Wilson Cary Nicholas (1761 - 1820) MP

‹ Back to Nicholas surname

32

Matches

0 2 30
Adds more complete death place, more complete burial place, occupation, residence, spouse(s) and child(ren).

View Wilson Cary Nicholas's complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Wilson Cary Nicholas
  • Request to view Wilson Cary Nicholas' family tree

Share

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Williamsburg, Williamsburg City, Virginia, United States
Death: Died in Charlottsville, Albermarle , Virginia, United States
Managed by: Dan Cornett
Last Updated:

About Wilson Cary Nicholas

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilson_Cary_Nicholas

Wilson Cary Nicholas (January 31, 1761 – October 10, 1820) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1799 to 1804 and was the 19th Governor of Virginia from 1814 to 1816.


Nicholas was born in Williamsburg, Virginia. He attended the College of William and Mary. According to Nicholas's entry in the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, he served in the American Revolutionary War as commander of George Washington's Life Guard until the unit disbanded in 1783. This appears to be an error: his entry in American National Biography states that "he commanded Virginia volunteer units from the fall of 1780 until the following fall, but there is no evidence that he was actually involved in battlefield action."


After the war, he was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates 1784-1789 and a delegate to the ratifying convention of 1788 which approved the Federal Constitution.


During the deliberations, on June 6, 1788, Nicholas countered Patrick's Henry's objection that correcting defects in the new national Constitution by way of the Article V convention would be excessively difficult. Said Nicholas: "The conventions which shall be so called will have their deliberations confined to a few points; no local interest to divert their attention; nothing but the necessary alterations. They will have many advantages over the last Convention. No experiments to devise; the general and fundamental regulations being already laid down."


During the years 1794-1800, Nicholas served again in the State house of delegates. He was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Henry Tazewell and served from December 5, 1799, until May 22, 1804, when he resigned to become collector of the port of Norfolk 1804-1807. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in the Tenth and Eleventh Congresses and served from March 4, 1807, until his resignation November 27, 1809. Nicholas was chosen to be Governor of Virginia and served in that position 1814-1817.


Nicholas also served as president of the Richmond branch of the Second Bank of the United States. His speculations in western lands put him in serious debt during the Panic of 1819. Having convinced Thomas Jefferson to endorse two of his notes for $10,000 each, he also plunged Jefferson into debt.


He died at Tufton, near Charlottesville, Virginia. As his son had married Jefferson's granddaughter, Nicholas was a Jefferson relation. Thus, he was interred in the Jefferson burying ground at Monticello, near Charlottesville.


Nicholas County, Virginia (now West Virginia) was formed in 1843 and named in honor of Nicholas.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Letters from Wilson Cary Nicholas to Samuel Smith, Accession #2343-a, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

There are two letters, July 23, 1806 and September 25, 1810, from Wilson Cary Nicholas (1761-1820), U. S. senator and governor of Virginia, to his brother-in-law, General Samuel Smith (1752-1839), American politician. Wilson Cary Nicholas was married to the general's sister Margaret Smith (1765-1849) ca. 1783; they were the parents of Jane Hollins (1798-1871), who later became Mrs. Thomas Jefferson Randolph. Wilson Cary Nicholas (1761-1820) was the son of Robert Carter (1715-1780) and Anne (Cary) Nicholas. He had three brothers: George (1754-1799); John (1756-1819); and, Philip Norborne (1773-1849). George married General Samuel Smith's sister Mary (1755-1806); they had several children including Robert Carter ( -1857); Samuel Smith (1797-1869), Georgianna [George Ann?], Betsy [Elizabeth?], Cary, and Nelson [children mentioned in this letter].

