Is your surname Tversky?

Research the Tversky family

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Amos Nathan Tversky

Hebrew: עמוס נתן טברסקי
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Haifa, Haifa, Israel
Death: June 02, 1996 (59)
Santa Clara, California, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Yoseph Tversky and Jenia Zana Tversky
Husband of Private
Father of Private; Private and Private
Brother of Ruth Proznin, Ariel

Managed by: Ron Rabinovitch
Last Updated:
view all

Immediate Family

About Amos Tversky

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amos_Tversky

Amos Nathan Tversky (Hebrew: עמוס טברסקי‎‎; March 16, 1937 – June 2, 1996) was a cognitive and mathematical psychologist, a student of cognitive science, a collaborator of Daniel Kahneman, and a figure in the discovery of systematic human cognitive bias and handling of risk. Much of his early work concerned the foundations of measurement. He was co-author of a three-volume treatise, Foundations of Measurement (recently reprinted). His early work with Kahneman focused on the psychology of prediction and probability judgment; later they worked together to develop prospect theory, which aims to explain irrational human economic choices and is considered one of the seminal works of behavioral economics. Six years after Tversky's death, Kahneman received the 2002 Nobel Prize in Economics for the work he did in collaboration with Amos Tversky.[1] (The prize is not awarded posthumously.) Kahneman told The New York Times in an interview soon after receiving the honor: "I feel it is a joint prize. We were twinned for more than a decade."[2] Tversky also collaborated with many leading researchers including Thomas Gilovich, Itamar Simonson, Paul Slovic and Richard Thaler. A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Tversky as the 93rd most cited psychologist of the 20th century, tied with Edwin Boring, John Dewey, and Wilhelm Wundt.[3] Contents [show] Biography[edit] Tversky was born in Haifa, British Palestine (now Israel), as son of the Polish-born veterinarian Yosef Tversky and Jenia Tversky (nee Ginzburg), a social worker who later became member of parliament for the Mapai (worker's party).[4] He served with distinction in the Israel Defense Forces, rising to the rank of captain and being decorated for bravery.[4] He received his undergraduate education at Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel, and his doctorate from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 1964. He later taught at Hebrew University before moving to Stanford University. In 1980 he became a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[5] In 1984 he was a recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship, and in 1985 he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.[6] Amos Tversky was married to Barbara Tversky, now a professor in the human development department at Teachers College, Columbia University. Tversky, co-recipient with Daniel Kahneman, earned the 2003 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.[7] He died of a metastatic melanoma.[8] Career[edit] Comparative ignorance[edit] Tversky and Fox (1995)[9] addressed ambiguity aversion, the idea that people do not like ambiguous gambles or choices with ambiguity, with the comparative ignorance framework. Their idea was that people are only ambiguity averse when their attention is specifically brought to the ambiguity by comparing an ambiguous option to an unambiguous option. For instance, people are willing to bet more on choosing a correct colored ball from an urn containing equal proportions of black and red balls than an urn with unknown proportions of balls when evaluating both of these urns at the same time. However, when evaluating them separately, people are willing to bet approximately the same amount on either urn. Thus, when it is possible to compare the ambiguous gamble to an unambiguous gamble people are averse — but not when one is ignorant of this comparison. Notable contributions[edit]

The shape of the value (utility) function in prospect theory. The asymmetry of the function corresponds to loss aversion. foundations of measurement anchoring and adjustment availability heuristic base rate fallacy conjunction fallacy framing behavioral finance clustering illusion loss aversion prospect theory cumulative prospect theory representativeness heuristic Tversky index support theory contrast model In popular culture[edit] Tversky Intelligence Test[edit] As recounted by Malcolm Gladwell in 2013's David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants, Tversky's peers thought so highly of him that they devised a tongue-in-cheek one-part test for measuring intelligence. As related to Gladwell by psychologist Adam Alter, the Tversky Intelligence Test was "The faster you realized Tversky was smarter than you, the smarter you were."[10] The Undoing Project[edit] Michael Lewis's book The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds, released on December 16, 2016, is about Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman, and is the "story of their lives and work together".[11]

פסיכולוג קוגניטיבי ישראלי, ואחד מחלוצי המחקר בתחום ההטיות הקוגניטיביות

About Amos Tversky (עברית)

עמוס טבֶרסקי

' (16 במרץ 1937 – 2 ביוני 1996) היה פסיכולוג קוגניטיבי ישראלי, ואחד מחלוצי המחקר בתחום ההטיות הקוגניטיביות, לצד עמיתו לאורך שנים דניאל כהנמן.

