William Coffyn Coffin, Sir (c.1495 - 1538) MP

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Alwington, Devon, UK
Death: Died in Ware, Hertfordshire, UK
Cause of death: The plague - as confirmed by wife, Dame Margaret Coffyn (Dymoke)
Occupation: Knight, Master of the Horse, High Sherrif, Parliament Member
Managed by: Kira Jay
Last Updated:

About William Coffyn Coffin, Sir

About his death:

BRITISH HISTORY ONLINE:

MARGARET COFFYN to CROMWELL. Begs him to intimate to the King the death of her husband. He died of the great sickness, full of God's marks over all his body. Begs Cromwell to be her good lord that she may know how she and her servants stand. Standon, 8 Dec.

About Sir William's resting place:

Sir William was buried in the parish church of Standon, dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin, where he is commemorated by an inscription on a slab at the foot of the chancel steps. (Prior to the church's restoration in 1864, this slab had been in the centre of the chancel immediately above the steps). The inscription reads:

"Here lies William Coffin, Knight, sometime of the privy chamber with his sovereign Lord King Henry the eighth, Master of the Horse unto queen Jane the most lawful wife unto the aforesaid King Henry the eighth, and high steward of all the liberty [and] manor of Standon in the county of Hertford, which William deceased the eighth day of december Anno domini 1538, [in] the thirtieth year of the reign of King Henry the eighth (.........)"

On the nave floor, near the east end, are four slabs with brasses; one to Sir William Coffyn, of the household of King Henry VIII, died in 1538, a shield with his arms above.

Some armour, including a breastplate and helmet, pistol, spurs, and an instrument for stringing a cross-bow, which were over Sir Ralph's tomb, and a piece of horse armour which had hung over Sir William Coffyn's, are now in the possession of Rev. Franc Sadleir.

-------------------- Born about 1495, younger brother of Richard Coffin, lord of the manor of Alwington and High Sheriff of Devon in the late 15th century. He joined Henry VIII's household about 1515, and took part, as a gentleman of the privy chamber, in the tournament between Henry VIII and the French King held at Guisnes in 1520.

"Sir William Coffyn, ' chosen by King Henry VIII. to accompany him to a tournament in France in 1520.' No knight of the Field of the Cloth of Gold was braver or gentler than himself."

In 1529 he became a Member of Parliament for Derbyshire, having acquired a connection with that county through his marriage to Margaret, the daughter of the Hereditary Royal Champion, Sir Robert Dymoke of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire; sister of Sir Edward Dymoke; and the widow since 1517 of Sir Richard Vernon of Haddon Hall.

_____________________________________________________________________________________ William Coffin (courtier) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

Sir William Coffin was a courtier at the court of Henry VIII of England.

Born at Portledge about 1495 into an ancient Devon family, he was the younger brother of Sir Richard Coffin, who was Lord of the Manor of Alwington and High Sheriff of Devon in the late 15th century.

Sir William lived during the reign of Henry VIII, and was often seen at his court. He joined Henry VIII's household about 1515 as courtier and gentleman of the Privy chamber, a post of great confidence and trust. There were 40 of these, and their duty was to wait on the king in public and private; they were all knights or esquires of distinction, and the attendance of two was required at each meal, to help and serve the king; they had also to sleep within call of the king at night.

In 1519, Sir William Coffin joined King Henry in the tournament of Guesnes, Field of the Cloth of Gold, as one of His Majesty's eighteen favourites. After Anne Boleyn's beheading, Sir William continued to serve in the king's Privy chamber and attendant to His Majesty; serving the King's third wife, Jane Seymour, just as he had served Queen Anne.[1]

In 1529 he became a MP for Derbyshire, having acquired a connection with that county through his marriage to Margaret Dymoke, the daughter of the Hereditary Royal Champion, Sir Robert Dymoke of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire; sister of Sir Edward Dymoke; and the widow since 1517 of Sir Richard Vernon of Haddon Hall. In 1531 he was appointed High Sheriff of Derbyshire

He was Master of the Horse at the coronation of Anne Boleyn in 1533, when the king knighted him.

