Cadwallon Lawhir ab Einion, Brenin Gwenydd

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Cadwallon Lawhir ab Einion, Brenin Gwenydd

Also Known As: "Caswallon Llawhir"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wales
Death: Wales
Immediate Family:

Son of Einion Yrth ap Cunedda, Brenin Gwynedd and Prawst verch Tidlet
Husband of Meddyf verch Maeldaf
Father of Cwyllog and Maelgwyn ap Cadwallon, Brenin Gwynedd
Half brother of Tegog ab Einion; Owain Danwyn, King of Rhos and Einion ab Einion

Occupation: King of Gwynedd, King of Gwynedd from 443-557
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Cadwallon Lawhir ab Einion, Brenin Gwenydd

See Peter Bartrum, https://cadair.aber.ac.uk/dspace/bitstream/handle/2160/6516/TABLES%... (April 29, 2018; Anne Brannen, curator)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Royal Family of Gwynedd - Maelgwn Gwynedd, The Dragon of Anglesey; http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id166.html. (Steven Ferry, November 28, 2019.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Royal Family of Gwynedd - Ancestry of Cynan Tyndaethwy; http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id16.html. (Steven Ferry, November 29, 2019.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Harleian Ms 3859; http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id129.html. (Steven Ferry, March 8, 2021.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Bridei and Domlech, "Children" of Maelgwn Gwynedd; http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id281.html. (Steven Ferry, July 24, 2021.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Meibion Kunedda Wledig; http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id284.html. (Steven Ferry, August 30, 2021.)

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Cadwallon ap Einion (c. 460-534; reigned from c. 500), usually known as Cadwallon Lawhir ('Long Hand') and also called Cadwallon I by some historians, was a king of Gwynedd.

According to tradition, Cadwallon ruled during, or shortly after, the Battle of Mons Badonicus, and King Arthur's victory over the Saxons (in either the the early 490s or the mid 510s). Cadwallon's name is not connected with the legendary battle, but he may have benefitted from the period of relative peace and prosperity throughout Britain that it procured. The most momentous military achievement of Cadwallon's reign was the final expulsion of Irish settlers on Anglesey, and the re-absorption of that island, which would later become the cultural and political base of the kingdom, into Gwynedd.

Cadwallon's epithet, Lawhir, may possibly refer to him having longer than usual arms or might also be a metaphor, referring to the extent of his authority. The late medieval poet Iolo Goch claims that he could "reach a stone from the ground to kill a raven, without bending his back, because his arm was as long as his side to the ground."[citation needed]

According to Gildas, Cadwallon's son, Maelgwn Gwynedd, murdered his uncle to ascend to the throne, which suggests that someone other than Maelgwn himself inherited the kingdom upon Cadwallon's death. No clear evidence exists as to who this "lost king" might be (assuming, of course, that Gildas's account is reliable), but some have suggested the name of Owain Ddantgwyn as the unfortunate heir/victim.


Cadwallon Lawhir ap Einion

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cadwallon ap Einion (c. 460-534; reigned from c. 500), also known as Cadwallon Lawhir ('Long Hand') and Cadwallon I, was a king of Gwynedd.

According to tradition, Cadwallon ruled during, or shortly after, the Battle of Mons Badonicus, and King Arthur's victory over the Saxons (depending on which date you believe, said battle accorded either sometime between the early 490s and the mid 510s). Although it is unlikely that Cadwallon himself was present at the event, he would likely have benefitted from the period of relative peace and prosperity throughout Britain that it procured. The most momentous military achievement of Cadwallon's reign was the final expulsion of Irish settlers on Ynys Mon (Anglesey), and the absorption of that island, which would later become the cultural and political base of the kingdom, into Gwynedd.

Cadwallon's second name, Lawhir, referred to an actual physical characteristic of the man: he apparently had unusually long arms. Iolo Goch claims that he could "reach a stone from the ground to kill a raven, without bending his back, because his arm was as long as his side to the ground."

According to Gildas, Cadwallon's son, Maelgwn, murdered his uncle to ascend to the throne, which suggests that someone other than Maelgwn himself inherited the kingdom upon Cadwallon's death. No clear evidence exists as to who this "lost king" might be (assuming, of course, that Gildas's account is reliable), but some have suggested the name of Owain White Tooth as the unfortunate heir/victim.


Name: Cadwallon Lawhir (Long Hand) KING OF GWYNEDD Given Name: Cadwallon Lawhir (Long Hand) Surname: King of Gwynedd Sex: M Change Date: 13 MAY 2009 Note: !#4568> Welsh Genealogies Ad 300-1400,-v1-p3* (FHL #6025561); !ARCH REC> Wurts Magna Charta; Plantagenent Ancestry; Ancestral Lines; Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons; (birth 445, death 517); !MISC> said to have expelled the Irish from Anglesey-circa 500; @AFN #QL4TG8; 1 2 Birth: 450 in Gwynedd, Wales, United Kingdom Death: 517 Ancestral File #: QL4T-G8 Reference Number: > 73 WEL

Father: Einion Yrth (the Impetuous) KING OF GWYNEDD b: ABT 417 in North Wales c: in , Votadini, North Britain Mother: Prawst ferch TIDLET b: ABT 425 in , Powys, Wales, United Kingdom