תוכן עניינים 1 ביוגרפיה 2 ראו גם 3 לקריאה נוספת 4 קישורים חיצוניים 5 הערות שוליים ביוגרפיה טברסקי נולד בחיפה, בנם של ז'ניה טברסקי, עובדת סוציאלית ועסקנית ציבור (לימים חברת הכנסת) ושל ד"ר יוסף טברסקי, וטרינר. עם גיוסו לצה"ל, התנדב לצנחנים לגדוד הנח"ל המוצנח. בצנחנים עבר מסלול הכשרה כלוחם, ולאחר מכן עבר קורס מ"כים חי"ר וקורס קצינים. בסיום הקורס מונה למפקד מחלקה בצנחנים בגדוד 88. באחד האימונים בקיץ 1956 תרגלה המחלקה בפיקוד טברסקי תקיפת יעד מבוצר. אחד מחייליו הפעיל בונגלור וקפא על מקומו לאחר ההפעלה. סגן טברסקי מיהר ומשך את החייל למקום מבטחים בהפגינו בכך אומץ לב רב. אלוף פיקוד המרכז העניק לו צל"ש על מעשהו[1].

טברסקי קיבל את התואר הראשון מהאוניברסיטה העברית ב-1961 ואת הדוקטורט שלו מאוניברסיטת מישיגן בשנת 1965 ושב לישראל להרצות באוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים. ב-1970 הצטרף לאוניברסיטת סטנפורד שבארצות הברית וב-1978 הפך לחלק מסגל הפקולטה. הפסיכולוג וולטר מישל (אנ') אמר עליו "נוכחותו של טברסקי האירה את המקום בלהט אינטלקטואלי, השפיעה על דרך המחשבה שלי בצורה בולטת, והפכה את חיי למעניינים יותר"[2]. טברסקי כיהן בסנאט הפקולטה מ-1990 עד מותו. כמו כן לימד באוניברסיטת הרווארד ובאוניברסיטת מישיגן. טברסקי זכה בפרס לתרומה מדעית יוצאת דופן (Award for Distinguished Scientific Contribution) של האגודה האמריקנית לפסיכולוגיה ב-1982 ובמלגת גוגנהיים ובמלגת עמיתי מקארתור ב-1984. נבחר ב-1980 לחבר באקדמיה האמריקאית לאמנויות ולמדעים[3] וב-1985 לחבר באקדמיה הלאומית למדעים של ארצות הברית[4]. ב-1993 נבחר כעמית בחברה האקונומטרית (Econometric Society)[5]. ב-1995 זכה, יחד עם דניאל כהנמן, במדליית וורן של Society of Experimental Esychologists. בנוסף קיבל תוארי דוקטור לשם כבוד מאוניברסיטת ייל, אוניברסיטת שיקגו, אוניברסיטת גטבורג שבשוודיה ומאוניברסיטת מדינת ניו יורק, בפאלו. לאחר מותו הוענקו לו פרסים נוספים, בהם פרס גרומאייר לפסיכולוגיה ב-2002, במשותף עם כהנמן, וב-2006 הוענקה לו, גם כן במשותף עם כהנמן, מדליית פרנק רמזי מטעם The Decision Analysis Society.

בשנת 1992 פרסם ביחד עם אלדר שפיר מחקר בשם The Disjunction Effect in Choice[6], המפריך את עקרון ה-Sure Thing Principle.