On July 23, 1806, Wilson Cary Nicholas, "Warren," Albemarle County, Virginia, writes to his brother-in-law Samuel Smith, Baltimore, Maryland, upon receiving news of the death of sister [Mary (Smith)] Nicholas. He discusses the financial hardships following the death of his brother [George in 1799] and his dealings with the estate, estimating that "the house, lands, and Negroes, which is held in our names, and in mine, at [near] $40000..." Nicholas attempts to make financial arrangements to pay his own debts and the debts of the estate. One major concern of this letter is the disposition of the children of George and Mary (Smith) Nicholas, now dependent on Nicholas, Smith, and [ ] Morrison, who are apparently their guardians. Nicholas thinks it best for Georgianna and Betsy to live with close friends for awhile; and, he entrusts young Samuel to the general. He also mentions Cary and Nelson, who have been educated and supported at his own expense, as being the children of his dearest friends; and, he is concerned specifically about Nelson who "came to me so young, and has lived with me so long, that I feel towards him as if he was my own child..." He is also disturbed by [George's son]Robert being unfit to help with the children, claiming him unfit as a proper guardian for his five sisters.

-------------------- Wilson Cary Nicholas (January 31, 1761 – October 10, 1820) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1799 to 1804 and was the 19th Governor of Virginia from 1814 to 1816.

Nicholas was born in Williamsburg, Virginia. He attended the College of William and Mary. According to Nicholas's entry in the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, he served in the American Revolutionary War as commander of George Washington's Life Guard until the unit disbanded in 1783. This appears to be an error: his entry in American National Biography states that "he commanded Virginia volunteer units from the fall of 1780 until the following fall, but there is no evidence that he was actually involved in battlefield action."

After the war, he was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates 1784-1789 and a delegate to the ratifying convention of 1788 which approved the Federal Constitution.

During the deliberations, on June 6, 1788, Nicholas countered Patrick's Henry's objection that correcting defects in the new national Constitution by way of the Article V convention would be excessively difficult. Said Nicholas: "The conventions which shall be so called will have their deliberations confined to a few points; no local interest to divert their attention; nothing but the necessary alterations. They will have many advantages over the last Convention. No experiments to devise; the general and fundamental regulations being already laid down."

During the years 1794-1800, Nicholas served again in the State house of delegates. He was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Henry Tazewell and served from December 5, 1799, until May 22, 1804, when he resigned to become collector of the port of Norfolk 1804-1807. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in the Tenth and Eleventh Congresses and served from March 4, 1807, until his resignation November 27, 1809. Nicholas was chosen to be Governor of Virginia and served in that position 1814-1817.

Nicholas also served as president of the Richmond branch of the Second Bank of the United States. His speculations in western lands put him in serious debt during the Panic of 1819. Having convinced Thomas Jefferson to endorse two of his notes for $10,000 each, he also plunged Jefferson into debt.

He died at Tufton, near Charlottesville, Virginia. As his son had married Jefferson's granddaughter, Nicholas was a Jefferson relation. Thus, he was interred in the Jefferson burying ground at Monticello, near Charlottesville.

NICHOLAS, Wilson Cary, (brother of John Nicholas and uncle of Robert Carter Nicholas), a Senator and a Representative from Virginia; born in Williamsburg, Va., January 31, 1761; attended the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va.; served in the Revolutionary Army and commanded George Washington’s Life Guard until it disbanded in 1783; member, State house of delegates 1784-1789; delegate to the State constitutional convention which ratified the Federal Constitution in 1788; member, State house of delegates 1794-1800; elected as a Democratic Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Henry Tazewell and served from December 5, 1799, until May 22, 1804, when he resigned to become collector of the port of Norfolk 1804-1807; elected to the Tenth and Eleventh Congresses and served from March 4, 1807, until his resignation November 27, 1809; Governor of Virginia 1814-1817; died at “Tufton,” near Charlottesville, Va., October 10, 1820; interment in the Jefferson burying ground at “Monticello,” near Charlottesville.

Nicholas County, Virginia (now West Virginia) was formed in 1843 and named in honor of Nicholas.

--------------------

view all

Wilson Cary Nicholas, Governor, U.S. Senator's Timeline

1761
January 31, 1761
Williamsburg, Williamsburg City, Virginia, United States
1787
January 10, 1787
Age 25
Warren, Albermarle, Virginia
1798
January 16, 1798
Age 36
Albemarle, Virginia, USA
1800
1800
Age 38
1820
October 10, 1820
Age 59
Charlottsville, Albermarle , Virginia, United States
????
????
Charlottesville, Albemarle, Virginia, United States