Eric Ives described Coffin as a professional household administrator, actively concerned with the staffing of his department, and later to serve Jane Seymour in the same capacity.[2] His wife Margaret

When Lady Margaret Dymoke of Scrivelsby was left a wealthy widow by the death of her first husband, Henry VIII urged her to marry Sir William Coffin. Margaret had attended Catalina of Aragon at the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1519 and was at court with Sir William, her second husband. Margaret was one of the gentlewomen sent to wait (and spy) upon Anne Boleyn in the Tower. Some accounts give the name as "Mistress Cosyns" but this is a mistake for Coffin (presumably the confusion was caused by the use of the long "S"). In Jane Seymour’s household, Margaret was a lady of the bedchamber. Shortly after Sir William Coffin's death in December, 1538, she married Sir Richard Manners of Garendon, Leicestershire.

In 1536, five women were appointed to serve Queen Anne in the Tower of London, reporting back to William Kingston, Lieutenant of the Tower, and through him to Thomas Cromwell, all that the Queen said. Margaret Coffin was one of them. The others included Anne Shelton, the sister of Thomas Boleyn. Lady Shelton had been entrusted with the care of Princess Mary and Princess Elizabeth, but perhaps fell out with Anne during Henry VIII's affair with Anne's first cousin and Lady Shelton's daughter, Mary Shelton. The other women to attend Anne were Lady Kingston, wife of the Lieutenant of the Tower and Elizabeth Stoner, wife of the King's sergeant-at arms, Anne's aunt, Elizabeth Boleyn, Lady Boleyn and 'Mother of the Maids', the woman with responsibility for the young female attendants.[3]

Kingston described the five as honest and good women but Anne said that it was a great unkindness in the King to set such about me as I have never loved.[4]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Coffin_%28courtier%29

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William Coffin's Timeline

1495
1495
Alwington, Devon, UK
1502
1502
Age 7
England, United Kingdom
1519
1519
Age 24
Guînes, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France

The first Coffyn to have made a name for himself in English history was William, the younger brother of the Sir Richard Coffyn who was lord of the manor of Alwington and High Sheriff of Devon in the late 15th century.

William was born about 1495, and made his career at the Court of Henry VIII. He joined the King's household about 1515, and took part, as a gentleman of the privy chamber, in the tournament between Henry VIII and the French King held at Guisnes in 1519 - despite the strictures of canon law (which denied Christian burial to anyone killed at such jousts), and in contravention of the statute which required forfeiture of an offender's estate. The following year William accompanied the King to the Field of the Cloth of Gold.

1529
1529
Age 34

In 1529 he was married to Margaret, the daughter of the Hereditary Royal Champion, Sir Robert Dymoke of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire; sister of Sir Edward Dymoke; and the widow since 1517 of Sir Richard Vernon of Haddon Hall.

1529
Age 34
Derbyshire, UK

In 1529 Sir William became a Member of Parliament for Derbyshire, having acquired a connection with that county through his marriage to Margaret, the widow since 1517 of Sir Richard Vernon, of Haddon Hall, and the daughter of the Hereditary Royal Champion, Sir Robert Dymoke of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire.

1533
1533
Age 38

At the coronation of Queen Anne Boleyn in 1533 he was her Master of the Horse, and seems to have managed to please his mistress - not an easy thing to do, without at the same time incurring the wrath and suspicion of her husband and his sovereign. But after Anne's trial and execution, he continued in the same office to her successor, Jane Seymour.

1535
1535
Age 40
Hitchin, Hertfordshire, UK

On 18 Oct 1537 William Coffin was knighted, having by then become steward not only of Queen Jane's manor and liberties of Standon in Herfordshire, but also (in 1535) of Hitchin, another royal manor in the same county. In that capacity, it was his duty on 17 Oct 1538 to receive the surrender to the Crown of the priory of Hitchin from the Prior and his brethren.

1537
October 18, 1537
Age 42
Stafford, UK

On 18 Oct 1537 William Coffin was knighted, having by then become steward not only of Queen Jane's manor and liberties of Standon in Herfordshire, but also (in 1535) of Hitchin, another royal manor in the same county. In that capacity, it was his duty on 17 Oct 1538 to receive the surrender to the Crown of the priory of Hitchin from the Prior and his brethren.

1538
December 8, 1538
Age 43
Stafford, UK

8 Dec 1538, Sir William was dead of the plague. His widow wrote from Standon to the King's chief minister, Thomas Cromwell, asking him to inform the King that her husband had "died of the great sickness, full of God's marks all over his body", and begging Cromwell to let her know how she and her servants now stood.

December 8, 1538
Age 43
Ware, Hertfordshire, UK