אחרי מותו של טברסקי זכה דניאל כהנמן, יחד עם ורנון סמית', בפרס נובל לכלכלה לשנת 2002. הפרס הוענק לכהנמן במידה רבה עבור המחקרים שבוצעו במהלך השנים שבהן פעל יחד עם טברסקי באוניברסיטה העברית. טברסקי לא זכה בפרס נובל, שכן זה אינו מוענק לאנשים שעברו מן העולם, אך בצעד חריג הוזכר שמו במעמד חלוקת הפרסים כשותפו של כהנמן למחקריו בתחום קבלת החלטות בתנאים של אי-ודאות ושיפוט סובייקטיבי בתנאים של אי-ודאות. המאמר החשוב הראשון שפרסמו השניים ראה אור בכתב העת "Science" בשנת 1974. ב-1979 פרסמו השניים בכתב העת "אקונומטריקה" את מאמרם פורץ הדרך בנושא תורת הערך אותה פיתחו כחלופה לתורת התועלת, Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decisions under Risk‏[7], מאמר שהפך ברבות הימים למצוטט ביותר בכתב העת הזה. מאמרם המשותף החשוב והמפורסם ביותר פורסם בירחון "Science" בשנת 1981 וכותרתו "מיסגור החלטות והפסיכולוגיה של בחירה"[8]. בשנת 1982 ראה אור ספרו "שיפוט בתנאי חוסר ודאות" אותו כתב יחד עם כהנמן ופול סלוביק[9].

במהלך שנות המחקר שלו, שיתף טברסקי פעולה גם עם תומאס גילוביץ', פול סלוביק, ריצ'רד ת'אלר וורדה ליברמן, איתה גם כתב את הספר "חשיבה ביקורתית" באוניברסיטה הפתוחה.

טברסקי היה נשוי לברברה טברסקי, לימים פרופסור לפסיכולוגיה באוניברסיטת סטנפורד וכיום פרופסור לפסיכולוגיה בבית הספר לחינוך של אוניברסיטת קולומביה, אותה הכיר באוניברסיטת מישיגן. לזוג שני בנים ובת.

טברסקי היה אתאיסט[10].

טברסקי המשיך לעסוק בעבודתו האקדמית, מביתו, עד ימיו האחרונים. הוא נפטר בביתו ב-2 ביוני 1996 מסרטן המלנומה ונקבר בבית הקברות היהודי בקולומה, מחוז סן מטאו, קליפורניה[11].

ראו גם היוריסטיקת הזמינות כשל הסתברות קודמת כשל צירופיות מסגור כלכלה התנהגותית שנאת הפסד שנאת סיכון חשבונאות נפשית היוריסטיקת הייצוגיות מסגור כלכלה התנהגותית שנאת הפסד שנאת סיכון חשבונאות נפשית היוריסטיקת הייצוגיות עיגון לקריאה נוספת מייקל לואיס, ענן של אפשרויות: עמוס טברסקי ודניאל כהנמן, החברות ששינתה את האופן שבו אנו חושבים, הוצאת בבל, 2018[12]. קישורים חיצוניים עמוס טברסקי , באתר פרויקט הגנאלוגיה במתמטיקה עמוס טברסקי, הפסיכולוגיה של החלטה ושיפוט , הרצאה מכנס "בכור המהפכה" לזכר אהרון קציר, 1995 ורדה ליברמן ועמוס טברסקי, חשיבה ביקורתית, הוצאת האוניברסיטה הפתוחה, 1996 (קריאת הספר בתצוגה מלאה

באתר "גוגל ספרים" ספר זמין ברשת)

ורדה ליברמן ועמוס טברסקי, חשיבה הסתברותית בחיי יומיום, הוצאת האוניברסיטה הפתוחה ומשרד החינוך, 2001 (קריאת הספר בתצוגה מקדימה

באתר "גוגל ספרים" ספר זמין ברשת)

Amos Tversky, leading decision researcher, dies at 59 , באתר אוניברסיטת סטנפורד מיה בר-הלל ועמוס טברסקי, ‏הפסיכולוגיה של האי ודאות , מחשבות 64, דצמבר 1992, עמ' 10–19 עינב אייזיקוביץ'-עודי, ‏הפסיכולוג ששינה את המחשבה הכלכלית , במדור "היום לפני במדע " באתר של מכון דוידסון לחינוך מדעי, 2 ביוני 2016 אורן נהרי‏, המסע המופלא , באתר וואלה! NEWS‏, 29 במרץ 2018 https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A2%D7%9E%D7%95%D7%A1_%D7%98%D7%91...