Marriage 1 Meddyf ferch MAELDAF b: 460 in Nanconwy, Arllechwedd, Caernarvonshire, Wales, United Kingdom Married: ABT 471 in Gwynedd, Wales, United Kingdom Children

Maelgwn Gwynedd alias Hir (the Tall) KING OF GWYNEDD b: 480 in North Wales

Sources: Abbrev: Ancestral File Title: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 JAN 1998;FamilySearch® Ancestral File? v4.19" 3 Feb 2001 /i> Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 JAN 1998;FamilySearch® Ancestral File? v4.19" 3 Feb 2001 /i> Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 JAN 1998;FamilySearch® Ancestral File? v4.19" 3 Feb 2001

Repository: Name: Family History Library 35 N West Temple Street

Repository: Abbrev: Pedigree Resource File CD 6 Title: Pedigree Resource File CD 6 (Salt Lake City, UT: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 1999)serve, Inc., 1999)serve, Inc., 1999). Repository:

Cadwallon Lawhir ap Einion From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cadwallon ap Einion (c. 460-534[citation needed]; reigned from c. 500[citation needed]), usually known as Cadwallon Lawhir ('Long Hand') and also called Cadwallon I by some historians, was a king of Gwynedd. According to tradition, Cadwallon ruled during, or shortly after, the Battle of Mons Badonicus, and King Arthur's victory over the Saxons (in either the early 490s or the mid 510s). Cadwallon's name is not connected with the legendary battle, but he may have benefitted from the period of relative peace and prosperity throughout Britain that it procured. The most momentous military achievement of Cadwallon's reign was the final expulsion of Irish settlers on Anglesey, and the re-absorption of that island, which would later become the cultural and political base of the kingdom, into Gwynedd. Cadwallon's epithet, Lawhir, may possibly refer to him having longer than usual arms or might also be a metaphor, referring to the extent of his authority. The late medieval poet Iolo Goch claims that he could "reach a stone from the ground to kill a raven, without bending his back, because his arm was as long as his side to the ground."[citation needed] According to Gildas, Cadwallon's son, Maelgwn Gwynedd, murdered his uncle to ascend to the throne, which suggests that someone other than Maelgwn himself inherited the kingdom upon Cadwallon's death. No clear evidence exists as to who this "lost king" might be (assuming, of course, that Gildas's account is reliable), but some have suggested the name of Owain Ddantgwyn as the unfortunate heir/victim.


Cadwallon ap Cadfan (died 634[1]) was the King of Gwynedd from around 625 until his death in battle. The son and successor of Cadfan ap Iago, he is best remembered as the King of the Britons who devastated Northumbria, defeating and killing its king, Edwin, prior to his own death in battle against Oswald of Bernicia.
Cadwallon Lawhir King of Wales (Gwynedd)

Born : Abt. 450

Died : Abt. 534

Age : 84

Ruled c500-c534

Father Einion Yrth Venedos King of Wales (Gwynedd)

Mother Prawst ferch Deithlyn Queen of Wales (Gwynedd)

Marriage - Meddyf ferch Maeldaf Queen of Wales (Gwynedd)

Children Abt. 480 - Maelgwyn Hir (the Tall) King of Wales (Gwynedd)

Forrás / Source:

http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/persons/per08781.htm#0


Cadwallon ap Einion (c. 460-534; reigned from c. 500), usually known as Cadwallon Lawhir ('Long Hand') and also called Cadwallon I by some historians, was a king of Gwynedd.

According to tradition, Cadwallon ruled during, or shortly after, the Battle of Mons Badonicus, and King Arthur's victory over the Saxons (in either the the early 490s or the mid 510s). Cadwallon's name is not connected with the legendary battle, but he may have benefitted from the period of relative peace and prosperity throughout Britain that it procured. The most momentous military achievement of Cadwallon's reign was the final expulsion of Irish settlers on Anglesey, and the re-absorption of that island, which would later become the cultural and political base of the kingdom, into Gwynedd.

Cadwallon's epithet, Lawhir, may possibly refer to him having longer than usual arms or might also be a metaphor, referring to the extent of his authority. The late medieval poet Iolo Goch claims that he could "reach a stone from the ground to kill a raven, without bending his back, because his arm was as long as his side to the ground."

According to Gildas, Cadwallon's son, Maelgwn Gwynedd, murdered his uncle to ascend to the throne, which suggests that someone other than Maelgwn himself inherited the kingdom upon Cadwallon's death. No clear evidence exists as to who this "lost king" might be (assuming, of course, that Gildas's account is reliable), but some have suggested the name of Owain Ddantgwyn as the unfortunate heir/victim.


Byname means "long hand". Supposedly could ""reach a stone from the ground to kill a raven, without bending his back, because his arm was as long as his side to the ground." First of the Gwynedd dynasty to be born in Wales. Inherited the western part of his father's kingdom. Together with his cousins (Yneigr, Cynyr, and Meilir) his extended his lands by overthrowing the Irish an Ynys Mon and driving them back to Ireland. First palace was at Bodysgollen near Llanrhos, but later his moved in to Ynys Mon. Rebelled in the beginning of Arthur's reign, but the two were later reconciled. His daughter, whom Agrafain wished to marry in his youth, married Medraut ab Arthur.