehöll bland annat den magiska ringen Andvaranaut som gjorde sin ägare rik. Tidigare hade dock Loke avtvingat dvärgen Andvare ringen, men denne hade som hämnd försett ringen med en förbannelse: ringen skulle förgöra den som ägde den. Ringen förgjorde så först Fafners far Hreidmar, därefter Fafner och till slut även Sigurd. Den tog dvärgen med sig på köpet.

De huvudsakliga tilldragelserna i Sigurd Fafnesbanes liv skildras i Ramsundsristningen och på Gökstenen.

-------------------- SIGURD & THE DRAGON FAFNIR Origin: Norse Myth Sigurd (also known as Siegfried) Volsung was told by the dwarf Regin to gain fame and power to slay a terrible dragon named Fafnir that guarded a huge mound of treasure. Sigurd took up interest in this dragon, and recently was awarded with his father's broken sword (named Gram) which Regin forged back into one whole massive sword. Sigurd and the dwarf rode to find the fearless beast. What Sigurd did not know is that Regin's brother murdered their father to gain the wealth of the kingdom. This brother's name was Fafnir. Fafnir, because of his greed for gold and jewels changed his corrupt self into a massive dragon to protect his hoard better.

From what Sigurd knew of dragons, their tough,scaly hide on the top of the body was impregnable to any weapon. Regin suggested building a pit in which Sigurd could hide. So they both dug a pit outside of the dragon's lair. With Sigurd hiding, Regin covered the pit with branches. He waited hours for the dragon to come back from its daily visit to the watering hole nearby. Finally, a shadow covered the top of the pit, and Sigurd took the huge sword Gram in both hands and shoved as hard as he could up towards the exposed, soft belly of the dragon. With the dragon dead, Sigurd climbed out of his hiding place.

Regin then caved out the beast's heart to roast. When handing it to Sigurd to share, he burnt his hand and sucked on his fingers. Moments later he heard chattering, and surprised, looked up to see birds talking. They were saying how the dwarf was planning Sigurd's murder. He saw the truth in the dwarf's eyes and took out the sword and sliced off Regin's head. He went into the cave to claim the treasure as his own. To learn more, look at <a href="http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/sigurdstone.html">The Sigurd Runestone</a>

Source: http://www.draconian.com/history/history.htm

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Sigurd "Fafnisbana" Sigmundsson, of Denmark's Timeline