--------------------------------

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amos_Tversky

Amos Nathan Tversky (Hebrew: עמוס טברסקי‎‎; March 16, 1937 – June 2, 1996) was a cognitive and mathematical psychologist, a student of cognitive science, a collaborator of Daniel Kahneman, and a figure in the discovery of systematic human cognitive bias and handling of risk. Much of his early work concerned the foundations of measurement. He was co-author of a three-volume treatise, Foundations of Measurement (recently reprinted). His early work with Kahneman focused on the psychology of prediction and probability judgment; later they worked together to develop prospect theory, which aims to explain irrational human economic choices and is considered one of the seminal works of behavioral economics. Six years after Tversky's death, Kahneman received the 2002 Nobel Prize in Economics for the work he did in collaboration with Amos Tversky.[1] (The prize is not awarded posthumously.) Kahneman told The New York Times in an interview soon after receiving the honor: "I feel it is a joint prize. We were twinned for more than a decade."[2] Tversky also collaborated with many leading researchers including Thomas Gilovich, Itamar Simonson, Paul Slovic and Richard Thaler. A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Tversky as the 93rd most cited psychologist of the 20th century, tied with Edwin Boring, John Dewey, and Wilhelm Wundt.[3] Contents [show] Biography[edit] Tversky was born in Haifa, British Palestine (now Israel), as son of the Polish-born veterinarian Yosef Tversky and Jenia Tversky (nee Ginzburg), a social worker who later became member of parliament for the Mapai (worker's party).[4] He served with distinction in the Israel Defense Forces, rising to the rank of captain and being decorated for bravery.[4] He received his undergraduate education at Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel, and his doctorate from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 1964. He later taught at Hebrew University before moving to Stanford University. In 1980 he became a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[5] In 1984 he was a recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship, and in 1985 he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.[6] Amos Tversky was married to Barbara Tversky, now a professor in the human development department at Teachers College, Columbia University. Tversky, co-recipient with Daniel Kahneman, earned the 2003 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.[7] He died of a metastatic melanoma.[8] Career[edit] Comparative ignorance[edit] Tversky and Fox (1995)[9] addressed ambiguity aversion, the idea that people do not like ambiguous gambles or choices with ambiguity, with the comparative ignorance framework. Their idea was that people are only ambiguity averse when their attention is specifically brought to the ambiguity by comparing an ambiguous option to an unambiguous option. For instance, people are willing to bet more on choosing a correct colored ball from an urn containing equal proportions of black and red balls than an urn with unknown proportions of balls when evaluating both of these urns at the same time. However, when evaluating them separately, people are willing to bet approximately the same amount on either urn. Thus, when it is possible to compare the ambiguous gamble to an unambiguous gamble people are averse — but not when one is ignorant of this comparison. Notable contributions[edit]

The shape of the value (utility) function in prospect theory. The asymmetry of the function corresponds to loss aversion. foundations of measurement anchoring and adjustment availability heuristic base rate fallacy conjunction fallacy framing behavioral finance clustering illusion loss aversion prospect theory cumulative prospect theory representativeness heuristic Tversky index support theory contrast model In popular culture[edit] Tversky Intelligence Test[edit] As recounted by Malcolm Gladwell in 2013's David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants, Tversky's peers thought so highly of him that they devised a tongue-in-cheek one-part test for measuring intelligence. As related to Gladwell by psychologist Adam Alter, the Tversky Intelligence Test was "The faster you realized Tversky was smarter than you, the smarter you were."[10] The Undoing Project[edit] Michael Lewis's book The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds, released on December 16, 2016, is about Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman, and is the "story of their lives and work together".[11]

פסיכולוג קוגניטיבי ישראלי, ואחד מחלוצי המחקר בתחום ההטיות הקוגניטיביות

view all

Amos Tversky's Timeline

1937
March 16, 1937
Haifa, Haifa, Israel
1996
June 2, 1996
Age 59
Santa Clara, California, United States